(19)
(11)EP 1 432 844 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
21.11.2018 Bulletin 2018/47

(21)Application number: 02776040.4

(22)Date of filing:  27.09.2002
(51)Int. Cl.: 
C23C 16/455  (2006.01)
C30B 25/14  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2002/030960
(87)International publication number:
WO 2003/029516 (10.04.2003 Gazette  2003/15)

(54)

APPARATUS FOR INVERTED CVD

VORRICHTUNG ZUR INVERTIERTEN CHEMISCHEN GASPHASENABSCHEIDUNG

APPAREIL POUR DEPOT CHIMIQUE EN PHASE VAPEUR INVERSE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LI LU MC NL PT SE SK TR

(30)Priority: 29.09.2001 US 325637 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
30.06.2004 Bulletin 2004/27

(73)Proprietor: CREE, INC.
Durham, NC 27703 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • DENBAARS, Steven
    Goleta, CA 93117 (US)
  • NAKAMURA, Shuji
    Santa Barbara, CA 93160 (US)
  • COULTER, Mike
    Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (US)
  • BATRES, Max
    Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (US)

(74)Representative: Portch, Daniel et al
Elkington and Fife LLP Prospect House 8 Pembroke Road
Sevenoaks, Kent TN13 1XR
Sevenoaks, Kent TN13 1XR (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A- 0 811 702
US-B1- 6 239 043
FR-A- 1 462 335
  
  • PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 016, no. 394 (C-0976), 21 August 1992 (1992-08-21) & JP 04 128379 A (MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC CORP), 28 April 1992 (1992-04-28)
  • ARAI T ET AL: "Highly uniform growth in a low-pressure MOVPE multiple wafer system" JOURNAL OF CRYSTAL GROWTH, NORTH-HOLLAND PUBLISHING CO. AMSTERDAM, NL, vol. 170, no. 1-4, 1997, pages 88-91, XP004087082 ISSN: 0022-0248 cited in the application
  • PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 1998, no. 02, 30 January 1998 (1998-01-30) -& JP 09 266173 A (MATSUSHITA ELECTRIC IND CO LTD), 7 October 1997 (1997-10-07)
  • PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 010, no. 161 (C-352), 10 June 1986 (1986-06-10) -& JP 61 015976 A (MATSUSHITA DENKI SANGYO KK), 24 January 1986 (1986-01-24)
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


Field of the Invention



[0001] This invention relates to fabricating semiconductor devices and more particularly to an apparatus for fabricating semiconductor devices using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).

Description of the Related Art



[0002] Numerous semiconductor devices can be fabricated in MOCVD systems using different material systems, with MOCVD systems more recently being used to fabricate Group III nitride based devices. Growth of Group III nitride based semiconductor devices in MOCVD systems is generally described in DenBaars and Keller, Semiconductors and Semimetals, Vol. 50, Academic Press Inc., 1997, p. 11-35. One of the concerns in fabricating Group III nitride devices is the ability to produce uniform materials with minimal impurities in the device layers, while providing sharp interfaces between layers. Impurities and poor interfaces between layers can negatively impact device performance and can prevent consistent reproduction of semiconductor devices.

[0003] Some conventional multi-wafer MOCVD reactors utilize a rotatable susceptor that is mounted at the bottom of the reactor chamber. [See Emcore Discover and Enterprise Series of the TurboDisc Tools, provided by Emcore Inc.]. Semiconductor wafers are held on the top surface of the susceptor and a heating element is arranged below the susceptor to heat the susceptor and the wafers. Reactant growth gasses enter the reactor to deposit the desired materials on the wafer with the susceptor rotating to provide a more uniform deposition of the materials on the wafer.

