(19)
(11)EP 2 392 166 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
11.11.2015 Bulletin 2015/46

(21)Application number: 10736521.5

(22)Date of filing:  01.02.2010
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H04W 72/02(2009.01)
H04W 48/16(2009.01)
H04W 16/14(2009.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2010/022726
(87)International publication number:
WO 2010/088598 (05.08.2010 Gazette  2010/31)

(54)

TARGETED GROUP SCALING FOR ENHANCED DISTRIBUTED SPECTRUM SENSING

TARGETGRUPPENSKALIERUNG FÜR DIE ERWEITERTE VERTEILTE SPEKTRUMSFÜHLUNG

MISE À L'ÉCHELLE D'UN GROUPE CIBLÉ PERMETTANT UNE MEILLEURE DÉTECTION DE SPECTRE RÉPARTIE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 02.02.2009 US 363855

(43)Date of publication of application:
07.12.2011 Bulletin 2011/49

(73)Proprietor: Motorola Solutions, Inc.
Schaumburg IL 60196 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • KYPEROUNTAS, Spyros
    Weston, FL 33327 (US)
  • CORREAL, Neiyer, S.
    Cooper City, FL 33026 (US)
  • SHI, Qicai
    Coral Springs, FL 33076 (US)

(74)Representative: Treleven, Colin 
Optimus Patents Limited Grove House Lutyens Close Chineham Court
Basingstoke, RG24 8AG
Basingstoke, RG24 8AG (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
KR-B1- 100 808 045
US-A1- 2008 112 427
US-A1- 2008 261 639
KR-B1- 100 872 819
US-A1- 2008 233 991
US-A1- 2009 016 293
  
  • YNGVE SELEN ET AL: "Sensor Selection for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing", NEW FRONTIERS IN DYNAMIC SPECTRUM ACCESS NETWORKS, 2008. DYSPAN 2008. 3RD IEEE SYMPOSIUM ON, IEEE, PISCATAWAY, NJ, USA, 14 October 2008 (2008-10-14), pages 1-11, XP031353290, ISBN: 978-1-4244-2016-2
  • CHUNMEI QI ET AL: "Weighted-Clustering Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Context", COMMUNICATIONS AND MOBILE COMPUTING, 2009. CMC '09. WRI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON, IEEE, PISCATAWAY, NJ, USA, 6 January 2009 (2009-01-06), pages 102-106, XP031434634, ISBN: 978-0-7695-3501-2
  • CHIA-HAN LEE ET AL: "Multiple Access-Inspired Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio", MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE, 2007. MILCOM 2007. IEEE, IEEE, PISCATAWAY, NJ, USA, 29 October 2007 (2007-10-29), pages 1-6, XP031232378, ISBN: 978-1-4244-1512-0
  • TAO CHEN ET AL: "CogMesh: A Cluster-Based Cognitive Radio Network", 2007 2ND IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON NEW FRONTIERS IN DYNAMIC SPECTRUM ACCESS NETWORKS : [DYSPAN 2007] ; DUBLIN, IRELAND, 17 - 20 APRIL 2007, IEEE, US, 1 April 2007 (2007-04-01), pages 168-178, XP031095616, ISBN: 978-1-4244-0663-0
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

Field of the Invention



[0001] The present invention generally relates to the field of wireless communications, and more particularly relates to managing the allocation of spectrum sensing resources within a cognitive radio network.

Background of the Invention



[0002] Wireless communication technology has evolved greatly over the recent years. Recent studies have shown that the wireless spectrum in the U.S. is under-utilized, although most of the spectrum has been assigned to licensees, or primary users. Therefore, spectrum sharing has been proposed to alleviate the spectrum scarcity that prevents new wireless services being deployed. Spectrum sensing is a key enabling technology for secondary access in licensed bands. Spectrum sensing technologies utilize radios that monitor the radio spectrum to detect the presence or absence of primary users. Spectrum sensing complements the geo-location database approach (when a geo-location database is available) by sensing for licensed systems that are not in the database and driving channel selection and coexistence with other secondary systems. Spectrum sensing is vital for bands and incumbent signals where a geo-location database is not available.

[0003] With conventional spectrum sensing systems a problem arises when one or more sensing radios that can only minimally contribute, if at all, are included in the group detection process. For example, to achieve a target group probability of false alarm the radios that are capable of detecting the primary signal reduce their detection and false alarm probabilities to accommodate the non-contributing radios. These radios are relying on the performance of the other radios to make up for the reduced detection and false alarm probabilities. Since these radios only contribute marginally, including them is detrimental to group detection performance and wastes valuable resources and bandwidth.

[0004] US2008/0233991A1 (Gillig et al.) provides a secondary communication system. In operation, a device will perform spectrum sensing of certain channels. When activity is found on a channel from one of the primary users, the channel is not available for use by devices of the secondary system. The device may then assist another device that has not yet found activity on a different set of channels. By assigning additional channels to devices that have extra capacity, the overall system efficiency can be raised. Many more channels may be monitored than in systems where a device is not re-assigned to assist other devices, once it has detected activity on its initial list of channels for sensing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0005] In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, a method having the steps of appended claim 1 is provided. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, a wireless device having the features of appended claim 6 is provided. In accordance with a third aspect of the invention, an information processing system having the features of appended claim 11 is provided. The dependent claims provide further details of steps and features of embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0006] The accompanying figures where like reference numerals refer to identical or functionally similar elements throughout the separate views, and which together with the detailed description below are incorporated in and form part of the specification, serve to further illustrate various embodiments and to explain various principles and advantages all in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating a wireless communication system according to various embodiments of the present invention;

FIGs. 2 and 3 illustrate distributed sensing network positions relative to the incumbent signal sensing boundary according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a graph illustrating an example of the probability of detection as a function of the total number of users participating in distributed detection according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a graph illustrating an a example of system probability of detection vs. the total number of sensors outside the contour according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a graph illustrating an example of system probability of detection vs. the total number of sensors available for distributed detection according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating a detailed view of a wireless device according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating a detailed view of an information processing system according to an embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 9 is an operational flow diagram illustrating a process of dynamically updating spectrum sensors allocated to a distributed spectrum sensing group according to an embodiment of the present invention.


SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0007] The invention is defined by the independent claims 1, 6 and 11.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0008] As required, detailed embodiments of the present invention are disclosed herein; however, it is to be understood that the disclosed embodiments are merely examples of the invention, which can be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for the claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to variously employ the present invention in virtually any appropriately detailed structure. Further, the terms and phrases used herein are not intended to be limiting; but rather, to provide an understandable description of the invention.

[0009] The terms "a" or "an", as used herein, are defined as one or more than one. The term plurality, as used herein, is defined as two or more than two. The term another, as used herein, is defined as at least a second or more. The terms including and/or having, as used herein, are defined as comprising (i.e., open language). The term coupled, as used herein, is defined as connected, although not necessarily directly, and not necessarily mechanically.

[0010] The term "wireless device" is intended to broadly cover many different types of devices that can wirelessly receive signals, and optionally can wirelessly transmit signals, and may also operate in a wireless communication system. For example, and not for any limitation, a wireless communication device can include (but is not limited to) any one or a combination of the following: a two-way radio, a cellular telephone, a mobile phone, a smartphone, a two-way pager, a wireless messaging device, a laptop/computer, automotive gateway, or a residential gateway.

[0011] One advantage of various embodiments of the present invention is that allocated spectrum sensing resources are dynamically adjusted to provide optimal performance of the spectrum sensing system. In particular, various embodiments of the present invention select an appropriate subset of sensing radios out of a larger set to improve the probability of detection of the overall system while maintaining the required system probability of false alarm. Furthermore, by reducing the number of sensors collaborating to only the essential radios vital communication bandwidth can be saved since the non-essential sensors do not have to send their detection results to a fusion center. Additionally, sensor resources are saved and the remaining sensors which are not included in the subset of sensors are able to be allocated for detecting a different incumbent signal or to examine a different band for incumbents.

Operating Environment



[0012] According to an embodiment of the present invention as shown in FIG. 1 an example of a wireless communication system 100 is illustrated. FIG. 1 shows a plurality of networks 102, 104. Although only two networks 102, 104 are shown, the wireless communication system 100 can comprise additional networks. In an embodiment, one of the networks 102 is a host/primary network and one or more of the additional networks are secondary networks 104. In an embodiment, a host/primary network can be an underlay network and a secondary network can be an overlay network. The host/primary network 102 is assigned RF spectrum that is divided into channels that can potentially be used by the secondary network(s) 104. Throughout this discussion the terms "host" and "primary" that refer to, for example, host/primary network 102, are used interchangeably. The type of wireless communication system that allows for a secondary network to utilize the RF spectrum of a host/primary network is commonly referred to as Cognitive Radio ("CR") system.

[0013] Each of the wireless communication networks 102, 104 can include one or more communication networks 106, 108 such as a circuit service network and/or a packet data network. The communication networks 106, 108 can either be wired or wireless. The wireless communications standard of the networks 102, 104 coupling base stations 110, 112 to mobiles 114 to 122 can comprise Code Division Multiple Access ("CDMA"), Time Division Multiple Access ("TDMA"), Global System for Mobile Communications ("GSM"), General Packet Radio Service ("GPRS"), Frequency Division Multiple Access ("FDMA"), other IEEE 802.16 standards, Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing ("OFDM"), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access ("OFDMA"), Wireless LAN ("WLAN"), WiMAX, or the like. The wireless communications networks 102, 104 are able to be an Internet Protocol ("IP") or Session Initiation Protocol ("SIP") based connectivity network, which provides data connections at much higher transfer rates than a traditional circuit services network. These networks are able to comprise an Evolution Data Only ("EVDO") network, a General Packet Radio Service ("GPRS") network, a Universal Mobile Telecommunications System ("UMTS") network, an 802.11 network, an 802.16 (WiMAX) network, Ethernet connectivity, dial-up modem connectivity, or the like.

[0014] A circuit services network is able to provide, among other things, voice services to the wireless devices 114 to 122 communicatively coupled to one or both of networks 102, 104. Other applicable communications standards include those used for Public Safety Communication Networks including TErrestrial TRunked rAdio ("TETRA") and P25 Trunking. It should be noted that these network technologies are only used as an illustrative example and do not limit further embodiments of the present invention. Each of the wireless communication networks 102, 104 includes a plurality of base stations 110, 112. Each of the base stations 110, 112 is communicatively coupled to an information processing system 126, 128 such as a site controller 126, 128.

[0015] As discussed above, the wireless communication system 100, in an embodiment, is a CR system. In a cognitive radio (CR) system of the type considered for use by IEEE 802.22, a cognitive secondary radio system utilizes spectrum assigned to a primary system using an opportunistic approach. With this approach, the secondary radio system shares the spectrum with primary incumbents as well as those operating under authorization on a secondary basis. Under these conditions, it is imperative that any user in the cognitive radio system not interfere with primary users.

[0016] Therefore, in an embodiment, the devices 114, 116, 118 sense the channel to detect a licensed, primary user 120, 122. The devices 114, 116, 118 are allowed to transmit if their transmissions will not interfere with any primary user 120, 122. In an embodiment this is accomplished by the devices (e.g., secondary users) 114, 116, 118 detecting primary user signals on a given channel. In order to perform signal detection, the devices 114, 116, 118 (which can also be referred to as "spectrum sensing devices", "sensors", "nodes", and "secondary users"), utilize one or more spectrum sensing methods. For example, a spectrum sensing device 114 can utilize adaptive noise level estimation for estimating noise levels, which enables robust signal detection. For example, the noise level estimations, which take into account time-varying noise levels, are used to dynamically and adaptively determine detection criteria.

