(19)
(11)EP 2 664 028 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
25.03.2020 Bulletin 2020/13

(21)Application number: 12702640.9

(22)Date of filing:  09.01.2012
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H01Q 1/48(2006.01)
H01Q 13/10(2006.01)
H01Q 1/24(2006.01)
H01Q 9/42(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2012/020662
(87)International publication number:
WO 2012/096894 (19.07.2012 Gazette  2012/29)

(54)

Electronic device having an IFA antenna integrated with a peripheral conductive housing member

Elektronisches Gerät mit einer mit einem leitfähigen Gehäuseperipherieteil integrierten IFA-Antenne

Dispositif électronique avec une antenne IFA intégrée avec un membre conducteur périphérique du boîtier


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 11.01.2011 US 201161431520 P
31.01.2011 US 201113018142

(43)Date of publication of application:
20.11.2013 Bulletin 2013/47

(73)Proprietor: Apple Inc.
Cupertino CA 95014 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • MERZ, Nicholas, G., L.
    Cupertino, CA 95014 (US)
  • MYERS, Scott, A.
    Cupertino, CA 95014 (US)
  • DARNELL, Dean, F.
    Cupertino, CA 95014 (US)
  • SCHLUB, Robert, W.
    Cupertino, CA 95014 (US)

(74)Representative: Froud, Christopher Andrew et al
Withers & Rogers LLP 4 More London Riverside
London, SE1 2AU
London, SE1 2AU (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 2 109 185
US-A1- 2008 074 329
US-A1- 2009 174 612
US-A1- 2004 257 283
US-A1- 2008 316 115
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    Background



    [0001] This relates generally to electronic devices, and, more particularly, to conductive electronic device structures such as structures associated with antennas for supporting wireless communications.

    [0002] Electronic devices such as cellular telephones and other devices often contain wireless communications circuitry. The wireless communications circuitry may include, for example, cellular telephone transceiver circuits for communicating with cellular telephone networks. Wireless communications circuitry in an electronic device may also include wireless local area network circuits and other wireless circuits. Antenna structures are used in transmitting and receiving wireless signals.

    [0003] To satisfy consumer demand for small form factor wireless devices, manufacturers are continually striving to implement wireless communications circuitry such as antennas using compact arrangements. At the same time, it may be desirable to include conductive structures such as metal device housing components in an electronic device. Because conductive components can affect radio-frequency performance, care must be taken when incorporating antennas into an electronic device that includes conductive structures. In some arrangements, it may be desirable to use conductive housing structures in forming antenna structures for a device. Doing so may entail formation of electrical connections between different portions of the device. For example, it may be desirable to form an electrical connection between internal device components and a conductive peripheral housing member. Electrical connection arrangements based on springs have been used to form such connections. Spring-based connections may be satisfactory in some situations, but pose challenges because they are generally not insulated from their surroundings and can be challenging to adjust during manufacturing. Springs also present the possibility of becoming loose during daily use, which could pose reliability challenges. Examples of prior art devices can be found disclosed in EP2109185, US2004257283, EP1093098, US2008/316115, US2008074329 and US2009/174612.

    [0004] It would therefore be desirable to be able to provide improved arrangements for forming electrical connections with conductive structures such as conductive electronic device housing members.

    Summary



    [0005] There is provided an electronic device according to the appended claims. Embodiments which do not fall within the scope of the claims do not describe part of the present invention.

    [0006] Electronic devices may be provided that contain wireless communications circuitry. The wireless communications circuitry may include antenna structures that are formed from conductive hcousing structures. For example, an electronic device may be provided that has an antenna formed from an internal ground plane and a peripheral conductive housing member.

    [0007] The ground plane and the peripheral conductive housing member may be separated by a gap. The antenna may include a conductive path that connects the peripheral conductive housing member and the internal ground plane across the gap.

    [0008] The conductive path may include a flex circuit. A metal structure may be welded to the peripheral conductive housing member. A solder pad and other traces in the flex circuit may be soldered to the metal structure at one end of the conductive path. At the other end of the conductive path the flex circuit may be attached to the ground plane using a bracket, screw, and screw boss.

    [0009] Further features of the invention, its nature and various advantages will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings and the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments.

