(19)
(11)EP 2 684 948 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
04.12.2019 Bulletin 2019/49

(21)Application number: 12757313.7

(22)Date of filing:  07.03.2012
(51)Int. Cl.: 
C12N 1/19  (2006.01)
C12N 15/09  (2006.01)
C12P 21/08  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/JP2012/055825
(87)International publication number:
WO 2012/124567 (20.09.2012 Gazette  2012/38)

(54)

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ANTIBODIES OR ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS USING YEAST HAVING KNOCKED OUT VPS GENE

VERFAHREN ZUR HERSTELLUNG VON ANTIKÖRPER ODER ANTIKÖRPERFRAGMENTEN UNTER VERWENDUNG VON HEFE MIT EINEM ABGESCHALTETEN VPS-GEN

PROCÉDÉ POUR LA PRODUCTION D'ANTICORPS OU DE FRAGMENTS D'ANTICORPS METTANT EN OEUVRE DE LA LEVURE COMPRENANT UN GÈNE VPS AYANT SUBI UNE INVALIDATION GÉNÉTIQUE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 11.03.2011 JP 2011054637

(43)Date of publication of application:
15.01.2014 Bulletin 2014/03

(73)Proprietor: Kaneka Corporation
Osaka-shi, Osaka 530-8288 (JP)

(72)Inventors:
  • NISHIYAMA Tozo
    Takasago-shi Hyogo 676-8688 (JP)
  • SAKAI Yasuyoshi
    Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8264 (JP)

(74)Representative: Hoffmann Eitle 
Patent- und Rechtsanwälte PartmbB Arabellastraße 30
81925 München
81925 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-94/25591
WO-A1-2011/053545
JP-A- 2009 060 797
JP-A- 2010 193 869
WO-A1-2011/053541
JP-A- 2009 060 797
JP-A- 2009 240 185
US-A1- 2006 148 039
  
  • ALIMJAN IDIRIS & HIDEKI TOHDA & MAYUMI SASAKI & KATSUNORI OKADA & HIROMICHI KUMAGAI & YUKO GIGA-HAMA & KAORU TAKEGAWA: "Enhanced protein secretion from multiprotease-deficient fission yeast by modification of its vacuolar protein sorting pathway", APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, SPRINGER VERLAG, BERLIN, DE, vol. 85, no. 3, 11 August 2009 (2009-08-11), pages 667-677, XP008156420, ISSN: 0175-7598, DOI: 10.1007/S00253-009-2151-0
  • MOROZKINA ELENA V ET AL: "Proteinase B disruption is required for high level production of human mechano-growth factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.", JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 2010, vol. 18, no. 3, 2010, pages 188-194, XP008172066, ISSN: 1660-2412
  • ABDEL-SALAM, H. A. ET AL.: 'Expression of mouse anticreatine kinase (MAK33) monoclonal antibody in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.' APPL. MICROBIOL. BIOTECHNOL. vol. 56, 2001, pages 157 - 164, XP008156029
  • IDIRIS, ALIMJAN ET AL.: 'Enhanced protein secretion from multiprotease-deficient fission yeast by modification of its vacuolar protein sorting pathway.' APPL. MICROBIOL. BIOTECHNOL. vol. 85, 2010, pages 667 - 677, XP008156420
  • AGAPHONOV, MICHAEL ET AL.: 'Defect of vacuolar protein sorting stimulates proteolytic processing of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.' FEMS YEAST RES. vol. 5, 2005, pages 1029 - 1035, XP005137657
  • NETT, JUERGEN H.: 'Production of Antibodies in Pichia pastoris.' THERAPEUTIC MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES: FROM BENCH TO CLINIC. 2009, pages 573 - 588, XP055103908
  • CREGG, JAMES M. ET AL.: 'Recombinant protein expression in Pichia pastoris.' MOL. BIOTECHNOL. vol. 16, 2000, pages 23 - 52, XP001078911
  • GRAUPNER, STEFAN ET AL.: 'Identification of multiple plasmids released from recombinant genomes of Hansenula polymorpha by transformation of Escherichia coli.' APPL. ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. vol. 62, no. 5, 1996, pages 1839 - 1841, XP055103911
  • FARR, JEAN-CLAUDE ET AL.: 'Roles of Pichia pastoris Uvrag in vacuolar protein sorting and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex in phagophore elongation in autophagy pathways.' AUTOPHAGY. vol. 6, no. 1, 2010, pages 86 - 99, XP055103912
  • STASYK, OLEH V. ET AL.: 'A Pichia pastoris VPS15 homologue is required in selective peroxisome autophagy.' CURR. GENET. vol. 36, 1999, pages 262 - 269, XP055103913
  • AGAPHONOV, M.O. ET AL.: 'Inactivation of the Hansenula polymorpha PMR1 gene affects cell viability and functioning of the secretory pathway.' FEMS YEAST RES. vol. 7, 2007, pages 1145 - 1152, XP055103914
  • KOUSUKE KURODA ET AL: "Antibody expression in protease-defficient strains of the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta", FEMS YEAST RES., WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD, GB, NL, vol. 7, no. 8, 1 December 2007 (2007-12-01), pages 1307-1316, XP008127158, ISSN: 1567-1356, DOI: 10.1111/J.1567-1364.2007.00291.X [retrieved on 2007-08-23]
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

