(19)
(11)EP 2 603 778 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
25.03.2020 Bulletin 2020/13

(21)Application number: 11758589.3

(22)Date of filing:  09.08.2011
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G01F 1/60(2006.01)
G01F 1/72(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2011/047024
(87)International publication number:
WO 2012/021482 (16.02.2012 Gazette  2012/07)

(54)

NOISE DETECTION AND AVOIDANCE

RAUSCHDETEKTION UND -VERMEIDUNG

DÉTECTION ET PRÉVENTION DE BRUIT


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 11.08.2010 US 372637 P
01.08.2011 US 201113195348

(43)Date of publication of application:
19.06.2013 Bulletin 2013/25

(73)Proprietor: Micro Motion, Inc.
Boulder, CO 80301 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • ROVNER, Bruce, D.
    Minneapolis, MN 55416 (US)
  • FOSS, Scot, R.
    Eden Prairie, MN 55346 (US)

(74)Representative: Isarpatent 
Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Behnisch Barth Charles Hassa Peckmann & Partner mbB Postfach 44 01 51
80750 München
80750 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-00/34744
WO-A2-01/90702
US-A1- 2006 235 634
WO-A1-2009/008974
JP-A- 60 056 221
US-A1- 2008 250 867
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD



    [0001] The present invention relates to a method of using process variable transmitters used in process control and monitoring systems and to process variable transmitters receiving a sensor signal from a process variable sensor and controlling the sensor using a control signal. More specifically, the present invention relates to detecting process noise frequency and adjusting sensor control signals so the sensor control signal frequency is moved away from the detected noise frequency to avoid error induced by the process noise.

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION



    [0002] Process variable transmitters are used to measure process parameters in a process control or monitoring system. Microprocessor-based transmitters often include a sensor, an analog-to-digital converter for converting an output from the sensor into a digital form, a microprocessor for compensating the digitized output, and an output circuit for transmitting the compensated output. Currently, this transmission is normally done over a process control loop, such as a 4-20mA control loop, or wirelessly.

    [0003] One exemplary parameter that is measured by such a system is the volumetric flow rate of a conductive fluid through a tube or pipe in the process. This can be done, for example, using a magnetic flow meter.

    [0004] One exemplary type of magnetic flow meter includes a pipe, with coils disposed on opposite sides of a cross section of the pipe. The coils are energized by a coil drive current from a transmitter and develop a magnetic field along the cross section of the pipe. Two electrodes are located across the pipe from each other along a line which is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Fluid passing through the pipe is electrically conductive. As a result of the movement of the conductive fluid through the magnetic field, an electric potential or electromotive force (EMF) is induced in the fluid which is detected by the electrodes.

    [0005] These types of magnetic flow meters are often deployed in processes that have various substances added to the flow of fluid through the pipe, that is being sensed and measured. For instance, in some paper processing mills, silica is added to the fluid flowing through the pipe in the paper process. The silica can be added to the process using a piston pump that is controlled by a variable frequency drive motor to control the flow of the silica added to the process.

    [0006] Piston pumps normally operate using a set of pistons that are alternatively connected to an input port and an output port. The substance to be pumped is alternately drawn in through the inlet port and then pumped out through the outlet port by the reciprocating action of the piston. When this type of pump is used to add a substance to fluid flowing through a pipe in a process, the pump can add a pressure modulation to the flow that corresponds to the speed of operation of the pump. This pressure modulation can be observed by the magnetic flow meter and can contain significant energy at the odd harmonics of the coil drive frequency used to drive the coils in the magnetic flow meter. This can result in a beat frequency to appear on the measured output signal that measures the process flow.

    [0007] Of course, this type of introduction of periodic noise caused by a piston pump (which interferes with the measurement of flow) is but one exemplary source of periodic or intermittent noise that can interfere with the measured output signals that represent measured process variables. A variety of other noise sources can create noise that interferes with the measurement of process variables in a similar way. For instance, similar types of noise can be generated by sources that cause pulsating pressure, vibration, and external electrical interference, to name a few.

