(19)
(11)EP 2 376 691 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
27.04.2016 Bulletin 2016/17

(21)Application number: 09771455.4

(22)Date of filing:  10.12.2009
(51)Int. Cl.: 
D04H 1/44  (2006.01)
D04H 5/02  (2012.01)
D21F 7/08  (2006.01)
D04H 1/46  (2012.01)
B32B 5/26  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2009/067531
(87)International publication number:
WO 2010/068778 (17.06.2010 Gazette  2010/24)

(54)

INDUSTRIAL FABRIC INCLUDING SPIRALLY WOUND MATERIAL STRIPS

TECHNISCHES FLÄCHENGEBILDE MIT SPIRALFÖRMIG GEWICKELTEN MATERIALSTREIFEN

TISSU INDUSTRIEL COMPRENANT DES BANDES DE MATIÈRE ENROULÉES EN SPIRALE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 29.09.2009 US 246812 P
29.09.2009 US 246801 P
27.01.2009 US 147637 P
12.12.2008 US 121998 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
19.10.2011 Bulletin 2011/42

(73)Proprietor: Albany International Corp.
Albany, NY 12204 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • EAGLES, Dana
    Sherborn, MA 01770 (US)
  • KARLSSON, Jonas
    S-30180 Halmstad (SE)
  • STOWE, Bruce
    Neenah, WI 54956 (US)
  • BOTELHO, Joseph
    Lincoln, RI 02856 (US)
  • MOURAD, Sabri
    F-67730 Chatenois (FR)
  • O'CONNOR, Jerry
    Hopedale, MA 01747 (US)
  • MONTCRIEFF, Jon
    Boston, MA 02127 (US)
  • HANSEN, Robert
    North Muskegon, MI 49445 (US)

(74)Representative: Novaimo 
Bâtiment Europa 2 310 avenue Marie Curie Archamps Technopole
74166 Saint-Julien-en-Genevois Cedex
74166 Saint-Julien-en-Genevois Cedex (FR)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 0 538 211
US-A- 5 171 389
US-A1- 2005 112 332
EP-A2- 1 063 349
US-A- 6 124 015
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS



    [0001] This application claims priority benefits of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/246,812 filed September 29, 2009, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/246,801 filed September 29, 2009, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/147,637 filed January 27, 2009, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/121,998 filed December 12, 2008.

    INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE



    [0002] All patents, patent applications, documents, references, manufacturer's instructions, descriptions, product specifications, and product sheets for any products mentioned herein are incorporated by reference herein, and may be employed in the practice of the invention.

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


    1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION



    [0003] The present invention relates to the papermaking arts. More specifically, the present invention relates to papermaker's fabrics, namely the forming, press, dryer fabrics, and through air dryer (TAD) fabrics, also known as paper machine clothing, on which paper is manufactured on a paper machine. Also, the invention may be used as a substrate for a shoe press or transfer or calender belt, any of which can also be used on a paper machine. In addition, the present invention may be applied in other industrial settings where industrial belts are used to dewater a material. Furthermore, the present invention may be used as a belt and/or sleeve used in the production of nonwovens by processes such as airlaid, melt blowing, spunbonding, and hydroentangling.

    2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART



    [0004] During the papermaking process, a cellulosic fibrous web is formed by depositing a fibrous slurry, that is, an aqueous dispersion of cellulose fibers, on a moving forming fabric in the forming section of a paper machine. A large amount of water is drained from the slurry through the forming fabric, leaving the cellulosic fibrous web on the surface of the forming fabric.

    [0005] The newly formed cellulosic fibrous web proceeds from the forming section to a press section, which includes a series of press nips. The cellulosic fibrous web passes through the press nips supported by a press fabric, or, as is often the case, between two such press fabrics. In the press nips, the cellulosic fibrous web is subjected to compressive forces which squeeze water therefrom, and which adhere the cellulose fibers in the web to one another to turn the cellulosic fibrous web into a paper sheet. The water is accepted by the press fabric or fabrics and, ideally, does not return to the paper sheet.

    [0006] The paper sheet finally proceeds to a dryer section, which includes at least one series of rotatable dryer drums or cylinders, which are internally heated by steam. The newly formed paper sheet is directed in a serpentine path sequentially around each in the series of drums by a dryer fabric, which holds the paper sheet closely against the surfaces of the drums. The heated drums reduce the water content of the paper sheet to a desirable level through evaporation.

    [0007] It should be appreciated that the forming, press and dryer fabrics all take the form of endless loops on the paper machine and function in the manner of conveyors. It should further be appreciated that paper manufacture is a continuous process which proceeds at considerable speed. That is to say, the fibrous slurry is continuously deposited onto the forming fabric in the forming section, while a newly manufactured paper sheet is continuously wound onto rolls after it exits from the dryer section.

    [0008] It should also be appreciated that the vast majority of forming, press and dryer fabrics are, or at least include as a component, a woven fabric in the form of an endless loop having a specific length, measured longitudinally therearound, and a specific width, measured transversely thereacross. Because paper machine configurations vary widely, paper machine clothing manufacturers are required to produce forming, press and dryer fabrics to the dimensions required to fit particular positions in the forming, press and dryer sections of the paper machines of their customers. Needless to say, this requirement makes it difficult to streamline the manufacturing process, as each fabric must typically be made to order.

    [0009] Moreover, because the surface of a woven fabric is necessarily uneven to some degree, as knuckles formed where yarns lying in one direction of the fabric wrap around those lying in another direction lie on the surface, it is difficult to produce a paper product entirely free of sheet marking.

    [0010] The prior art includes several attempts to solve these problems. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,323,226 to Beaumont et al. relates to a synthetic dryer belt comprising one or more plies of polyester film. Perforations through the belt are formed by mechanical punching. U.S. Pat. No. 4,495,680 to Beck shows a method and apparatus for forming a base fabric composed solely of warp yarns to be used in making a papermaker's belt. Essentially, the warp yarns are helically wound about two parallel rolls. Subsequently, fibrous batting or other nonwoven material is applied and adhered to the helical array of warp yarns to provide a fillingless papermaker's belt, which is to say that it has no cross-machine direction yarns.

    [0011] U.S. Pat. No. 4,537,658 to Albert shows a papermaker's fabric made from a plurality of elongated, linked, slotted elements. The elongated elements are linked one to the next either by an integral tongue or through the use of a pintle connecting means which extends from one elongated element to the adjacent element. The elongated elements extend in the cross-machine direction of the disclosed papermaker's fabric, and have flat, parallel top and bottom surfaces.

    [0012] U.S. Pat. No. 4,541,895 to Albert describes a papermaker's fabric made up of a plurality of nonwoven sheets laminated together to define a fabric or belt. The nonwoven sheets are perforated by laser drilling. Such sheets are composed of unoriented polymer material, and if produced in the fineness needed for papermaking applications, would lack sufficient dimensional stability to operate as endless belts on paper machines.

    [0013] U.S. Pat. No. 4,842,905 to Stech shows a tessellated papermaker's fabric and elements for making the fabric. The elements are formed so as to have male or projection members which interlock with female or recess members. The papermaker's fabric comprises a plurality of the tessellated elements which have been interconnected to produce a tessellation of a desired length and width.