[0004] One the disadvantages of these conventional MOCVD reactors is that a large and non-uniform boundary layer thickness of hot air can form over the wafers and susceptor as a result of the heating of the susceptor. During growth, heat from the susceptor causes gasses to rise and the boundary layers can extend to the top surface of the reactor chamber. Reactant growth gasses are injected into the reactor chamber, usually through a top inlet. When the lower temperature growth gasses encounter the hot gasses heat convention can occur, which causes turbulence within the reactor. This turbulence can result in non-uniform deposition of materials on the wafer. It is also difficult for the deposition gasses to diffuse through a larger boundary layer and as a result, much of the growth gasses do not deposit on the wafers. This increases the amount,of growth gasses necessary to form the desired semiconductor device.

[0005] A large boundary layer over a susceptor can also limit the susceptor's speed of rotation. As the rotation speed of a heated susceptor is increased, the boundary layer can cause turbulence that adds to the turbulence from the convection forces of the lower temperature growth gasses. This can lead to further non-uniformity in the device layers.

[0006] Another disadvantage of conventional MOCVD reactors is that the growth gasses that do not deposit on the wafers (or susceptor) can deposit on the sidewalls or top surface of the reactor chamber above the susceptor. These deposits can adversely impact the reactor's ability to grow good quality layers. The deposits can react with gasses for subsequent layers and redeposit on the wafers during fabrication. The deposits can be introduced as impurities in the subsequent layers and the deposits can reduce the sharpness between layers. This can ultimately limit the reactor's ability to accurately reproduce the semiconductor devices.

[0007] A metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system for the growth of Group III-V compound semiconductor materials is described in Aria et al., Highly Uniform Growth on a Low-Pressure MOPVE Multiple Wafer System, Journal of Crystal Growth 170, Pgs. 88-91 (1997). The wafers are held in a susceptor and placed facedown (inverted) in the growth chamber, with the flow gasses flowing under the growth surfaces. The susceptor rotates, thereby rotating the wafers to attain a more uniform growth. Gasses are injected into the chamber from one of the sidewalls of the chamber, through a triple flow channel, and the gas exhaust in on the opposite sidewall. Group V species (hydride gasses) and H2 carrier gas, Group III (organometals) and H2 carrier gas, and purging gas flow into the reactor through the triple flow channel's upper, middle and lower channels, respectively.

[0008] One disadvantage this of system is that because the inlet flow channels are on one chamber side wall and the outlet is on the opposite side wall at about the same height, gas flow is created across the chamber between inlet and outlet. Some of the gasses tend to flow through the chamber without having the opportunity to deposit reactants on the wafers. Also, the leading edges of the wafers experience gasses with the highest concentration of reactants, which results in non-uniform deposition across the wafers.

[0009] The fluid flow and mass transport for "chimney" chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors is discussed in Holstein, Modeling of Chimney CVD Reactors, Journal of Crystal Growth 125, Pgs. 311-319 (1992). A chimney reactor has wafers held on heated susceptors (usually two) that are vertically mounted on the interior side walls of the reactor. The intent of the chimney reactor design is to create upward convective gas flow near the susceptor to help promote rapid gas switching for growth of abrupt heterojunctions. A cold carrier gas containing reactants enters at the base of the reactor and flows upward into the heated region.

[0010] One of the disadvantages of this design is that asymmetric flow conditions result in the primary gas flow being located near one side of the reactor and reverse flow near the opposite side. This results in different disposition rates at the two susceptors. Also, with upward gas flow, the growth rate uniformity at the leading edge of the susceptor is much greater than at its trailing edge due to depletion of the reactants.

[0011] Growth of GaAs based semiconductor devices in an MOCVD reactor is also discussed in Lee et al. MOCVD in Inverted Stagnation Point Flow, Journal of Crystal Growth, Pgs 120-127 (1886). The reactor is based on inverted stagnation point flow geometry where the reactants flow up towards wafers clamped to an inverted heated susceptor. However, this reactor is stagnation flow, where the susceptor does not rotate, which can reduce the uniformity of the device layers.