[0017] An example of a detection criterion is a detection threshold. Detection thresholds are used to identify whether an active signal is on a channel as compared to noise on the channel based on energy estimation ε, and therefore can be used by a device 114, 116, 118 to determine whether its transmissions would cause interference to the primary user. A more detailed discussion on adaptive noise level estimation can be found in the co-pending and commonly owned U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/241,019, entitled "Signal Detection In Cognitive Radio Systems", filed on September 29, 2008. It should be noted that the various embodiments of the present invention are not limited to performing adaptive noise level estimation. For example, a device 114 can simply monitor the signal strength of a given channel, or perform detection by looking for specific features of the primary signal such as pilot tones or spectral correlations.

[0018] In the example of FIG. 1, each of the secondary network wireless devices 114, 116, 118 includes a spectrum sensing engine 130, 132, 134 for performing the spectrum sensing discussed above. The spectrum sensing engines 130, 132, 134, in this embodiment, include an energy estimator 136 for determining the energy associated with an observed signal. Energy detection is just used for illustrative and non-limiting purposes, as one of many possible spectrum sensing methods can be used instead. For example, spectrum sensing can also be performed by looking for specific features of the primary signal such as pilot tones or spectral correlations.

[0019] In another embodiment of FIG. 1, each secondary network wireless device 114, 116, 118 can transmit information associated with an observed signal such as energy estimation to a central processing system 138 or a fusion center. This central processing system 138 comprises a cognitive engine 140 that utilizes the information received from each of the devices 114, 116, 118 to determine whether noise or a signal exists on a particular channel in the primary network 102 based on a detection algorithm managed by the central system 138 such as comparison to a detection threshold. The detection threshold indicates a desired system performance for performing spectrum sensing and is used to identify whether an active signal is on a channel as compared to noise on the channel based on energy estimation ε. The central processing system 138 is then able to notify the secondary network wireless devices 114, 116, 118 whether a signal or noise has been detected on the given channel so the wireless devices 114, 116, 118 can decide to transmit or not transmit on the channel.

[0020] In another embodiment, each of the devices 114, 116, 118 comprises, in addition to the spectrum sensing engine 130, 132, 134, a cognitive engine (not shown) and a detection criteria database (not shown) for maintaining information sets associated with one or more detection criteria such as, but not limited to, thresholds for performing the spectrum sensing. In this embodiment, the devices 114, 116, 118 perform the signal detection operations discussed above with respect to the central processing system 138. Stated differently, the devices 114, 116, 118 are not required to transmit spectrum sensing information to the central processing system 138 for signal detection. For example, in this embodiment, the cognitive engine of the devices 114, 116, 118 utilizes the observed spectrum sensing data and determines whether noise or a signal exists on a particular channel in the primary network 102 based on the detection threshold. In this embodiment, the detection threshold can be maintained and updated by the device 114 itself or by the central processing system 138, which is discussed in greater detail below.

[0021] In yet another embodiment, one or of the devices 114, 116, 118 can perform the functions of the central processing system 138 discussed above for the remaining devices. For example, a first device 114 can include a spectrum sensing engine 130 and a cognitive engine. The other devices 116, 118 can transmit spectrum sensing data the first device 114. The first device 114 analyzes the spectrum sensing data received from the other devices 116, 118 and determines whether noise or a signal exists on a particular channel in the primary network 102 based on a detection criteria, which can be managed by the central system or the first device 114. The first device 114 is then able to notify the other secondary network wireless devices 116, 118 whether a signal or noise has been detected on the given channel so the wireless devices 116, 118 can decide to transmit or not transmit on the channel. It should be noted that in the embodiments discussed above, the detection criteria can be maintained and updated by the devices 114, 116, 118 themselves or by the central processing system, which is discussed in greater detail below.

[0022] In yet another an embodiment where the central processing system 138 is deployed, the cognitive engine 140 of the central processing system 138 also includes a dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142. The dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142 selects and allocates which sensing devices 114, 116, 118 are to perform spectrum sensing. As discussed above, various problems occur when one or more sensing radios that can only minimally contribute, if at all, are included in the group detection process. Therefore, the cognitive engine 140 monitors and analyzes device performance information/statistics 144 to determine which devices to allocate or de-allocate (or eliminate) to/from a spectrum sensing group. For example, the cognitive engine 140, via the dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142 selects a subset of sensing radios out of a larger set to improve the probability of detection of the overall system while maintaining the required system probability of false alarm. By reducing the number of sensors collaborating to only the essential sensors communication bandwidth and sensor resources can be saved since the non-essential sensors do not have to send their detection results to the central processing system 138. The dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142 can also allocate the non-selected or de-allocated sensors to perform spectrum sensing on a different incumbent signal or examine a different band for incumbents. This dynamic allocation process is discussed in greater detail below.

Group Scaling for Enhanced Distributed Spectrum Sensing



[0023] As discussed above, in distributed spectrum detection, the individual node probability of false alarm ("Pfai") and thus the probability of detection ("Pdi") is reduced to achieve a target system Pfa at the central processing system. Fortunately, with collaboration, the diversity gains provided by group detection more than compensate for the fact that the individual detectors operate at a lower probability of detection. However, with collaborating nodes, if a portion of the participating nodes minimally contribute to the group detection process, then the system detection performance deteriorates since all nodes that do contribute operate at a lower Pdi, and cause a detriment to group detection performance. Furthermore, resources are wasted.

[0024] FIGs. 2 and 3 show an example of the problem discussed above where a portion of the participating nodes minimally contribute to the group detection process. The spatial deployment of the distributed sensing network is illustrated by the dotted line 202, 302 and the individual sensor nodes (sensors) are indicated by the shaded circles 204, 304. The solid line circle 206, 306 around the primary transmitter 208, 308 indicates the signal boundary of the primary signal that system is trying to detect. Since in the absence of geographic information on primary transmitters one does not know where the primary transmitter is located (the system does not know if there is a signal at all), it is difficult to know in advance which sensors are inside the contour (the solid line circle 206, 306) and should be included in group detection. For example, the situation could be that as illustrated in FIG. 2, where only one sensor 203 out of six is in range, or as illustrated in FIG. 3, where four sensors 303, 305, 307, 309 out of six are in range. The nodes that are in range (inside the solid line circle 206, 306) are considered to contribute towards the collaborative detection.