    Brief Description of the Drawings



    [0010] 

    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an illustrative electronic device of the type that may be provided with antenna structures in which an electrical connection is made to a conductive housing structure such as a conductive peripheral housing member in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 2 is a top interior view of an electronic device of the type shown in FIG. 1 in which electrical connections are made to a conductive peripheral housing member in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 3 is a diagram showing illustrative structures that may be used in forming an electrical connection between an internal housing structure such as a ground plate member and a conductive peripheral housing member in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an interior portion of an electronic device of the type shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 showing how a flex circuit and associated structures may be used in forming an electrical connection to a conductive peripheral housing member in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of an electronic device having a flex circuit connection arrangement of the type shown in FIG. 4 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the flex circuit connection structures of FIG. 5 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional side view of a flex circuit attached to a conductive peripheral housing member in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 8 is a side view of flex circuit structures and a portion of a conductive peripheral housing member during assembly using a hot bar tool in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

    FIG. 9 is a side view of flex circuit structures and a portion of a conductive peripheral housing member during assembly using a hot bar tool and a support structure in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.


    Detailed Description



    [0011] Electronic devices may be provided with wireless communications circuitry. The wireless communications circuitry may be used to support wireless communications in one or more wireless communications bands. Antenna structures in an electronic device may be used in transmitting and receiving radio-frequency signals.

    [0012] An illustrative electronic device that contains wireless communications circuitry is shown in FIG. 1. Device 10 of FIG. 1 may be a notebook computer, a tablet computer, a computer monitor with an integrated computer, a desktop computer, or other electronic equipment. If desired, electronic device 10 may be a portable device such as a cellular telephone, a media player, other handheld devices, a wrist-watch device, a pendant device, an earpiece device, or other compact portable device.

    [0013] As shown in FIG. 1, device 10 may have a housing such as housing 11. Housing 11 may be formed from materials such as plastic, metal, carbon fiber and other fiber composites, ceramic, glass, wood, other materials, or combinations of these materials. Device 10 may be formed using a unibody construction in which some or all of housing 11 is formed from a single piece of material (e.g., a single cast or machined piece of metal, a single piece of molded plastic, etc.) or may be formed from frame structures, housing sidewall structures, and other structures that are assembled together using fasteners, adhesive, and other attachment mechanisms. In the illustrative arrangement shown in FIG. 1, housing 11 includes conductive peripheral housing member 12. Conductive peripheral housing member 12 may have a ring shape that runs around the rectangular periphery of device 10. One or more gaps such as gaps 30 may be formed in conductive peripheral housing member 12. Gaps such as gaps 30 may be filled with dielectric such as plastic and may interrupt the otherwise continuous shape of conductive peripheral housing member. Conductive peripheral housing member may have any suitable number of gaps 30 (e.g., more than one, more than two, three or more, less than three, etc.) .

    [0014] Conductive peripheral housing member 12 may be formed from a durable material such as metal. Stainless steel may be used for forming housing member 12 because stainless steel is aesthetically appealing, strong, and can be machined during manufacturing. Other metals may be used if desired. The rear face of housing 11 may be formed from plastic, glass, metal, ceramic composites, or other suitable materials. For example, the rear face of housing 11 may be formed form a plate of glass having regions that are backed by a layer of internal metal for added strength. Conductive peripheral housing member 12 may be relatively short in vertical dimension Z (e.g., to serve as a bezel for display 14) or may be taller (e.g., to serve as the sidewalls of housing 11 as shown in the illustrative arrangement of FIG. 1).

    [0015] Device 10 may include components such as buttons, input-output port connectors, ports for removable media, sensors, microphones, speakers, status indicators, and other device components. As shown in FIG. 1, for example, device 10 may include buttons such as menu button 16. Device 10 may also include a speaker port such as speaker port 18 (e.g., to serve as an ear speaker for device 10).

    [0016] One or more antennas may be formed in device 10. The antennas may, for example, be formed in locations such as locations 24 and 26 to provide separation from the conductive elements of display 14. Antennas may be formed using single band and multiband antenna structures. Examples of communications bands that may be covered by the antennas include cellular telephone bands (e.g., the bands at 850MHz, 900 MHz, 1800 MHz, 1900 MHz, and 2100 MHz), satellite navigation bands (e.g., the Global Positioning System band at 1575 MHz), wireless local area network bands such as the IEEE 802.11 (WiFi®) bands at 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz, the Bluetooth band at 2.4 GHz, etc. Examples of antenna configurations that may be used for the antennas in device 10 include monopole antennas, dipole antennas, strip antennas, patch antennas, inverted-F antennas, coil antennas, planar inverted-F antennas, open slot antennas, closed slot antennas, loop antennas, hybrid antennas that include antenna structures of multiple types, or other suitable antenna structures.