[0012] Patents Abstract of Japan Vol. 016, no. 394 (C-0976), 21 August 1992 & JP 04128379A presents an atmospheric pressure CVD device having discharge pipes through the sidewall of its reaction chamber.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0013] The present invention seeks to provide an improved method and apparatus for the fabrication of semiconductor devices, and in particular the fabrication of semiconductor devices in MOCVD reactors. According to an aspect of the invention, there is provided a semiconductor fabrication reactor according to claim 1.

[0014] The growth
gasses can also more easily penetrate the boundary layer and the susceptor can be rotated at a higher rotation rate. This arrangement also helps reduce the level of impurities in the semiconductor material that are introduced from deposits within the reactor chamber.

[0015] These and other further features and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0016] 

FIG. 1 is a simplified schematic of an embodiment of an MOCVD semiconductor fabrication system according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of one embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention having a central rotation rod gas inlet;

FIG. 4 is a below perspective view of an embodiment of a susceptor according to the present invention that can be used in the reactor in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention having a central bottom gas inlet;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention having bottom showerhead gas inlet;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention having sidewall gas inlet; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a reactor according to the present invention having a height adjustable susceptor.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION



[0017] MOCVD reactors with inverted susceptors according to the present invention can be used in many different semiconductor fabrication systems, but are particularly adapted for use in MOCVD fabrication systems of the type shown in FIG. 1. MOCVD is a nonequilibrium growth technique that relies on vapor transport of precursers and subsequent reactions of Group III alkyls and Group V hydrides in a heated zone. Composition and growth rate are controlled by controlling mass flow rate and dilution of various components of the gas stream to the MOCVD reactor.

[0018] Organometallic Group III growth gas sources are either liquids such as trimethylgallium (TMGa) and trimethylaluminum (TMAl), or solids such as trimethylindium (TMIn). The organometallic sources are stored in bubblers through which a carrier gas (typically hydrogen) flows. The bubbler temperature controls the vapor pressure over source material. Carrier gas will saturate with vapor from the organometallic source and transport vapor to the heated substrate.

[0019] Group V growth gas sources are most commonly gaseous hydrides, for example NH3 for nitride growth. Dopant materials can be metal organic precursers [diethylzine (DEZn), cyclopenin dienyl magnesium (Cp2Mg)j or hydrides (silane or disilane). Growth gasses and dopants are supplied to the reactor and are deposited as epitaxial layers on a substrate or wafer. One or more wafers are held on a structure of graphite called a susceptor that can be heated by a radio frequency (RF) coil, resistance heated, or radiantly heated by a strip heater, which in turn heats the wafers.

[0020] The MOCVD semiconductor fabrication system 10 comprises a reactor chamber 12 having a susceptor 14 that is mounted to the top of the chamber 12 and is inverted. The susceptor 14 can hold a plurality of wafers 16 that can be made of many different materials such as sapphire, silicon (Si), silicon carbide (SiC), aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN), gallium arsenide (GaAs). For Group III nitride based semiconductor devices a preferred wafer is made of SiC because it has a much closer crystal lattice match to Group III nitrides compared to other materials, which results in Group III nitride films of higher quality. SiC also has a very high thermal conductivity so that the total output power of Group III nitride devices on SiC is not limited by the thermal dissipation of the wafer. The availability of semi insulating SiC wafers also provides the capacity for device isolation and reduced parasitic capacitance that make commercial devices possible. SiC substrates are available from Cree, Inc., of Durham, North Carolina and methods for producing them are set forth in the scientific literature as well as in a U.S. Patents, Nos. Re. 34,861; 4,946,547; and 5,200,022.

[0021] During growth, the susceptor 14 is heated by heater,18 to maintain wafers 16 at a predetermined temperature. The temperature is typically between 400 and 1200 degrees centigrade (°C), but can be higher or lower depending on the type of growth desired. The heater 18 can be any of the heating devices listed above, but is usually a radio frequency (RF) or resistance coil.