    [0014] U.S. Pat. No. 6,290,818 to Romanski shows a shoe press belt wherein the base fabric is made from an endless tube of expanded film which can be perforated.

    [0015] U.S. Pat. No. 6,630,223 to Hansen shows an industrial belt made from a plurality of spirally wound shaped (non-circular cross-section) monofilaments which are abutted to each other, side to side of adjacent turns and secured to one another by a suitable means.

    [0016] U.S. Pat. No. 6,989,080 to Hansen shows a nonwoven papermaker's fabric made from a spirally wound MD base layer of raw stock, overlaid with a CD layer of similar or dissimilar raw stock and mated by suitable means.

    [0017] U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2007/0134467 A1 to Sayers provides a method comprising the steps of laminating a series of layers of film material and cutting perforations in the laminate to provide a foraminous fabric.

    [0018] Fabrics in modern papermaking machines may have a width of from 5 feet to over 33 feet, a length of from 40 feet to over 400 feet and weigh from approximately 100 pounds to over 3,000 pounds. These fabrics wear out and require replacement. Replacement of fabrics often involves taking the machine out of service, removing the worn fabric, setting up to install a fabric and installing the new fabric. While many fabrics are endless, many of those used today are on-machine-seamable. Installation of the fabric includes pulling the fabric body onto a machine and joining the fabric ends to form an endless belt.

    [0019] In response to this need to produce fabrics in a variety of lengths and widths more quickly and efficiently, fabrics have been produced in recent years using a spiral winding technique disclosed in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,360,656 to Rexfelt et al. (hereinafter "the '656 patent"), the teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

    [0020] The '656 patent shows a fabric comprising a base fabric having one or more layers of staple fiber material needled thereinto. The base fabric comprises at least one layer composed of a spirally wound strip of woven fabric having a width which is smaller than the width of the base fabric. The base fabric is endless in the longitudinal, or machine, direction. Lengthwise threads of the spirally wound strip make an angle with the longitudinal direction of the fabric. The strip of woven fabric may be flat-woven on a loom which is narrower than those typically used in the production of paper machine clothing.

    SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



    [0021] The present invention provides an alternative solution to the problems addressed by these prior-art patents/patent applications.

    [0022] Accordingly, one embodiment of the present invention is an industrial fabric or belt for the forming, press and dryer sections, including a through air dryer (TAD), of a paper machine. The fabric or belt of the present invention may also be used as a sheet-transfer, long nip press (LNP) or calender belt, or as other industrial process belts, such as corrugator belts. The fabric may also be used as part of a textile finishing belt, such as a sanforizing belt or tannery belt, for example. Moreover, the fabric of the invention may be used in other industrial settings where industrial belts are used to dewater a material. For example, the fabric may be used in a pulp-forming or pulp-pressing belt, in a belt used to dewater recycled paper during the deinking process, such as a dewatering belt on a double-nip-thickener (DNT) deinking machine; or in a sludge dewatering belt. The inventive fabric may also be used in a belt and/or sleeve used in the production of nonwovens by processes such as airlaid, spunbonding, melt blowing or hydroentangling. The belt and/or sleeve is in the form of an endless loop, and has an inner surface and an outer surface.

    [0023] In an exemplary embodiment, the endless belt is formed from strips of material that are spiral wound around two rolls in a side to side abutting manner. The strips are firmly attached to each other by a suitable method to form an endless loop at the required length and width for the particular use. In the case of a sleeve, the strips may be wound around the surface of a single roll or mandrel which is approximately the size of the diameter and CD length of the drum on which the sleeve will be used. The strips of material used are commonly produced as industrial strapping material. Strapping, especially plastic strapping material, is usually defined as a relatively thin plastic band used for fastening or clamping objects together. Surprisingly, it was discovered that this type of plastic material has the appropriate characteristics to be the material strips to form the inventive belt.

    [0024] The difference in definition between (plastic) strapping and monofilament is related to size, shape and application. Both strapping and monofilament are made by extrusion processes that have the same basic steps of extrusion, uniaxial orientation and winding. Monofilament is generally smaller in size than strapping and usually round in shape. Monofilament is used in a wide variety of applications such as fishing lines and industrial fabrics, including papermachine clothing. Strapping is generally much larger in size than monofilament and always basically wider along a major axis, and as such, being rectangular in shape for its intended purpose.

    [0025] It is well known in the art of extrusion that plastic strapping is made by an extrusion process. It is also well known that this process includes uniaxial orientation of the extruded material. It is also well known that there are two basic extrusion processes using uniaxial orientation. One process is the extrusion and orientation of a wide sheet that is slit into individual straps. The other process is the extrusion of individual strapping that is oriented. This second process is very much like the process of making monofilament as evidenced by the similarity in equipment for both processes.

    [0026] An advantage of using strapping material versus monofilament is the number of spiral windings needed to produce a fabric. Monofilaments are usually considered to be yarns that are no larger than 5 mm in their largest axis. Uniaxial monofilament sizes used for paper machine clothing and the other uses aforementioned seldom exceed 1.0 mm in their largest axis. The strapping material used is usually at least 10 mm in width and sometimes exceeds 100 mm in width. It is envisioned that strapping up to 1000 mm in width could be also used. Suppliers of strapping material which may be used include companies such as Signode.

    [0027] The instant invention provides an improved fabric, belt or sleeve that functions in place of a traditional belt or sleeve, and imparts desired physical characteristics, such as bulk, appearance, texture, absorbency, strength, and hand to the paper or nonwoven product produced thereon.

    [0028] Other advantages such as, but not limited to, improved fiber support and release (no picking) over prior art woven fabrics, and easier cleanability as a result of no yarn crossovers to trap elementary fibers are provided. If the belt/sleeve has a surface texture, then more effective patterning/texture is transferred to the paper/nonwoven, and it also results in better physical properties such as bulk/absorbency.

    [0029] Yet another advantage is thickness versus tensile modulus. Polyester (PET) films in the prior art, for example, have a tensile modulus in the long axis (or machine direction - MD) of about 3.5 GPa. PET strapping (or ribbon) material has a tensile modulus ranging from 10 GPa to 12.5 GPa. To achieve the same modulus with a film, a structure would have to be 3 to 3.6 times thicker.

    [0030] The invention therefore, according to one exemplary embodiment, is a fabric, belt or sleeve formed as a single or multi layer structure from these spiral wound ribbons. The fabric, belt or sleeve may have planar, smooth top and bottom surfaces. The fabric, belt or sleeve may also be textured in some manner using any of the means known in the art, such as for example, sanding, graving, embossing or etching. The belt can be impermeable to air and/or water. The belt can also be perforated by some mechanical or thermal (laser) means so it may be permeable to air and/or water.

    [0031] In another exemplary embodiment, the ribbon is formed such that is has an interlocking profile. The belt is formed by spirally winding these interlocking strips and would have greater integrity than just abutting parallel and/or perpendicular sides of adjacent ribbon strips. This belt can also be impermeable to air and/or water or perforated to be made permeable.

    [0032] The fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may optionally include a functional coating on one or both of its surfaces. The functional coating may have a top surface that is planar or smooth, or may alternatively be textured in some manner using any of the means known in the art, such as for example, sanding, graving, embossing or etching. The functional coating can be any of the materials known to one of ordinary skill in the art, such as for example, polyurethane, polyester, polyamide, or any other polymeric resin material or even rubber, and the functional coating may optionally include particles such as nano fillers, which can improve resistance to flex fatigue, crack propagation or wear characteristics of the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve.

