(19)
(11)EP 2 058 529 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
28.06.2017 Bulletin 2017/26

(21)Application number: 08172866.9

(22)Date of filing:  29.01.2002
(51)Int. Cl.: 
F01M 11/04  (2006.01)
F15B 21/04  (2006.01)

(54)

Vehicle fluid change apparatus and method

Vorrichtung und Verfahren zum Wechseln von Fahrzeugflüssigkeiten

Appareil et procédé de changement de fluide de véhicule


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LI LU MC NL PT SE TR

(30)Priority: 30.01.2001 US 772604

(43)Date of publication of application:
13.05.2009 Bulletin 2009/20

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
02702089.0 / 1285169

(73)Proprietor: RPM Industries, LLC
Wilmington, DE 19801 (US)

(72)Inventor:
  • Apostolides, John
    Pittsburgh, PA 15238 (US)

(74)Representative: Giles, Ashley Simon 
Haseltine Lake LLP Lincoln House, 5th Floor 300 High Holborn
London WC1V 7JH
London WC1V 7JH (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
US-A- 4 240 523
US-A- 5 203 429
US-A- 5 056 621
US-A- 5 526 782
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS



    [0001] This application claims priority from U.S. Application Serial No. 09/772,604 filed on 30 January 2001. The latter is a continuation in part application of U.S. Application Serial No. 09/435,375, filed on 5 November 1999, which is a continuation in part of U. S. Application Serial No. 08/961,339, filed on 30 October 1997, entitled "Portable Fluid Transfer Conduit."

    BACKGROUND


    FIELD OF INVENTION



    [0002] The present invention relates to fluid transfer conduit having flow control means and an adapter means for connection with a source of fluid, and, in particular, to a portable fluid transfer conduit that is useful in the removal of fluids from equipment which do not have conveniently located outlet ports.

    [0003] The invention also relates to apparatuses and methods for draining and replacing fluids from reservoirs on vehicles and other equipment or devices having one or more fluid containing reservoirs.

    DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION BACKGROUND



    [0004] Many industrial machines and equipment have requirements for fluid exchanges. Examples of these include changing the oil in motors and engines or hydraulic fluid in presses and lifting equipment. Countless other examples exist, but what is generally common to these machines or equipment is the fact that the outlet port is inconveniently located. Typically this is the result of having to remove the fluid from a sump or drainage point that is located at the bottom of the machine to utilize gravity flow.

    [0005] While the task of removal is not difficult, it is often time consuming because of the inconvenient location of the fittings. However, in a number of the newer or retrofit machines, fluid circulation pumps are provided which are external to the machine or engine. Also, some of the newer equipment is fitted with external prelubrication devices which permit oil or fluid to commence circulation prior to the activation of the primary equipment or engine on which it is fitted. Illustrative of such devices is the prelubrication device shown in U.S. Patent No. 4,502,431 which is incorporated herein by reference, which is typically fitted to a diesel engine used in power equipment, trucks or heavy equipment. Also, circulation devices used to heat hydraulic fluid are applicable to the present invention.

    [0006] Furthermore, in certain off-road heavy equipment, the reservoirs containing their fluids may contain scores of gallons of fluid, which take unacceptably long to drain and refill. For example, in some equipment an engine oil sump or reservoir may contain up to 150 gallons of oil; a transmission sump may contain up to 100 gallons of transmission fluid; and a separate reservoir of hydraulic fluid to power hydraulic functions may contain up to 500 gallons of hydraulic fluid. In equipment valued from one hundred thousand to millions of dollars per unit, downtime costs are enormous. Accordingly, if downtime for maintenance in such apparatuses can be minimized, substantial economic benefits will result.

    [0007] Additionally there are numerous smaller devices and motors where access to fluid discharge ports is difficult to reach or in which the fluid must be assisted for removal. Examples include marine engines and the like. In some small sized equipment, the engine must be inverted to remove the oil or other fluid. See also United States Patent No. 5,526,782, 5,257,678 and 4,977,978.

    [0008] Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide portable fluid transfer conduit that will facilitate the removal of fluids remote from the discharge port. It is also an object of the present invention to provide a conduit for use in fluid transfer that is adapted to fit a discharge port and remotely control the flow of fluid from an engine or equipment. Another object of the invention is to provide a portable transfer conduit that includes fluid pump means for extracting fluid from a machine or engine. A further object of the invention is adapter means for connecting the fluid transfer conduit to an outlet port for such fluid. Another object of the invention is an adapter connector for coupling an air evacuation means to purge or remove part of the fluid from the channels of the machine and filter. Yet another object is to provide apparatuses and methods for facilitating the removal of fluids from one or more fluid reservoirs to expedite fluid removal and changeover. Closely related to these objects are the additional benefits of saving time for the service technicians by making faster flow rates for removal or replacement fluids possible, thus increasing efficiency, creating a safer environment by providing controlled evacuation and replacement of fluids from a remote location, thus minimizing spilling, and contributing to noise reduction by providing a remote fluid replacement location so that engine compartments may contain more fixed noise shields.

    SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



    [0009] Generally, the present invention comprises a portable fluid transfer conduit having at least one flexible fluid conduit. Typically the conduit is made from a rubber or polymeric material, stainless steel braiding or the like. In most typical applications it comprises a polyethylene or propropylene tubing. The conduit includes an inlet port and an outlet port. The inlet port is adapted for connection with the discharge port of a fluid source such as the sump of an engine, a hydraulic sump, a transmission sump, or a prelubrication pump. In one preferred embodiment of the invention, a coupler is provided at the inlet port to couple the conduit with discharge port of the fluid source. Most preferably, a quick connect-disconnect fitting is secured to the inlet port of the conduit and a mateable fitting therewith at the discharge port.

    [0010] A flow control means is positioned adjacent the outlet port of the conduit for controlling the flow of fluid from said source, such as an engine sump, through the conduit. In one preferred embodiment, the flow control means includes an actuator electrically connected to means for pumping the fluid from said fluid source, such as a prelubrication pump used in a diesel or internal combustion engine. In this embodiment, the flow control actuator includes disconnectable electrical connection means for control of the pump means.

    [0011] In a second preferred embodiment, the flow control means comprises a pump for pumping the fluid from the fluid source through the conduit. The actuator includes electrical means such as a battery pack or connections to an external source of power such as an electrical wall outlet or battery on vehicle or equipment. The electrical connection is similar to the first embodiment in which disconnectable electric connectors are used. In the case of the battery pack or portable power source, the preferred pump is a lightweight de-motor or ac-motor driven pump in which a small lightweight rechargeable battery pack is mounted as part of the flow control means. The pump may be portable or handheld.

    [0012] In another embodiment of the invention, a conduit having a female or male coupling is used to connect an air gun or supply source of air pressure. The conduit includes a fitting in the line between the prelubrication pump and the system filter. This is preferably used prior to the removal of oil from the system to clear oil channels and at least some of the oil from the filter to simplify oil removal and make it safer for the workers.

    [0013] In yet another embodiment of the invention, a flow controller includes a pump for pumping fluids selectively from a plurality of fluid reservoirs, such as the engine, hydraulic and/or transmission reservoirs. For three fluid reservoirs, for example, a three-position control valve selectively connects the pump to three conduits, which are in fluid communication with the engine, hydraulic and transmission sumps, respectively. The pump may be mounted on the engine or the vehicle or may be portable or even handheld.

    [0014] Other embodiments include a first pump fluidically connected to the engine oil reservoir and a second pump fluidically connected to a plurality of other fluid reservoirs, such as a hydraulic and a transmission reservoir. Each of these pumps may be mounted on the engine or the vehicle or may also be portable or handheld.

    [0015] In addition to the pumps that are mounted on the vehicle or engine, external pumps may also be used as apart of a comprehensive system of fluid service. An external pump may be, for example, an evacuation pump on a lubrication service truck or "lube truck" or another external, pump that may be located either on the lube truck or on an independent portable conduit and dedicated, for example, to supplying new replacement oil to the engine and equipped with a pressure regulator valve.

    [0016] While the present invention facilitates the removal of fluid from machines, engines, hydraulic systems and the like, other advantages of the invention will become apparent from a perusal of the following detailed description of presently preferred embodiments of the invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0017] 

    Figure 1 is a side elevation of an embodiment of a single-reservoir conduit system of the present invention;

    Figure 2 is a plan view of the embodiment shown in Figure 1 showing a coupling;

    Figure 3 is a plan view of another embodiment of the invention having a pump integrally included in the flow control means;

    Figure 4 is a side elevation of the embodiment shown in Figure 3; and

    Figure 5 and 6 are two views of a coupling for use with the present invention;

    Figure 7 is diagrammatic view of a conduit, and a coupling for oil purges;

    Figure 8 is a diagrammatic view of an embodiment of a multiple-reservoir conduit system;

    Figure 9 is an electrical schematic diagram of the system of Figure 8;

    Figure 10 is an elevational view of a service panel for a fluid evacuation system;

    Figure 11 is an electrical schematic view of the system of Figure 10;

    Figure 12 is a hydraulic schematic diagram of a fluid evacuation system;

    Figure 13 is a diagrammatic view of an embodiment of a dual-pump multiple-reservoir conduit system;

    Figure 14 is an electrical schematic diagram of the system of Figure 13;

    Figure 15 is an elevation view of another control panel for a fluid evacuation system;

    Figure 16 is an electrical diagram of the system of Figure 15;

    Figure 17 is a hydraulic schematic diagram of a multiple pump fluid evacuation system; and

    Figure 18 is a schematic diagram showing a replacement fluid conduit system.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION



    [0018] Referring to Figures 1 and 2, there is shown a portable fluid transfer conduit 10 having an inlet port 11 and outlet port 12. Flexibly extending between inlet and outlet ports 11 and 12 is flexible tubing 13. Tubing 13 is preferably made from a natural or synthetic rubber material, braided stainless steel or polymeric extruded material such as polyethylene or styrene.