    [0017] Device 10 may include one or more displays such as display 14. Display 14 may be a liquid crystal display (LCD), an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display, a plasma display, an electronic ink display, etc. A touch sensor may be incorporated into display 14 (i.e., display 14 may be a touch screen). The touch sensor may be an acoustic touch sensor, a resistive touch sensor, a piezoelectric touch sensor, a capacitive touch sensor (e.g., a touch sensor based on an array of indium tin oxide capacitor electrodes), or a touch sensor based on other touch technologies.

    [0018] Display 14 may be covered by a transparent planar conductive member such as a layer of glass or plastic. The cover layer for display 14, which is sometimes referred to as a cover glass layer or cover glass, may extend over substantially all of the front face of device 10, as shown in FIG. 1. The rectangular center portion of the cover glass (surrounded by dashed line 20 in FIG. 1) contains an array of image pixels and is sometimes referred to as the active portion of the display. The peripheral outer portion of the cover glass (i.e., rectangular peripheral ring 22 of FIG. 1) does not contain any active image pixels and is sometimes referred to as the inactive portion of display 14. A patterned opaque masking layer such as a peripheral ring of black ink may be formed under inactive portion 22 to hide interior device components from view by a user.

    [0019] FIG. 2 is a top view of the interior of device 10 showing how antennas 40L and 40U may be implemented within housing 12. As shown in FIG. 2, ground plane G may be formed within housing 12. Ground plane G may form antenna ground for antennas 40L and 40U. Because ground plane G may serve as antenna ground, ground plane G may sometimes be referred to as antenna ground, ground, or a ground plane element (as examples). One or more printed circuit boards or other mounting structures may be used to mount components 31 in device 10. Components 31 may include radio-frequency transceiver circuits that are coupled to antennas 40U and 40L using transmission lines 52L and 52U, processors, application-specific integrated circuits, cameras, sensors, switches, connectors, buttons, and other electronic device components.

    [0020] In central portion C of device 10, ground plane G may be formed by conductive structures such as a conductive housing midplate member (sometimes referred to as an internal housing plate or planer internal housing structures). The structures of ground plane G may be connected between the left and right edges of member 12. Printed circuit boards with conductive ground traces (e.g., one or more printed circuit boards used to mount components 31) may form part of ground plane G.

    [0021] The midplate member may have one or more individual sections (e.g., patterned sheet metal sections) that are welded together. Portions of the midplate structures may be covered with insert-molded plastic (e.g., to provide structural support in portions of the interior of device where no conductive ground is desired, such dielectric-filled portions of antennas 40U and 40L in regions 24 and 26).

    [0022] At ends 24 and 26 of device 10, the shape of ground plane G may be determined by the shapes and locations of conductive structures that are tied to ground. Ground plane G in the simplified layout of FIG. 2 has a straight upper edge UE and a straight lower edge LE. In actual devices, the upper and lower edges of ground plane G and the interior surface of conductive peripheral housing member 12 generally have more complex shapes determined by the shapes of individual conductive structures that are present in device 10. Examples of conductive structures that may overlap to form ground plane G and that may influence the shape of the inner surface of member 12 include housing structures (e.g., a conductive housing midplate structure, which may have protruding portions), conductive components (e.g., switches, cameras, data connectors, printed circuits such as flex circuits and rigid printed circuit boards, radio-frequency shielding cans, buttons and conductive button mounting structures), and other conductive structures in device 10. In the illustrative layout of FIG. 2, the portions of device 10 that are conductive and tied to ground to form part of ground plane G are shaded and are contiguous with central portion C.

    [0023] Openings such as openings 138 and 140 (sometimes referred to as gaps) may be formed between ground plane G and respective portions of peripheral conductive housing member 12. Openings 138 and 140 may be filled with air, plastic, and other dielectrics and are therefore sometimes referred to as dielectric-filled gaps or openings. Openings 138 and 140 may be associated with antenna structures 40U and 40L.