    [0033] The fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may also be used as a reinforcing base or substrate in a forming fabric, press fabric, dryer fabric, through air dryer (TAD) fabric, shoe press or transfer or calender belt, a process belt used in airlaid, melt blowing, spunbonding, or hydroentangling processes, sheet-transfer belt, long nip press (LNP) or calender belt, corrugator belt, sanforizing belt, tannery belt, pulp-forming or pulp-pressing belt, dewatering belt on a double-nip-thickener (DNT) deinking machine, or sludge dewatering belt.

    [0034] While the embodiments above are for a single layer of strips of spirally wound ribbon, there may be advantages to use strips with various geometries that form a belt of two or more layers. Therefore, according to one exemplary embodiment the belt may have two or more layers where the strips may be formed such that the two or more layers mechanically interlock or are attached together by other means known to those skilled in the art. Again the structure can be either impermeable or perforated to be permeable to either air and/or water.

    [0035] Another exemplary embodiment is a multilayer structure formed using the concept of a "welding strip" used to further improve the belt integrity. The structure can be impermeable or perforated to be permeable to either air and/or water.

    [0036] While the term fabric and fabric structure is used, fabric, belt, conveyor, sleeve, support member, and fabric structure are used interchangeably to describe the structures of the present invention. Similarly, the terms strapping, ribbon, strip of material, and material strips are used interchangeably throughout the description.

    [0037] The various features of novelty which characterize the invention are pointed out in particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and specific objects attained by its uses, reference is made to the accompanying descriptive matter in which preferred, but non-limiting, embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which corresponding components are identified by the same reference numerals.

    [0038] Terms "comprising" and "comprises" in this disclosure can mean "including" and "includes" or can have the meaning commonly given to the term "comprising" or "comprises" in U.S. Patent Law. Terms "consisting essentially of" or "consists essentially of" if used in the claims have the meaning ascribed to them in U.S. Patent Law. Other aspects of the invention are described in or are obvious (and within the ambit of the invention) from the following disclosure.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0039] The accompanying drawings, which are included to provide a further understanding of the invention, are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings presented herein illustrate different embodiments of the invention and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention. In the drawings:

    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a fabric, belt or sleeve according to one aspect of the present invention;

    FIG. 2 illustrates a method by which the fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may be constructed;

    FIGS. 3(a) through 3(i) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIGS. 4(a) through 4(d) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIGS. 5(a) through 5(c) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIGS. 6(a) through 6(d) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIGS. 7(a) through 7(d) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIGS. 8(a) through 8(c) are cross-sectional views taken in a widthwise direction of several embodiments of the strip of the material used to manufacture the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve;

    FIG. 9 is a bar graph depicting the advantages of using a uniaxially oriented material (strap/ribbon) over a biaxially oriented material (film) and an extruded material (molded part);

    FIGS. 10(a) through 10(d) illustrate steps involved in a method by which the fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may be constructed;

    FIGS. 11 (a) and 11(b) are schematics of an apparatus that may be used in forming the fabric, belt or sleeve according to one aspect of the present invention;

    FIG. 12 is a schematic of an apparatus that may be used in forming the fabric, belt or sleeve according to one aspect of the present invention;

    FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view of a fabric, belt or sleeve according to one aspect of the present invention; and

    FIG. 14 is an apparatus used in the manufacture of a fabric, belt or sleeve according to one aspect of the present invention.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERED EMBODIMENTS



    [0040] Now turning to the figures, FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the industrial fabric, belt or sleeve 10 of the present invention. The fabric, belt or sleeve 10 has an inner surface 12 and an outer surface 14, and is fashioned by spirally winding a strip of polymeric material 16, for example an industrial strapping material, in a plurality of abutting and mutually adjoined turns. The strip of material 16 spirals in a substantially longitudinal direction around the length of the fabric 10 by virtue of the helical fashion in which the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 is constructed.

    [0041] An exemplary method by which the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 may be manufactured is illustrated in FIG. 2. Apparatus 20 includes a first process roll 22 and a second process roll 24, each of which is rotatable around its longitudinal axis. The first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 are parallel to one another, and are separated by a distance which determines the overall length of the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 to be manufactured thereon, as measured longitudinally therearound. At the side of the first process roll 22, there is provided a supply reel (not shown in the figures) rotatably mounted about an axis and displaceable parallel to process rolls 22 and 24. The supply reel accommodates a reeled supply of the strip of material 16 having a width of 10 mm or more, for example. The supply reel is initially positioned at the lefthand end of the first process roll 12, for example, before being continuously displaced to the right or other side at a predetermined speed.

    [0042] To begin the manufacture of the fabric, belt or sleeve 10, the beginning of the strip of polymeric strapping material 16 is extended in taut condition from the first process roll 22 toward the second process roll 24, around the second process roll 24, and back to the first process roll 22 forming a first coil of a closed helix 26. To close the first coil of the closed helix 26, the beginning of the strip of material 16 is joined to the end of the first coil thereof at point 28. As will be discussed below, adjacent turns of the spirally wound strip of material 16 are joined to one another by mechanical and/or adhesive means.

    [0043] Therefore, subsequent coils of closed helix 26 are produced by rotating first process roll 22 and second process roll 24 in a common direction as indicated by the arrows in FIG. 2, while feeding the strip of material 16 onto the first process roll 22. At the same time, the strip of material 16 being freshly wound onto the first process roll 22 is continuously joined to that already on the first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 by, for example, mechanical and/or adhesive or any other suitable means to produce additional coils of closed helix 26.

    [0044] This process continues until the closed helix 26 has a desired width, as measured axially along the first process roll 22 or the second process roll 24. At that point, the strip of material 16 not yet wound onto the first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 is cut, and the closed helix 26 produced therefrom is removed from the first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 to provide the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 of the present invention.

    [0045] Although a two roll set up is described herein, it may be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that the strips may be wound around the surface of a single roll or mandrel to form the instant fabric, belt or sleeve. A roll or mandrel of appropriate size may be selected based on the desired dimension of the fabric, belt or sleeve to be produced.

    [0046] The present method for producing fabric, belt or sleeve 10 is quite versatile and adaptable to the production of papermaker's and/or industrial fabrics or belts of a variety of longitudinal and transverse dimensions. That is to say, the manufacturer, by practicing the present invention, need no longer produce a woven fabric of appropriate length and width for a given paper machine. Rather, the manufacturer need only separate the first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 by the appropriate distance, to determine the approximate length of the fabric, belt or sleeve 10, and wind the strip of material 16 onto the first process roll 22 and the second process roll 24 until the closed helix 26 has reached the approximate desired width.