    [0019] A coupling 14 is attached to inlet 11. As shown, coupling 14 is the male mateable end of a quick disconnect coupling more clearly shown in Figures 5 and 6. Alternatively, coupling 14 can be any type of fitting such as a screw in or a bayonet type coupling. Preferably, however, a fitting is adapted to the outlet of the fluid source. On devices such as a prelubrication pump similar to that shown in U.S. Patent No. 4,502,431, a bypass or connector means is easily inserted on the pressure side of the pump to divert the oil from the engine to the fluid transfer conduit 10. An example is disclosed relative to Figures 5 and 6 below.

    [0020] Positioned adjacent outlet port 12 is flow control means 16. Flow control means comprises in one embodiment an electric or mechanical valve for controlling the flow of fluid through the conduit activated by switch 17. This embodiment is useful where the fluid source does not incorporate a pump means and/or the fluid is gravity transferred. On the other hand, in the case where means such as a prelubrication device is used, flow control means 16 is preferably a pass through conduit having switch 17 sealably mounted thereon. Switch 17 is electrically connected by conductor 18 to electrical connector 19, which is adapted to connect with the pump circuit to activate the pump and control the flow of fluid. Where flow control means 16 comprises an electric valve, conductor 18 and connector 19 are typically connected to a source of electrical power such as a battery terminal, a magnetic switch, relay contacts or other electromechanical means for activating the pumping means.

    [0021] To drain a fluid such as oil or hydraulic oil from a piece of equipment is a simple matter of connecting coupling 14 to the outlet of the pump and initiating the pump through activation of flow control switch 17 or gravity flow. It should be noted that where a prelubrication pump is used, such as in U.S. Patent No. 4,502,431 a valve is not required. The outlet port of fluid transfer conduit 10 is positioned at a remote and convenient location to discharge the fluid into a waste oil-receiving receptacle. Such waste oil-receiving receptacles are known in the art and may commonly comprise barrels or service vehicles adapted to receive and transport waste oil or other contaminated vehicle fluids.

    [0022] In another preferred embodiment shown in Figures 3 and 4, fluid transfer conduit 20 comprises a conduit 23 having an inlet port 21 and an outlet port 22. Inlet port 21 includes a coupling 24, preferably a mateable coupling as shown in Figures 5 and 6. In this embodiment, flow control means 26 comprises a small suction, diaphragm, piston or reciprocating pump 28 preferably including a battery pack within. Flow control means 16 includes activator switch 27 preferably in the form of a "trigger switch" having guard 29 and grip means 31 to facilitate holding the discharge end of fluid transfer conduit 20. It should be noted, however, that where a long transfer conduit is contemplated, for example 20 to 30 feet in length, it is desirable to locate the pump adjacent or in close proximity to coupling means 14.

    [0023] Many types of small portable pumps 28 are commercially available on the market. A number of pumps are better suited for heavier or more viscose fluids but are not capable of being run with battery power. In such cases, a power cable such as conductor 18 and connector 19 can be used in this embodiment as well. Typically, the electrical power required can be supplied by a vehicle storage battery or an a-c pump can be connected to an a-c outlet.

    [0024] The smaller pump means are especially useful in the consumer market and the larger pumps are especially applicable to the industrial market.

    [0025] Referring to Figures 5 and 6 an example of a preferred coupling means 14 and 41 are respectively shown. Coupling means 14 and 41 are adaptable to both fluid transfer conduit embodiments shown with respect to Figures 1 and 3. Coupling 41 connects to the engine oil port (not shown) whereas coupling 14 is attached to conduit 10. Such couplings are well known in the art and comprise a male quick connector fitting 30 and a female mateable quick connector fitting 32. Also shown is an electrical receptor 33 for receiving electrical connector 19. It is also possible to include a sensing means on the coupling to indicate that the sump is dry and signal for shut down of the pump. A cap 34 is shown for protecting receptor 33 between periods of use. As shown in Figures 5 and 6, receptor 33 and fitting 32 are mounted on a bracket 36 which is then connected to a source of fluid 37, such as a prelubrication pump, not otherwise shown. In this embodiment, fitting 32 is connected in the output or high pressure side of the fluid source system. In the case of a prelubrication system, fitting 32 is interposed in the high pressure pump discharge line between pump and an engine.