Technical Field



[0001] The present invention relates to a method for producing an antibody or an antibody fragment using a yeast host with the improved secretion productivity of a heterologous protein via disruption of at least one vacuolar protein sorting gene (VPS, selected from the group consisting of VPS8, VPS10 and VPS15, and the simultaneous disruption of the vacuolar protease B gene (PBR1 gene).

Background Art



[0002] In recent years, host strains for production of proteins of interest, such as animal cells (e.g., CHO), insects (e.g., silk worm), insect cells, animals (e.g., chickens and cows), and microorganisms (e.g., E. coli and yeast), have been used in order to produce proteins via genetic recombination. In particular, yeasts can be cultured in large-scale, high-density culture systems in cost-effective media, and proteins can be produced at low cost. In addition, proteins can be secreted in a culture solution of yeast cells by using a signal peptide or the like, therefore, a process for purifying proteins is easy.

[0003] When a yeast host is used, however, heterologous protein production is not always satisfactory. Thus, improvement of protein productivity has been attempted through use of a potent promoter or improvement, such as reinforcement of chaperon functions via introduction of the chaperon gene, or disruption of a protease gene possessed by a yeast host.

[0004] Concerning heterologous protein secretion into a culture solution, an improvement in the productivity achieved via disruption of the vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene was reported in addition to the improvement described above.

[0005] While 61 types of VPS genes denoted as VPS1 to VPS75 are known to exist in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of such VPS genes are not effective. It is reported that the secretion productivity of a heterologous protein is improved via disruption of the particular VPS gene (Non-Patent Document 1; Patent Documents 1, 2, and 3).

[0006] In addition, genes that are effective to achieve the improved secretion productivity of a heterologous protein vary depending on yeast species. For example, disruption of the VPS10 gene is effective for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Non-Patent Document 1), although such disruption is not effective for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Patent Document 1).

Prior Art Documents


Patent Documents



[0007] 

Patent Document 1: JP 2009-60797 A

Patent Document 2: JP 2009-240185 A

Patent Document 3: JP 2010-193869 A


Non-Patent Document



[0008] Non-Patent Document 1: Alimjan, I. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 2010, vol. 85, pp. 667-677

[0009] JP 2009 060797 A relates to a method of selecting a heterologous protein secretion highly productive strain.

[0010] Idiris et al., Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2010), vol. 85, pp. 667-677 relates to enhanced protein secretion from multiprotease-deficient fission yeast by modification of its vacuolar protein sorting pathway.

[0011] US 2006/0148039 A1 relates to methylotroph producing mammalian type sugar chain. Morozkina E.V. et al., J. Mol. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2010), vol. 18, pp. 188-194 describes that proteinase B disruption is required for high level production of human mechano-growth factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

[0012] WO 2011/053541 A1 relates to methods for the production of recombinant proteins with improved secretion efficiencies.

[0013] WO 2011/053545 A1 relates to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris.

[0014] US 61/350,668 relates to methods for the production of recombinant proteins with improved secretion efficiencies.

[0015] Abdel-Salam H. A. et al., Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2001), vol. 56, pp. 157-164 relates to expression of mouse anticreatine kinase (MAK33) monoclonal antibody in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

[0016] Agaphonov M. et al., FEMS Yeast Research (2005), vol. 5, pp. 1029-1035 describes that defect of vacuolar protein sorting stimulates proteolytic processing of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

[0017] WO 94/25591 A1 relates to production of antibodies or (functionalized) fragments thereof derived from heavy chain immunoglobulins of Camelidae.

[0018] Kousuke Kuroda et al., FEMS Yeast Research (2007), vol. 7, pp. 1307-1316 relates to antibody expression in protease-deficient strains of the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta.

Summary of the Invention


Problem to be Solved by the Invention



[0019] The influence of disruption of the VPS gene imposed on secretory production of a heterologous protein in a methanol-assimilating yeast having properties significantly different from those of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was unknown. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to discover an effective VPS gene to be disrupted in a methanol-assimilating yeast, and to improve the secretion productivity of heterologous protein.