    [0047] Further, because the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 is produced by spirally winding a strip of polymeric strapping material 16, and is not a woven fabric, the outer surface 12 of the fabric, belt or sleeve 10 is smooth and continuous, and lacks the knuckles which prevent the surfaces of a woven fabric from being perfectly smooth. The fabrics, belts, or sleeves of the present invention may, however, have geometrical characteristics that provide enhanced topography and bulk to the paper or nonwoven product produced thereon. Other advantages of the instant support members include easier sheet or web release, improved contamination resistance, and reduced fiber picking. Yet another advantage is that it avoids the constraints of and need for a conventional weaving loom since the through voids can be placed in any desired location or pattern. The fabric, belt or sleeve may also have a texture on one or both surfaces, produced using any of the means known in the art, such as for example, sanding, graving, embossing or etching. Alternatively, the fabric, belt or sleeve may be smooth on one or both surfaces.FIGS. 3(a) through 3(i) are cross-sectional views, taken in a widthwise direction, of several embodiments of the strip of material used to produce the present fabric, belt or sleeve. Each embodiment includes upper and lower surfaces which may be flat (planar) and parallel to one another, or may have a certain profile intended to suit a particular application. Turning to FIG. 3(a), material strip 16 has an upper surface 15, a lower surface 17, a first planar side 18 and a second planar side 19, according to one embodiment of the invention. The upper surface 15 and the lower surface 17 may be flat (planar) and parallel to one another, and the first planar side 18 and the second planar side 19 may be slanted in parallel directions, so that the first planar side 18 of each spirally wound strip of material 16 abuts closely against the second planar side 19 of the immediately preceding turn thereof. Each turn of the strip of material 16 is joined to its adjacent turns by joining their respective first and second planar sides 18, 19 to one another by an adhesive, for example, which may be a heat-activated, room-temperature-cured (RTC) or hot-melt adhesive, for example, or any other suitable means.

    [0048] In FIG. 3(b), material strip 16 may have a cross-sectional structure that enables a mechanical interlock for joining adjacent strips of material 16 in the spirally formed fabric, belt or sleeve. Adjacent strips of material 16 can be the same or different in size and/or profile, but each has a locking position, as shown in FIG. 3(b). Other examples of mechanical interlock structures are shown in FIGS. 3(c) through 3(g) where the cross section of individual strips of material 16 is illustrated. In each case, one side of the strip of material 16 may be designed to mechanically interlock or connect with the other side of the adjacent strip of material 16. For example, referring to the embodiment shown in FIG. 3(g), the strip of material 16 may have an upper surface 42, a lower surface 44, a tongue 46 on one side and a corresponding groove 48 on the other side. The tongue 46 may have dimensions corresponding to those of the groove 48, so that the tongue 46 on each spirally wound turn of strip 16 fits into the groove 48 of the immediately preceding turn thereof. Each turn of the strip of material 16 is joined to its adjacent turns by securing tongues 46 in the grooves 48. The upper surface 42 and the lower surface 44 may be flat (planar) and parallel to one another, or non-planar and non-parallel depending on the application, or even may be convexly or concavely rounded in the widthwise direction thereof, as shown in FIG. 3(f). Similarly, either side of the strip may be cylindrically convex or concave shaped with the same radius of curvature. FIG. 3(h) shows another embodiment of the present invention.

    [0049] In addition to having an extruded strip of material with opposing hemispheres or profiles as described above, various other shapes could be extruded or machined from rectangular extrusions to have mating edges with raised rails, which may facilitate bonding by mechanical and/or adhesive means. One such structure, according to one exemplary embodiment of the invention is shown in FIG. 3(i). Alternatively, the material strip may not require a right and left side that mate or join together. For example, as shown in FIG. 4(a), the cross section of strip of material 16 may have interlocking grooves on its upper surface or top side, or material strip 16 may have interlocking grooves on its lower surface or bottom side, as shown in FIG. 4(b).

    [0050] FIG. 4(c), for example, shows the material strips of FIGS. 4(a) and 4(b) positioned for interlocking. The arrows in FIG. 4(c) indicate, for example, the direction that each of the material strips 16 would have to be moved in order to engage the grooves and interlock the two strips. FIG. 4(d) shows the two material strips 16 after they have been interlocked or joined together. Although only two of the mating material strips are shown in the exemplary embodiments, it should be noted that the final fabric, belt or sleeve is formed of several of the material strips interlocked together. Clearly, if one interlocks the material strips in a spiral winding process, one can form a sheet of material in the form of an endless loop. It should also be noted that while mechanical interlocks are shown, the strength of the interlocks can be improved by, for example, thermal bonding, especially by a technique known as selective bonding as exemplified by a commercial process known as 'Clearweld.' (See www. clearweld. com).

    [0051] FIG. 5(a) shows a cross-sectional view of a material strip 16 that has grooves both on the top side and bottom side thereof. FIG. 5(b) shows how two material strips 16 having the cross-sectional shape shown in FIG. 5(a) can be interlocked. The interlocked structure results in grooves on the top and bottom surface of the end product.

    [0052] Referring to the embodiment shown in FIG. 5(c), FIG. 5(c) shows the interlocking of the two material strips 16 shown in FIG. 5(a) and FIG. 4(b). This results in a sheet product that has grooves on the bottom surface with a flat top surface. Likewise, one may also form a structure having grooves on the top surface with a flat bottom surface.

    [0053] Another exemplary embodiment is a fabric, belt or sleeve formed from material strips 16 that have knob-like interlocks or "positive" locks that form stronger interlocks due to their mechanical design. The designs have "positive" interlocks in the sense that the pins and the receptors for the pins have mechanical interference that require considerable force either to join the ribbons together or to separate them. FIG. 6(a), for example, illustrates the features of knoblike interlocks in individual ribbon-like material strips 16. FIG. 6(b) illustrates the features of knoblike interlocks in individual ribbon-like material strips 16 of opposite configuration that are designed to interlock with the structure shown in FIG. 6(a). FIG. 6(c) shows the individual ribbon-like material strips of FIGS. 6(a) and 6(b) positioned for interlocking. It is to be noted here that the staggered position of the top and bottom ribbons is in order to accommodate another material strip 16 of opposite configuration. Finally, FIG. 6(d) illustrates these same strips after they have been pressed together to form an interlocked structure. Several ribbon-like material strips like these may be interlocked together to form the final fabric, belt or sleeve.

    [0054] Another exemplary embodiment is a fabric, belt or sleeve formed from material strips 16 that have grooves on both the top and bottom sides thereof, for example, as shown in FIG. 7(a). These two ribbon-like material strips 16 are designed to be joined together to form a positive interlock, as shown in FIG. 7(b). It is to be noted that the top and bottom surfaces both retain grooves in their respective surfaces. Also, looking at FIGS. 7(a) and 7(b) it may be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art to combine three or more strips to make a multi-layered structure, or if just two strips are used, the groove profile of the grooves in the top strip may be the same or different on top versus bottom sides. Similarly, the groove profile of the grooves in the bottom strip may be the same or different on either sides. As noted earlier, while the embodiments described herein are for a single layer of spirally wound ribbons or strips, there may be advantages to use strips with various geometries that form a belt of two or more layers. Therefore, according to one exemplary embodiment the belt may have two or more layers where the strips may be formed such that the two or more layers mechanically interlock. Each layer may be spirally wound in an opposite direction or angled in the MD to provide additional strength.

    [0055] FIG. 7(c) shows an interlocked structure that results in a grooved bottom surface and a flat top surface, whereas FIG. 7(d) shows an interlocked structure that results in a flat bottom surface and a grooved top surface, for example.