    [0026] As shown in Figure 6 is a sampling port 39 can be used to sample oil in a prelubrication system where the prelubrication pumps flows in to 37. This has the advantage of providing a live sample of oil without requiring the engine to be running.

    [0027] As shown in Figure 7, an additional fitting 40 is attached to an external air supply 42. Preferably fitting 40 is a female fitting adapted to a couple to air supply (not shown). By attaching an air source to fitting 40 prior to or during the removal of oil from the engine, oil resident in the channels can be removed to the sump and the oil in the filter system at least partially removed to facilitate removal of the filter, especially if it is hot. Typically, it is desirable to have the source of air at a pressure from about 90 to 150 psi.

    [0028] I have found that a vehicle or other equipment having, for example, an engine reservoir 105, hydraulic fluid reservoir 107 and a transmission fluid reservoir 109, may be more efficiently serviced and the risks of environmental contamination reduced if the service locations for such fluids are in relatively close proximity to one another. For example, and without limitation, if the service locations for such reservoirs are within about 3-10 feet from one another, service can be accomplished by a single technician and in much shorter times. Also, the risks from environmental contamination caused, for example, by spillage when several lines and fluid containers are disconnected and connected, can be greatly reduced if a unitary service location is provided.

    [0029] Figure 8 illustrates one embodiment for a single-pump multiple reservoir conduit system 100, which may be used, for example, to quickly evacuate the engine reservoir 105, the hydraulic reservoir 107 and the transmission or other fluid reservoir 109 of a machine, vehicle or other apparatus through a quick connect port 112 that may be mounted on a bracket 173 or to an evacuation port 153 in a control panel 150, discussed below. A pump 128, and each of the reservoirs 105, 107 and 109 are connected to a control valve 116 through a network of conduits 113. The pump 128 may be a dedicated evacuation pump, or it may alternatively be, for example, an engine prelubrication pump. The network of conduits includes a first conduit 400 connected to the hydraulic reservoir 107 at a first end 402 by a first coupling 406, and to the control valve 116 at a second end 404 by a second coupling 408. Similarly, a second conduit 410 is connected at a first end 414 to the engine reservoir 105 by a first coupling 416, and to the control valve 116 at a second end 412 by a second coupling 418. A third conduit 420 is connected at a first end 422 to the transmission reservoir 109 by a first coupling 426, and to the control valve 116 at a second end 424 by a second coupling 428. A fourth conduit 430 is connected to the pump 128 at a first end 432 by a first coupling 436 and to the outlet port 112 at a second end 434 by a second coupling 438. A fifth conduit 461 is connected to the pump 128 at a first end 463 by a first coupling 467 and to the control valve 116 at a second end 465 by a second coupling 469.

    [0030] The control valve 116 is preferably a three-position, four-port directional valve, which controls the connection of the pump 128 with each of the conduits 410, 400 and 420 leading to the reservoirs 105, 107 and 109, respectively. The control valve 116 has one default position which, preferably is the engine sump 105 position. The control valve 116 and the pump 128 may be operated from a remote bracket 173 by an electrical evacuator switch attached, for example, to a connector 172, and a toggle selector switch 174, respectively.

    [0031] As will be appreciated, in the operation of the system of Figure 8, the control valve 116 determines which of the reservoirs 105, 107 or 109 will be in fluid communication with the pump 128 through the conduit network 113. Specifically, the selector switch 174 determines the position of the control valve 116. The switch connected at connector 172 serves as the on-off switch for the pump 118, and may be mounted on the bracket 173 or may be mounted on a tethered switch connected to connector 172.

    [0032] In operation, the selector switch 174 controls the position of the control valve 116 to determine which reservoir 105, 107 or 109 will be evacuated. When the switch connected to connector 172 is energized, the pump 128 is energized, thereby providing negative pressure on line 461 and, thereby, to the control valve 16. The fluid in the reservoir 105, 107 or 109 fluidly coupled to the control valve 116 will be drawn into line 461, through pump 128, through line 430 and to coupling 112 for discharge into a suitable receptacle or into a fluid line.

    [0033] Figure 9 shows an exemplary diagram of the electrical circuitry for an embodiment of the single-pump, multiple reservoir system of Figure 8. A relay switch 158 is connected to the motor 162 of the pump 128 to start and stop the pump motor 162 when the start switch connected at 172 is activated to provide power from a direct current source. The relay switch 158 stops the motor when a low flow condition is detected in the any conduits 400, 410, and 420 during evacuation by sensor 180. The control valve 116 is electrically operated through two solenoids 164 and 166 connected to a selector switch 174, which is connected to the start switch connected at 172. The start switch connected at 172 is preferably a single pole, normally open switch, and the selector switch 174 is preferably single pole double throw switch.