[0025] Simulations were performed to examine this problem and evaluate the impact of non-contributing sensors on the overall distributed sensing detection performance. In an embodiment, an assumption was made that the spectrum detection system is designed to operate at a target false alarm ("Pfa") rate of 10% and that the radios use energy detectors for local detection. For the baseline case, one can assume that all sensors are able to observe the primary signal at a mean received SNR = -12 dB. In the baseline case, the total number of cooperating sensors N in the distributed sensing network was varied from 1 to 6 and group decisions were made by ORing the local decisions from the individual detectors. Throughout the simulations, the 10% requirement for system false alarm probability was met, i.e. all distributed system detectors regardless of number of sensors are designed as Neyman-Pearson ("NP") detectors with constant false alarm probability. In the simulations the total number of samples used per sensor for signal detection was m=1000. The resulting baseline curve for probability of detection ("Pd") (at a 10% false alarm) achieved with OR combining when all the participating sensors contribute to group detection is shown in FIG. 4 by the circles on the first line 402. This is the case where all sensors used in distributed detection are inside the contour (larger circle) and thus actively contribute to group detection.

[0026] In order to establish the detriment in detection probability caused by non-contributing users in the group, simulations were then run where 1, 2, and 3 out-of-N detectors used for group detection are non-contributing (i.e. they are outside the contour). The resulting probabilities of detection curves as a function of the total number of sensors (contributing + non-contributing) in the group (for a group false alarm rate of 10%) are shown by the squares on the second line 404 in FIG. 4 for one non-contributing sensor, by the X's on the third line 406 for two non-contributing sensors, and the dots on the fourth line 406 for three non-contributing sensors. As FIG. 4 illustrates, as non-contributing sensors are added to the group decision process the detection performance decreases steadily. Also FIG. 4 indicates that it is possible to achieve better detection performance with a smaller number of participating sensors, all contributing, than having to some extent a larger number of collaborative nodes where a number of them do not contribute to the distributed detection process.

[0027] For example point A on FIG. 4 represents a collaborative sensing network of 4 nodes that are all inside the primary Tx contour. Point B on FIG. 4 represents a collaborative sensing network of 6 nodes that also has four sensors inside the contour, but also has two sensing nodes outside the contour. Even though both networks have the same number of contributing nodes (four) inside the detection contour, the network that has two additional nodes outside the contour experiences a probability of detection degradation of about 8%. Also, note that the detection performance for point C where three contributing nodes are used in the group detection scheme is better than that for point B, were four sensors are inside the contour and two are outside.

[0028] The cognitive engine 140 of the central processing system 138 improves group detection performance by identifying the key contributing detectors and weeding out the detectors having inconsequential contributions to detection performance. Stated differently, the cognitive engine 140 adaptively eliminates nodes from the cooperative detection process that minimally contribute. In an embodiment, the cognitive engine 140 identifies the detectors having inconsequential contributions by observing the time series of detection decisions of each sensor 114, 116, 118 and then constructing estimates of their respective probabilities of detection over time. The time series of detection decisions and the constructed estimates can be stored in the central processing system 138 as the performance information/statistics 144. The dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142 then excludes from group detection the detectors that satisfy:

where N is the total number of available sensors to be used for distributed detection,

is the estimated probability of detection of the ith node, and 0<α<1.

[0029] After downscaling the set of sensing nodes 114, 116, 118 by the dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142, the cognitive engine 140 re-estimates the detection criteria such as, but not limited to a detection threshold, of each detector 114, 116, 118 in order to meet the desired probability of false alarm based on the reduced set of sensors to be used in group detection and performs the sensing procedure again with fewer nodes to obtain better detection results. Furthermore, by reducing the number of sensors participating in group detection to only the essential ones, communication bandwidth is enhanced since the non-essential sensors do not have to send results to the central processing system. In addition, the released sensor resources can be used to detect a different incumbent signal or examine a different band for incumbents.

[0030] Simulations were performed to demonstrate the effect of various embodiments of the present invention on the detection performance. The same setup discussed above with respect to FIG. 2 was used, and the simulations started with ten nodes available for collaboration all of which were inside the contour 206, 306. The parameter α in EQ 1 was set to α=0.8. Detection thresholds were used as one type of detection criteria and were set so that the probability of false alarm of group detection with the 10 nodes is 10%. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out where the number of non-contributing nodes (outside the contour 206, 306) was incrementally increased from 0 to 10. FIG. 5 shows the probability of detection for distributed detection as a function of the number of non-contributing sensors located outside the contour 206, 306 in FIG. 2 (out of ten nodes). The first curve 502 corresponds to the case where distributed detection is achieved using all the ten available nodes. The detection results when the various embodiments of the present invention are used to narrow down the sensors participating in distributed sensing are shown by the second line 504. As the number of sensors inside the contour decreases, the detection performance decreases (lower diversity gain). However, identifying and using a subset of sensors for collaborative detection utilizing the various embodiments of the present invention greatly improves the overall performance that is achieved with distributed sensing. For example for the case when there are only three contributing nodes inside the contour 206, 306 and seven outside, the probability of group detection goes from 50% to 70% when one or more embodiments of the present invention are applied.

[0031] Another manifestation of the problem discussed above (where a portion of the participating nodes minimally contribute to the group detection process) exists in the presence of fading environments where the signal received by the sensing nodes experiences different levels of shadowing even for sensors inside the contour. If a portion of the sensing nodes experience harsh fading conditions, by identifying and removing them from group detections discussed above, one can improve the performance of the group detection process. The inventors performed simulations for operation in a log-normal channel with shadowing standard deviation σ = 10 dB. The average signal to noise ratio at the sensors was set to SNR = -20dB. The total number of participating sensors was varied from 1 to 10, the total number of samples used per node per decision was set to m = 1000, and α = .8 to form equation 1. The system probability of false alarm was kept at 10% for all simulations. The first curve 602 in Fig. 6 shows the performance when all available nodes are used in the group decision process. The detection results with the various embodiments of the present invention are shown by the second line 604. It is apparent that eliminating (e.g., de-allocating) heavily faded nodes from the collaborative detection process improves the overall group detection performance. An interesting fact from this scenario is that when there are 10 sensors participating, on average only 2.5 sensors are picked to contribute to distributed detection using EQ 1, and yet produce better results.