    [0056] As it may be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art, many shapes may be considered for making positive interlocks as described above. For example, the previous few embodiments focused on round knob-like protrusions and round receptacles. However, it is also possible to use other shapes such as a trapezoid to accomplish the same effect. An example of a positive interlock having such a shape is shown in FIG. 8(a). Alternatively, one can mix shapes to accomplish a positive interlock. An example of mixed shapes is shown in FIGS. 8(b) and 8(c).

    [0057] The mechanical interlock thus formed between adjacent strips of material as described in the above embodiments increases the ease with which a spiral wound base fabric or structure can be made, because without such a lock, it is possible for adjacent strips of material to wander and separate during the process of making the spirally wound fabric. By mechanically interlocking adjacent spirals, one may prevent wandering and separation between adjacent spirals. Additionally, one may not need to depend solely on the strength of the mechanical lock for joining strength as one may also form thermal welds in the mechanically locked zones of the fabric. According to one embodiment of the invention, this can be accomplished by placing a near infrared or infrared or laser absorbing dye prior to locking the male/female components together followed by exposing the mechanical lock to a near infrared or infrared energy or laser source that causes thermal welding of the mechanical lock without melting material external to the zone of the mechanical lock.

    [0058] The strip of material described in the above embodiments may be extruded from any polymeric resin material known to those of ordinary skill in the art, such as for example, polyester, polyamide, polyurethane, polyether ether ketone resins, etc. While industrial strapping is attractive as a base material, given that it is uniaxally oriented, i.e., it has at least twice the tensile modulus of a biaxially oriented material (film) and up to ten times the modulus of an extruded material (molded), any other suitable material may be used. That is to say, the structure resulting from a uniaxially oriented material requires less than half the thickness of biaxially oriented material (film) and less than one-tenth the thickness of an extruded material (molded). This feature is illustrated in FIG. 9 where results are shown for designing a part that has been designed for a specific force and strain for a fixed width. The equation used in this design problem is the relationship between stress and strain shown as follows:



    [0059] The force (or load) is kept constant along with the width and strain in this illustration. The equation shows that the required thickness is inversely proportional to the modulus of the material. This equation is representative of the problem of designing paper machine clothing for dimensional stability, i.e., the load is known, the maximum strain is known and the width of the machine is fixed. The result is shown in terms of the final thickness of the part required depending upon the modulus of the material employed. Clearly, uniaxial materials such as strappings or ribbons have a significant advantage over films and molded polymers as shown by FIG. 9. The instant fabrics, belts or sleeves, however, are not limited to uniaxial or biaxial orientation of the strapping, in that either or both orientations may be used in the practice of the instant invention.

    [0060] Strapping is usually supplied in continuous lengths with the product having a rectangular cross section. It is a tough, general purpose, usually untreated polyester strip with excellent handling characteristics, which makes it suitable for many industrial applications. It has excellent mechanical strength and dimensional stability as noted earlier, and does not become brittle with age under normal conditions. Strapping has good resistance to moisture and most chemicals, and can withstand temperatures of -70 degrees C to 150 degrees C or more. Typical cross-sectional dimensions of a strapping material that may be used in the present invention are, for example, 0.30mm (or more) thickness and 10mm (or more) width. While strapping can be spirally wound, the adjacent wraps of strapping that do not have any means of interlocking to be held together may need to welded or joined in some manner. In such cases, laser welding or ultrasonic welding may be used in to fix or weld the adjacent ribbons or material strips together so as to improve cross-machine direction ("CD") properties, such as strength, and reducing the risk of separation of neighboring material strips.

    [0061] While uniaxial strapping is found to have the maximum MD modulus, properties other than modulus may also be important. For example, if the MD modulus is too high for the strapping material, then crack and flex fatigue resistance of the final structure may be unacceptable. Alternatively, CD properties of the final structure may also be important. For instance, when referring to PET material and material strips of the same thickness, non-oriented strips may have a typical MD modulus of about 3GPa and strength of about 50MPa. On the other hand, a biaxially oriented strip may have a MD modulus of about 4.7GPa and strength of about 170MPa. It is found that modifying the processing of a uniaxial strip such that the MD modulus may be between 6-10GPa and strength may be equal to or greater than 250MPa, may result in a strip with CD strength approaching, approximately, 100MPa. Further the material may be less brittle, i.e. it may not crack when repeatedly flexed, and may process better when joining the strips together. The bond between the strips may also resist separation during the intended use on the production machine.

    [0062] One method to hold together the adjacent strips, according to one embodiment of the invention, is to ultrasonically weld adjacent strips edge to edge while simultaneously providing a sideways pressure to keep the edges in contact with each other. For example, one part of the welding device can hold one strip, preferably the strip that has already been wound into a spiral, down against a supporting roll while another part of the device pushes the other strip, preferably the strip being unwound, up against the strip being held down. This edge to edge welding is illustrated in FIG. 11 (a), for example.

    [0063] The application of ultrasonic gap welding results in a particularly strong bond. By contrast, ultrasonic welding in either a time mode or energy mode, which is also known as conventional ultrasonic welding, results in a bond that can be described as brittle. Therefore, it may be concluded that a bond formed via ultrasonic gap welding is preferred versus conventional ultrasonic welding.

    [0064] Another exemplary method to hold together adjacent strips, according to one embodiment of the invention, is to apply an adhesive 30 to ends 34, 36 of adjacent strips 16, 16, and joining them is shown in FIGS. 10(a) -10(d). It is to be noted that a filler material 32, may be used to fill gaps or portions where the strips do not contact each other.

    [0065] Another method to hold together adjacent strips of material or functional strips, according to one embodiment of the invention, is to use a "welding strip" comprised of the same basic material as the strip of material. For example, this welding strip is shown in FIG. 11(b) as a thin material appearing above and below the strips of material. In such an arrangement, the welding strip provides a material for the strips of material to be welded such that the assembled structure does not depend upon the edge to edge welding depicted in FIG. 11(a). Using the welding strip method, edge to edge welding may result; however, it is neither required nor preferred. Using the welding strip method, a "sandwich" or laminate type of structure may be formed with the horizontal surface of the strip of material being welded to the horizontal surface of the welding strip, as shown in FIG. 11(b). It is to be noted here that the welding strip does not have to be located both above and below the strips of material, in that the welding strip may be located either just above or just below the strips of material. According to one aspect, the welding strip may also be the central part of the sandwiched structure with the strip of material being above and/or below the welding strip. Additionally, the welding strip is shown as being thinner than the strip of material and as being the same width as the strip of material merely for exemplary purposes. The welding strip may well be narrower or broader than the strip of material, and may be of the same thickness or even thicker than the strip of material. The welding strip may also be another piece of strip of material rather than being a special material made solely for the purpose of the welding strip. The welding strip may also have adhesive applied to one of its surfaces to assist in holding the welding strip in place for the welding operation. However, if such an adhesive is used, it is preferred that the adhesive be partially applied to the welding strip versus the entire surface, because partial application may promote a strong weld between like materials (polyester to polyester, for example) of the strip of material and the welding strip upon ultrasonic or laser welding.