    [0034] Although three reservoirs are shown in Figure 8, the number of reservoirs is not limited to three. For embodiments with N reservoirs, for example, there are N reservoir conduits connecting each reservoir with the control valve, such as the conduits 400, 410 and 420 of Figure 8. A pump conduit, such as conduit 461, connects the control valve 116 to the pump 128, and an outlet conduit, such as conduit 430, connects the pump 128 to the outlet port 112. For N reservoirs, the control valve 116 has one default position and N-1 selector activated positions.

    [0035] The control valve 116 may also be operated from a centralized location, such as a service panel. An embodiment of a remote single service panel 150 for a single pump, which includes switches for the actuation of the pump 128 and the control valve 116 in addition to switches for ignition and ports for sampling engine, transmission and hydraulic fluids, is shown in Figure 10. A selector switch 152 on the service panel 150 is instead connected to the control valve 116 to enable an operator to select the reservoir to be evacuated. A switch for controlling evacuation 154, an emergency evacuation stop switch 156, and an evacuation connect port 153 (coupled, for example, to the line 430) for connecting/ disconnecting the pump 128 may also be mounted on the service panel 150. Additionally, a transmission oil sampling port 50, an engine oil sampling port 52, and a hydraulic oil sampling port 54 may be mounted on the service panel 150 for with the transmission, engine and hydraulic reservoirs respectively. The service panel 150 may also include an oil filter 56 having an oil inlet line 44, transmission oil filter, a fuel filter 58, a fuel separator 60, hydraulic oil filter, a remote ignition selector 62 and an ignition switch 64. It should be appreciated, however, that the service panel need not be a full service panel, and it may only include the evacuation system switches. Thus, service locations, such as control panel 150, may be provided for virtually all vehicle or engine fluid service needs.

    [0036] An embodiment of the electrical diagram for the service panel of Figure 10 is shown in Figure 11. A motor relay 76 is connected to the pump motor 80 connected to pump 128 to start and stop the pump motor 80 when the start 154 and emergency stop 156 switches, respectively, are operated. The relay switch 76 stops the motor when a low flow condition is detected by sensor 69 during evacuation. The evacuation selector switch 152, which is electrically connected to the start switch 154 and the and emergency stop switch 156, enables the selective evacuation of the hydraulic reservoir 107 or transmission reservoir 109 through the operation of a hydraulic reservoir solenoid valve coil 65 and a transmission reservoir solenoid valve coil 67, respectively. The default position in this Figure is the evacuation of the engine reservoir 105, but it will be appreciated that any of the reservoirs may be chosen as the default position, and that the number of reservoirs may not be limited to three.

    [0037] As shown in Fig. 12, each of the lines 410, 420 and 400 may also be coupled to a corresponding check valve 170, 170' or 170", respectively, to allow flow in one direction only as well as a check valve 170"' around pump 128. Optionally, a line 439 (shown in dotted lines in Fig. 11) may be provided with appropriate valving around the pump 128 which is connected to a quick disconnect coupling 440. In that case, the truck pump 160 of a lubrication evacuation truck may be used to evacuate fluids. The truck pump 160 evacuates through permanent line 472 or quick disconnect line 474 to a truck waste tank 470. If pump 128 is used and the truck pump 160 is not used, a conduit 460 may be connected via appropriate valving through the hard plumbing 472 or quick disconnect 474 to the lubrication truck waste tank 470.

    [0038] Figures 13-17 illustrate embodiments for a dual-pump multiple reservoir conduit system 200 including a first pump 230 in fluid communication with an engine reservoir 505, and a second pump 228 in fluid communication with a hydraulic reservoir 507 and a transmission reservoir 509. However, it will be appreciated that more pumps may be used or the pumps may be connected to different reservoirs within the scope of the claims. In this embodiment, the first pump 230 evacuates the engine oil through a first outlet port 312 operated with an electrical switch connected to a connector 372 on a remote bracket 373 or mounted on a service panel 250. A first conduit 520 is connected to the engine reservoir 505 at a first end 522 by a first coupling 524, and to the first pump 230 at a second end 526 by a second coupling 528. A second conduit 530 is connected at a first end 532 to the first pump 230 by a first coupling 534, and to the first outlet port 312 at a second end 536 by a second coupling 538. The outlet port 312 may be connected to a conduit to provide for prelubrication of the engine. Alternatively, the second conduit 530 may also be fluidically connected to a coupling 251 in a control panel 250, discussed below. The second pump 228 is connected to a control valve 616 and evacuates fluid from the transmission reservoir 509 or the hydraulic reservoir 407 to a second outlet port 212 by operating the selector switch 274 and an evacuation switch connected to connector 272 which, together with the outlet port 212, may be mounted on a second bracket 273. The second pump 228 and each of the reservoirs 507, 509 are connected to a control valve 616 through of a network of conduits 513. The network of conduits 513 includes a first network conduit 540, which is connected at a first end 542 to the hydraulic reservoir 507 by a first coupling 546, and to the control valve 616 at a second end 544 by a second coupling 548. A second network conduit 550 is connected at a first end 554 to the transmission reservoir 509 by a first coupling 558, and to the valve 616 at a second end 552 by a second coupling 556. A third network conduit 580 is connected to the pump 228 at a first end 582 by a first coupling 586 and to the outlet port 212 at a second end 584 by a second quick coupling 588. Alternatively, the conduit 580 may be fluidically connected to a coupling 253 on the control panel 250. A fourth network conduit 590 is connected to the second pump 228 at a first end 592 by a first coupling 596 and to the control valve 616 at a second end 594 by a second quick coupling 598. A flexible conduit 315 may be used connect the outlet ports 312 or 212 to a waste oil container or to a port of a lubrication truck leading to a waste oil tank 570 on the lube truck, as shown in Figure 17. The control valve 616 provides for the selective evacuation of the transmission 509 or hydraulic reservoir 507.