    [0024] Lower antenna 40L may be formed by a loop antenna structure having a shape that is determined at least partly by the shape of the lower portions of ground plane G and conductive housing member 12. In the example of FIG. 2, opening 138 is depicted as being rectangular, but this is merely illustrative. In practice, the shape of opening 138 may be dictated by the placement of conductive structures in region 26 such as a microphone, flex circuit traces, a data port connector, buttons, a speaker, etc.

    [0025] Lower antenna 40L may be fed using an antenna feed made up of positive antenna feed terminal 58L and ground antenna feed terminal 54L. Transmission line 52L may be coupled to the antenna feed for lower antenna 40L. Gap 30' may form a capacitance that helps configure the frequency response of antenna 40L. If desired, device 10 may have conductive housing portions, matching circuit elements, and other structures and components that help match the impedance of transmission line 52L to antenna 40L.

    [0026] Antenna 40U may be a two-branch inverted-F antenna. Transmission line 52U may be used to feed antenna 40U at antenna feed terminals 58U and 54U. Conductive structures 150 may form a shorting path that bridges dielectric opening 140 and electrically shorts ground plane G to peripheral housing member 12. Conductive structure 148 (which may be formed using structures of the type used in forming structures 150 or other suitable structures) and matching circuit M may be used to connect antenna feed terminal 58U to peripheral conductive member 12 at point 152. Conductive structures such as structures 148 and 150 (which are sometimes referred to as conductive paths) may be formed by flex circuit traces, conductive housing structures, springs, screws, welded connections, solder joints, brackets, metal plates, or other conductive structures.

    [0027] Gaps such as gaps 30', 30", and 30''' (e.g., gaps 30 of FIG. 1) may be present in peripheral conductive member 12. A phantom gap may be provided in the lower right-hand portion of device 10 for aesthetic symmetry if desired. The presence of gaps 30', 30'', and 30''' may divide peripheral conductive housing member 12 into segments. As shown in FIG. 2, peripheral conductive member 12 may include first segment 12-1, second segment 12-2, and third segment 12-3.

    [0028] Segment 12-1 may form antenna resonating element arms for antenna 40U. In particular, a first portion (segment) of segment 12-1 may extend from point 152 (where segment 12-1 is fed) to the end of segment 12-1 that is defined by gap 30" and a second portion (segment) of segment 12-1 may extend from point 152 to the opposing end of segment 12-1 that is defined by gap 30"'. The first and second portions of segment 12-1 may form respective branches of an inverted F antenna and may be associated with respective low band (LB) and high band (HB) antenna resonances for antenna 40U. The relative positions of structures 148 and 150 along the length of member 12-1 may affect the response of antenna 40U and may be selected to tune antenna 40U. Antenna tuning adjustments may also be made by adjusting matching circuit M, by adjusting the configuration of components used in forming paths 148 and 150, by adjusting the shapes of opening 140, etc. Antenna 40L may likewise be adjusted.

    [0029] With one illustrative arrangement, antenna 40L may cover the transmit and receive sub-bands in five communications bands (e.g., 850 MHz, 900 MHz, 1800 MHz, 1900 MHz, and 2100 MHz). Antenna 40U may, as an example, be configured to cover a subset of these five illustrative communications bands. For example, antenna 40U may be configured to cover a two receive bands of interest and, with tuning, four receive bands of interest.

    [0030] Illustrative structures that may be used to form shorting path 150 of FIG. 2 (e.g., the electrical path in antenna 40U that spans peripherally enclosed dielectric opening 140 and to short conductive peripheral housing member 12 to ground plane G) are shown schematically in FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 3, path 150 may include one or more components such as flex circuit 160 that can be adjusted as part of the manufacturing process used to form device 10. Flex circuits, which are also sometimes referred to as flexible printed circuits, contain layers of flexible dielectric (typically polyimide or other flexible polymer sheets) and conductive traces (e.g. metal traces such as copper traces or copper traces coated with gold). The layout of the trace pattern on a flex circuit can be adjusted separately from the layout of the remaining structures in device 10 (e.g., the size and shape of structural members such as midplate structures G and conductive peripheral housing member 12). Tuning components such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors can also be added to a flex circuit. Adjustments to antenna 40U may generally be made more readily by changing the tuning components and trace layout for a structure such as flex circuit 160 than by changing the machining of member 12 or other housing structures.