    [0008] Examples for process variable transmitters are described in WO 2009/008974 A1, WO 00/34744 A1, US 2008/250867 A1, WO 01/90702 A2, US 2006/235634 A1 and JP 60 056221 A. WO 01/90702 A2 describes a magnetic flow transmitter providing a coil driver output and a selected fundamental to a coil on a float tube carrying a flow of the liquid, an amplifier amplifying an electrical signal from the flow tube and an A/D converter converting the amplified electrode signal. It further describes a digital signal processor providing a coil driver output and a digital signal processor that uses a spectral transform to generate a noise diagnosing output based on components at or near and noise frequency. WO 00/34744 A1 describes a process variable transmitter that has a filter with a bandwidth which is automatically adjusted based on noise detected in the center output.

    SUMMARY



    [0009] The present invention provides a method of using a process variable transmitter with the features according to independent claim 1, a process variable transmitter with the features according to independent claim 6 and/or a process variable transmitter with the features according to independent claim 9.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0010] 

    FIG. 1 is a simplified block diagram of a process variable transmitter coupled to a sensor and a process.

    FIG. 2 is a simplified partial schematic and partial block diagram of one embodiment of a magnetic flow meter.

    FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating the operation of the system shown in FIG. 1 in characterizing a sensor drive signal.

    FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of the system shown in FIG. 1 for detecting noise.

    FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of the system shown in FIG. 1 for modifying a sensor drive signal to avoid noise frequencies.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0011] FIG. 1 is a simplified block diagram of a transmitter 10 in accordance with one embodiment. Transmitter 10, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, includes analog-to-digital (A/D) converter 12, processor 14, memory 16, noise detector 18 and coil drive controller 20. Transmitter 10 is shown coupled to flow sensor 22 and zero or more other process variable (PV) sensors 24. Transmitter 10 is also shown coupled to process control loop 26. Of course, transmitter 10 could be connected to a wireless transmission connection instead, or in addition to process control loop 26. In one embodiment, process control loop 26 provides power to transmitter 10. Processor 14 transmits information over process control loop 26 and receives information from other circuits or systems, over process control loop 26 as well. By way of example, process control loop 26 may illustratively be a 4-20mA process control loop and may operate using a suitable communication protocol. Other example formats include Modbus, Profibus or Fieldbus. Alternatively, process control loop 26 can be replaced by, or used in addition to, a wireless connection, transmitting the information wirelessly employing various wireless techniques or configurations.

    [0012] Sensors 22 and 24 are illustratively process variable sensors that receive inputs from process 28 that is being sensed. Sensor 22 is illustratively a flow sensor for sensing flow in process 28, and other PV sensors 24 can be a variety of other sensors, such as sensors that sense pressure, temperature, PH, etc. Sensors 22 and 24 illustratively provide an analog output to A/D converter 12 indicative of the sensed parameter.

    [0013] Sensors 22 and 24 can be sensors that are driven by various sensor drive signals at different frequencies. Embodiments discussed herein are directed to detecting noise in the signal output by sensor 22 and the signals output by PV sensors 24 and to change the frequency of the sensor drive signals used to drive the sensors so that the frequency of the noise in the process does not interfere with the measurements of the sensor signals provided to transmitter 10. The present specification will describe this in terms of controlling the frequency of a coil drive signal output by coil drive controller 20 to drive coils on flow sensor 22. The coil drive frequency is changed such that noise generated, at certain frequencies, by process 28 does not interfere with the sensor signal output by flow sensor 22. It will be recognized, of course, that the frequency of other sensor drive signals used to drive other sensors 24 can be controlled in this way as well, in order to increase the accuracy of the sensor signal output by those sensors and measured by transmitter 10.

    [0014] The present discussion will proceed with respect to an exemplary embodiment in which noise is induced in the system by the reciprocation of a piston pump. This is illustrative only, and the same steps can be applied to detect and avoid other sources of noise as well. That being said, FIG. 1 illustrates that process 28 illustratively has a substance 30 that is added to it by piston pump 32. For instance, where process 28 is used for processing paper, the substance 30 to be added to process 28 may illustratively be silica. Of course, a wide variety of different processes can be represented by process 28. In the specific embodiment shown in FIG. 1, piston pump 32 is driven by drive component 34. For instance, drive component 34 may include variable drive controller 36 that drives motor 38, which ultimately drives piston pump 32 to pump substance 30 into process 28.

