(19)
(11)EP 2 506 646 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
01.05.2019 Bulletin 2019/18

(21)Application number: 12173046.9

(22)Date of filing:  27.01.2009
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H04W 72/04(2009.01)
H04W 72/08(2009.01)
H04W 52/24(2009.01)

(54)

Interference mitigation for control channels in a wireless communication network

Interferenzabschwächung für Steuerungskanäle in einem drahtlosen Kommunikationsnetzwerk

Réduction des interférences pour des canaux de commande dans un réseau de communication sans fil


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO SE SI SK TR

(30)Priority: 01.02.2008 US 25644 P
11.07.2008 US 80039 P
26.01.2009 US 359989

(43)Date of publication of application:
03.10.2012 Bulletin 2012/40

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
09708426.3 / 2241123

(73)Proprietor: Qualcomm Incorporated
San Diego, CA 92121-1714 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • Palanki, Ravi
    San Diego, CA 92121-1714 (US)
  • Khandekar, Aamod D.
    San Diego, CA 92121-1714 (US)
  • Bhushan, Naga
    San Diego, CA 92121-1714 (US)
  • Agrawal, Avneesh
    San Diego, CA 92121-1714 (US)

(74)Representative: Dunlop, Hugh Christopher et al
Maucher Jenkins 26 Caxton Street
London SW1H 0RJ
London SW1H 0RJ (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-2006/099546
US-A1- 2006 019 694
US-A1- 2005 277 425
US-A1- 2008 008 147
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    BACKGROUND


    I. Field



    [0001] The present disclosure relates generally to communication, and more specifically to techniques for mitigating interference in a wireless communication network.

    II. Background



    [0002] Wireless communication networks are widely deployed to provide various communication content such as voice, video, packet data, messaging, broadcast, etc. These wireless networks may be multiple-access networks capable of supporting multiple users by sharing the available network resources. Examples of such multiple- access networks include Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) networks, Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) networks, Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) networks, Orthogonal FDMA (OFDMA) networks, and Single-Carrier FDMA (SC-FDMA) networks.

    [0003] A wireless communication network may include a number of base stations that can support communication for a number of user equipments (UEs). A UE may communicate with a base station via the downlink and uplink. The downlink (or forward link) refers to the communication link from the base station to the UE, and the uplink (or reverse link) refers to the communication link from the UE to the base station.

    [0004] A base station may transmit data and control channels on the downlink to UEs and may receive data and control channels on the uplink from the UEs. On the downlink, a transmission from the base station may observe interference due to transmissions from neighbor base stations. On the uplink, a transmission from a UE may observe interference due to transmissions from other UEs communicating with the neighbor base stations. For both the downlink and uplink, the interference due to interfering base stations and interfering UEs may degrade performance.

    [0005] There is therefore a need in the art for techniques to mitigate interference in a wireless network.

    [0006] US 2006/019694 A1 (Sutivong Arak et al) 26 January 2006, relates to power control for a wireless communication system. WO 2006/099546 A1 (QUALCOMM INC) 21 September 2006, relates to use of information from multiple sectors for power control in a wireless terminal. US 2008/008147 A1 (Nakayama Satoshi) 10 January 2008, relates to a wireless station, a wireless communication control method, and a computer-readable medium having a wireless communication control program that prevents radio interference. US 2005/277425 A1 (Niemela Kari et al) 15 December 2005, relates to a method of controlling data transmission in a radio system, to a radio system, to a controller and to a base station.

    SUMMARY



    [0007] Techniques for mitigating interference on control channels in a wireless communication network are described herein. In an aspect, high interference on radio resources (e.g., time-frequency resources) used for a control channel may be mitigated by sending a request to reduce interference to one or more interfering stations. Each interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources, which may then allow the control channel to observe less interference.

    [0008] In one design of interference mitigation on the downlink, a UE may detect high interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired base station. The UE may generate a request to reduce interference on the radio resources used for the control channel and may send the request to an interfering base station, which may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources. The UE may receive the control channel on the radio resources from the desired base station and may observe less interference from the interfering base station.

    [0009] Interference mitigation on the uplink may occur in similar manner, as described below. Various aspects and features of the disclosure are also described in further detail below.

    [0010] According to the present invention, wireless communication methods as set forth in claims 1 and 10 and wireless communication apparatuses as set forth in claims 7 and 11 and computer program product as set forth in claim 13 are provided. Embodiments of the invention are claimed in the dependent claims.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0011] 

    FIG. 1 shows a wireless communication network.

    FIGS. 2A and 2B show example transport channels and physical channels.

    FIG. 3 shows example transmissions of data and control channels.

    FIG. 4 shows control channel reception with interference mitigation.

    FIG. 5 shows a process for sending a reduce interference request.

    FIG. 6 shows an apparatus for sending a reduce interference request.

    FIG. 7 shows a process for receiving a reduce interference request.

    FIG. 8 shows an apparatus for receiving a reduce interference request.

    FIG. 9 shows a block diagram of a base station and a UE.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0012] The techniques described herein may be used for various wireless communication networks such as CDMA, TDMA, FDMA, OFDMA, SC-FDMA and other networks. The terms "network" and "system" are often used interchangeably. A CDMA network may implement a radio technology such as Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (UTRA), cdma2000, etc. UTRA includes Wideband CDMA (WCDMA) and other variants of CDMA. cdma2000 covers IS-2000, IS-95 and IS-856 standards. A TDMA network may implement a radio technology such as Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). An OFDMA network may implement a radio technology such as Evolved UTRA (E-UTRA), Ultra Mobile Broadband (UMB), IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX), IEEE 802.20, Flash-OFDM®, etc. UTRA and E-UTRA are part of Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS). 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) is an upcoming release of UMTS that uses E-UTRA, which employs OFDMA on the downlink and SC-FDMA on the uplink. UTRA, E-UTRA, UMTS, LTE and GSM are described in documents from an organization named "3rd Generation Partnership Project" (3GPP). cdma2000 and UMB are described in documents from an organization named "3rd Generation Partnership Project 2" (3GPP2). The techniques described herein may be used for the wireless networks and radio technologies mentioned above as well as other wireless networks and radio technologies. For clarity, certain aspects of the techniques are described below for LTE, and LTE terminology is used in much of the description below.

    [0013] FIG. 1 shows a wireless communication network 100, which may be an LTE network or some other network. Wireless network 100 may include a number of evolved Node Bs (eNBs) 110 and other network entities. An eNB may be a station that communicates with the UEs and may also be referred to as a base station, a Node B, an access point, etc. Each eNB may provide communication coverage for a particular geographic area. The term "cell" can refer to a coverage area of an eNB and/or an eNB subsystem serving this coverage area, depending on the context in which the term is used.