    [0039] Figure 14 illustrates an electrical diagram for an embodiment of a dual-pump multiple reservoir evacuation system illustrated in Figure 13. Each pump motor 263 and 262 is connected to a corresponding relay switch 258 and 259, and each relay switch is powered, for example, by a portable source of 12V or 24V DC current. First and second motor relay switches 258, 259 are connected to a first and second normally open start switches 372 and 272. Between each relay and the corresponding start switch, low flow sensors 280 and 281, respectively, intervene to stop the corresponding motor when a low flow condition is detected. A source of electric current is connected to the second relay switch 259, to the selector switch 274 and to the start switch 372 and 272. A two-position control valve 216 controls flow to the hydraulic reservoir 507 and the transmission reservoir 509, and is shown with a hydraulic reservoir as the default position, although any of the reservoirs may be the default reservoir.

    [0040] It will be appreciated that the number of conduits connected to the first and second pumps need not be limited to a total of three. For example, the first pump 230 may be connected to N1 reservoirs and the second pump 228 may be connected to N2 reservoirs for a total number of

    Figure 13 illustrates a first example of an embodiment where N1 is equal to 1 and N2 is equal to 2. In a second example of the same embodiment, N1 is still equal to 1, but N2 is a number greater that 2. In the second example, the control valve 616 is connected to N2 reservoir conduits, such as conduits 540 and 550. In both examples, the second pump is connected to the control valve 616 with pump conduit 590, and to the second outlet 212 with outlet conduit 580.

    [0041] An embodiment for a remote service panel 250 including controls for a dual-pump multiple reservoir evacuation system is shown in Figure 15. It includes start 254 and stop 256 switches, a selector switch 252 and evacuation disconnect ports 251, 253 for the first pump 230 and second pump 228. A line 900 connected to the unfiltered side of the engine oil filter head may also be connected to a pressure-regulated air supply to purge the engine of used oil before adding replacement oil through the same port. On the same service panel sample ports 910, 912, 914 for the transmission, engine and hydraulic fluid reservoirs respectively may be mounted, as well as a remote ignition selector 918 and a remote ignition switch 916.

    [0042] An embodiment of an electrical diagram for the panel of Figure 15 is shown in Figure 16. The pump motors 963 and 962 for the pumps 230 and 228, respectively, are connected to corresponding relay switches 958 and 959, respectively, and each relay switch is powered, for example, by a source of 12V or 24V DC current. The first and second motor relay switches 958, 959 are connected to the selector switch 252 and a normally closed emergency stop switch 256. Between each relay and the emergency stop switch 256, low flow sensors 280 and 281, respectively, intervene to stop the respective motor when a low flow condition is detected. The selector switch 252 is connected to a valve coil 966 and a normally open start switch 254. In Figure 16 electrical wiring for the transmission reservoir is depicted in the selector switch 254, corresponding to contact points designated with the letter "T". For clarity, some wiring for the hydraulic and engine reservoirs, corresponding to contact points "H" and "E" of the selector switch 966 is omitted.