    [0066] If the welding strip is made from an extruded polymer with no orientation, then it is preferred that the welding strip be much thinner than the strip of material, because a non-oriented extruded welding strip is less capable of maintaining the dimensional stability of the final structure as illustrated earlier in this disclosure. However, if the welding strip is made from an oriented polymer, it is preferred that the welding strip in combination with the strip of material be as thin as possible. As noted earlier, the welding strip may be another piece of strip of material. However, if this is the case, it is preferred that the thickness of the individual materials be selected such that the total thickness of the sandwich or laminate can be minimized. As also noted earlier, the welding strip may be coated with an adhesive that is used to hold the structure together for further processing. According to one aspect, the welding strip with adhesive may be used, for example, to create a structure that goes directly to a perforation step, which could be laser drilling without any ultrasonic bonding such that the laser drilling or laser perforation produces spot welds that can hold the sandwich structure together.

    [0067] Another method to hold together adjacent strips of material, according to one embodiment of the invention, is to weld the adjacent strips using a laser welding technique.

    [0068] FIG. 14 illustrates an exemplary apparatus 320 that may be used in the laser welding process, according to one aspect of the invention. In this process, fabric, belt or sleeve 322 as shown in FIG. 14 should be understood to be a relatively short portion of the entire length of the final fabric, belt or sleeve. While the fabric, belt or sleeve 322 may be endless, it may most practically be mounted about a pair of rolls, not illustrated in the figure, but known to those of ordinary skill in the art. In such an arrangement, apparatus 320 may be disposed on one of the two surfaces, most conveniently the top surface, of the fabric 322 between the two rolls. Whether endless or not, fabric 322 may preferably be placed under an appropriate degree of tension during the process. Moreover, to prevent sagging, fabric 322 may be supported from below by a horizontal support member as it moves through apparatus 320.

    [0069] Referring now more specifically to FIG. 14, where fabric 322 is indicated as moving in an upward direction through the apparatus 320 as the method of the present invention is being practiced. The laser heads that are used in the welding process may traverse across the fabric in a CD or widthwise "X" direction while the fabric may move in the MD or "Y" direction. It may also be possible to setup a system where the fabric is moved in three-dimensions relative to a mechanically fixed laser welding head.

    [0070] The advantage of laser welding over ultrasonic welding is that laser welding can be accomplished at speeds in the range of 100 meters per minute while ultrasonic welding has a top end speed of about 10 meters per minute. The addition of a light absorptive dye or ink absorber to the edges of the strips may also assist in concentrating the thermal effect of the laser. Absorbers could be black ink or near IR dyes that are not visible to the human eye, such as for example those utilized by "Clearweld." (See www.clearweld.com)

    [0071] Once the final fabric, belt or sleeve is made and adjacent strips in the fabric, belt or sleeve have been welded or joined in some manner, holes or through voids allowing fluids (air and/or water) to pass from one side of the fabric to the other side of the fabric can be provided by means such as laser drilling. It should be noted that these through holes or through voids that allow fluid to pass from one side of the fabric to the other can be made either before or after the spiral winding and joining process. Such holes or through voids can be made via laser drilling or any other suitable hole/perforation making process, for example, using a mechanical or thermal means, and can be of any size, shape, orientation, form and/or pattern, depending on the intended use. The through voids or holes can have a nominal diameter in the range of 0.005 inches to 0.01 inches or more. An exemplary embodiment is shown in FIG. 13, which is a cross section, taken in a transverse, or cross-machine, direction, of a fabric 80 of the present invention, strips of material 82 are provided along their entire lengths with a plurality of holes 84 for the passage of air and/or water.

    [0072] The inventive fabric, as noted earlier, may be used as a substrate for use in a forming fabric, press fabric, dryer fabric, through air dryer (TAD) fabric, shoe press or transfer or calender belt, or a process belt used in airlaid, melt blowing, spunbonding, or hydroentangling processes. The inventive fabric, belt or sleeve may include one or more additional layers, for example textile layers, on top of or under the substrate formed using the strips of material, merely to provide functionality, and not reinforcement. For example, a MD yarn array may be laminated to the backside of the belt or sleeve to create void spaces. Alternatively, the one or more layers may be provided in between two layers of strapping. The additional layers used may be any of woven or nonwoven materials, MD or CD yarn arrays, spirally wound strips of woven material that have a width less than the width of the fabric, fibrous webs, films, or a combination thereof, and may be attached to the substrate using any suitable technique known to one of ordinary skill in the art. Needle punching, thermal bonding and chemical bonding are but few examples.

    [0073] As noted earlier, the industrial fabric, belt or sleeve of the invention may be used in the forming, press and dryer sections, including a through air dryer (TAD), of a paper machine. The fabric, belt or sleeve may also be used as a sheet-transfer, long nip press (LNP) or calender belt, or as other industrial process belts, such as corrugator belts. The inventive fabric, belt or sleeve may have a texture on one or both surfaces, which can be produced using any of the means known in the art, such as for example, sanding, graving, embossing or etching. The fabric may also be used as part of a textile finishing belt, such as a sanforizing belt or tannery belt, for example. Moreover, the fabric, belt or sleeve of the invention may be used in other industrial settings where industrial belts are used to dewater a material. For example, the fabric, belt or sleeve may be used in a pulp-forming or pulp-pressing belt, in a belt used to dewater recycled paper during the deinking process, such as a dewatering belt on a double-nip-thickener (DNT) deinking machine; or in a sludge dewatering belt. The inventive fabric, belt or sleeve may also be used as a belt used in the production of nonwovens by processes such as airlaid, spunbonding, melt blowing or hydroentangling.

    [0074] According to one exemplary embodiment, the fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may optionally include a functional coating on one or both of its surfaces. The functional coating may have a top surface that is planar or smooth, or may alternatively be textured in some manner using any of the means known in the art, such as for example, sanding, graving, embossing or etching. The functional coating can be any of the materials known to one of ordinary skill in the art, such as for example, polyurethane, polyester, polyamide, or any other polymeric resin material or even rubber, and the functional coating may optionally include particles such as nano fillers, which can improve resistance to flex fatigue, crack propagation or wear characteristics of the inventive fabric, belt or sleeve.

    [0075] The fabric, belt or sleeve of the present invention may also be used as a reinforcing base or substrate in a forming fabric, press fabric, dryer fabric, through air dryer (TAD) fabric, shoe press or transfer or calender belt, a process belt used in airlaid, melt blowing, spunbonding, or hydroentangling processes, sheet-transfer belt, long nip press (LNP) or calender belt, corrugator belt, sanforizing belt, tannery belt, pulp-forming or pulp-pressing belt, dewatering belt on a double-nip-thickener (DNT) deinking machine, or sludge dewatering belt. The reinforcing base or substrate can have a smooth planar surface or it can be textured. The reinforcing base or substrate can optionally include a functional coating on one or both of its surfaces, which in turn can have a smooth planar surface or may be textured.

    [0076] Although preferred embodiments of the present invention and modifications thereof have been described in detail herein, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise embodiments and modifications, and that other modifications and variations may be effected by one skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.


    Claims

    1. An industrial fabric, belt or sleeve produced by spirally winding one or more strips of polymeric material, wherein said one or more strips of polymeric material is an industrial strapping.
     
    2. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is a substrate for use in a forming fabric, press fabric, dryer fabric, through air dryer (TAD) fabric, shoe press or transfer or calender belt, a process belt used in airlaid, melt blowing, spunbonding, or hydroentangling processes, sheet-transfer belt, long nip press (LNP) or calender belt, corrugator belt, sanforizing belt, tannery belt, pulp-forming or pulp-pressing belt, dewatering belt on a double-nip-thickener (DNT) deinking machine, or sludge dewatering belt.
     