    [0014] An eNB may provide communication coverage for a macro cell, a pico cell, a femto cell, and/or other types of cell. A macro cell may cover a relatively large geographic area (e.g., several kilometers in radius) and may allow unrestricted access by UEs with service subscription. A pico cell may cover a relatively small geographic area and may allow unrestricted access by UEs with service subscription. A femto cell may cover a relatively small geographic area (e.g., a home) and may allow restricted access by UEs having association with the femto cell, e.g., UEs belonging to a closed subscriber group (CSG). The CSG may include UEs for users in a home, UEs for users subscribing to a special service plan offered by a network operator, etc. An cNB for a macro cell may be referred to as a macro eNB. An eNB for a pico cell may be referred to as a pico eNB. An eNB for a femto cell may be referred to as a femto eNB or a home eNB.

    [0015] Wireless network 100 may also include relay stations. A relay station is a station that receives a transmission of data and/or other information from an upstream station and sends a transmission of the data and/or other information to a downstream station. The upstream station may be an eNB, another relay station, or a UE. The downstream station may be a UE, another relay station, or an eNB.

    [0016] A network controller 130 may couple to a set of eNBs and provide coordination and control for these eNBs. Network controller 130 may be a single network entity or a collection of network entities. Network controller 130 may communicate with eNBs 110 via a backhaul. eNBs 110 may also communicate with one another, e.g., directly or indirectly via wireless or wireline backhaul.

    [0017] Wireless network 100 may be a homogeneous network that includes only macro eNBs. Wireless network 100 may also be a heterogeneous network that includes different types of eNBs, e.g., macro eNBs, pico eNBs, home eNBs, relays, etc. The techniques described herein may be used for homogeneous and heterogeneous networks.

    [0018] UEs 120 may be dispersed throughout wireless network 100, and each UE may be stationary or mobile. A UE may also be referred to as a mobile station, a terminal, an access terminal, a subscriber unit, a station, etc. A UE may be a cellular phone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a wireless modem, a wireless communication device, a handheld device, a laptop computer, a cordless phone, a wireless local loop (WLL) station, etc. A UE may be able to communicate with macro eNBs, pico eNBs, femto eNBs, and/or other types of eNBs. In FIG. 1, a solid line with double arrows indicates desired transmissions between a UE and an eNB. A dashed line with double arrows indicates interfering transmissions between a UE and an eNB. In the description herein, a station may be a base station/eNB, a UE, or a relay station.

    [0019] Wireless network 100 may utilize orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or single-carrier frequency division multiplexing (SC-FDM) for each of the downlink and uplink. OFDM and SC-FDM partition the system bandwidth into multiple (K) orthogonal subcarriers, which are also commonly referred to as tones, bins, etc. Each subcarrier may be modulated with data. In general, modulation symbols are sent in the frequency domain with OFDM and in the time domain with SC-FDM. The spacing between adjacent subcarriers may be fixed, and the total number of subcarriers (K) may be dependent on the system bandwidth. For example, K may be equal to 128, 256, 512, 1024 or 2048 for system bandwidth of 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 MHz, respectively.

    [0020] For each link, the available time-frequency resources may be partitioned into resource blocks. Each resource block may cover S subcarriers in L symbol periods, e.g., S = 12 subcarriers in L = 7 symbol periods for a normal cyclic prefix in LTE. The available resource blocks may be used to send different channels.

    [0021] Wireless network 100 may support a set of transport channels and a set of physical channels for each link. For example, in LTE, the transport channels for the downlink may include:
    • Broadcast Channel (BCH) - carry system information,
    • Paging Channel (PCH) - carry pages for UEs,
    • Multicast Channel (MCH) - carry multicast information, and
    • Downlink Shared Channel (DL-SCH) - carry traffic data sent to UEs.


    [0022] The transport channels for the uplink in LTE may include:
    • Random Access Channel (RACH) - carry random access preambles sent by UEs to access the network, and
    • Uplink Shared Channel (UL-SCH) - carry traffic data sent by UEs.


    [0023] The physical channels for the downlink in LTE may include:
    • Physical broadcast channel (PBCH) - carry the BCH,
    • Physical multicast channel (PMCH) - carry the MCH,
    • Physical downlink control channel (PDCCH) - carry control information for the DL-SCH and PCH and uplink scheduling grants, and
    • Physical downlink shared channel (PDSCH) - carry the DL-SCH and PCH.


    [0024] The physical channels for the uplink in LTE may include:
    • Physical random access channel (PRACH) - carry the RACH,
    • Physical uplink control channel (PUCCH) - carry scheduling requests, CQI reports, and ACK information for data transmission on the downlink, and
    • Physical uplink shared channel (PUSCH) - carry the UL-SCH and may also carry inband CQI and ACK information.


    [0025] FIG. 2A shows a mapping of downlink transport channels to downlink physical channels in LTE. The BCH may be mapped to the PBCH, the MCH may be mapped to the PMCH, and the PCH and DL-SCH may be mapped to the PDSCH.

    [0026] FIG. 2B shows a mapping of uplink transport channels to uplink physical channels in LTE. The RACH may be mapped to the PRACH, and the UL-SCH may be mapped to the PUSCH.

    [0027] In LTE, the BCH, PBCH, PCH, RACH, PRACH, PDCCH and PUCCH may be considered as control channels. The DL-SCH, PDSCH, UL-SCH, PUSCH, MCH and PMCH may be considered as data channels. The DL-SCH and PDSCH may also be used to carry random access responses and may be considered as control channels when carrying these random access responses.

    [0028] FIGS. 2A and 2B show some transport channels and physical channels that may be used for the downlink and uplink. Other transport channels and physical channels may also be used for each link.

    [0029] In general, wireless network 100 may support one or more control channels for the downlink and one or more control channels for the uplink. A control channel is a channel carrying control information, which may comprise any information other than traffic data. Control information may include scheduling information, system information, broadcast information, paging information, etc. Control information may also be referred to as overhead information, signaling, etc. A control channel may be a physical channel (e.g., any of the downlink and uplink physical channels listed above possibly except for the PDSCH and PUSCH), a transport channel (e.g., any of the downlink and uplink transport channels listed above possibly except for the DL-SCH and UL-SCH), or some other type of channel. A control channel may also be referred to as a control transmission, a control signal, etc.

    [0030] FIG. 3 shows example transmissions of data and control channels on the downlink and uplink. For each station, the horizontal axis may represent time, and the vertical axis may represent frequency. The transmission timeline for each link may be partitioned into units of subframes. Each subframe may have a predetermined duration, e.g., 1 millisecond (ms).