    [0015] Coil drive controller 20 and noise detector 18 are shown in phantom in FIG. 1 to indicate that they can be separate components, or incorporated within, processor 14. In the embodiment described herein, processor 14 is a computer microprocessor that has associated memory and clock circuitry and provides information regarding the sensed parameters over process control loop 26. It should be noted, of course, that processor 14 can include an input/output (I/O) circuit, or an I/O circuit can be provided separately, that transmits information in a digital formant on loop 26, or in an analog format by controlling current flow through loop 26. In any case, the information related to the sensed parameters is provided over process control loop 26 by transmitter 10.

    [0016] As discussed above, by way of example only, flow sensor 22 in FIG. 1 will be described as a magnetic flow meter that senses the flow of conductive fluid through a pipe in process 28. FIG. 2 is a partial schematic, partial block diagram of transmitter 10 coupled to a magnetic flow meter which comprises flow sensor 22. FIG. 2 shows that transmitter 10 connects to a two-wire, 4-20mA communication loop that carriers current I and an A/C power line (not shown). Flow sensor 22 includes flow tube 40, a pair of coils 42 and 44 and a pair of electrodes 46 and 48. Transmitter 10 provides a load current IL to drive coils 42 and 44 adjacent flow tube 40. This generates a magnetic field in fluid flowing through tube 40. Electrodes 46 and 48 are mounted in flow tube 40 along a line generally perpendicular to the magnetic field in the fluid for sensing EMF induced in the fluid flow. Transmitter 10 senses the EMF between electrodes 46 and 48 and controls an output current I representative of the sensed EMF which is, in turn, proportional to fluid flow in tube 40. Transmitter 10 can transmit this information using a variety of different analog or digital communication formats.

    [0017] Coil drive controller 20, in one embodiment, includes a transistor bridge circuit that controls a constant current drive that generates alternating load current IL through coils 42 and 44. Processor 14 controls coil drive controller 20 such that load current IL begins flowing in one direction through coils 42 and 44 and is then turned on and off at a given frequency referred to herein as the coil drive frequency. Drive controller 20 is then controlled by processor 14 to reverse the flow of load current IL such that it is flowing in the opposite direction through coils 42 and 44 and is then turned on and off at the coil drive frequency. The current flowing through coils 42 and 44 generates a magnetic field in the fluid flowing in tube 40 and movement of the conductive fluid through tube 40 induces an EMF in the fluid flow which is sensed by electrodes 46 and 48. A/D converter 12 converts the analog signals provided by electrodes 46 and 48 into digital values which are provided to processor 14 for measurement. Processor 14 provides an output current I representative of the sensed EMF which is, in turn, proportional to fluid flow in tube 40.

    [0018] With reference again to FIG. 1, the reciprocation of pistons in piston pump 32 (in order to add substance 30 to process 28) can add a pressure modulation to the flow of fluid through pipe 40. The pressure modulation corresponds to the speed of pump 32. This pressure modulation can be observed on the signals provided by electrodes 46 and 48 and those signals can contain significant energy at the primary frequency and the odd harmonics of the coil drive frequency used to drive coils 42 and 44. This can cause a beat frequency to appear on the signal output by flow sensor 22 and that beat frequency can thus be incorporated into the output provided by processor 14 over process control loop 26. Thus, the pressure modulation introduced by pump 32 can be a source of error in the flow signal that represents the sensed flow of fluid through pipe 40.

    [0019] In order to avoid this error, in one embodiment, processor 14 first controls flow sensor 22 in order to identify the frequency characteristics of the coil drive signal used by coil drive controller 22 to drive coils 42 and 44. Processor 14 then uses those characteristics to detect noise frequencies that are close enough to the coil drive frequency in order to cause inaccuracies in the measurement. Processor 14 then controls coil drive controller 20 to drive coils 42 and 44 at a frequency that is sufficiently distant from the noise frequencies detected, so that the noise frequencies will not introduce error into the measured output signal.

    [0020] FIG. 3 is a flow diagram of one illustrative embodiment of the operation of transmitter 10 in order to first identify the frequency characteristics of the coil drive signal. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, processor 14 receives the coil drive signal (or some representative signal indicating the frequency of the coil drive signal). This is indicated by block 50 in FIG. 3.

    [0021] Processor 14 then detects characteristics of the primary frequencies and harmonics of the coil drive signal. This is indicated by block 52. In one embodiment, detector 14 detects the ratio of the primary frequency to the harmonics and stores that in memory 16. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, memory 16 is a non-volatile memory in transmitter 10. Storing the characteristics of the primary frequency and harmonics of the coil drive signal is indicated by block 54 in FIG. 3.