    [0043] Figure 17 illustrates a hydraulic diagram for an embodiment of a dual-pump multiple reservoir evacuation system. The first and second pumps 230 and 228 evacuate fluid from each of the selected reservoirs to ports 312 and 212, which may be mounted on brackets 373 and 273, respectively, or to the connectors 251 and 253 on the control panel 250. The flow from each reservoir 505, 507 and 509 may be controlled in one-way direction by check valves downstream from each reservoir. Check valves 705, 707 and 709 are connected downstream from the engine reservoir 505, the hydraulic reservoir 507 and the transmission reservoir 509 respectively. Check valves 720 and 722 are also mounted on bypass pipes 711 and 712, respectively, bypassing the first pump 230 and the second pump 228, respectively. A control valve 216, controls flow to the transmission reservoir 509 and to the hydraulic reservoir 507, and is shown with default position to the hydraulic reservoir 507. The discharge from bracket couplings 212 and 312 or control panel connectors 251 and 253 may be coupled to a discharge container or to a conduit 315 mounted on a lube truck. In that case, evacuated fluid passes through properly valved line 360 around lube truck pump 160 and directly into reservoir 570. Alternatively, it will be appreciated that the pumps 230 and 228 may be bypassed by lines 574 and 576, respectively, and appropriate valving provided in order that evacuation suction may be provided by the pump 160 on the lube truck. That discharge may then pass directly to the lube truck reservoir 570 via a fixed line 372 or a quick connection line 374.

    [0044] Either single-pump multiple reservoir system described in connection with Figures 8-12, or the dual-pump multiple reservoir described in connection with Figures 13-17 may be used to remove fluid from any of the reservoirs on a vehicle, by attaching evacuation conduits to the reservoirs as shown in the respective figures, operating the control valve to select a reservoir and actuating the pump to pump fluid from the selected reservoir to an outlet port for discharge. Additionally, after draining a selected reservoir, replacement fluid may be admitted into the appropriate cavity as shown schematically in Figure 18, by attaching to a conduit 972 connected to the unfiltered side of the cavity's filter head 970 a replacement fluid conduit 974, by means of a coupling 976. The coupling 976 is connected to a replacement fluid source 978. For example, engine oil can be input into line 44 in the embodiment in Fig. 10 or into line 900 in the embodiment in Fig. 15, in each case before the oil filter head. It should be appreciated that the fluid cavities corresponding to the other reservoirs discussed herein can also be refilled by inputting replacement fluid on the unfiltered side of the respective filters of such fluid cavities.

    [0045] The numerous advantages of the invention are manifested in the described embodiments, which include a versatile and flexible system and method for quickly evacuating any chosen reservoir on a vehicle. The evacuation rate may be as high as 90 gallons per minute, thereby considerably decreasing downtime and realizing significant economic benefits. The evacuation is performed in a controlled and targeted operation through direct conduits to the vehicle fluid system that minimize spilling and do not require removal of existing insulation shields. Furthermore, the invention may be used for either limited evacuation service or as a total fluid service system, which includes fluid evacuation, oil filter purging, and fluid replacement.

    [0046] It should be appreciated that all the figures, and in particular the hydraulic and electrical diagrams of Figures 9, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17 and 18, are presented for illustrative purposes and not as construction drawings. Omitted details and modifications or alternative embodiments are within the purview of persons of ordinary skill in the art. Furthermore, whereas particular embodiments of the invention have been described herein for the purpose of illustrating the invention and not for the purpose of limiting the same, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that numerous variations of the details, materials and arrangement of parts may be made within the principle and scope of the invention without departing from the invention as described in the appended claims.

    [0047] The present application is a divisional application of EP 02702089.0.


    Claims

    1. A method for removing fluid from a plurality of fluid reservoirs (105, 107, 109) of different fluids on an apparatus, the method comprising:

    coupling through a network of conduits (113):

    each of the reservoirs to a control valve (116);

    the control valve to a pump (128); and

    the pump to an outlet port (112);

    operating the control valve (116) to select one of the reservoirs (105,107, 109) for draining; and

    actuating the pump (128) to pump fluid from the selected reservoir (105, 107, 109) through the outlet port (112), wherein one of the reservoirs is an engine reservoir (105),

    characterised in that the pump (128) comprises an engine pre-lubrication pump.


     
    2. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the reservoirs include transmission fluid and hydraulic fluid reservoirs (109 107)
     
    3. A method for removing fluids from an engine reservoir (505) and at least one other reservoir (507, 509) on an apparatus, the method comprising:

    coupling through a network of conduits (520, 530):

    the engine reservoir (505) to a first pump (230); and

    the first pump (230) to a first outlet port (312);

    coupling through a second network of conduits (513):

    the at least one other reservoir (507, 509) to a control valve (616);

    the control valve (616) to a second pump (228); and

    the second pump (228) to a second outlet port (212);

    actuating the first pump (230) to pump fluid from the engine reservoir (505) through the first outlet port (312);

    operating the control valve (616) to select one of the at least one other reservoirs (507, 509) for draining; and

    actuating the second pump (212) to pump fluid from the selected at least one other reservoir (507, 509) through the second outlet port (212),

    characterised in that the first pump (230) is an engine pre-lubrication pump.