Wireless Device



[0032] FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating a detailed view of a wireless device 114 according to an embodiment of the present invention. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with wireless communication devices. To simplify the present description, only that portion of a wireless communication device that is relevant to the present invention is discussed. The wireless device 114 operates under the control of a device controller/processor 702, that controls the sending and receiving of wireless communication signals. In receive mode, the device controller 702 electrically couples an antenna 704 through a transmit/receive switch 706 to a receiver 708. The receiver 708 decodes the received signals and provides those decoded signals to the device controller 702.

[0033] In transmit mode, the device controller 702 electrically couples the antenna 704, through the transmit/receive switch 706, to a transmitter 710. It should be noted that in an embodiment, the receiver 708 and the transmitter 710 are a dual mode receiver and a dual mode transmitter for receiving/transmitting over various access networks providing different air interface types. In another embodiment a separate receiver and transmitter is used for each of type of air interface. A memory 712 includes, among other things, the spectrum sensing engine 130, which has been discussed above. The wireless device 114, also includes non-volatile storage memory 714 for storing, for example, an application waiting to be executed (not shown) on the wireless device 114.

Information Processing System



[0034] FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating a more detailed view of an information processing system 138. The information processing system 138 is based upon a suitably configured processing system adapted to implement an embodiment of the present invention. For example, a personal computer, workstation, or the like, may be used. The information processing system 138 includes a computer 802. The computer 802 has a CPU processor 804 that is connected to a main memory 806, a mass storage interface 808, and communication network adapter hardware 816. A system bus 814 interconnects these system components.

[0035] The main memory 806 includes the cognitive engine 140, the dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142, and the device performance data 144, which have been discussed in greater detail above. Also, the cognitive engine 140 and the dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142 can also reside within a sensing device 114, 116, 118 as well. Although illustrated as concurrently resident in the main memory 806, it is clear that respective components of the main memory 806 are not required to be completely resident in the main memory 806 at all times or even at the same time. Furthermore, one or more of these components can be implemented as hardware. The mass storage interface 808 can store data on a hard-drive or media such as a CD or DVD. The communication network adapter hardware 816, in an embodiment, is used to provide an interface to the communication network 106, 108. Certain embodiments of the present invention are able to be adapted to work with any data communications links, including present day analog and/or digital techniques or via a future networking mechanism.

Process Of Dynamically Updating Spectrum Sensor Allocation



[0036] FIG. 9 is an operational flow diagram illustrating a process of dynamically updating spectrum sensor allocation to a spectrum sensing group according to an embodiment of the present invention. The operational flow diagram of FIG. 9 begins at step 902 and flows directly to step 904. The cognitive engine 140, at step 904, identifies a set of wireless devices currently allocated to a spectrum sensing group. Each wireless device in the set performs spectrum sensing on one or more wireless communication channels. The cognitive engine 140, at step 906, analyzes spectrum sensing performance data 144 for each such wireless device in the set. The spectrum sensing performance data 144 indicates wireless communication performance of a wireless device associated with the spectrum sensing performance data with respect to detecting a transmitted signal on the one or more communication channels. The dynamic spectrum sensor allocator 142, at step 908, then dynamically adjusts wireless device membership of the set of wireless devices allocated to the spectrum sensing group based on the analyzing. The control flow then exits at step 910.


Claims

1. A method, with a wireless communication controller (702), for dynamically updating spectrum sensing groups in a wireless communication system, the method comprising:

identifying (904) a set of wireless devices currently allocated to a spectrum sensing group, wherein each wireless device in the set performs spectrum sensing on one or more wireless communication channels;

analyzing (906), with each such wireless device in the set, spectrum sensing performance data that indicates wireless communication performance of a wireless device associated with the spectrum sensing performance data with respect to detecting a transmitted signal on the one or more communication channels, wherein the analyzing (906) further comprises observing a time series of the spectrum sensing performance data for each wireless device in the set for a given time interval and constructing an estimate of a probability of detection over time for each wireless device in the set based on observing the time series associated therewith; and

dynamically adjusting (908) wireless device membership of the set of wireless devices allocated to the spectrum sensing group based on the analyzing (906).


 
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

updating a detection criteria associated with each wireless device in the set of wireless devices in which wireless device membership has been dynamically adjusted (908), wherein the detection criteria indicates whether one of an active signal and noise is on a channel.


 
3. The method of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the dynamically adjusting (908) further comprises:

dynamically de-allocating at least one wireless device from the spectrum sensing group.


 
4. The method of claim 3, further comprising:

allocating the at least one wireless device that has been de-allocated to perform spectrum sensing on a different wireless communication channel than the one or more wireless communication channels.


 
5. The method of any previous claim, wherein the dynamically adjusting (908) further comprises:

dynamically adding at least one wireless device to the spectrum sensing group.


 
6. A wireless device (114) for dynamically updating spectrum sensing groups in a wireless communication system, the wireless device comprising:

a wireless transmitter (710);

a wireless receiver (708);

a memory (712);

a processor (702) communicatively coupled to the memory (712); and

a cognitive engine (130) communicatively coupled to the memory and the processor, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is adapted to:

identify (904) a set of wireless devices currently allocated to a spectrum sensing group, wherein each wireless device in the set performs spectrum sensing on one or more wireless communication channels;

analyze (906), from each such wireless device in the set, spectrum sensing performance data that indicates wireless communication performance of a wireless device associated with the spectrum sensing performance data with respect to detecting a transmitted signal on the one or more communication channels, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is further adapted to analyze (906) by observing a time series of the spectrum sensing performance data for each wireless device in the set for a given time interval and by constructing an estimate of a probability of detection over time for each wireless device in the set based on observing the time series associated therewith; and

dynamically adjust (908) wireless device membership of the set of wireless devices allocated to the spectrum sensing group based on the analyzing (906).