[0022] A hydrogen or nitrogen carrier gas 20 is supplied to a gas line 22. The carrier gas 20 is also supplied through mass flow controllers 24a-c to respective bubblers 26a-c. Bubbler 26a can have an organometallic Group III source as described above. Bubblers 26b and 26c may also contain a similar organometallic compound to be able to grow an alloy of a Group III compound. The bubblers 26a-c are typically maintained at a predetermined temperature by constant temperature baths 28a-c to ensure a constant vapor pressure of the organometallic compound before it is carried to the reactor chamber 12 by the carrier gas 20.

[0023] The carrier gas 20 which passes through bubblers 28a-c is mixed with the carrier gas 20 flowing within the gas line 22 by opening the desired combination of valves 30a-c. The mixed gas is then introduced into the reactor chamber 12 through a gas inlet port 32, which can be located at different locations on the reactor, but in the system 10 is located at the bottom of the chamber 12.

[0024] A nitrogen containing gas 34 such as ammonia is supplied to the gas line 22 through a mass flow controller 36 and the flow of nitrogen containing gas is controlled by valve 38. If the carrier gas 20 is mixed with the nitrogen containing gas 34, and the organometallic vapor within the gas line 22 is introduced into the reactor chamber 12, the elements are present to grow gallium nitride on the substrates 16 through thermal decomposition of the molecules in the organometallic and nitrogen containing gas.

[0025] To dope alloys of gallium nitride on the wafers 16, one of the bubblers 26a-c not being used for the organometallic compounds, can be used for a dopant material. Many different doping materials can be used such as beryllium, calcium, zinc, or carbon, with preferred materials being magnesium (Mg) or silicon (Si). Bubbler 26b or 26c can be used for an alloy material such as boron, aluminum, indium, phosphorous, arsenic or other materials. Once the dopant and/or alloy are selected and the appropriate valve 30a-c is opened to allow the dopant to flow into gas line 22 with the organometallic and nitrogen containing gas 34, the growth of the doped layer of gallium nitride can take place on substrates 16.

[0026] The gas within the reactor chamber 12 can be purged through a gas purge line 40 connected to a pump 42 operable under hydraulic pressure. Further, a purge valve 44 allows gas pressure to build up or be bled off from the reactor chamber 12.

[0027] The growth process is typically stopped by shutting off the organometallic and dopant sources by closing valves 30a-c, and keeping the nitrogen containing gas 36 and the carrier gas 20 flowing. Alternatively, the reactor chamber 12 can be purged with a gas 46 that can be controlled through a mass flow controller 48 and valve 50. The purge is aided by opening valve 44 to allow the pump 42 to evacuate the reaction chamber 12 of excess growth gasses. Typically, the purge gas 46 is hydrogen, but can be other gasses. Turning off power to the heater 18 then cools the substrates 16.

[0028] FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of a MOCVD reactor 60 in accordance with the present invention. The reactor 60 can be used to fabricate many different semiconductor devices from different material systems, but is particularly applicable to fabricating devices from the Group III nitride material system and its alloys, in an MOCVD fabrication system.

[0029] The reactor 60 comprises a reactor chamber 62, with a susceptor 64 that is inverted and mounted from the reactor's top surface 66. The susceptor 64 can be made of many heat conductive materials, with a suitable material being graphite. Semiconductor wafers 68 are mounted on the susceptor's face down surface 70 that faces the chamber's bottom surface 72, with typical susceptors capable of holding approximately six three inch wafers and up to eighteen two inch wafers. The wafers can be held to the susceptor surface 70 by many different mechanisms including, but not limited to, mounting faceplates, clamps, clips, adhesives, tape, etc.

[0030] The susceptor 64 is held within the reactor chamber 60 by a rotation rod 74 that can be rotated so that the susceptor 64 is also rotated. The susceptor is heated by a heating element 80 that is arranged between the susceptor 64 and the chamber's top surface. The heater 80 can be any of the heating devices listed above, but is usually a radio frequency (RF) or resistance coil. When the heater 80 heats the susceptor 64, a hot gas boundary layer 82 forms over the susceptor surface 70 and the wafers 68. During growth of semiconductor material on the wafers 68, the growth gasses can enter the chamber 62 in many different ways and through different walls of the chamber 62.