     
    4. Method of claim 3, wherein the first and second pumps (230, 228) are mounted on the apparatus.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Verfahren zum Entfernen von Fluid aus mehreren Fluidbehältern (105, 107, 109) mit unterschiedlichen Fluiden an einer Vorrichtung, wobei das Verfahren Folgendes umfasst:

    Koppeln durch ein Netzwerk von Leitungen (113):

    jeden der Behälter mit einem Steuerventil (116);

    das Steuerventil mit einer Pumpe (128); und

    die Pumpe mit einem Auslassanschluss (112);

    Betreiben des Steuerventils (116), um einen der Behälter (105, 107, 109) zum Entleeren auszuwählen; und

    Betätigen der Pumpe (128), um Fluid aus dem ausgewählten Behälter (105, 107, 109) durch den Auslassanschluss (112) zu pumpen, wobei einer der Behälter ein Motorbehälter (105) ist,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die Pumpe (128) eine Motorvorschmierpumpe umfasst.


     
    2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Behälter Übertragungsfluid- und Hydraulikfluidbehälter (109, 107) aufweisen.
     
    3. Verfahren zum Entfernen von Fluid aus einem Motorbehälter (505) und mindestens einem anderen Behälter (507, 509) an einer Vorrichtung, wobei das Verfahren Folgendes umfasst:

    Koppeln durch ein Netzwerk von Leitungen (520, 530):

    den Motorbehälter (505) mit einer ersten Pumpe (230); und

    die erste Pumpe (230) mit einem ersten Auslassanschluss (312);

    Koppeln durch ein zweites Netzwerk von Leitungen (513):

    den mindestens einen anderen Behälter (507, 509) mit einem Steuerventil (616);

    das Steuerventil (616) mit einer zweiten Pumpe (228); und

    die zweite Pumpe (228) mit einem zweiten Auslassanschluss (212);

    Betätigen der ersten Pumpe (230), um Fluid aus dem Motorbehälter (505) durch den ersten Auslassanschluss (312) zu pumpen;

    Betreiben des Steuerventils (616), um einen des mindestens einen anderen Behälters (507, 509) zum Entleeren auszuwählen; und

    Betätigen der zweiten Pumpe (212), um Fluid aus dem ausgewählten mindestens einen anderen Behälter (507, 509) durch den zweiten Auslassanschluss (212) zu pumpen,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die erste Pumpe (230) eine Motorvorschmierpumpe ist.


     
    4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 3, wobei die erste und zweite Pumpe (230, 228) an der Vorrichtung montiert sind.
     


    Revendications

    1. Procédé pour enlever un fluide à partir d'une pluralité de réservoirs de fluide (105, 107, 109) de différents fluides sur un appareil, le procédé comprenant les étapes consistant à :

    coupler au travers d'un réseau de conduits (113) :

    chacun des réservoirs à une vanne de commande (116) ;

    la vanne de commande à une pompe (128) ; et

    la pompe à un orifice de sortie (112) ;

    actionner la vanne de commande (116) pour sélectionner l'un des réservoirs (105, 107, 109) pour un drainage ; et

    actionner la pompe (128) pour pomper le fluide à partir du réservoir sélectionné (105, 107, 109) à travers l'orifice de sortie (112), dans lequel l'un des réservoirs est un réservoir de moteur (105),

    caractérisé en ce que la pompe (128) comprend une pompe de pré-lubrification de moteur.


     
    2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les réservoirs comprennent des réservoirs de fluide de transmission et de fluide hydraulique (109, 107).
     
    3. Procédé pour enlever des fluides à partir d'un réservoir de moteur (505) et d'au moins un autre réservoir (507, 509) sur un appareil, le procédé comprenant les étapes consistant à :

    coupler au travers d'un réseau de conduits (520, 530) :

    le réservoir de moteur (505) à une première pompe (230) ; et

    la première pompe (230) à un premier orifice de sortie (312) ;

    coupler au travers d'un second réseau de conduits (513) :

    le au moins un autre réservoir (507, 509) à une vanne de commande (616) ;

    la vanne de commande (616) à une seconde pompe (228) ; et

    la seconde pompe (228) à un second orifice de sortie (212) ;

    actionner la première pompe (230) pour pomper du fluide à partir du réservoir de moteur (505) à travers le premier orifice de sortie (312) ;

    actionner la vanne de commande (616) pour sélectionner l'un des au moins un autre réservoir (507, 509) pour un drainage ; et

    actionner la seconde pompe (212) pour pomper du fluide depuis le au moins un autre réservoir sélectionné (507, 509) à travers le second orifice de sortie (212),

    caractérisé en ce que la première pompe (230) est une pompe de pré-lubrification de moteur.


     
    4. Procédé selon la revendication 3, dans lequel les première et seconde pompes (230, 228) sont montées sur l'appareil.
     




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    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description