    [0022] Once the characteristics of the coil drive frequency have been detected and stored, processor 14 can use noise detector 18 to detect noise in the flow signal provided by flow sensor 22. FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of transmitter 10 in detecting noise. Once the characteristics of the coil drive signal have been identified and stored, processor 14 can detect the noise as the improper harmonic content in the electrode signals provided by electrodes 46 and 48 to transmitter 10. In one embodiment, processor 14 intermittently (e.g., periodically) phase shifts the coil drive frequency by 180 degrees. This effectively cancels the noise. This is indicated by block 65 in FIG. 4. The periodic phase shift basically converts the low frequency noise caused by the pump beating to high frequency noise. The high frequency noise can be more easily filtered with an RC filter. In one embodiment, where the coil drive frequency was periodically phase shifted, a two second clamping RC filter is used. It has been seen that peak-to-peak noise was 14 times less than on a measurement taken on a signal where the coil frequency was not phase shifted.

    [0023] In another embodiment, processor 14 monitors the electrode frequency spectrum to detect when noise approaches the coil drive primary frequency or odd harmonics and then changes the coil drive frequency so that it is sufficiently distant from the noise frequency to avoid errors.

    [0024] In doing so, processor 14 first receives the flow signal from electrodes 46 and 48. This is indicated by block 60 in FIG. 4. Processor 14 then controls drive controller 20 to momentarily disable coil drive controller 20 in order to detect noise that is caused by sources other than flow of the fluid through tube 40. Other such sources include pulsating pressure, vibration, external electrical interference, etc. It will be noted, of course, that in this step, processor 14 will detect noise introduced by the pressure modulation of piston pump 32. Disabling the coil drive and detecting noise are indicated by blocks 62 and 64 in FIG. 4, respectively.

    [0025] Processor 14 then determines whether the noise frequency detected in block 64 is too close to the coil drive frequency, or its harmonics, such that it may cause an undesirable amount of noise. In doing so, processor 14 accesses the coil drive frequency and harmonics characteristics stored in memory 16 and compares them to the detected noise frequency. Determining whether the noise frequency is too close to the coil drive frequency or its harmonics is indicated by block 66 in FIG. 4. Exactly how close the two frequencies can be before substantial interference occurs will depend on the particular application. It can be determined ahead of time, or at runtime, and it can be determined empirically as well.

    [0026] If the noise frequency is not too close to the coil drive frequency or its harmonics, processor 14 need not change the coil drive frequency and simply enables the coil driver as indicated by block 69. However, if the two are too close, then processor 14 adjusts coil drive controller 20 to change the coil drive frequency to avoid inaccuracies due to the detected noise. This is indicated by block 67 in FIG. 4. In one embodiment, adjusting the coil drive frequency is simply done by changing the frequency so that it is far enough away and avoids harmonics from the pulsating noise in order to keep the noise from interfering with the measurement of the process variable being sensed.

    [0027] FIG. 4 shows one embodiment for detecting noise that can be avoided,but detecting noise is not to be limited to this embodiment. For instance, instead of simply momentarily disabling the coil driver at block 62, the noise detection can be part of a user-commanded test. In that embodiment, the user can simply request that noise be detected, and processor 14 can disable the coil driver for a longer period of time, during which noise can be detected, and noise sources can optionally be identified.

    [0028] FIG. 5 is a flow diagram that illustrates one aspect of the invention besides a number of different examples for adjusting the coil drive to avoid inaccuracies due to detected noise, shown in block 67 in FIG. 4. In one example shown in FIG. 5, processor 14 simply adjusts the coil drive frequency (by controlling coil drive controller 20) so that it and its harmonics are far enough away from the noise frequency to keep noise from interfering with the measurement being taken. This is indicated by block 70 in FIG. 5.