    3. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said industrial strapping has a thickness of 0.30mm or more, and a width of 10mm or more.
     
    4. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is permeable or impermeable to air and/or water.
     
    5. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 4, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is permeable to air and/or water, and through voids or holes in said fabric, belt or sleeve are created using a mechanical or thermal means.
     
    6. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 5, wherein said through voids or holes are formed in a predetermined size, shape or orientation.
     
    7. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 6, wherein said through voids or holes have a nominal diameter in the range of 0.005 inches to 0.01 inches.
     
    8. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, further comprising one or more layers of woven or nonwoven materials, MD or CD yarn arrays, spirally wound strips of woven material having a width less than the width of the fabric, fibrous webs, films, or a combination thereof.
     
    9. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve has a texture on one or both surfaces.
     
    10. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is smooth on one or both surfaces.
     
    11. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve comprises at least two layers of strapping materials spirally wound in opposite directions to each other, or opposite to the MD.
     
    12. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, further comprising a functional coating on one or both sides of the fabric, belt or sleeve.
     
    13. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 8, wherein said one or more layers is provided on one or both sides of the fabric, belt or sleeve, or in between two layers of strapping.
     
    14. A method for forming an industrial fabric, belt or sleeve, the method comprising the steps of:

    spirally winding one or more strips of polymeric material around a plurality of rolls, wherein said one or more strips of polymeric material is an industrial strapping; and

    joining edges of adjacent strips of material using a predetermined technique.


     
    15. The method according to claim 14, wherein said predetermined technique is laser, infrared or ultrasonic welding.
     
    16. The method according to claim 14, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is made permeable to air and/or water by creating through voids or holes in said fabric, belt or sleeve using a mechanical or thermal means.
     
    17. The method according to claim 14, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is made permeable to air and/or water by creating through voids or holes in said fabric, belt or sleeve using a mechanical or thermal means, and wherein said through voids or holes are formed in a predetermined size, shape or orientation.
     
    18. The method according to claim 14, further comprising the step of:

    applying to an upper or lower surface of said fabric, belt or sleeve one or more layers of woven or nonwoven materials, MD or CD yarn arrays, spirally wound strips of woven material having a width less than the width of the fabric, fibrous webs, films, or a combination thereof.


     
    19. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 1, wherein adjacent strips of polymeric material are mechanically interlocked.
     
    20. The method according to claim 14, wherein adjacent strips of polymeric material are mechanically interlocked.
     
    21. The method according to claim 14, wherein said fabric, belt or sleeve is provided with a texture on one or both surfaces and wherein said texture is provided by sanding, graving, embossing or etching.
     
    22. The method according to claim 14, further comprising the step of coating on one or both sides of the fabric, belt or sleeve with a functional coating.
     
    23. The method according to claim 18, wherein said one or more layers is provided on one or both sides of the fabric, belt or sleeve, or in between two layers of strapping.
     
    24. The fabric, belt or sleeve according to claim 12, wherein the functional coating has a texture on its top surface.
     
    25. The method according to claim 22, further comprising the step of providing a texture to the functional coating.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Technisches Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel, das der durch spiralförmiges Wickeln eines oder mehrerer Streifen aus Polymermaterial hergestellt wird, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Streifen aus Polymermaterial ein industrielles Umreifungsband sind.
     
    2. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel ein Substrat zur Verwendung bei einem Formiersieb, einem Pressensieb, einem Trocknersieb, einem Durchströmtrockner(TAD)-Sieb, einem Schuhpressen- oder Transfer- oder Kalanderband, einem Prozessband, das bei "Airlaid"-, Schmelzblas-, "Spunbonding"- oder Wasserstrahlverfestigungsverfahren verwendet wird, einem Bogentransferband, einem Langspaltpressen(LNP)-Band oder -kalanderband, einem Wellenband, einem Sanforisierband, einem Gerbband, einem Zellstoffformier- oder -pressband, einem Entwässerungsband auf einer Doppelspalteindicker(DNT)-"Deinking"-Maschine oder bei einem Schlammentwässerungsband ist.
     
    3. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das industrielle Umreifungsband eine Dicke von 0,30 mm oder mehr und eine Breite von 10 mm oder mehr aufweist.
     
    4. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel durchlässig oder undurchlässig gegenüber Luft und/oder Wasser ist.
     
    5. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 4, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel luft- und/oder wasserdurchlässig ist und durch Verwendung eines mechanischen oder thermischen Mittels Durchgangsleerräume oder -löcher in dem Flächengebilde, dem Band oder dem Mantel hergestellt werden.
     
    6. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 5, wobei die Durchgangsleerräume oder -löcher in einer vorgegebenen Größe, Gestalt oder Ausrichtung ausgebildet sind.
     
    7. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 6, wobei die Durchgangsleerräume oder -löcher einen Nenndurchmesser im Bereich von 0,005 Inch bis 0,01 Inch aufweisen.
     
    8. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, ferner aufweisend eine oder mehrere Lagen aus Gewebe oder Vliesstoff, Anordnungen aus Fäden in Maschinenrichtung oder Querrichtung, spiralförmig gewickelte Streifen aus Gewebe mit einer Breite, die kleiner als die Breite des Flächengebildes ist, Faservliese, Filme oder eine Kombination daraus.
     
    9. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel auf einer oder beiden Oberflächen eine Textur aufweist.
     
    10. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel auf einer oder beiden Oberflächen glatt ist.
     
    11. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel mindestens zwei Lagen aus Umreifungsbandmaterialien aufweist, welche in entgegengesetzten Richtungen zueinander oder der Maschinenrichtung entgegengesetzt spiralförmig gewickelt sind.
     
    12. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, ferner aufweisend eine funktionelle Beschichtung auf einer oder beiden Seiten des Flächengebildes, des Bands oder des Mantels.
     
    13. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 8, wobei die eine oder die mehreren Lagen auf einer oder beiden Seiten des Flächengebildes, des Bands oder des Mantels oder zwischen zwei Umreifungsbandlagen bereitgestellt sind.
     
    14. Verfahren zum Formen eines technischen Flächengebildes, Bands oder Mantels, wobei das Verfahren folgende Schritte umfasst:

    spiralförmiges Wickeln eines oder mehrerer Streifen aus Polymermaterial um mehrere Walzen, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Streifen aus Polymermaterial ein industrielles Umreifungsband sind; und

    Fügen von Kanten benachbarter Materialstreifen mittels einer vorgegebenen Methode.


     
    15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei die vorgegebene Methode Laser-, Infrarot- oder Ultraschallschweißen ist.
     
    16. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel durch Herstellen von Durchgangsleerräumen oder -löchern in dem Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel durch Verwendung eines mechanischen oder thermischen Mittels luft- und/oder wasserdurchlässig gemacht wird.
     
    17. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel durch Herstellen von Durchgangsleerräumen oder -löchern in dem Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel durch Verwendung eines mechanischen oder thermischen Mittels luft- und/oder wasserdurchlässig gemacht wird, und wobei die Durchgangsleerräume oder -löcher in einer vorgegebenen Größe, Gestalt oder Ausrichtung ausgebildet werden.
     