    [0031] As shown in FIG. 3, flex circuit 160 includes one or more traces such as trace 162. Changes that may be made to path 150 to adjust antenna 40U include changes to the length of trace 162, changes to the width of trace 162, changes to the shape of trace 162, the addition or removal of matching circuit components on flex circuit 162 such as the addition or removal of capacitors, resistors, inductors, and other changes to the properties of flex circuit 160 and other structures shown in FIG. 3.

    [0032] In the illustrative arrangement of FIG. 3, flex circuit 160 has been connected to conductive peripheral housing member 12 (e.g., housing member segment 12-1) using a combination of solder and welds. Welds 164 have been used to connect metal member 166 to conductive peripheral housing member 12. Metal member 166 may be a metal plate having one or more openings (not shown in FIG. 3) that permit solder 172 to penetrate and help hold member 166 in place. Solder 172 may form a connection between metal member 166 and traces on flex circuit 160 such as solder pad 168.

    [0033] Flex circuit dielectric layer portions such as dielectric structures 170 may help prevent solder 172 from flowing under metal member 166 in the vicinity of welds 164. The process of forming welds 164 tends to disrupt the surface of member 166 in the vicinity of welds 164 (e.g., by disrupting or even removing some of the surface coating layer of member 166 in configurations where a solder-compatible coating is formed on member 166). This disrupted surface on member 166 is not as suitable as other portions of member 166 (e.g., the portions of member 166 in region 184) for forming consistent solder joints with solder 172. It may therefore be desirable to interpose dielectric structures such as structures 170 between flex circuit 160 and member 166 in the regions of member 166 that have been exposed to welding (i.e., the portions of member 166 in the vicinity of welds 164 in the FIG. 3 example). Because structures 170 cover the edges of solder pad 168 (in the illustrative arrangement of FIG. 3), these portions of solder pad 168 will repel solder 172. Solder 172 will therefore be confined to the portions of member 166 away from welds 164.

    [0034] To ensure satisfactory formation of welds 164 between member 166 and housing member 12 while simultaneously forming a satisfactory solder joint between member 166 and solder pad 168 on flex circuit 160, it may be desirable to form member 166 from a material such as nickel (or other materials such a tin, gold, etc.). As an example, member 166 may be formed from a stainless steel plate that has been plated with nickel or other solder-compatible coating. The nickel coating or other solder-compatible coating on member 166 may help solder 172 adhere to member 166 while forming a good electrical connection between solder 172 and member 166. Solder pad 168 may be formed from gold plated copper or other conductor that forms a satisfactory bond with solder 172.

    [0035] Traces 162 in flex circuit 160 may be soldered to bracket 174 using solder 176. If desired, bracket 174 may be soldered to flex circuit 160 before flex circuit 160 is installed in device 10 to form path 150. Metal screw 178 may be used to form an electrical and mechanical connection to metal screw boss 180. Screw boss 180 may be welded to ground plane G (e.g., a metal midplate member or other internal housing structures) using welds 182. The metal midplate member or other structures of ground plane G may be formed from stainless steel (e.g., sheet metal) structures that have been machined to form mounting features for receiving internal device components.

    [0036] FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of illustrative structures that may be used in forming conductive path 150. As shown in FIG. 4, conductive peripheral housing member may have a feature such as lip 186 or other protruding structure to which member 166 may be attached (e.g., using welds 164 of FIG. 3 to attach member 166 to the underside of lip 186). Solder may flow into hole 194 to help hold the structures of path 150 together following soldering.

    [0037] Bracket 174 may have prongs 190 surrounding opening 192. Opening 192 may receive screw 178 when screw 178 is screwed into screw boss 180 (FIG. 3). When assembled, current can flow from the internal traces of flex circuit 160 into bracket 174, screw 178, screw boss 180, and into ground G (to which boss 180 is connected).

    [0038] FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of device 10 in the vicinity of path 150. Ground plane G (e.g., the midplate housing structure for device 10) may include regions such as plastic-coated sheet metal region 198. Plastic extension plate 196 extends into region 140 along the upper edge of ground G. Because extension plate 196 is formed from dielectric, plate 196 forms part of dielectric opening 140.