    [0029] According to one aspect of the invention shown in FIG. 5, processor 14 can control coil drive controller 20 so that it intermittently or randomly changes the coil drive frequency within a range of operable frequencies. By changing the coil drive frequency often enough, processor 14 ensures that the coil drive frequency has sufficient content outside of the interfering frequency ranges to maintain measurement accuracy. That is, if the period where the coil drive frequency is sufficiently far away from the noise frequency to avoid noise interference is great enough, then even though the coil drive frequency may intermittently be too close to the noise frequency for a short period of time, the noise will still not interfere with the measured signal in any significant way. Randomly or intermittently changing the coil drive frequency in this way is indicated by block 72 in FIG. 5.

    [0030] Another example for avoiding the interference caused by periodic noise is to detect the period of pulsation (or the period of the noise interference) and then filter it out. For instance, in FIG. 5, detector 14 can use noise detector 18 to detect the period of pulsation caused by piston pump 32, or the period of any other interfering noise. This is indicated by block 74. Having detected the period of interfering noise, processor 14 can then simply apply a moving average filter to filter out the pulsation (or otherwise interfering) noise. This is indicated by block 76. Of course, other ways for adjusting the coil driver to avoid inaccuracies due to detected noise can be used as well.

    [0031] It will be appreciated that, while the present description proceeded primarily with respect to noise introduced into the flow signal by a piston pump, the same techniques can be used to avoid noise in substantially any other process variable which is sensed by a sensor that has a driver that drives the sensor at a given frequency, and which suffers from interfering noise that interferes at frequencies that can be detected. Thus, the present description is not to be limited to only avoiding periodic noise associated with a flow sensor.


    Claims

    1. A method of using a process variable transmitter (10) to control a process variable sensor (22, 24) that senses a process variable in a running process, the method comprising:

    applying a sensor control signal having a sensor control signal frequency to the process variable sensor (22, 24);

    receiving (50; 60) a sensor signal from the process variable sensor (22, 24) related to the process variable, the sensor control signal and noise in the process;

    detecting a noise frequency at which noise occurs on the sensor signal;

    comparing the noise frequency to a frequency characteristics of the sensor control signal; and

    intermittently or randomly changing (72) the sensor control signal frequency within a range of frequencies to ensure sufficient content outside of interfering frequency ranges to maintain measurement accuracy.


     
    2. The method of claim 1 wherein adjusting the sensor control signal frequency comprises:
    periodically shifting a phase of the sensor control signal frequency to cancel the periodic noise, in particular periodically shifting (65) the phase of the sensor control signal by 180 degrees.
     
    3. The method of claim 1 and further comprising:

    prior to detecting (64) the noise frequency, detecting (52) frequency characteristics of the sensor control signal; and

    storing (54) the frequency characteristics.


     
    4. The method of claim 1 and further comprising:
    adjusting (67) the sensor control signal frequency if the noise frequency is sufficiently close to the frequency characteristics of the sensor control signal.
     
    5. The method of claim 1 and further comprising:
    prior to detecting the noise frequency:

    intermittently disabling (62) the sensor control signal and then detecting (64) the noise frequency or

    disabling (62) the sensor control signal in response to a user request and then detecting (64) the noise frequency in response to a user request to detect the noise frequency.


     
    6. A process variable transmitter (10) receiving a sensor signal from a process variable sensor (22, 24) and controlling the sensor (22, 24) using a control signal, the transmitter (10) comprising:
    a noise detector (18) detecting (64) noise, having a noise frequency, on the sensor signal;
    a controller (20) generating a sensor control signal at a sensor control signal frequency;
    the processor is configured to compare the noise frequency to a frequency characteristics of the sensor control signal; and to intermittently or randomly change (72) the sensor control signal frequency within a range of frequencies to ensure sufficient content outside of interfering frequency ranges to maintain measurement accuracy.
     
    7. The process variable transmitter (10) of claim 6 and further comprising:
    a frequency characteristics data store, the processor (14) identifying (52) frequency characteristics of the control signal and storing (54) the frequency characteristics in the frequency characteristics data store, wherein the processor (14) is in particular configured to identify the frequency characteristics of the control signal as a ratio of the control frequency to harmonics of the control frequency.
     
    8. The process variable transmitter (10) of claim 6 wherein the processor (14) is configured to:
    periodically phase shift (65) the control frequency by 180 degrees.
     
