(19)
(11)EP 0 004 148 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
19.09.1979 Bulletin 1979/19

(21)Application number: 79300271.8

(22)Date of filing:  21.02.1979
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC)2H01L 23/48, H01L 23/12, H01L 23/30, H01L 23/36, H05K 7/02
(84)Designated Contracting States:
BE DE FR GB IT NL SE

(30)Priority: 28.02.1978 US 882300

(71)Applicant: AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation)
Harrisburg Pennsylvania 17105 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • Andrews, Daniel Marshall
    San Marcos California (US)
  • Merlina, Joseph Francis
    Harrisburg Pennsylvania (US)
  • Redmond, John Peter
    Mechanicsburg Pennsylvania (US)
  • Scheingold, William Samuel
    Palmyra Pennsylvania (US)
  • Ulbrich, George
    Harrisburg Pennsylvania (US)

(74)Representative: Stuart-Prince, Richard Geoffrey (GB) et al


 ()


(56)References cited: : 
  
      


    (54)Electrical connector for use in mounting an electronic device on a substrate


    (57) An electrical connector for use in mounting an electronic device on a substrate, comprises a body (1) formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material in open box config- uration; a metallic layer (5) on the outer surface of the base (2) and walls (3) of the body (1); and a plurality of mutually isolated metallic leads (6) each extending across part of the base (2) and a wall (3) on the inner surface of the body (1), each lead (6) terminating at its outer end in a pad (7) for connection to a substrate (13).




    Description


    [0001] This invention relates to an electrical connector for use in mounting an electronic device on a substrate.

    [0002] Known connectors for use in mounting electronic devices such as integrated circuit chips, on substrates such as printed circuit boards, comprise a housing moulded from electrically insulating material and carrying a plurality of electrical contacts each having a portion for contacting a lead on the electronic device, and a portion for receipt in a hole in a substrate or in a socket contact mounted on the substrate.

    [0003] Other known connectors comprise a moulded housing adapted to receive and hold an electronic device in contact with conductors on a substrate, the housing being formed with latching members arranged to effect such holding.

    [0004] Such known connectors suffer from the disadvantages that they are relatively large in size and also expensive to manufacture, these being particular disadvantages in view of the decreasing size and cost of electronic devices and particularly integrated circuit chips.

    [0005] According to this invention an electrical connector for use in mounting an electronic-device on a substrate, comprises a body formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material in open box configuration; a metallic layer on the outer surface of the base and walls of the body; and a plurality of mutually isolated metallic leads each extending across part of the base and a wall on the inner surface of the body, each lead terminating at its outer end in a pad for connection to a substrate.

    [0006] The connector of this invention has the advantages that it is cheap and simple to manufacture and that it can be directly connected as by soldering to conductors or a substrate without the need for holes in, or socket contacts mounted on, the substrate. The metal layer on the outer surface of the body serves in use as a heat sink, and like the leads on the inner surface of the body, can be applied to the body by standard metalisation techniques.

    [0007] This invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:-

    Figure 1 is a perspective view of one side of a connector according to this invention;

    Figure 2 is a perspective view of the other side of the connector of Figure 1;

    Figure 3 is a sectional view showing the connector of Figures 1 and 2 in use;

    Figure 4 is a perspective view of one side of another connector according to this invention;

    Figure 5 is a perspective view of the other side of the connector of Figure 4;

    Figure 6 is a sectional view showing the connector of Figures 4 and 5 in use; and

    Figure 7 is a sectional view of a further connector according to this invention.



    [0008] Referring to Figures 1, 2 and 3, the connector here shown comprises a body 1 formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material such as a glass-filled circuit board material 0.127mm thick, in open box configuration, having a base 2 and walls 3. Each wall 3 terminates in an outwardly directed flange 4 lying in a plane parallel to the plane of the base 2.

    [0009] A metallic layer 5, preferably of copper, extends over the base 2, walls 3 and flanges 4 on the outer surface of the body 1, while the inner surface of the body 1 carries a plurality of mutually isolated metallic leads 6 each extending across part of the base 2, a wall 3, and a flange 4 of the body, and terminating at its outer end in a pad 7. The leads 6 radiate from. a central isolated metallic heat sink member 8 on the inner surface of the base 2 of the body 1.

    [0010] The leads 6 are covered by a sheet 9 of electrically insulating material, leaving the pads 7 and a short length at the inner end of each lead 6 uncovered.

    [0011] The above described structure is manufactured from an initially flat sheet of material to form the body 1, the sheet being provided with the metallic members 5, 6, 7 and 8 by conventional plating techniques prior to application of the sheet 9 and formation of the sheets and metallic members into the open box configuration with flanges shown in the drawings. To facilitate such formation the metallic layer 5 is cut away at positions which become corners of the body 1, as shown in Figure 2.