    [0039] Shielding layer portions 170 (e.g., a layer of patterned polyimide associated with flex circuit 160) may cover only part of each end of solder pad 168 (i.e., the portion under welds 164 between member 166 and lip 186 of peripheral conductive housing member 12), so that the exposed portion of solder pad 168 that is visible in FIG. 5 forms a "T" shape. Other patterns of polyimide or other materials may be used to prevent solder on pad 168 from contacting the underside of member 166 in the vicinity of welds 164 if desired.

    [0040] FIG. 6 is perspective view of the interior portions of device 10 of FIG. 5. As shown in FIG. 6, when member 166 is attached to the lower portion of lip 168 of peripheral conductive housing member 12, a portion of member 166 may protrude sufficiently to expose a portion of opening 194. Pad 168 may also protrude somewhat from under member 166.

    [0041] A cross-sectional side view of member 166 on peripheral conductive housing member 12 taken along line 200 of FIG. 6 and viewed in direction 202 is shown in FIG. 7. As shown in FIG. 7, the protrusion of solder pad 168 from under the edge of member 166 allows solder portion 172-1 to extend up front face 204 of member 166. Hole 194 allows solder 172-2 to extend up front face 206 of lip portion 186 of peripheral conductive housing member. Distributing solder 172 in this way may help hold the structures of FIG. 7 in place.

    [0042] Soldering operations may be performed using a hot-bar technique of the type illustrated in FIG. 8. As shown in FIG. 8, the underside of member 166 may be coated with solder flux 212 following welding of member 166 to peripheral conductive housing member 12 with welds 164. Hot-bar soldering head 208 may be moved upwards in direction 210. This compresses flex circuit 160 against member 166 and peripheral conductive housing member 12. Solder 172 is melted by the heat from hot bar 208, thereby forming a solder joint between the traces of flex circuit 160 and member 166. Member 166 is preferably formed from a material that accepts solder joints (e.g., nickel-plated stainless steel). If desired, a portion of peripheral conductive member 12 may be machined to form structure 166 and plated with nickel or other suitable substances for facilitating solder joint formation. The use of a separate member such as member 166 that is welded to peripheral conductive housing member 12 is merely illustrative.

    [0043] Another illustrative hot-bar soldering arrangement that may be used in attaching flex circuit 160 to peripheral conductive housing member 12 is shown in FIG. 9. With an arrangement of the type shown in FIG. 9, hot-bar soldering head 208 may bear against peripheral conductive housing member 12 in direction 214, rather than direction 210. To ensure that the structures of FIG. 9 are compressed together during soldering, support 216 may be press against flex circuit 160 in opposing direction 210.

    [0044] The use of hot bar soldering to form the connection between flex circuit 160 and member 166 and thereby peripheral conductive housing member 12 is merely illustrative. Other types of connections may be formed if desired.

    [0045] For example, laser soldering techniques may be used to supply the heat necessary to melt solder 172 instead of using hot bar 208.

    [0046] As another example, a piece of self-igniting material (e.g., NanofoilD) may be placed in the solder joint in place of solder flux 212. An exposed tail portion of the self-igniting material may be exposed to laser light to initiate ignition. The self-igniting material may then consume itself and generate sufficient heat to form the solder joint.

    [0047] If desired, member 166 may be soldered to flex circuit 160 before attachment to peripheral conductive housing member 12. Following attachment of member 166 and flex 160, the assembly formed by member 166 and flex 160 may be welded to peripheral conductive housing member 12.

    [0048] Materials such as conductive epoxy or other conductive adhesives may also be used in attaching flex circuit 160. With this type of arrangement, solder 172 may be replaced with conductive adhesive.

    [0049] The use of conductive adhesive or solder can be reduced or eliminated by treating the surfaces of the components that are being connected. For example, a diamond-impregnated gold plating layer may be formed on pad 168. Flex circuit 160 may then be compressed against peripheral conductive housing member 12 using a bracket with a rubber shim. When compressed in this way, the sharp diamond particles or other particles in the surface of flex circuit 160 may penetrate into peripheral conductive housing member 12 to form a satisfactory electrical contact.