[0031] By inverting the susceptor, the depth of the boundary layer 82 is reduced compared to conventional reactor chambers that have a susceptor at the bottom. As the susceptor 64 is heated and generates hot gas, the heated gas rises. Accordingly, the boundary layer 82 is compressed against the susceptor 64 and wafers 68 by the rising of the hot gas. The reduced boundary layer height reduces the turbulence generated when lower temperature growth gasses encounter the boundary layer 82, which allows for more uniform deposition of materials on the wafers 68. The growth gasses can also more easily penetrate the boundary layer 82 and as a result, more of the growth gasses deposit on the wafers 68. This decreases the amount of deposition gasses necessary to form the desired semiconductor device.

[0032] The reduced boundary layer also reduces gas convection that can occur when the susceptor 64 rotates. As a result, the susceptor 64 can be rotated much faster than conventionally arranged susceptors. In the reactor 10, the susceptor can be rotated above 100 revolutions per minute (rpm) and up to several thousand rpm.

[0033] The reduced boundary layer 82 also allows the deposition gasses to deposit on the wafers 68 under increased reactor chamber pressure to further facilitate efficient fabrication. Depending on the device being fabricated, the pressure can be below 1/8 of an atmosphere to more that 10 atmospheres.

[0034] Another advantage of the inverted susceptor arrangement is that most of the growth gasses that do not deposit on the wafers rise past the susceptor 64 toward the top of the chamber 62. These gasses can form deposits 84 on the side walls and top surface of the chamber 62 behind the susceptor. These deposits are less likely to interact with subsequent growth gasses to introduce impurities into the material deposited on the wafers 68 because the growth gasses will not encounter these deposits until they are past the wafers. That is, the gasses encounter these impurities when they are past the point when they are depositing reactants on the wafers. Gasses that do not deposit on the wafers or reactor walls can exit the chamber through a top gas outlet

[0035] FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of an MOCVD reactor 90 in accordance with the present invention that is similar to the reactor 60 in FIG. 2. The reactor has a rotation rod 92 that is hollow so that deposition gasses can enter the reactor chamber 94 through the rotation rod 92.

[0036] FIG. 4 shows a susceptor 96 that can be used in reactor 90, which includes a central gas inlet 98 that allows gas from the rotation rod 92 to enter the reactor chamber 94 through the susceptor 96. As the susceptor 96 rotates, the gasses from the inlet are drawn to the susceptor's perimeter and along the way, some of the growth gasses deposit on the wafers 100. Gasses that do not deposit on the wafers, pass off the edge of the susceptor 96 and are drawn toward the chamber's top surface 102. Like above, these gasses can form deposits 106 on the inside of the chamber's sidewalls 108a, 108b and inside of the chamber's top surface 102, that are downstream and behind the susceptor 96. These deposits are less likely to adversely effect the fabrication of subsequent layers as described above. Gasses can exit the reactor chamber 94 through a gas outlet 110 that is at the top of the reactor chamber, which promotes flow of the gasses past the wafers and then to the top of the chamber.

[0037] FIG. 5 shows another embodiment of an MOCVD reactor 120 in accordance with the invention, where the growth gasses enter the chamber 122 through a central bottom inlet 124 that is directed toward the wafers 126 on the rotating susceptor 128. The growth gasses rise toward the susceptor 128 where gasses are deposited on the wafers 126. Like the embodiment in FIG. 3, any gasses that do not deposit on the wafers 126 are drawn past the susceptor 128 where they can form deposits 130 on the inside of the chamber's sidewalls 132a, 132b and inside of the chamber's top surface 134. The reactor also has a top gas outlet 136.