    [0031] An eNB may transmit one or more control channels on the downlink. Each control channel may be transmitted on radio resources allocated for that control channel. In general, radio resources may be quantified by time, frequency, code, transmit power, etc. For example, radio resources may be quantified by resource blocks in LTE. Each control channel may be transmitted in each subframe or only certain subframes. Each control channel may also be transmitted at a fixed location in each subframe in which that control channel is transmitted or at different locations in different subframes. In the example shown in FIG. 3, the eNB transmits control channel #1 at a fixed location in each subframe and transmits control channel #2 at different locations in some subframes. The UEs and possibly other eNBs may know the radio resources used for each control channel transmitted by the eNB. The eNB may also transmit traffic data on radio resources not used for the control channels.

    [0032] A UE may also transmit one or more control channels on the uplink. Each control channel may be transmitted in each subframe or only certain subframes and may be transmitted at a fixed location or different locations. The eNBs and possibly other UEs may know the radio resources used for each control channel transmitted by the UE. The UE may also transmit traffic data on assigned radio resources whenever the UE is scheduled for data transmission.

    [0033] Wireless network 100 may include different types of cNBs, e.g., macro eNBs, pico eNBs, femto eNBs, etc. These different types of eNBs may transmit at different power levels, have different coverage areas, and have different impact on interference in wireless network 100. For example, macro eNBs may have a high transmit power level (e.g., 20 Watts) whereas pico and femto eNBs may have a low transmit power level (e.g., 1 Watt).

    [0034] A UE may be within the coverage of multiple eNBs. One of these eNBs may be selected to serve the UE. The serving eNB may be selected based on various criteria such as geometry, pathloss, etc. Geometry may be quantified by a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a signal-to-noise-and-interference ratio (SINR), a carrier-to-interference ratio (C/I), etc.

    [0035] The UE may operate in a dominant interference scenario in which the UE may observe high interference from one or more interfering eNBs and/or may cause high interference to one or more neighbor eNBs. High interference may be quantified by the observed interference exceeding a threshold or based on some other criteria. A dominant interference scenario may occur due to the UE connecting to an eNB with lower pathloss and lower geometry among the multiple eNBs detected by the UE. For example, the UE may detect two eNBs X and Y and may obtain lower received power for eNB X than eNB Y. Nevertheless, it may be desirable for the UE to connect to eNB X if the pathloss for eNB X is lower than the pathloss for eNB Y. This may be the case if eNB X (which may be a pico eNB) has much lower transmit power as compared to eNB Y (which may be a macro eNB). By having the UE connect to eNB X with lower pathloss, less interference may be caused to the wireless network to achieve a given data rate, and network capacity may be enhanced.

    [0036] A dominant interference scenario may also occur due to restricted association. The UE may be close to eNB Y and may have high received power for eNB Y. However, the UE may not be able to access eNB Y due to restricted association and may connect to unrestricted eNB X with lower received power. The UE may then observe high interference from eNB Y and may also cause high interference to eNB Y.

    [0037] The UE may need to receive one or more downlink control channels from a desired eNB in the presence of high interference from one or more interfering eNBs. The UE may also cause high interference on one or more uplink control channels at each interfering eNB.

    [0038] In an aspect, high interference on radio resources used for a control channel may be mitigated by sending a request to reduce interference to one or more interfering stations. Each interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources, which may then allow the control channel to observe less interference. A reduce interference request may also be referred to as a special resource utilization message (RUM), a clearing resource utilization message (CRUM), a control blanking RUM, etc.

    [0039] FIG. 4 shows a design of control channel reception with interference mitigation. For each station, the horizontal axis may represent time, and the vertical axis may represent transmit power. A receiver station (e.g., a UE) may detect high interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired station (e.g., a desired eNB) at time T1. The receiver station may be unable to correctly decode the control channel from the desired station due to the high interference. The receiver station may then send a reduce interference request to an interfering station (e.g., a neighbor eNB) at time T2 to request the interfering station to reduce interference on the radio resources used for the control channel.

    [0040] The interfering station may receive the reduce interference request from the receiver/sender station and may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources used for the control channel at time T3. The receiver station may receive the control channel from the desired station at time T3. The control channel may observe less or no interference from the interfering station and may be correctly decoded by the receiver station. The reduce interference request may be valid for a particular duration. The interfering station may then reduce its transmit power on the radio resources used for the control channel during the entire duration, which may end at time T4. The interfering station may resume transmitting at the nominal power level on the radio resources used for the control channel starting at time T5.

    [0041] In general, reduce interference requests may be used to reduce interference on downlink control channels as well as uplink control channels. Reduce interference requests may also be used to reduce interference on one or more specific control channels or all control channels for a given link.

    [0042] For interference mitigation on the downlink, a UE may send a reduce interference request (e.g., in a unicast message or a broadcast message) to one or more interfering eNBs to request reduction of interference on radio resources used for one or more downlink control channels from a desired eNB. Each interfering eNB may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources to allow the UE to receive the downlink control channel(s) from the desired eNB. An interfering eNB may be (i) a high-power macro eNB for a scenario in which the UE connects to a low-power pico eNB with lower pathloss and lower geometry, (ii) a femto eNB for a scenario in which the UE is close to the femto eNB but is unable to access this eNB due to restricted association, or (iii) an eNB causing interference in some other scenario.

    [0043] For interference mitigation on the uplink, an eNB may send a reduce interference request (e.g., in a unicast message or a broadcast message) to one or more interfering UEs to request reduction of interference on radio resources used for one or more uplink control channels for this eNB. Each interfering UE may then reduce its transmit power on the radio resources to allow the eNB to receive the uplink control channel(s) from its UEs.

    [0044] In one design, for both the downlink and uplink, the control channels may be divided into multiple control segments. Each eNB may be assigned a primary control segment. A UE may request interfering cNBs to reduce interference on the primary control segment of its desired eNBs on the downlink. The desired eNB may request interfering UEs to reduce interference on its primary control segment on the uplink.

    [0045] Reduce interference requests may be used for various operating scenarios. In one design, reduce interference requests may be used for initial access. A UE may detect multiple eNBs, e.g., based on low reuse pilots/preambles (LRPs) or other synchronization signals transmitted by these eNBs. An LRP is a pilot sent with low reuse and/or high power so that it can be detected even by distant UEs observing high interference on the downlink. Low reuse refers to different eNBs using different resources (at least in part) for pilot transmission, thus improving pilot SNR by reducing interference and ensuring that even pilots of relatively weak eNBs can be detected. The other synchronization signals may comprise a primary synchronization signal and a secondary synchronization signal in LTE. The UE may desire to access an eNB with low pathloss and low geometry and may need to receive one or more downlink control channels (e.g., the PBCH) from this eNB. In one design, the UE may send a reduce interference request to interfering eNBs to request interference reduction on radio resources used for the downlink control channel(s) from the desired eNB. In one design, the UE may ask the interfering eNBs to send reduce interference requests to their UEs to request interference reduction on radio resources used for one or more uplink control channels (e.g., the PRACH) sent from the UE to the desired eNB. In one design, the UE may send a random access preamble to access the desired eNB. The interfering eNB may detect the random access preamble and may ask its interfering UEs to reduce interference on uplink control channel(s).