 
7. The wireless device of claim 6, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is further adapted to dynamically adjust (908) by:

dynamically de-allocating at least one wireless device from the spectrum sensing group.


 
8. The wireless device of claim 7, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is further adapted to:

allocate the at least one wireless device that has been de-allocated to perform spectrum sensing on a different wireless communication channel than the one or more wireless communication channels.


 
9. The wireless device of any of claims 6-8, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is further adapted to dynamically adjust (908) by:

dynamically adding at least one wireless device to the spectrum sensing group.


 
10. The wireless device of any of claims 6-9, wherein the cognitive engine (130) is further adapted to:

update a detection criteria associated with each wireless device in the set of wireless devices in which wireless device membership has been dynamically adjusted (908), wherein the detection criteria indicates whether one of an active signal and noise is on a channel, based on a signal detection algorithm.


 
11. An information processing system (138) for dynamically updating spectrum sensing groups in a wireless communication system (100), comprising:

a communication network adapter (816);

a memory (806);

a processor (804) communicatively coupled to the memory and the communication network adapter; and

a cognitive engine (140)communicatively coupled to the memory, the processor, and the communication network adapter, wherein the cognitive engine is adapted to:

identify (904) a set of wireless devices currently allocated to a spectrum sensing group, wherein each wireless device in the set performs spectrum sensing on one or more wireless communication channels;

analyze (906), from each such wireless device in the set, spectrum sensing performance data that indicates wireless communication performance of a wireless device associated with the spectrum sensing performance data with respect to detecting a transmitted signal on the one or more communication channels, wherein the cognitive engine is further adapted to analyze (906) by observing a time series of the spectrum sensing performance data for each wireless device in the set for a given time interval and constructing an estimate of a probability of detection over time for each wireless device in the set based on observing the time series set associated therewith; and

dynamically adjust (908) wireless device membership of the set of wireless devices allocated to the spectrum sensing group based on the analyzing (906).


 
12. The information processing system of claim 11, wherein the cognitive engine (140) is further adapted to dynamically adjust (908) by:

adaptively eliminate at least one wireless device from the spectrum sensing group.


 
13. The information processing system of claim 12, wherein the cognitive engine is further adapted to:

allocate the at least one wireless device that has been adaptively eliminated to perform spectrum sensing on a different wireless communication channel than the one or more wireless communication channels.


 
14. The information processing system of any of claims 11-13, wherein the cognitive engine (140) is further adapted to dynamically adjust (908) by:

dynamically adding at least one wireless device to the spectrum sensing group.


 
15. The information processing system of any of claims 11-14, wherein the cognitive engine (140) is further adapted to:

update a detection criterion associated with each wireless device in the set of wireless devices in which wireless device membership has been dynamically adjusted (908), wherein the detection criterion indicates whether one of an active signal and noise is on a channel based on an energy estimation.


 


Ansprüche

1. Verfahren, mit einer drahtlosen Kommunikationsteuerung (702), zur dynamischen Aktualisierung von Spektrumsabtastgruppen in einem drahtlosen Kommunikationssystem, wobei das Verfahren umfasst:

Identifizierung (904) eines Satzes von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, die aktuell einer Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, wobei jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz eine Spektrumsabtastung auf einem oder mehreren Kommunikationskanälen durchführt;

Analyse (906), mit jeder solchen drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz, von Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten, die eine drahtlose Kommunikationsleistung einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung anzeigt, die mit den Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten bezüglich einer Detektion eines übertragenen Signals auf dem einen oder den mehreren Kommunikationskanälen verknüpft ist, wobei die Analyse (906) weiterhin umfasst: Beobachtung einer Zeitfolge der Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz über ein gegebenes Zeitintervall und Konstruktion eines Schätzwertes einer Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Detektion über die Zeit für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz, basierend auf einer Beobachtung der damit verknüpften Zeitfolge; und

dynamische Justierung (908) der Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, die der Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, basierend auf der Analyse (906).


 
2. Verfahren gemäß Anspruch 1, das weiterhin umfasst:

Aktualisierung eines Detektionskriteriums, das mit jeder drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, in dem die Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung dynamisch justiert worden ist (908), verknüpft ist, wobei das Detektionskriterium anzeigt, ob sich entweder ein aktives Signal oder Rauschen auf einem Kanal befindet.


 
3. Verfahren gemäß Anspruch 1 oder Anspruch 2, wobei die dynamische Justierung (908) weiterhin umfasst:

dynamische Freigabe mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung aus der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
4. Verfahren gemäß Anspruch 3, das weiterhin umfasst:

Zuordnung der mindestens einen drahtlosen Vorrichtung, die freigegeben worden ist, zur Durchführung einer Spektrumsabtastung auf einem anderen drahtlosen Kommunikationskanal als dem einen oder den mehreren Kommunikationskanälen.


 
5. Verfahren gemäß einem der vorangehenden Ansprüche, wobei die dynamische Justierung (908) weiterhin umfasst:

dynamisches Hinzufügen mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
6. Drahtlose Vorrichtung (114) zur dynamischen Aktualisierung von Spektrumsabtastgruppen in einem drahtlosen Kommunikationssystem, wobei die drahtlose Vorrichtung umfasst:

einen drahtlosen Sender (710);

einen drahtlosen Empfänger (708);

einen Speicher (712);

einen Prozessor (702), der kommunikativ an den Speicher (712) gekoppelt ist; und

eine Cognitive Engine (130), die kommunikativ an den Speicher und den Prozessor gekoppelt ist, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) geeignet ist:

einen Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen zu identifizieren (904), die aktuell einer Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, wobei jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz eine Abtastung auf einem oder mehreren Kommunikationskanälen durchführt;

von jeder solchen drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten zu analysieren (906), die eine drahtlose Kommunikationsleistung einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung anzeigen, die mit den Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten bezüglich einer Detektion eines übertragenen Signals auf dem einen oder den mehreren Kommunikationskanälen verknüpft ist, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) weiterhin geeignet ist, durch Beobachtung einer Zeitfolge der Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz über ein gegebenes Zeitintervall und durch Konstruktion eines Schätzwertes einer Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Detektion über die Zeit für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz zu analysieren (906), basierend auf einer Beobachtung der damit verknüpften Zeitfolge; und

die Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, die der Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, dynamisch zu justieren (908), basierend auf der Analyse (906).