[0038] FIG. 6, shows another embodiment of an MOCVD reactor 140 in accordance with the present invention, where the growth gasses enter the reactor chamber 142 through a bottom "showerhead" inlet 144. The inlet 144 has multiple boreholes 145 for the growth gasses to pass into the chamber where they rise toward the wafers 146 on the rotating susceptor 148. The bore-holes 145 in the inlet 144 provide for a more uniform application of the growth gasses across the susceptor 148, which provides for a more uniform deposition of materials on the wafers 146. Like above, the gasses that do not deposit on the wafers are drawn downstream and if they do not deposit on the walls of the reactor chamber 142, they can exit the chamber through the top outlet 149.

[0039] FIG. 7 shows another embodiment of an MOCVD reactor 150 in accordance with the present invention, where the deposition gasses enter the reactor chamber 152 through a sidewall inlet 154. Like above, the gasses that do not deposit on the wafers 156 on the rotating susceptor 158 are drawn downstream where they can form deposits 159 on the inside of the reactor's walls. The reactor can also have a top gas outlet 160, which is arranged so that the gasses pass from the inlet 154 toward the top of the chamber 152. The growth gasses rise toward the susceptor 158 where semiconductor material can be deposited on the wafers 156.

[0040] FIG. 8 shows still another embodiment of an MOCVD reactor 170 in accordance with the present invention, that includes a reactor chamber 171, rotating susceptor 172, wafers 174 on the susceptor, and a showerhead gas inlet 175, all of which are similar those in reactor 140 of FIG. 6. In most respects, the reactor 170 operates in the same way as the reactor 140 in FIG. 6. However, in reactor 170 the susceptor 172 is mounted to the reactor's top surface 176 by a rod 178 that is movable in directions shown be arrows 177a, 177b, to adjust the distance between the showerhead inlet 175 and the susceptor 172. This adjustment can vary the concentration of reactants in the growth gasses that react with the wafers 174, to vary the semiconductor growth conditions and rate.

[0041] As further shown in FIG. 8 the susceptor 172 can be further adjusted in the direction of arrows 178a, 178b to vary the angle between the susceptor 172 and the gas inlet 175. Similarly, the angle of the gas inlet 175 can be adjusted in the direction of arrows 179a, 179b to also adjust the angle between the susceptor 172 and the inlet 175. These adjustments can also vary the semiconductor grown conditions and rate on the wafers 174. The movable susceptor arrangement and angle adjustable susceptor and inlet arrangement can also be used in reactors 60, 120, 150, above that have gas inlets through the susceptor, a bottom inlet and a side inlet, respectively. The reactors can include only one or all of these adjustment options.

[0042] Although the present invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain preferred configurations thereof, other versions are possible. Many different gas inlets, gas outlets and susceptors can be used. The gas inlets can be arranged in many different locations. The reactor according to the invention can be used to grow many different semiconductor devices from many different material systems, in many different semiconductor fabrication systems.


Claims

1. A semiconductor fabrication reactor, comprising:

a rotable susceptor (64) mounted to a top surface of a reactor chamber (62) said reactor chamber comprising a bottom surface opposite said top surface, said susceptor comprising a face down surface (70) that faces toward said bottom surface;

sidewalls arranged between said top surface and said bottom surface, said susceptor arranged between said sidewalls and arranged between said top surface and said bottom surface;

one or more wafers (68) mounted to said face down surface of said susceptor (64), the rotation of said susceptor (64) causing said wafers (68) to rotate within said chamber (62);

a heater (80) to heat said susceptor (64);

a chamber gas inlet (98, 124, 144, 154, 175), arranged to allow semiconductor growth gasses into said reactor chamber (62) to deposit semiconductor material on said wafers (68), said inlet (98) below said face down surface; and

a chamber gas outlet (110, 149, 160) above the level of said wafers, the chamber gas outlet being arranged to allow gases to exit from the interior of said reactor changer (62) above the level of said wafers,

and characterised in that said susceptor (64) can be moved up and down to vary the distance between said inlet (124, 144, 175) and said susceptor.