    [0046] In one design, reduce interference requests may be used to reduce interference on the PDCCH and PHICH for the downlink and on the PUCCH for the uplink. The PDCCH and PHICH may be used to schedule downlink/uplink data. The downlink data may comprise a random access response (or an access grant) to the UE and downlink handshake messages. The uplink data may comprise uplink handshake messages. Interference may also be reduced for other downlink and uplink control channels for initial access.

    [0047] In one design, a reduce interference request may be valid for a duration covering initial access. A long-term interference mitigation scheme may be used to allow the UE to communicate with the desired eNB after initial access. For example, a reduce interference request may be sent to reduce interference for a duration long enough to establish a connection and to negotiate longer-term interference mitigation, e.g., using backhaul communication between the desired eNB and interfering eNB(s). A reduce interference request may also be used to extend the duration of interference reduction. For example, a subsequent reduce interference request may be sent if backhaul negotiations for long-term interference mitigation are not completed before expiration of a prior reduce interference request.

    [0048] Reduce interference requests may also be used during handover events and operation in a connected mode. A UE may send a reduce interference request to an interfering eNB to request interference reduction on radio resources used for one or more downlink control channels from a desired eNB. The desired eNB may be a target eNB during handover or a serving eNB in the connected mode. An interfering eNB may also send a reduce interference request to its UEs to request interference reduction on radio resources used for one or more uplink control channels sent from the UE to the desired eNB. The reduce interference requests may allow the UE to communicate with the desired eNB for handover or connected mode operation. For example, the UE may attempt to access a target eNB during handover and may ask interfering eNBs to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel carry an access grant from the target eNB. The interfering eNBs may reduce their transmit power to allow the UE to receive the access grant from the target eNB.

    [0049] Reduce interference requests may also be used during operation in an idle mode. For example, the UE may be idle and may send a reduce interference request to ask interfering eNBs to reduce their transmit power on radio resources used for transmission of pages and system information by a serving eNB. The UE may send the reduce interference request in every wakeup cycle or every few wakeup cycles. The interfering eNBs may reduce their transmit power on the radio resources to allow the UE to receive system information and monitor for pages from the serving eNB. Reduce interference requests may also be used for other operating scenarios.

    [0050] In one design, a reduce interference request may be sent as a unicast message to a specific UE or eNB, which may be a dominant interferer. This may be achieved by including a UE identity (ID) or a cell ID in the request. The specific UE or eNB may act on the request, and all other UEs or eNBs may ignore the request.

    [0051] In another design, a reduce interference request may be sent as a multicast message to a set of UEs or eNBs. This may be achieved by including individual UE IDs or cell IDs in the set, or a group ID for the set, in the request. Each UE or eNB in the set may act on the request, and all other UEs or eNBs may ignore the request.

    [0052] In yet another design, a reduce interference request may be sent as a broadcast message to all UEs or eNBs within reception range of the request. Each UE or eNB that can receive the request may act on the request.

    [0053] An interfering station that is an intended recipient of a reduce interference request may act on the request in various manners. In one design, the interfering station may decide whether to honor or dismiss the request. This decision may be based on various factors such as the priority of the request, the importance of the control channel(s) for which reduced interference is requested, network loading, etc. The interfering station may honor the request by reducing its transmit power on the radio resources used for the control channel(s). The interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources to a lower level (e.g., as shown in FIG. 4) or to zero (i.e., blank transmission on the radio resources). The interfering station may also spatially steer its transmission in a manner to reduce interference on the radio resources. For example, the interfering station may perform precoding to place a spatial null in the direction of the sender station observing high interference.

    [0054] In one design, a reduce interference request may convey the transmit power level of the request and a target interference level on radio resources used for one or more control channels. An interfering station may then reduce its transmit power such that the sender station can observe the target interference level on the radio resources. The interfering station may estimate the pathloss to the sender station based on the transmit power level of the request (which may be conveyed by the request) and the received power level of the request (which may be measured by the interfering station). The interfering station may then reduce its transmit power on the radio resources accordingly. If the interfering station receives the reduce interference request at very high power, then it may be close to the sender station and hence may be a dominant interferer. In this case, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power substantially on the radio resources. The converse may be true if the interfering station receives the request at low power.

    [0055] In one design, a reduce interference request may indicate one or more specific control channels to reduce interference. The radio resources used for the specified control channel(s) may be known by an interfering station. In another design, a reduce interference request may indicate specific radio resources on which to reduce interference. An interfering station may then reduce its transmit power on the specified radio resources. In yet another design, a reduce interference request may provide information used to determine radio resources used for one or more control channels. For example, a desired eNB may send a control channel on different radio resources determined based on a hopping function and a cell ID. The reduce interference request may provide the cell ID. The interfering eNB may be able to ascertain the radio resources used for the control channel based on the cell ID provided by the request and the known hopping function. A reduce interference request may also provide other information used to determine radio resources used for control channel(s).

    [0056] In one design, an interfering station may reduce its transmit power on only the radio resources used for one or more control channels indicated by a reduce interference request. The interfering station may transmit on other radio resources not used for the control channel(s). In another design, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power during a time interval covering the radio resources used for the control channel(s). For example, the control channel(s) may be sent on radio resources covering S subcarriers in L symbol periods. The interfering station may reduce (e.g., blank) its transmit power on all subcarriers in the L symbol periods. The interference from the interfering station may be so high that it may desensitize (or desens) a receiver at the sender station. This design may avoid desensitization of the receiver. In yet another design, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power on one or more interlaces including the radio resources used for the control channel(s). Each interlace may include every Q-th subframes in the transmission timeline, where Q may be equal to 4, 6, 8 or some other value. In general, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources used for the control channel(s) and possibly additional radio resources, depending on other considerations.

    [0057] In one design, a reduce interference request may be valid for a predetermined duration (e.g., 100 ms), which may be known a priori by both a sender station and an interfering station. In another design, a reduce interference request may indicate the duration over which it is valid. An interfering station may honor the reduce interference request for the specified duration or may counter with a different duration. In yet another design, a reduce interference request may be valid for a duration that may be dependent on one or more parameters for the request. Reduce interference requests for different control channels or different operating scenarios may be associated with different durations for which the requests are valid. For example, a reduce interference request for a paging channel may be valid for an amount of time in which a page might be sent to a UE. A reduce interference request for a control channel carrying an access grant may be valid for an amount of time in which initial access is performed. In yet another design, a reduce interference request may be valid indefinitely until it is revoked.