    9. A process variable transmitter (10) receiving (50; 60) a flow signal, from a magnetic flow meter, indicative of flow of a process fluid through a conduit, the process variable transmitter (10) comprising:

    a coil drive controller (20) generating a coil drive signal to drive coils on the magnetic flow meter at a coil drive frequency;

    a noise detector (18) detecting (64) periodic noise, having a noise frequency, on the flow signal; and

    a processor (14) configured to

    intermittently disable the coil drive signal so the noise detector (18) can detect the periodic noise, to compare the noise frequency to stored frequency characteristics of the coil drive signal, and to

    intermittently or randomly change (72) the coil drive frequency within a range of frequencies to ensure sufficient content outside of interfering frequency ranges to maintain measurement accuracy.


     
    10. The process variable transmitter (10) of claim 9 further comprising:
    a frequency data store, wherein the processor (14) identifies (52) the frequency characteristics of the coil drive signal and stores (54) them in the frequency data store.
     
    11. The process variable transmitter (10) of claim 9 wherein the process variable transmitter (10) receives additional sensor signals from additional sensors indicative of other sensed process variables, and wherein the processor (14) adjusts sensor control signals, for controlling the additional sensor signals, based on a comparison of frequency characteristics of sensor control signals for the additional sensors and the noise frequency of the periodic noise detected on the additional sensor signals.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Verfahren zum Verwenden eines Prozessvariablensenders (10), um einen Prozessvariablensensor (22, 24) zu steuern, der eine Prozessvariable in einem laufenden Prozess erfasst, wobei das Verfahren Folgendes umfasst:

    Anlegen eines Sensorsteuersignals, das eine Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz aufweist, an den Prozessvariablensensor (22, 24) ;

    Empfangen (50; 60) eines Sensorsignals von dem Prozessvariablensensor (22, 24) in Bezug auf die Prozessvariable, das Sensorsteuersignal und ein Rauschen in dem Prozess;

    Erfassen einer Rauschfrequenz, bei der ein Rauschen auf dem Sensorsignal auftritt;

    Vergleichen der Rauschfrequenz mit Frequenzcharakteristika des Sensorsteuersignals; und

    intermittierendes oder zufälliges Verändern (72) der Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz innerhalb eines Bereichs von Frequenzen, um einen ausreichenden Gehalt außerhalb von störenden Frequenzbereichen sicherzustellen, um eine Messgenauigkeit aufrechtzuerhalten.


     
    2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei ein Einstellen der Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz Folgendes umfasst:
    periodisches Verschieben einer Phase der Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz, um das periodische Rauschen zu entfernen, insbesondere periodisches Verschieben (65) der Phase des Sensorsteuersignals um 180 Grad.
     
    3. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 und ferner umfassend:

    vor einem Erfassen (64) der Rauschfrequenz, Erfassen (52) von Frequenzcharakteristika des Sensorsteuersignals; und

    Speichern (54) der Frequenzcharakteristika.


     
    4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 und ferner umfassend:
    Einstellen (67) der Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz, wenn die Rauschfrequenz ausreichend nahe den Frequenzcharakteristika des Sensorsteuersignals ist.
     
    5. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 und ferner umfassend:
    vor einem Erfassen der Rauschfrequenz:

    intermittierendes Sperren (62) des Sensorsteuersignals und dann Erfassen (64) der Rauschfrequenz oder

    Sperren (62) des Sensorsteuersignals als Reaktion auf eine Nutzeranfrage und dann Erfassen (64) der Rauschfrequenz als Reaktion auf eine Nutzeranfrage, um die Rauschfrequenz zu erfassen.


     
    6. Prozessvariablensender (10), der ein Sensorsignal von einem Prozessvariablensensor (22, 24) erfasst und den Sensor (22, 24) unter Verwendung eines Sensorsignals steuert, wobei der Sender (10) Folgendes umfasst:

    einen Rauschdetektor (18), der ein Rauschen, das eine Rauschfrequenz aufweist, auf dem Sensorsignal erfasst (64);

    eine Steuerung (20), die ein Sensorsteuersignal mit einer Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz erzeugt;

    wobei der Prozessor eingerichtet ist, um die Rauschfrequenz mit Frequenzcharakteristika des Sensorsteuersignals zu vergleichen; und um die Sensorsteuersignalfrequenz innerhalb eines Bereichs von Frequenzen intermittierend oder zufällig zu verändern (72), um einen ausreichenden Gehalt außerhalb von störenden Frequenzbereichen sicherzustellen, um eine Messgenauigkeit aufrechtzuerhalten.