    [0012] Referring now specifically to Figure 3, for use of the connector an integrated circuit chip 10 is bonded to the heat sink member 8 and contact areas on the chip 10 are connected to the inner ends of respective ones of the leads 6 by wires 11. The body 1 is then partially filled with an electrically insulating potties material 12 to a level which embraces the inner edges of the sheet 9 of insulating material. The connector with the chip 10 secured therein is then mounted on a substrate 13 by soldering or otherwise bonding the pads 7 on the leads 6 to conductors 14 on the substrate 13. During use the member 8 serves as a heat sink for the chip 10, and in view of the thinness of the body 1 the heat is conducted to the outer metallic layer 5 and radiated therefrom. In order to enhance such heat dissipation the sheet to form the body 1 can be formed with through holes (not shown) prior to application of the metallic members 5 and 8 such that the applied metal will fill the holes and provide direct metallic connections between the members 5 and 8.

    [0013] Referring now to Figures 4, 5 and 6, the connector here shown is similar to that shown in Figures 1 to 3,' and corresponding parts have been. given the same reference numerals.

    [0014] The essential difference in this connector is that the flanges 4 of the connector of Figures 1 to 3 and with them the overlying portions of the metallic layer 5, have been split into a plurality of fingers 15 each carrying one of the leads 6. Further, there is no insulating layer 9 covering the leads 6. The walls 3 of the body 1 are not as deep as those of the connector of Figures 1 to 3, and the fingers 15 do not extend therefrom parallel to the base 2, as do the flanges 4, but at angles to suit the spacing between the conductors 14 on the substrate 13.

    [0015] The connector of Figures 4 to 6 has the further advantage that the fingers 15 are individually flexible and thus allow for differences in coefficients of thermal expansion between the connector and the substrate 13.

    [0016] Referring now to Figure 7, the connector here shown is similar to that shown in Figures 4 to 6 and corresponding parts have again been given the same reference numerals.

    [0017] However, in this connector there is no heat sink member (8 in Figures 4 to 6) on the inner surface of the body 1, and the metallic layer 5 on the outer surface of the body 1 is part of a sub-assembly also comprising a second body 16 formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material like the body 1, the second body having a further metallic layer 17 on its outer surface.

    [0018] The sub-assembly of members 5, 16 and 17 is secured to the outer surface of the body 1 by means of a layer 18 of glass fibre cloth which is initially impregnated with a partially cured epoxy resin. The complete assembly is heated during formation into the open box configuration, the resin thus being completely cured and bonding the metallic layer 5 to the body 1.

    [0019] In use of this connector an electronic device (not shown in Figure 7) would be directly mounted on the metallic layer 5 with the necessary connections to the leads 6, and the pads 7 on the leads 6 then connected to conductors on a substrate. The complete metallic layer 5 then serves as a direct heat sink which disperses the heat from the electronic device over the area of the second body 16 and thus to the entire area of the outer heat sink member 17.


    Claims

    1. An electrical connector for use in mounting an electronic device on a substrate, characterised by a body (1) formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material in open box configuration; a metallic layer (5) on the outer surface of the base (2) and walls (3) of the body (1); and a plurality of mutually isolated metallic leads (6) each extending across part of the base (2) and a wall (3) on the inner surface of the body (1), each lead (6) terminating at its outer end in a pad (7) for connection to a substrate (13).
     
    2. A connector as claimed in Claim 1, characterised by a central isolated metallic heat sink member (8) on the inner surface of the base (2) of the body (1).
     
    3. A connector as claimed in Claim 1 or Claim 2, characterised in that each wall (3) of the body (1) over which leads (6) extend terminates in an outwardly directed flange (4) lying in a plane parallel to the plane of the base (2) of the body (1), the associated leads (6) and the outer metallic layer (5) extending onto the flange (4).
     
    4. A connector as claimed in Claim 1 or Claim 2, characterised in that each wall (3) of the body (1) over which leads (6) extend terminates in a plurality of outwardly directed fingers (15) each carrying one of the leads (6) and a portion of the outer metallic layer (5).
     
    5. A connector as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that the leads (6) except for the pads (7) and a short length at the inner end of each lead (6), are covered by a sheet (9) of electrically insulating material.
     
    6. A connector as claimed in Claim 2, or Claim 3, 4 or 5, as dependent upon Claim 2, characterised by through holes in the base (2) of the body (1), which holes contain metal interconnecting the inner heat sink member (8) and the outer metallic layer (5).
     
    7. A connector as claimed in Claim 1, characterised in that the outer metallic layer (5) constitutes part of a sub-assembly further comprising a second body (16) formed from a sheet of electrically insulating material and having a further metallic layer (17) on its outer surface, the outer metallic layer (5) being bonded to the first body (1) by means of an epoxy resin impregnated glass fibre cloth.
     
    8. A method of manufacturing a connector as claimed in Claim 1, characterised by the steps of applying the outer metallic layer (5) and the leads (6) to a planar sheet of electrically insulating material, and then forming the sheet into an open box configuration.
     




    Drawing













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