    [0058] A reduce interference request may be sent in a manner to ensure reliable reception of the request by an interfering station. In one design, the reduce interference request may be repeated and sent multiple times to improve reception of the request. In another design, the reduce interference request may be sent at progressively higher transmit power with power ramping to ensure that the request can reach the interfering station. In yet another design, a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) may be generated for the request and appended to the request. The interfering station may use the CRC to determine whether the request is received correctly. The CRC may reduce false alarm rate. In yet another design, the reduce interference request may be sent via Layer-3 signaling, which may be particularly applicable to renew interference reduction on radio resources used for control channels. The reduce interference request may also be sent in other manners to ensure reliable reception, which may be desirable since the request may trigger reduction of transmit power for an extended period of time.

    [0059] FIG. 5 shows a design of a process 500 for sending a reduce interference request in a wireless communication network. Process 500 may be performed by a sender station, which may be a UE or a base station, e.g., an eNB, a relay station, ctc.

    [0060] The sender station may detect high interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired station (block 512). The control channel may comprise any of the channels described above for LTE or other channels in other radio technologies. The sender station may generate a request to reduce interference on the radio resources used for the control channel (block 514) and may send the request to an interfering station (block 516). In one design, the sender station may identify the interfering station and may send the request as a unicast message to only the interfering station. In another design, the sender station may send the request as a broadcast message to the interfering station as well as other interfering stations within reception range of the request. In any case, the sender station may receive the control channel on the radio resources from the desired station (block 518). In general, the request may be applicable for one control channel or multiple control channels. The sender station may send a second request to extend interference reduction on the radio resources, if needed.

    [0061] For interference mitigation on the downlink, the sender station may be a UE. In one design, the interfering station may be a macro base station with a high transmit power level, and the desired station may be a pico or femto base station with a low transmit power level. In another design, the interfering station may be a femto base station with restricted access, and the desired station may be a pico or macro base station with unrestricted access. The UE may detect the interfering base station based on an LRP or a synchronization signal sent by the base station.

    [0062] For interference mitigation on the uplink, the sender station may be a base station, the interfering station may be a first UE not served by the base station, and the desired station may be a second UE served by the base station. The sender station, the interfering station, and the desired station may also be other stations in the wireless network.

    [0063] In one design, the sender station may generate the request to include a transmit power level of the request, a target interference level for the radio resources used for the control channel, an identity of the interfering station, an identity of the desired station, information identifying the control channel or the radio resources, the duration over which the request is valid, the priority of the request, other information, or any combination thereof.

    [0064] In one design, the sender station may generate a CRC for the request and may append the CRC to the request. The CRC may be used by the interfering station to detect for error in receiving the request. In one design, the sender station may send the request only once but in a manner (e.g., with a lower code rate) to ensure reliable reception of the request. In another design, the sender station may send the request multiple times to improve reception of the request by the interfering station. The sender station may send the request at higher transmit power after each time to further improve reception.

    [0065] In one design, the request may be sent by a UE during initial access, and the control channel may carry an access grant for the UE. In another design, the request may be sent by a UE operating in an idle mode, and the control channel may comprise a paging channel and/or a broadcast channel. In yet another design, the request may be sent during handover of a UE or during operation in a connected mode by the UE. The UE may communicate with a serving base station via the control channel for interference mitigation for data transmission. The request may also be sent for other operating scenarios.

    [0066] In one design, a UE may send the request to an interfering base station, as described above. In another design, the UE may send the request to its serving base station, which may forward the request to the interfering base station via the backhaul. The interfering base station may reserve radio resources in response to the request and may send the reserved radio resources to the serving base station, which may forward the information to the UE. In yet another design, the serving base station and the interfering base station may communicate via the backhaul to reserve downlink and/or uplink radio resources, without a trigger or a request from the UE.

    [0067] FIG. 6 shows a design of an apparatus 600 for sending a reduce interference request. Apparatus 600 includes a module 612 to detect high interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired station, a module 614 to generate a request to reduce interference on the radio resources used for the control channel, a module 616 to send the request to an interfering station, and a module 618 to receive the control channel on the radio resources from the desired station.

    [0068] FIG. 7 shows a design of a process 700 for receiving a reduce interference request in a wireless communication network. Process 700 may be performed by an interfering station, which may be a UE or a base station. The interfering station may receive from a sender station a request to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired station (block 712). The interfering station may determine the radio resources used for the control channel based on information sent in the request, a known hopping pattern and an identity of the desired station, etc.

    [0069] The interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources to reduce interference to the control channel from the desired station (block 714). In one design of block 714, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power on the radio resources to a lower level or zero. In one design, the interfering station may determine the pathloss from the sender station to the interfering station based on a transmit power level and a received power level of the request. The interfering station may then determine its transmit power for the radio resources based on the pathloss and a target interference level for the radio resources. In another design of block 714, the interfering station may steer a transmission on the radio resources away from the sender station. For all designs, the interfering station may reduce its transmit power for a predetermined duration, a duration indicated by the request, or a duration determined based on at least one parameter for the request, e.g., the control channel, the operating scenario, etc.

    [0070] For interference mitigation on the downlink, the sender station may be a UE. In one design, the interfering station may be a macro base station having a high transmit power level, and the desired station may be a pico or femto base station having a low transmit power level. In another design, the interfering station may be a femto base station with restricted access, and the desired station may be a pico or macro base station with unrestricted access. For interference mitigation on the downlink, the sender station may be a base station, the interfering station may be a first UE not served by the base station, and the desired station may be a second UE served by the base station. The sender station, the interfering station, and the desired station may also be other stations in the wireless network.

    [0071] FIG. 8 shows a design of an apparatus 800 for receiving a reduce interference request. Apparatus 800 includes a module 812 to receive from a sender station a request to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel by a desired station, and a module 814 to reduce transmit power of an interfering station on the radio resources to reduce interference to the control channel from the desired station.

    [0072] The modules in FIGS. 6 and 8 may comprise processors, electronics devices, hardware devices, electronics components, logical circuits, memories, software codes, firmware codes, etc., or any combination thereof.

    [0073] FIG. 9 shows a block diagram of a design of a base station/eNB 110 and a UE 120, which may be one of the base stations/eNBs and one of the UEs in FIG. 1. In this design, base station 110 is equipped with T antennas 934a through 934t, and UE 120 is equipped with R antennas 952a through 952r, where in general T ≥ 1 and R ≥ 1.