     
    7. Prozessvariablensender (10) nach Anspruch 6, ferner umfassend:
    einen Frequenzcharakteristika-Datenspeicher, wobei der Prozessor (14) Frequenzcharakteristika des Steuersignals identifiziert (52) und die Frequenzcharakteristika in dem Frequenzcharakteristika-Datenspeicher speichert (54), wobei der Prozessor (14) insbesondere eingerichtet ist, um die Frequenzcharakteristika des Steuersignals als Verhältnis der Steuerfrequenz zu Oberwellen der Steuerfrequenz zu identifizieren.
     
    8. Prozessvariablensender (10) nach Anspruch 6, wobei der Prozessor (14) eingerichtet ist, um:
    die Steuerfrequenz um 180 Grad periodisch phasenzuverschieben (65).
     
    9. Prozessvariablensender (10), der ein Durchflusssignal, von einem magnetischen Durchflussmesser, empfängt (50; 60), das einen Durchfluss eines Prozessfluids durch eine Leitung angibt, wobei der Prozessvariablensender (10) Folgendes umfasst:

    eine Spulenantriebssteuerung (20), die ein Spulenantriebssignal erzeugt, um Spulen auf dem magnetischen Durchflussmesser mit einer Spulenantriebsfrequenz anzutreiben;

    einen Rauschdetektor (18), der ein periodisches Rauschen, das eine Rauschfrequenz aufweist, auf dem Durchflusssignal erfasst (64); und

    einen Prozessor (14), der eingerichtet ist, um das Spulenantriebssignal intermittierend zu sperren, so dass der Rauschdetektor (18) das periodische Rauschen erfassen kann, um die Rauschfrequenz mit gespeicherten Frequenzcharakteristika des Spulenantriebssignals zu vergleichen, und um

    die Spulenantriebsfrequenz innerhalb eines Bereichs von Frequenzen intermittierend oder zufällig zu verändern (72), um einen ausreichenden Gehalt außerhalb von störenden Frequenzbereichen sicherzustellen, um eine Messgenauigkeit aufrechtzuerhalten.


     
    10. Prozessvariablensender (10) nach Anspruch 9, ferner umfassend:
    einen Frequenz-Datenspeicher, wobei der Prozessor (14) die Frequenzcharakteristika des Spulenantriebssignals identifiziert (52) und sie in dem Frequenz-Datenspeicher speichert (54) .
     
    11. Prozessvariablensender (10) nach Anspruch 9, wobei der Prozessvariablensender (10) zusätzliche Sensorsignale von zusätzlichen Sensoren empfängt, die andere erfasste Prozessvariablen angeben, und wobei der Prozessor (14) Sensorsteuersignale, zum Steuern der zusätzlichen Sensorsignale, basierend auf einem Vergleich von Frequenzcharakteristika von Sensorsteuersignalen für die zusätzlichen Sensoren und der Rauschfrequenz des auf den zusätzlichen Sensorsignalen erfassten periodischen Rauschens einstellt.
     


    Revendications

    1. Procédé d'utilisation d'un émetteur de variable de processus (10) pour commander un capteur de variable de processus (22, 24) qui détecte une variable de processus dans un processus en cours, le procédé comprenant les étapes consistant à :

    appliquer un signal de commande de capteur ayant une fréquence de signal de commande de capteur au capteur de variable de processus (22, 24) ;

    recevoir (50 ; 60) un signal de capteur du capteur de variable de processus (22, 24) lié à la variable de processus, au signal de commande de capteur et à un bruit dans le processus ;

    détecter une fréquence de bruit à laquelle le bruit se produit sur le signal de capteur ;

    comparer la fréquence de bruit à une caractéristique de fréquence du signal de commande de capteur ; et

    changer de façon intermittente ou aléatoire (72) la fréquence de signal de commande de capteur dans une gamme de fréquences pour assurer un contenu suffisant en dehors des gammes de fréquences parasites afin de maintenir la précision de mesure.


     
    2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'étape consistant à ajuster la fréquence de signal de commande de capteur consiste à :
    décaler périodiquement une phase de la fréquence de signal de commande de capteur pour annuler le bruit périodique, en particulier décaler périodiquement (65) la phase du signal de commande de capteur de 180 degrés.
     