 
7. Drahtlose Vorrichtung gemäß Anspruch 6, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) weiterhin geeignet ist, dynamisch zu justieren (908), durch:

eine dynamische Freigabe mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung aus der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
8. Drahtlose Vorrichtung gemäß Anspruch 7, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) weiterhin geeignet ist:

mindestens eine drahtlose Vorrichtung, die freigegeben worden ist, zur Durchführung einer Spektrumsabtastung auf einem anderen drahtlosen Kommunikationskanal als dem einen oder den mehreren drahtlosen Kommunikationskanälen zuzuordnen,.


 
9. Drahtlose Vorrichtung gemäß einem der Ansprüche 6 - 8, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) weiterhin geeignet ist, dynamisch zu justieren (908), durch:

ein dynamisches Hinzufügen mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
10. Drahtlose Vorrichtung gemäß einem der Ansprüche 6 - 9, wobei die Cognitive Engine (130) weiterhin geeignet ist:

ein Detektionskriterium zu aktualisieren, das mit jeder drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen verknüpft ist, in dem die Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung dynamisch justiert (908) worden ist, wobei das Detektionskriterium anzeigt, ob sich ein aktives Signal oder Rauschen auf dem Kanal befindet, basierend auf einem Signaldetektionsalgorithmus.


 
11. Informationsverarbeitungssystem (138) zur dynamischen Aktualisierung von Spektrumsabtastgruppen in einem drahtlosen Kommunikationssystem (100), das umfasst:

einen Kommunikationsnetzwerkadapter (816);

einen Speicher (806);

einen Prozessor (804), der kommunikativ an den Speicher und den Kommunikationsnetzwerkadapter gekoppelt ist; und

eine Cognitive Engine (140), die kommunikativ an den Speicher, den Prozessor und den Kommunikationsnetzwerkadapter gekoppelt ist, wobei die Cognitive Engine geeignet ist:

einen Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen zu identifizieren (904), die aktuell einer Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, wobei jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz eine Spektrumsabtastung auf einem oder mehreren drahtlosen Kommunikationskanälen durchführt;

von jeder solchen drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten zu analysieren (906), die eine drahtlose Kommunikationsleistung einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung anzeigt, die mit den Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten bezüglich einer Detektion eines übertragenen Signals auf dem einen oder den mehreren Kommunikationskanälen verknüpft ist, wobei die Cognitive Engine weiterhin geeignet ist, durch eine Beobachtung einer Zeitfolge der Spektrumsabtastungsleistungsdaten für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz über ein gegebenes Zeitintervall und Konstruktion eines Schätzwertes einer Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Detektion über die Zeit für jede drahtlose Vorrichtung in dem Satz zu analysieren (906), basierend auf einer Beobachtung der damit verknüpften Zeitfolge; und

die Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, die der Spektrumsabtastgruppe zugeordnet sind, dynamisch zu justieren (908), basierend auf der Analyse (906).


 
12. Informationsverarbeitungssystem gemäß Anspruch 11, wobei die Cognitive Engine (140) weiterhin geeignet ist, dynamisch zu justieren (908), durch:

ein adaptives Entfernen mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung aus der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
13. Informationsverarbeitungssystem gemäß Anspruch 12, wobei die Cognitive Engine weiterhin geeignet ist:

die mindestens eine drahtlose Vorrichtung, die adaptiv entfernt worden ist, zur Durchführung einer Spektrumsabtastung auf einem anderen drahtlosen Kommunikationskanal als dem einen oder den mehreren drahtlosen Kommunikationskanälen zuzuordnen.


 
14. Informationsverarbeitungssystem gemäß einem der Ansprüche 11 - 13, wobei die Cognitive Engine (140) weiterhin geeignet ist, dynamisch zu justieren (908), durch:

ein dynamisches Hinzufügen mindestens einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung zu der Spektrumsabtastgruppe.


 
15. Informationsverarbeitungssystem gemäß einem der Ansprüche 11 - 14, wobei die Cognitive Engine (140) weiterhin geeignet ist:

ein Detektionskriterium zu aktualisieren, das mit jeder drahtlosen Vorrichtung in dem Satz von drahtlosen Vorrichtungen, in dem die Zugehörigkeit einer drahtlosen Vorrichtung dynamisch justiert worden ist (908), verknüpft ist, wobei das Detektionskriterium anzeigt, ob sich entweder ein aktives Signal oder Rauschen auf einem Kanal befindet, basierend auf einer Energieabschätzung.


 


Revendications

1. Procédé, avec un contrôleur de communication sans fil (702), pour la mise à jour dynamique de groupes de détection de spectre dans un système de communication sans fil, le procédé comprenant :

l'identification (904) d'un ensemble de dispositifs sans fil actuellement alloués à un groupe de détection de spectre, où chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble exécute une détection de spectre sur un ou plusieurs canaux de communication sans fil ;

l'analyse (906), avec chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble, de données de performance de détection de spectre qui indiquent une performance de communication sans fil d'un dispositif sans fil associé aux données de performance de détection de spectre par rapport à la détection d'un signal transmis sur le ou les canaux de communication, l'analyse (906) comprenant en outre l'observation d'une série temporelle des données de performance de détection de spectre pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble pendant un intervalle de temps donné et la construction d'une estimation d'une probabilité de détection dans le temps pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble à partir d'une observation de la série temporelle associée à celui-ci ; et

l'ajustement dynamique (908) d'une appartenance du dispositif sans fil à l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil alloué au groupe de détection de spectre, sur la base de l'analyse (906).