    [0074] At base station 110, a transmit processor 920 may receive data for one or more UEs from a data source 912, process (e.g., encode, interleave, and modulate) the data, and provide data symbols. Transmit processor 920 may also receive information for control channels and possibly reduce interference requests from a controller/ processor 940, process the information, and provide control symbols. A transmit (TX) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) processor 930 may perform spatial processing (e.g., precoding) on the data symbols, the control symbols, and/or pilot symbols, if applicable, and may provide T output symbol streams to T modulators (MODs) 932a through 932t. Each modulator 932 may process a respective output symbol stream (e.g., for OFDM, etc.) to obtain an output sample stream. Each modulator 932 may further process (e.g., convert to analog, amplify, filter, and upconvert) the output sample stream to obtain a downlink signal. T downlink signals from modulators 932a through 932t may be transmitted via T antennas 934a through 934t, respectively.

    [0075] At UE 120, antennas 952a through 952r may receive the downlink signals from base station 110 and may provide received signals to demodulators (DEMODs) 954a through 954r, respectively. Each demodulator 954 may condition (e.g., filter, amplify, downconvert, and digitize) a respective received signal to obtain received samples. Each demodulator 954 may further process the received samples (e.g., for OFDM, etc.) to obtain received symbols. A MIMO detector 956 may obtain received symbols from all R demodulators 954a through 954r, perform MIMO detection on the received symbols if applicable, and provide detected symbols. A receive processor 958 may process (e.g., demodulate, deinterleave, and decode) the detected symbols, provide decoded data for UE 120 to a data sink 960, and provide decoded information for control channels and reduce interference requests to a controller/processor 980.

    [0076] On the uplink, at UE 120, a transmit processor 964 may receive and process data from a data source 962 and information for control channels and possibly reduce interference requests from controller/processor 980. The symbols from transmit processor 964 may be precoded by a TX MIMO processor 966 if applicable, further processed by modulators 954a through 954r, and transmitted to base station 110. At base station 110, the uplink signals from UE 120 may be received by antennas 934, processed by demodulators 932, detected by a MIMO detector 936 if applicable, and further processed by a receive processor 938 to obtain the data and information sent by UE 120.

    [0077] Controllers/processors 940 and 980 may direct the operation at base station 110 and UE 120, respectively. Processor 940 and/or other processors and modules at base station 110 may perform or direct process 500 in FIG. 5 to request reduced interference on the uplink, process 700 in FIG. 7 to reduce interference on the downlink, and/or other processes for the techniques described herein. Processor 980 and/or other processors and modules at UE 120 may perform or direct process 500 in FIG. 5 to request reduced interference on the downlink, process 700 in FIG. 7 to reduce interference on the uplink, and/or other processes for the techniques described herein. Memories 942 and 982 may store data and program codes for base station 110 and UE 120, respectively. A scheduler 944 may schedule UEs for data transmission on the downlink and uplink and may provide resource grants for the scheduled UEs.

    [0078] Those of skill in the art would understand that information and signals may be represented using any of a variety of different technologies and techniques. For example, data, instructions, commands, information, signals, bits, symbols, and chips that may be referenced throughout the above description may be represented by voltages, currents, electromagnetic waves, magnetic fields or particles, optical fields or particles, or any combination thereof.

    [0079] Those of skill would further appreciate that the various illustrative logical blocks, modules, circuits, and algorithm steps described in connection with the disclosure herein may be implemented as electronic hardware, computer software, or combinations of both. To clearly illustrate this interchangeability of hardware and software, various illustrative components, blocks, modules, circuits, and steps have been described above generally in terms of their functionality. Whether such functionality is implemented as hardware or software depends upon the particular application and design constraints imposed on the overall system. Skilled artisans may implement the described functionality in varying ways for each particular application, but such implementation decisions should not be interpreted as causing a departure from the scope of the present disclosure.

    [0080] The various illustrative logical blocks, modules, and circuits described in connection with the disclosure herein may be implemented or performed with a general-purpose processor, a digital signal processor (DSP), an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or other programmable logic device, discrete gate or transistor logic, discrete hardware components, or any combination thereof designed to perform the functions described herein. A general-purpose processor may be a microprocessor, but in the alternative, the processor may be any conventional processor, controller, microcontroller, or state machine. A processor may also be implemented as a combination of computing devices, e.g., a combination of a DSP and a microprocessor, a plurality of microprocessors, one or more microprocessors in conjunction with a DSP core, or any other such configuration.

    [0081] The steps of a method or algorithm described in connection with the disclosure herein may be embodied directly in hardware, in a software module executed by a processor, or in a combination of the two. A software module may reside in RAM memory, flash memory, ROM memory, EPROM memory, EEPROM memory, registers, hard disk, a removable disk, a CD-ROM, or any other form of storage medium known in the art. An exemplary storage medium is coupled to the processor such that the processor can read information from, and write information to, the storage medium. In the alternative, the storage medium may be integral to the processor. The processor and the storage medium may reside in an ASIC. The ASIC may reside in a user terminal. In the alternative, the processor and the storage medium may reside as discrete components in a user terminal.

    [0082] In one or more exemplary designs, the functions described may be implemented in hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof. If implemented in software, the functions may be stored on or transmitted over as one or more instructions or code on a computer-readable medium. Computer-readable media includes both computer storage media and communication media including any medium that facilitates transfer of a computer program from one place to another. A storage media may be any available media that can be accessed by a general purpose or special purpose computer. By way of example, and not limitation, such computer-readable media can comprise RAM, ROM, EEPROM, CD-ROM or other optical disk storage, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium that can be used to carry or store desired program code means in the form of instructions or data structures and that can be accessed by a general-purpose or special-purpose computer, or a general-purpose or special-purpose processor. Also, any connection is properly termed a computer-readable medium. For example, if the software is transmitted from a website, server, or other remote source using a coaxial cable, fiber optic cable, twisted pair, digital subscriber line (DSL), or wireless technologies such as infrared, radio, and microwave, then the coaxial cable, fiber optic cable, twisted pair, DSL, or wireless technologies such as infrared, radio, and microwave are included in the definition of medium. Disk and disc, as used herein, includes compact disc (CD), laser disc, optical disc, digital versatile disc (DVD), floppy disk and blu-ray disc where disks usually reproduce data magnetically, while discs reproduce data optically with lasers. Combinations of the above should also be included within the scope of computer- readable media.

    [0083] The previous description of the disclosure is provided to enable any person skilled in the art to make or use the disclosure. Various modifications to the disclosure will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the generic principles defined herein may be applied to other variations without departing from the scope of the claims.


    Claims

    1. A method for wireless communication, comprising:

    receiving (712), at an interfering first user equipment, UE, a request from a base station to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel received by a second UE, characterized in that

    the first UE is not served by the base station and the second UE is served by the base station; and

    reducing (714) transmit power of the first UE on the radio resources to reduce interference to the control channel.


     
    2. The method of claim 1, wherein the reducing transmit power comprises reducing transmit power of the first UE on the radio resources to a lower level or zero.
     
    3. The method of claim 1, wherein the reducing transmit power comprises:

    determining pathloss from the base station to the first UE based on a received power level of the request, and

    determining transmit power of the first UE for the radio resources based on the pathloss and a target interference level for the radio resources.