    18. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, ferner umfassend den Schritt des:

    Aufbringens von einer oder mehreren Lagen aus Gewebe oder Vliesstoff, Anordnungen aus Fäden in Maschinenrichtung oder Querrichtung, spiralförmig gewickelten Streifen aus Gewebe mit einer Breite, die kleiner als die Breite des Flächengebildes ist, Faservliesen, Filmen oder einer Kombination daraus auf eine obere oder untere Oberfläche des Flächengebildes, Bands oder Mantels.


     
    19. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 1, wobei benachbarte Streifen aus Polymermaterial mechanisch formschlüssig miteinander verbunden sind.
     
    20. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei benachbarte Streifen aus Polymermaterial mechanisch formschlüssig miteinander verbunden werden.
     
    21. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei das Flächengebilde, das Band oder der Mantel auf einer oder beiden Oberflächen mit einer Textur versehen wird und wobei die Textur durch Schleifen, Gravieren, Prägen oder Ätzen hergestellt wird.
     
    22. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, ferner umfassend den Schritt des Beschichtens des Flächengebildes, Bands oder Mantels auf einer oder beiden Seiten mit einer funktionellen Beschichtung.
     
    23. Verfahren nach Anspruch 18, wobei die eine oder die mehreren Lagen auf einer oder beiden Seiten des Flächengebildes, Bands oder Mantels oder zwischen zwei Umreifungsbandlagen bereitgestellt werden.
     
    24. Flächengebilde, Band oder Mantel nach Anspruch 12, wobei die funktionelle Beschichtung auf ihrer oberen Oberfläche eine Textur aufweist.
     
    25. Verfahren nach Anspruch 22, ferner umfassend den Schritt des Versehens der funktionellen Beschichtung mit einer Textur.
     


    Revendications

    1. Toile, tapis ou manchon industriel(le) produit(e) par enroulement en spirale d'une ou plusieurs bandes de matériau polymère, dans laquelle ou dans lequel lesdites une ou plusieurs bandes de matériau polymère sont constituées d'un feuillard industriel.
     
    2. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon étant un substrat destiné à une utilisation dans une toile de formation, une toile de pressage, une toile de séchage, une toile de séchage à air traversant (TAD), un tapis pour presse à sabot ou un tapis de transfert ou de calandre, un tapis de transformation utilisé dans des procédés de dépôt par voie aérodynamique, d'extrusion-soufflage, de filage à l'état fondu, ou d'hydroliage, un tapis de transfert de feuilles, un tapis de presse à zone de contact étendue (LNP) ou de calandre, un tapis d'onduleuse, un tapis de sanforisation, un tapis de tannage, un tapis de formation ou de pressage de pâte, un tapis d'essorage sur une machine de désencrage équipée d'un épaississeur à double zone de contact (DNT), ou un tapis de déshydratation des boues.
     
    3. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle ou dans lequel ledit matériau constitué d'un feuillard industriel a une épaisseur de 0,30 mm ou plus, et une largeur de 10 mm ou plus.
     
    4. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon étant perméable ou imperméable à l'air et/ou à l'eau.
     
    5. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 4, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon étant perméable à l'air et/ou à l'eau, et des vides ou des trous traversants étant formés dans ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon en utilisant un moyen mécanique ou thermique.
     
    6. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 5, dans laquelle ou dans lequel lesdits vides ou trous traversants sont formés dans une taille, une forme et une orientation prédéterminées.
     
    7. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 6, dans laquelle ou dans lequel lesdits vides ou trous traversants ont un diamètre nominal de 0,005 pouce à 0,01 pouce.
     
    8. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre une ou plusieurs couches de matériaux tissés ou non tissés, d'ensembles de fils dans le sens machine ou dans le sens travers, de bandes enroulées en spirale de matériau tissé ayant une largeur inférieure à la largeur de la toile, de nappes fibreuses, de films, ou d'une combinaison de ceux-ci.
     
    9. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon ayant une texture sur une de ses surfaces ou sur ses deux surfaces.
     
    10. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon étant lisse sur une de ses surfaces ou sur ses deux surfaces.
     
    11. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon comprenant au moins deux couches de matériaux constitués d'un feuillard enroulées en spirale dans des directions opposées l'une à l'autre, ou opposées au sens machine.
     
    12. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un revêtement fonctionnel sur un côté ou sur les deux côtés de la toile, du tapis ou du manchon.
     
    13. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 8, dans laquelle ou dans lequel lesdites une ou plusieurs couches sont présentes sur un côté ou sur les deux côtés de la toile, du tapis ou du manchon, ou entre deux couches de feuillard.
     
    14. Procédé de formation d'une toile, d'un tapis ou d'un manchon industriel(le), le procédé comprenant les étapes qui consistent à :

    enrouler en spirale une ou plusieurs bandes de matériau polymère autour d'une pluralité de rouleaux, lesdites une ou plusieurs bandes de matériau polymère étant constituées d'un feuillard industriel ; et

    réunir les bords de bandes de matériau adjacentes en utilisant une technique prédéterminée.


     
    15. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel ladite technique prédéterminée est un soudage laser, infrarouge ou ultrasonique.
     
    16. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon est rendu(e) perméable à l'air et/ou à l'eau par formation de vides ou de trous traversants dans ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon en utilisant un moyen mécanique ou thermique.
     
    17. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon est rendu(e) perméable à l'air et/ou à l'eau par formation de vides ou de trous traversants dans ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon en utilisant un moyen mécanique ou thermique, et dans lequel lesdits vides ou trous traversants sont formés dans une taille, une forme ou une orientation prédéterminées.
     
    18. Procédé selon la revendication 14, comprenant en outre l'étape qui consiste à :

    appliquer sur une surface supérieure ou inférieure de ladite toile, dudit tapis ou dudit manchon une ou plusieurs couches de matériaux tissés ou non tissés, d'ensembles de fils dans le sens machine ou dans le sens travers, de bandes enroulées en spirale de matériau tissé ayant une largeur inférieure à la largeur de la toile, de nappes fibreuses, de films, ou d'une combinaison de ceux-ci.


     
    19. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle ou dans lequel des bandes adjacentes de matériau polymère sont enchevêtrées mécaniquement.
     
    20. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel des bandes adjacentes de matériau polymère sont enchevêtrées mécaniquement.
     
    21. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel ladite toile, ledit tapis ou ledit manchon est pourvu(e) d'une texture sur une de ses surfaces ou sur ses deux surfaces et dans lequel ladite texture est produite par sablage, gravure, gaufrage ou attaque chimique.
     
    22. Procédé selon la revendication 14, comprenant en outre l'étape de revêtement d'un côté ou des deux côtés de la toile, du tapis ou du manchon avec un revêtement fonctionnel.
     
    23. Procédé selon la revendication 18, dans lequel lesdites une ou plusieurs couches sont présentes sur un côté ou sur les deux côtés de la toile, du tapis ou du manchon, ou entre deux couches de feuillard.
     
    24. Toile, tapis ou manchon selon la revendication 12, dans laquelle ou dans lequel le revêtement fonctionnel est pourvu d'une texture sur sa surface supérieure.
     
    25. Procédé selon la revendication 22, comprenant en outre l'étape qui consiste à donner une texture au revêtement fonctionnel.
     




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    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description