    [0050] If desired, member 166 may be plated differently on each of its sides. For example, one side of member 166 may be plated with nickel (e.g., to receive solder 172) and the other side of member 166 may be plated with a substance that is optimized for forming welds 164 or may be left unplated. As another example, a tin-based plating may be formed adjacent to solder 172 and flex circuit 160 and a nickel plating layer may be formed on the side of member 166 adjacent to welds 164. Gold plating may be formed on the solder side and the other side left unplated, etc. Using a plating configuration in which one side is optimized for forming solder joints (e.g., using tin plating or nickel plating) while the other side is optimized for forming welds (e.g., by being left unplated rather than including a coating such as tin that might impede welds) may help member 166 form a connection both to structures such as member 12 that benefit from the use of welds and structures such as pad 168 and flex circuit 160 that benefit from the use of solder.


    Claims

    1. An electronic device (10), comprising:

    an inverted-F antenna (40U);

    a housing (11), wherein the housing (11) comprises a peripheral conductive housing member (12) that runs around edges of the housing (11);

    an antenna ground plane (G) for the inverted-F antenna (40U), wherein a segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12) forms a resonating element arm for the inverted-F antenna (40U), and wherein the antenna ground plane (G) and the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12) are separated by a gap (140);

    characterized by:
    a conductive shorting path (150) that bridges the gap (140) and couples the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12) to the antenna ground plane (G), wherein the conductive shorting path (150) comprises a flex circuit (160) that is attached to the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12), the flex circuit (160) comprises a flexible polymer substrate that bridges the gap (140), the flex circuit (160) further comprises a conductive trace (162), and the conductive shorting path (150) further comprises a solder pad (168) that electrically connects the conductive trace (162) to the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12) .


     
    2. The electronic device (10) defined in claim 1 wherein the gap (140) comprises a dielectric-filled opening that includes at least some plastic.
     
    3. The electronic device (10) defined in any preceding claim further comprising a metal structure (166) that forms part of the conductive shorting path (150), wherein the metal structure electrically connects the solder pad (168) to the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing (12).
     
    4. The electronic device (10) defined in claim 3 wherein the metal structure (166) comprises a first metal coated with a second metal.
     
    5. The electronic device (10) defined in either of claims 3 or 4 wherein the metal structure (166) comprises a metal plate (166).
     
    6. The electronic device (10) defined in claim 5 further comprising welds (164) with which the metal plate (166) is welded to the segment (12-1) of the peripheral housing conductive member (12).
     
    7. The electronic device (10) defined in either of claims 5 or 6 further comprising solder with which the metal plate (166) is connected to the solder pad (168).
     
    8. The electronic device (10) defined in any preceding claim wherein the peripheral conductive housing member (12) comprises stainless steel.
     
    9. The electronic device (10) defined in claim 7 wherein the metal plate (166) has opposing first and second surfaces, wherein the first surface is attached to the segment (12-1) of the peripheral conductive housing member (12), and wherein the second surface has a solder-compatible coating to which the solder (172) is connected.
     
    10. The electronic device (10) defined in any preceding claim further comprising a screw (178) and a bracket (174) configured to attach the trace (162) in the flex circuit (160) to the antenna ground plane (G).
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10), umfassend:

    eine Inverted-F-Antenne (40U);

    ein Gehäuse (11), wobei das Gehäuse (11) ein peripheres leitendes Gehäuseelement (12) umfasst, das um die Kanten des Gehäuses (11) herum verläuft;

    eine Antennenmasseebene (G) für die Inverted-F-Antenne (40U), wobei ein Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) einen Resonanzelementarm für die Inverted-F-Antenne (40U) bildet, und wobei die Antennenmasseebene (G) und das Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) durch einen Spalt (140) getrennt sind;

    gekennzeichnet durch:
    einen leitenden Kurzschlusspfad (150), der den Spalt (140) überbrückt und das Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) mit der Antennenmasseebene (G) koppelt, wobei der leitende Kurzschlusspfad (150) eine flexible Schaltung (160) umfasst, die an dem Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) befestigt ist, die flexible Schaltung (160) ein flexibles Polymersubstrat umfasst, das den Spalt (140) überbrückt, die flexible Schaltung (160) ferner eine Leiterbahn (162) umfasst und der leitende Kurzschlusspfad (150) ferner ein Lötpad (168) umfasst, das die Leiterbahn (162) mit dem Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) elektrisch verbindet.


     
    2. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Spalt (140) eine mit Dielektrikum gefüllte Öffnung umfasst, die zumindest etwas Kunststoff enthält.
     