     
    4. The method of claim 1, wherein the reducing transmit power comprises steering a transmission from the first UE on the radio resources away from the base station.
     
    5. The method of claim 1, wherein the reducing transmit power comprises reducing the transmit power of the first UE on the radio resources for a predetermined duration, a duration indicated by the request, or a duration determined based on at least one parameter for the request.
     
    6. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    determining the radio resources used for the control channel by the base station based on a hopping pattern and an identity of the base station.
     
    7. An apparatus for wireless communication, comprising:

    means (812) for receiving, at interfering first user equipment, UE, a request from a base station to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel received by a second UE, characterized in that the first UE is not served by the base station and the second UE is served by the base station, and

    means (814) for reducing transmit power of first UE on the radio resources to reduce interference to the control channel.


     
    8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said means for reducing comprises:

    means for determining pathloss from the base station to the interfering first UE based on a transmit power level and a received power level of the request, and

    means for determining transmit power of the interfering first UE for the radio resources based on the pathloss and a target interference level for the radio resources.


     
    9. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said means for reducing is configured to reduce the transmit power of the interfering first UE on the radio resources for a predetermined duration, a duration indicated by the request, or a duration determined based on at least one parameter for the request.
     
    10. A method for wireless communication, comprising:

    transmitting (516), to one or more interfering user equipments, UEs, a request from a base station to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel by one or more UEs served by the base station characterized in that the one or more interfering UEs is/are not served by the base station; and

    receiving (518), on the radio resources, the control channel from the one or more served UEs, the radio resources having reduced interference from the one or more interfering UEs.


     
    11. An apparatus for wireless communication, comprising:

    means (616), executable at a base station, for transmitting, to one or more interfering user equipments, UEs, a request from the base station to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel by the base station characterized in that the one or more interfering UEs is/are not served by the base station; and

    means (618), executable at the base station, for receiving, on the radio resources, the control channel from one or more serviced UEs, the radio resources having reduced interference from the one or more interfering UEs.


     
    12. The apparatus of claim 11, comprising:
    at least one processor at the base station configured to transmit a request to one or more interfering user equipments, UEs, to reduce interference on radio resources used for a control channel by the base station, and to receive, on the radio resources, the control channel from one or more served UEs, the radio resources having reduced interference from the one or more interfering UEs.
     
    13. A computer program product, comprising a computer-readable medium having instruction code which, when executed by a processor, result in performance of all the steps of any of claims 1 to 6 and 10.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Ein Verfahren für Drahtloskommunikation, das Folgendes aufweist:

    Empfangen (712), an einer interferierenden ersten Nutzereinrichtung bzw. UE (UE = user equipment), einer Anfrage von einer Basisstation zum Verringern von Interferenz auf Funkressourcen, die für einen Steuerkanal verwendet werden, der durch eine zweite UE empfangen wird,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass

    die erste UE nicht durch die Basisstation versorgt wird und die zweite UE durch die Basisstation versorgt wird; und

    Verringern (714) einer Sendeleistung der ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen zum Verringern von Interferenz gegenüber dem Steuerkanal.


     
    2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Verringern von Sendeleistung Verringern von Sendeleistung der ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen auf einen niedrigeren Pegel oder Null aufweist.
     
    3. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Verringern von Sendeleistung Folgendes aufweist:

    Bestimmen eines Pfadverlusts von der Basisstation zu der ersten UE basierend auf einem empfangenen Leistungspegel der Anfrage, und

    Bestimmen einer Sendeleistung der ersten UE für die Funkressourcen basierend auf dem Pfadverlust und einem Zielinterferenzpegel für die Funkressourcen.


     
    4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Verringern von Sendeleistung Steuern einer Sendung von der ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen weg von der Basisstation aufweist.
     
    5. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Verringern von Sendeleistung Verringern der Sendeleistung der ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen für eine vorbestimmte Dauer, eine Dauer, die durch die Anfrage angezeigt wird oder eine Dauer, die basierend auf wenigstens einem Parameter für die Anfrage bestimmt wird, aufweist.
     
    6. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, das weiter Folgendes aufweist:
    Bestimmen der Funkressourcen, die für den Steuerkanal durch die Basisstation verwendet werden basierend auf einem Sprung- bzw. Hopping-Muster und einer Identität der Basisstation.
     
    7. Eine Vorrichtung für Drahtloskommunikation, die Folgendes aufweist:

    Mittel (812) zum Empfangen, an einer interferierenden ersten Nutzereinrichtung bzw. UE (UE = user equipment), einer Anfrage von einer Basisstation zum Verringern von Interferenz auf Funkressourcen, die für einen Steuerkanal verwendet werden, der durch eine zweite UE empfangen wird, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die erste UE nicht durch die Basisstation versorgt wird und die zweite UE durch die Basisstation versorgt wird; und

    Mittel (814) zum Verringern einer Sendeleistung der ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen zum Verringern von Interferenz gegenüber dem Steuerkanal.


     
    8. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 7, wobei die Mittel zum Verringern Folgendes aufweisen:

    Mittel zum Bestimmen eines Pfadverlusts von der Basisstation zu der interferierenden ersten UE basierend auf einem Sendeleistungspegel und einem empfangenen Leistungspegel der Anfrage, und

    Mittel zum Bestimmen von Sendeleistung der interferierenden ersten UE für die Funkressourcen basierend auf dem Pfadverlust und einem Zielinterferenzpegel für die Funkressourcen.


     
    9. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 7, wobei die Mittel zum Verringern konfiguriert sind zum Verringern der Sendeleistung der interferierenden ersten UE auf den Funkressourcen für eine vorbestimmte Dauer, eine Dauer, die durch die Anfrage angezeigt wird oder eine Dauer, die basierend auf wenigstens einem Parameter für die Anfrage bestimmt wird.
     
    10. Ein Verfahren für Drahtloskommunikation, das Folgendes aufweist:

    Senden (516), an eine oder mehrere interferierenden Nutzereinrichtungen bzw. UEs (UE = user equipment), einer Anfrage von einer Basisstation zum Verringern von Interferenz auf Funkressourcen, die für einen Steuerkanal durch eine oder mehrere UEs, die durch die Basisstation versorgt werden, verwendet werden, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die eine oder die mehreren interferierenden UEs nicht durch die Basisstation versorgt wird/werden; und

    Empfangen (518), auf den Funkressourcen, des Steuerkanals von der einen oder den mehreren versorgten UEs, wobei die Funkressourcen verringerte Interferenz von der einen oder den mehreren interferierenden UEs haben.