 
2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre :

la mise à jour d'un critère de détection associé à chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil dans lequel l'appartenance du dispositif sans fil a été ajustée de manière dynamique (908), le critère de détection indiquant si l'un d'un signal actif et d'un bruit est présent sur un canal.


 
3. Procédé selon la revendication 1 ou la revendication 2, dans lequel l'ajustement dynamique (908) comprend en outre :

la désallocation dynamique d'au moins un dispositif sans fil du groupe de détection de spectre.


 
4. Procédé selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :

l'allocation de l'au moins un dispositif sans fil qui a été désalloué pour l'exécution d'une détection de spectre sur un canal de communication sans fil différent du ou des canaux de communication sans fil.


 
5. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel l'ajustement dynamique (908) comprend en outre :

l'ajout dynamique d'au moins un dispositif sans fil au groupe de détection de spectre.


 
6. Dispositif sans fil (114) pour la mise à jour dynamique de groupes de détection de spectre dans un système de communication sans fil, le dispositif sans fil comprenant :

un émetteur sans fil (710) ;

un récepteur sans fil (708) ;

une mémoire (712) ;

un processeur (702) couplé en communication avec la mémoire (712) ; et

un moteur cognitif (130) couplé en communication avec la mémoire et le processeur, le moteur cognitif (130) étant adapté pour :

identifier (904) un ensemble de dispositifs sans fil actuellement alloués à un groupe de détection de spectre, où chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble effectue une détection de spectre sur un ou plusieurs canaux de communication sans fil ;

analyser (906), depuis chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble, des données de performance de détection de spectre qui indiquent une performance de communication sans fil d'un dispositif sans fil associé aux données de performance de détection de spectre par rapport à la détection d'un signal transmis sur le ou les canaux de communication, le moteur cognitif (130) étant en outre adapté pour effectuer l'analyse (906) par observation d'une série temporelle des données de performance de détection de spectre pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble pendant un intervalle de temps donné et construction d'une estimation d'une probabilité de détection dans le temps pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble à partir d'une observation de la série temporelle associée à celui-ci ; et

effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) d'une appartenance du dispositif sans fil à l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil alloué au groupe de détection de spectre, sur la base de l'analyse (906).


 
7. Dispositif sans fil selon la revendication 6, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (130) est en outre adapté pour effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) par :

désallocation dynamique d'au moins un dispositif sans fil du groupe de détection de spectre.


 
8. Dispositif sans fil selon la revendication 7, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (130) est en outre adapté pour :

allouer l'au moins un dispositif sans fil qui a été désalloué pour l'exécution d'une détection de spectre sur un canal de communication sans fil différent du ou des canaux de communication sans fil.


 
9. Dispositif sans fil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 6 à 8, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (130) est en outre adapté pour effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) par :

ajout dynamique d'au moins un dispositif sans fil au groupe de détection de spectre.


 
10. Dispositif sans fil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 6 à 9, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (130) est en outre adapté pour :

mettre à jour un critère de détection associé à chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil dans lequel l'appartenance du dispositif sans fil a été ajustée de manière dynamique (908), le critère de détection indiquant si l'un d'un signal actif et d'un bruit est présent sur un canal, sur la base d'un algorithme de détection de signal.


 
11. Système de traitement d'informations (138) pour la mise à jour dynamique de groupes de détection de spectre dans un système de communication sans fil (100), comprenant :

un adaptateur de réseau de communication (816) ;

une mémoire (806) ;

un processeur (804) couplé en communication avec la mémoire et l'adaptateur de réseau de communication ; et

un moteur cognitif (140) couplé en communication avec la mémoire, le processeur et l'adaptateur de réseau de communication, le moteur cognitif étant adapté pour :

identifier (904) un ensemble de dispositifs sans fil actuellement alloués à un groupe de détection de spectre, où chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble effectue une détection de spectre sur un ou plusieurs canaux de communication sans fil ;

analyser (906), depuis chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble, des données de performance de détection de spectre qui indiquent une performance de communication sans fil d'un dispositif sans fil associé aux données de performance de détection de spectre par rapport à la détection d'un signal transmis sur le ou les canaux de communication, le moteur cognitif étant en outre adapté pour effectuer l'analyse (906) par observation d'une série temporelle des données de performance de détection de spectre pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble pendant un intervalle de temps donné et construction d'une estimation d'une probabilité de détection dans le temps pour chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble à partir d'une observation de la série temporelle associée à celui-ci ; et

effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) d'une appartenance du dispositif sans fil à l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil alloué au groupe de détection de spectre en fonction de l'analyse (906).


 
12. Système de traitement d'informations selon la revendication 11, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (140) est en outre adapté pour effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) par :

élimination adaptative d'au moins un dispositif sans fil du groupe de détection de spectre.


 
13. Système de traitement d'informations selon la revendication 12, dans lequel le moteur cognitif est en outre adapté pour :

allouer l'au moins un dispositif sans fil qui a été éliminé de manière adaptative pour l'exécution d'une détection de spectre sur un canal de communication sans fil différent du ou des canaux de communication sans fil.


 
14. Système de traitement d'informations selon l'une quelconque des revendications 11 à 13, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (140) est en outre adapté pour effectuer un ajustement dynamique (908) par :

ajout dynamique d'au moins un dispositif sans fil au groupe de détection de spectre.


 
15. Système de traitement d'informations selon l'une quelconque des revendications 11 à 14, dans lequel le moteur cognitif (140) est en outre adapté pour :

mettre à jour un critère de détection associé à chaque dispositif sans fil de l'ensemble de dispositifs sans fil dans lequel l'appartenance du dispositif sans fil a été ajustée de manière dynamique (908), le critère de détection indiquant si l'un d'un signal actif et d'un bruit est présent sur un canal, sur la base d'une estimation d'énergie.


 




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Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description