    3. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend eine Metallstruktur (166), die einen Teil des leitenden Kurzschlusspfades (150) bildet, wobei die Metallstruktur das Lötpad (168) mit dem Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuses (12) elektrisch verbindet.
     
    4. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach Anspruch 3, wobei die Metallstruktur (166) ein erstes Metall umfasst, das mit einem zweiten Metall beschichtet ist.
     
    5. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach einem der Ansprüche 3 oder 4, wobei die Metallstruktur (166) eine Metallplatte (166) umfasst.
     
    6. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach Anspruch 5, ferner umfassend Schweißnähte (164), mit denen die Metallplatte (166) an das Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) geschweißt wird.
     
    7. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach einem der Ansprüche 5 oder 6 ferner umfassend Lot, mit dem die Metallplatte (166) mit dem Lötpad (168) verbunden ist.
     
    8. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das periphere leitende Gehäuseelement (12) Edelstahl umfasst.
     
    9. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach Anspruch 7, wobei die Metallplatte (166) eine erste und eine zweite Oberfläche aufweist, die einander gegenüberliegen, wobei die erste Oberfläche an dem Segment (12-1) des peripheren leitenden Gehäuseelements (12) befestigt ist und wobei die zweite Oberfläche eine lotkompatible Beschichtung aufweist, mit der das Lot (172) verbunden ist.
     
    10. Elektronische Vorrichtung (10) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend eine Schraube (178) und eine Klammer (174), die konfiguriert sind, um die Leiterbahn (162) in der flexiblen Schaltung (160) an der Antennenmasseebene (G) zu befestigen.
     


    Revendications

    1. Un dispositif électronique (10) comprenant :

    une antenne en F inversé (40U) ;

    un boîtier (11), le boîtier (11) comprenant un élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) qui fait le tour des bords du boîtier (11) ;

    un plan de masse d'antenne (G) pour l'antenne en F inversé (40U), un segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) formant un bras d'élément résonateur pour l'antenne en F inversé (40U), et le plan de masse d'antenne (G) et le segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) étant séparés par un intervalle (140) ;

    caractérisé par :
    un trajet de court-circuit conducteur (150) qui enjambe l'intervalle (140) et qui couple le segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) au plan de masse d'antenne (G), le trajet de court-circuit conducteur (150) comprenant un circuit flexible (160) qui est solidarisé au segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12), le circuit flexible (160) comprenant un substrat en polymère flexible qui enjambe l'intervalle (140), le circuit flexible (160) comprenant en outre une piste conductrice (162), et le trajet de court-circuit conducteur (150) comprenant en outre un plot de brasure (168) qui relie électriquement la piste conductrice (162) au segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12).


     
    2. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans la revendication 1, dans lequel l'intervalle (140) comprend une ouverture remplie d'un diélectrique qui comprend au moins une partie en plastique.
     
    3. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans l'une des revendications précédentes, comprenant en outre une structure métallique (166) qui fait partie du trajet de court-circuit conducteur (150), la structure métallique reliant électriquement le plot de brasure (168) au segment (12-1) du boîtier conducteur périphérique (12).
     
    4. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans la revendication 3, dans lequel la structure métallique (166) comprend un premier métal revêtu d'un second métal.
     
    5. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans l'une ou l'autre des revendications 3 ou 4, dans lequel la structure métallique (166) comprend une plaque métallique (166) .
     
    6. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans la revendication 5, comprenant en outre des points de soudure (164) par lesquels la plaque métallique (166) est soudée au segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12).
     
    7. Le dispositif électronique défini dans l'une ou l'autre des revendications 5 ou 6, comprenant en outre une brasure avec laquelle la plaque métallique est connectée au plot de brasure (168).
     
    8. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans l'une des revendications précédentes, dans lequel l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) comprend de l'acier inoxydable.
     
    9. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans la revendication 7, dans lequel la plaque métallique (166) possède une première et une seconde surface opposées, la première surface étant solidarisée au segment (12-1) de l'élément de boîtier conducteur périphérique (12) et la seconde surface possédant un revêtement compatible avec une brasure, à laquelle la brasure (172) est reliée.
     
    10. Le dispositif électronique (10) défini dans l'une des revendications précédentes, comprenant en outre une vis (178) et une patte (174) configurées pour solidariser la piste (162) du circuit flexible (160) au plan de masse d'antenne (G).
     




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    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description