     
    11. Eine Vorrichtung für Drahtloskommunikation, die Folgendes aufweist:

    Mittel (616), die an einer Basisstation ausführbar sind, zum Senden, an eine oder mehrere interferierende Nutzereinrichtungen bzw. UEs (UE = user equipment) einer Anfrage von der Basisstation zum Verringern von Interferenz auf Funkressourcen, die für einen Steuerkanal durch die Basisstation verwendet werden, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die eine oder die mehrere interferierenden UEs nicht durch die Basisstation versorgt wird/werden; und

    Mittel (618), die an der Basisstation ausführbar sind, zum Empfangen, auf den Funkressourcen, des Steuerkanals von einer oder mehreren versorgten UEs, wobei die Funkressourcen verringerte Interferenz von der einen oder den mehreren interferierenden UEs haben.


     
    12. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 11, die weiter Folgendes aufweist:
    wenigstens einen Prozessor an der Basisstation, der konfiguriert ist zum Senden einer Anfrage an eine oder mehrere interferierende Nutzereinrichtungen bzw. UEs zum Verringern von Interferenz auf Funkressourcen, die für einen Steuerkanal durch die Basisstation verwendet werden und zum Empfangen, auf den Funkressourcen, des Steuerkanals von einer oder mehreren versorgten UEs, wobei die Funkressourcen verringerte Interferenz von der einen oder den mehreren interferierenden UEs haben.
     
    13. Ein Computerprogrammprodukt, das ein computerlesbares Medium mit Befehlscode aufweist, der, wenn er durch einen Prozessor ausgeführt wird, zur Durchführung aller Schritte nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 6 und 10 führt.
     


    Revendications

    1. Procédé de communication sans fil, comprenant les étapes consistant à :
    recevoir (712), au niveau d'un premier équipement d'utilisateur, UE, brouilleur, une demande en provenance d'une station de base pour réduire un brouillage sur des ressources radio utilisées pour un canal de contrôle reçu par un second UE, le procédé étant caractérisé en ce que :

    le premier UE n'est pas desservi par la station de base et le second UE est desservi par la station de base ; et

    réduire (714) une puissance de transmission du premier UE sur les ressources radio pour réduire un brouillage vers le canal de contrôle.


     
    2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la réduction de la puissance de transmission comprend l'étape consistant à réduire la puissance de transmission du premier UE sur les ressources radio à niveau inférieur ou égal à zéro.
     
    3. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la réduction de la puissance de transmission comprend les étapes consistant à :

    déterminer un affaiblissement de propagation de la station de base au premier UE sur la base d'un niveau de puissance reçu de la demande ; et

    déterminer une puissance de transmission du premier UE pour les ressources radio sur la base de l'affaiblissement de propagation et d'un niveau de brouillage cible pour les ressources radio.


     
    4. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la réduction de la puissance de transmission comprend l'étape consistant à conduire une transmission à partir du premier UE sur les ressources radio loin de la station de base.
     
    5. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la réduction de la puissance de transmission comprend l'étape consistant à réduire la puissance de transmission du premier UE sur les ressources radio pendant une durée prédéterminée, une durée indiquée par la demande ou une durée déterminée sur la base d'au moins un paramètre de la demande.
     
    6. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre l'étape consistant à :

    déterminer les ressources radio utilisées pour le canal de contrôle par la station de base sur la base d'un modèle de saut et d'une identité de la station de base.


     
    7. Appareil de communication sans fil, comprenant :

    un moyen (812) de réception, au niveau d'un premier équipement d'utilisateur, UE, brouilleur, d'une demande en provenance d'une station de base pour réduire un brouillage sur des ressources radio utilisées pour un canal de contrôle reçu par un second UE, l'appareil de communication sans fil étant caractérisé en ce que le premier UE n'est pas desservi par la station de base et le second UE est desservi par la station de base ; et

    un moyen (814) de réduction d'une puissance de transmission du premier UE sur les ressources radio pour réduire un brouillage vers le canal de contrôle.


     
    8. Appareil selon la revendication 7, dans lequel ledit moyen de réduction comprend :

    un moyen de détermination d'un affaiblissement de propagation de la station de base au premier UE brouilleur sur la base d'un niveau de puissance de transmission et d'un niveau de puissance reçu de la demande ; et

    un moyen de détermination d'une puissance de transmission du premier UE brouilleur pour les ressources radio sur la base de l'affaiblissement de propagation et d'un niveau de brouillage cible pour les ressources radio.


     
    9. Appareil selon la revendication 7, dans lequel ledit moyen de réduction est configuré pour réduire la puissance de transmission du premier UE brouilleur sur les ressources radio pendant une durée prédéterminée, une durée indiquée par la demande ou une durée déterminée sur la base d'au moins un paramètre de la demande.
     
    10. Procédé de communication sans fil, comprenant les étapes consistant à :

    transmettre (516), à un ou plusieurs équipements d'utilisateur, UE, brouilleurs, une demande en provenance d'une station de base pour réduire un brouillage sur des ressources radio utilisées pour un canal de contrôle par un ou plusieurs UE desservis par la station de base, le procédé de communication sans fil étant caractérisé en ce que les un ou plusieurs UE brouilleurs ne sont pas desservis par la station de base ; et

    recevoir (518), sur les ressources radio, le canal de contrôle en provenance des un ou plusieurs UE desservis, les ressources radio ayant un brouillage réduit à partir des un ou plusieurs UE brouilleurs.


     
    11. Appareil de communication sans fil, comprenant :

    un moyen (616), exécutable au niveau d'une station de base, de transmission, à un ou plusieurs équipements d'utilisateur, UE, brouilleurs, d'une demande en provenance de la station de base pour réduire un brouillage sur des ressources radio utilisées pour un canal de contrôle par la station de base, l'appareil de communication sans fil étant caractérisé en ce que les un ou plusieurs UE brouilleurs ne sont pas desservis par la station de base ; et

    un moyen (618), exécutable au niveau de la station de base, de réception, sur les ressources radio, du canal de contrôle en provenance d'un ou plusieurs UE desservis, les ressources radio ayant un brouillage réduit à partir des un ou plusieurs UE brouilleurs.


     
    12. Appareil selon la revendication 11, comprenant :
    au moins un processeur au niveau de la station de base, configuré pour transmettre une demande à un ou plusieurs équipements d'utilisateur, UE, brouilleurs pour réduire un brouillage sur des ressources radio utilisées pour un canal de contrôle par la station de base, et pour recevoir, sur les ressources radio, le canal de contrôle en provenance d'un ou plusieurs UE desservis, les ressources radio ayant un brouillage réduit à partir des un ou plusieurs UE brouilleurs.
     
    13. Produit de programme informatique, comprenant un support lisible par ordinateur comprenant un code d'instructions qui, lorsqu'il est exécuté par un processeur, entraîne la réalisation de toutes les étapes selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 6 et 10.
     




    Drawing























    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description