    3. Procédé selon la revendication 1 et comprenant en outre les étapes consistant à :

    avant de détecter (64) la fréquence de bruit, détecter (52) des caractéristiques de fréquence du signal de commande de capteur ; et

    stocker (54) les caractéristiques de fréquence.


     
    4. Procédé selon la revendication 1 et comprenant en outre l'étape consistant à :
    ajuster (67) la fréquence de signal de commande de capteur si la fréquence de bruit est suffisamment proche des caractéristiques de fréquence du signal de commande de capteur.
     
    5. Procédé selon la revendication 1 et comprenant en outre les étapes consistant à :
    avant de détecter la fréquence de bruit :
    désactiver de façon intermittente (62) le signal de commande de capteur et ensuite détecter (64) la fréquence de bruit ou désactiver (62) le signal de commande de capteur en réponse à une demande de l'utilisateur et ensuite détecter (64) la fréquence de bruit en réponse à une demande de l'utilisateur de détecter la fréquence de bruit.
     
    6. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) recevant un signal de capteur d'un capteur de variable de processus (22, 24) et commandant le capteur (22, 24) en utilisant un signal de commande, l'émetteur (10) comprenant :

    un détecteur de bruit (18) détectant (64) un bruit, ayant une fréquence de bruit, sur le signal de capteur ;

    un dispositif de commande (20) générant un signal de commande de capteur à une fréquence de signal de commande de capteur ;

    le processeur étant configuré pour comparer la fréquence de bruit à une caractéristique de fréquence du signal de commande de capteur ; et pour changer de façon intermittente ou aléatoire (72) la fréquence de signal de commande de capteur dans une gamme de fréquences pour assurer un contenu suffisant en dehors des gammes de fréquences parasites afin de maintenir la précision de mesure.


     
    7. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) selon la revendication 6 et comprenant en outre :
    une mémoire de données de caractéristiques de fréquence, le processeur (14) identifiant (52) les caractéristiques de fréquence du signal de commande et stockant (54) les caractéristiques de fréquence dans la mémoire de données de caractéristiques de fréquence, le processeur (14) étant en particulier configuré pour identifier les caractéristiques de fréquence du signal de commande comme un rapport de la fréquence de commande sur des harmoniques de la fréquence de commande.
     
    8. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) selon la revendication 6, dans lequel le processeur (14) est configuré pour :
    déphaser périodiquement (65) la fréquence de commande de 180 degrés.
     
    9. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) recevant (50 ; 60), d'un débitmètre magnétique, un signal d'écoulement indiquant l'écoulement d'un fluide de processus à travers un conduit, l'émetteur de variable de processus (10) comprenant :

    un dispositif de commande d'excitation de bobine (20) générant un signal d'excitation de bobine pour exciter des bobines sur le débitmètre magnétique à une fréquence d'excitation de bobine ;

    un détecteur de bruit (18) détectant (64) un bruit périodique, ayant une fréquence de bruit, sur le signal d'écoulement ; et

    un processeur (14) configuré pour

    désactiver de façon intermittente le signal d'excitation de bobine afin que le détecteur de bruit (18) puisse détecter le bruit périodique, pour comparer la fréquence de bruit à des caractéristiques de fréquence stockées du signal d'excitation de bobine, et pour

    changer de façon intermittente ou aléatoire (72) la fréquence d'excitation de bobine dans une gamme de fréquences pour assurer un contenu suffisant en dehors des gammes de fréquences parasites afin de maintenir la précision de mesure.


     
    10. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) selon la revendication 9, comprenant en outre ;
    une mémoire de données de fréquence, le processeur (14) identifiant (52) les caractéristiques de fréquence du signal d'excitation de bobine et les stockant (54) dans la mémoire de données de fréquence.
     
    11. Émetteur de variable de processus (10) selon la revendication 9, dans lequel l'émetteur de variable de processus (10) reçoit des signaux de capteurs supplémentaires provenant de capteurs supplémentaires, indiquant d'autres variables de processus détectées, et dans lequel le processeur (14) ajuste les signaux de commande de capteur, pour commander les signaux de capteurs supplémentaires, sur la base d'une comparaison des caractéristiques de fréquence des signaux de commande de capteur pour les capteurs supplémentaires et de la fréquence de bruit du bruit périodique détecté sur les signaux de capteurs supplémentaires.
     




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    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description