 
2. The reactor of claim 1, wherein said chamber gas inlet (124, 144, 175) is through the bottom of said reactor chamber (62).
 
3. The reactor of claim1, wherein said chamber gas inlet (144, 175) is a showerhead inlet through the bottom of said chamber (62), said showerhead inlet having a plurality of boreholes (145) to allow said growth gasses into said chamber (62).
 
4. The reactor of claim 1, further comprising a rotation rod (92) connected to the top surface of said chamber (62), said susceptor (64) attached to said rotation rod (92), the rotation of said rotation rod (92) causing said susceptor (64) to rotate in said chamber (62).
 
5. The reactor of claim 4, wherein said rod (92) is hollow and wherein a surface of said susceptor has a central inlet (98) in alignment with said rod (92), said growth gasses entering said chamber (62) through said rod (92) and central inlet (98).
 
6. The reactor of claim 1, wherein said chamber gas inlet (154) is through a sidewall of said reactor chamber (62).
 
7. The reactor of claim 1, wherein the angle of said susceptor (64) can be adjusted to adjust the angle between said inlet (124, 144, 175) and said susceptor (64).
 
8. The reactor of claim 1, wherein the angle of said inlet (124, 144, 175) can be adjusted to adjust the angle between said inlet (124, 144 175) and said susceptor (64).
 


Ansprüche

1. Halbleiterherstellungsreaktor, der umfasst:

einen drehbaren Suszeptor (64), der auf einer Oberseite einer Reaktorkammer (62) befestigt wird, wobei die Reaktorkammer eine der Oberseite gegenüberliegende Unterseite umfasst, wobei der Suszeptor eine abwärts gerichtete Fläche (70) umfasst, die in Richtung der Unterseite blickt;

Seitenwände, die zwischen der Oberseite und der Unterseite angeordnet werden, wobei der Suszeptor zwischen den Seitenwänden angeordnet und zwischen der Oberseite und der Unterseite angeordnet wird;

einen oder mehrere Wafer (68), die auf der abwärts gerichteten Fläche des Suszeptors (64) befestigt werden, wobei die Drehung des Suszeptors (64) die Wafer (68) veranlasst, innerhalb der Kammer (62) zu drehen;

eine Heizung (80), um den Suszeptor (64) zu erwärmen;

einen Kammergaseinlass (98, 124, 144, 154, 175), der angeordnet wird, Halbleiterwachstumsgase in die Reaktorkammer (62) zu lassen, um Halbleitermaterial auf den Wafern (68) abzulagern, wobei sich der Einlass (98) unterhalb der abwärts gerichteten Fläche befindet; und

einen Kammergasauslass (110, 149, 160) oberhalb des Niveaus der Wafer, wobei der Kammergasauslass angeordnet wird, Gasen zu ermöglichen, aus dem Innenraum des Reaktorwechslers (62) oberhalb des Niveaus der Wafer auszutreten,

und dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass der Suszeptor (64) aufwärts und abwärts bewegt werden kann, um den Abstand zwischen dem Einlass (124, 144, 175) und dem Suszeptor zu verändern.


 
2. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Kammergaseinlass (124, 144, 175) durch den Boden der Reaktorkammer (62) stattfindet.
 
3. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Kammergaseinlass (144, 175) ein Duschkopfeinlass durch den Boden der Kammer (62) ist, wobei der Duschkopfeinlass eine Vielzahl von Bohrungen (145) aufweist, um die Wachstumsgase in die Kammer (62) zu lassen.
 
4. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, der des Weiteren eine mit der Oberseite der Kammer (62) verbundene Drehstange (92) umfasst, wobei der Suszeptor (64) mit der Drehstange (92) verbunden wird, wobei die Drehung der Drehstange (92) den Suszeptor (64) veranlasst, in der Kammer (62) zu drehen.
 
5. Reaktor nach Anspruch 4, wobei die Stange (92) hohl ist und wobei eine Fläche des Suszeptors einen zentralen Einlass (98) in Ausrichtung mit der Stange (92) aufweist, wobei die Wachstumsgase in die Kammer (62) durch die Stange (92) und den zentralen Einlass (98) eintreten.
 
6. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Kammergaseinlass (154) durch eine Seitenwand der Reaktorkammer (62) stattfindet.
 
7. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Winkel des Suszeptors (64) eingestellt werden kann, um den Winkel zwischen dem Einlass (124, 144, 175) und dem Suszeptor (64) einzustellen.
 
8. Reaktor nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Winkel des Einlasses (124, 144, 175) eingestellt werden kann, um den Winkel zwischen dem Einlass (124, 144, 175) und dem Suszeptor (64) einzustellen.
 


Revendications

1. Réacteur de fabrication de semiconducteur comprenant :

un suscepteur rotatif (64) monté sur une surface supérieure d'une chambre de réacteur (62), ladite chambre de réacteur comprenant un surface inférieure opposée à ladite surface supérieure, ledit suscepteur comprenant une surface face vers le bas (70) faisant face à ladite surface inférieure ;

des parois latérales agencées entre ladite surface supérieure et ladite surface inférieure, ledit suscepteur étant agencé entre lesdites parois latérales et agencées entre ladite surface supérieure et ladite surface inférieure ;

une ou plusieurs tranches (68) montées sur ladite surface face vers le bas dudit suscepteur (64), la rotation dudit suscepteur (64) entraînant lesdites tranches (68) en rotation dans ladite chambre (62) ;

un chauffage (80) pour chauffer ledit suscepteur (64) ;

une entrée (98, 124, 144, 154, 175) de gaz de chambre agencée pour permettre aux gaz de croissance de semiconducteur d'entrer dans ladite chambre de réacteur (62) de déposer le matériau de semiconducteur sur lesdites tranches (68), ladite entrée (98) en dessous de ladite surface face vers le bas et

une sortie de gaz de chambre (110, 149, 160) au dessus du niveau desdites tranches, ladite sortie de gaz de chambre étant agencée pour permettre aux gaz de sortir de l'intérieur de la chambre de réacteur (62) au dessus du niveau desdites tranches et caractérisé en ce que ledit suscepteur (64) peut être déplacé vers le haut et vers le bas pour faire varier la distance entre ladite entrée (124, 144, 175) et ledit suscepteur.


 
2. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, ladite entrée de gaz de chambre (124, 144, 175) étant à travers le fond de ladite chambre de réacteur (62).
 
3. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, ladite entrée de gaz de chambre (144, 175) étant une entrée de pomme d'arrosage à travers le fond de ladite chambre (62), ladite entrée de pomme d'arrosage possédant une pluralité de trous (145) pour permettre auxdits gaz de croissance d'entrer dans ladite chambre (62).
 
4. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un tige de rotation (92) raccordé à la surface supérieure de ladite chambre (62), ledit suscepteur (64) fixé à ladite tige de rotation (92), ladite rotation de ladite tige de rotation (92) entraînant ledit suscepteur (64) en rotation dans ladite chambre (62).
 
5. Réacteur selon la revendication 4, ladite tige (92) étant creuse et une surface dudit suscepteur possédant une entrée centrale (98) alignée avec ladite tige (92), lesdits gaz de croissance entrant dans ladite chambre (62) à travers ladite tige (92) et l'entrée centrale (98).
 
6. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, ladite entrée de gaz de chambre (154) étant à travers une paroi latérale de ladite chambre de réacteur (62).
 
7. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, ledit angle dudit suscepteur (64) pouvant être ajusté pour régler l'angle entre ladite entrée (124, 144, 175) et ledit suscepteur (64).
 
8. Réacteur selon la revendication 1, ledit angle de ladite entrée (124, 144, 175) pouvant être ajusté pour régler l'angle entre ladite entrée (124, 144, 175) et ledit suscepteur (64).
 




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REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description




Non-patent literature cited in the description