Means for Solving the Problem



[0020] The present invention concerns:
  1. 1. A method for producing an antibody or antibody fragment, characterized by comprising using Pichia angusta with disruption of the vacuolar protein sorting gene (VPS gene) and with disruption of the vacuolar protease B gene (PRB1 gene) simultaneously with the VPS gene as a host for secretory production of the antibody or antibody fragment,
    wherein the VPS gene is at least one gene selected from the group consisting of VPS8, VPS10, and VPS15.


[0021] This patent application claims priority from Japanese Patent Application No. 2011-054637 filed on March 11, 2011.

Effects of the Invention



[0022] The present disclosure provides a method for producing a heterologous protein using a yeast host with the improved secretion productivity of a heterologous protein via disruption of the VPS gene.

Embodiments for Carrying out the Invention



[0023] The "methanol-assimilating yeast" for use in the present invention is the yeast Pichia angusta which can grow with the use of methanol as a sole carbon source.

[0024] Examples of preferable Pichia angusta strains include, but are not particularly limited to, NCYC495 (ATCC14754), 8V (ATCC34438), and DL-1 (ATCC26012). Such strains can be obtained from the American Type Culture Collection or other institutions. Strains derived from such strains can also be used, and examples of leucine auxotrophs include NCYC495-derived BY4329, 8V-derived BY5242, and DL-1-derived BY5243. These strains can be distributed by the National BioResource Project.

[0025] Further strains which can be used, but which are not part of the invention, refer to Pichia pastoris strains Y-11430 and X-33. Such strains can be obtained from the Northern Regional Research Laboratory or other institutions. Strains derived from such strains can also be used.

[0026] Pichia minuta strains NBRC1473, NBRC0975, NBRC10402, and NBRC10746.

[0027] Pichia methanolica strains NBRC1909, NBRC10704, and NBRC101503.

[0028] Candida boidinii strains NBRC1967, NBRC10035, NBRC10240, NBRC10329, NBRC10574, NBRC10871, NBRC101490, and NBRC101491. These strains can be obtained from the NITE Biological Resource Center or other institutions. Strains derived from such strains can also be used.

[0029] The "heterologous protein" to be produced by the method of the present invention is an antibody or an antibody fragment.

[0030] Further heterologous proteins which can be used are, for example, an enzyme derived from a microorganism or a protein produced by a multicellular organism, such as an animal or plant. Examples thereof include phytase, protein A, protein G, protein L, amylase, glucosidase, cellulase, lipase, protease, glutaminase, peptidase, nuclease, oxidase, lactase, xylanase, trypsin, pectinase, isomerase, and fluorescent protein. Examples include human or animal therapeutic proteins.

[0031] Specific examples of human or animal therapeutic proteins include hepatitis B virus surface antigen, hirudin, antibody, partial antibody, serum albumin, epidermal growth factor, insulin, growth hormone, erythropoietin, interferon, antihemophilic factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), thrombopoietin, IL-1, IL-6, tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), urokinase, leptin, and stem cell growth factor (SCF).

[0032] The term "antibody" refers to a heterotetrameric protein composed of two L- and H-polypeptide chains joined by disulfide bonds. An antibody is not particularly limited, provided that it is capable of binding to a particular antigen.

[0033] The term "partial antibody" refers to Fab antibody, (Fab)2 antibody, scFv antibody, diabody antibody, or a derivative of any thereof. A partial antibody is not particularly limited, provided that it is capable of binding to a particular antigen. The term "Fab antibody" refers to a heteromeric protein comprising the L-chain and the Fd chain of the antibody joined by S-S bonds or a heteromeric protein comprising the L-chain and the Fd chain of the antibody joined with each other without S-S bonds. A Fab antibody is not particularly limited, provided that it is capable of binding to a particular antigen.

[0034] The heterologous protein as mentioned above may originate from any animals without particular limitation. Examples thereof include humans, mice, rats, chickens, and camels. Alternatively, the heterologous protein may be a chimeric protein originating from two or more such animals.

[0035] A host for secretory production of such heterologous protein can be prepared by transforming the host with a vector for secretory expression of a heterologous protein via genetic engineering.

[0036] The term "secretory production" used in the present invention refers to antibody or antibody fragment accumulation resulting from liquid culture of methanol-assimilating yeast in the culture supernatant instead of the inside of the yeast. Secretory production is carried out by allowing a heterologous protein to express in the form of a fusion protein with a secretory signal, and fusion is realized by, for example, introducing a nucleotide sequence encoding a signal sequence into the 5' end of a nucleotide sequence encoding the heterologous protein.

[0037] A nucleotide sequence encoding a signal sequence is not particularly limited, provided that the methanol-assimilating yeast Pichia angusta is capable of secreting the heterologous protein. Examples thereof include nucleotide sequences encoding signal sequences of the mating factor α (MFα) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, acid phosphatase (PHO1) of Pichia angusta, acid phosphatase (PHO1) of Pichia pastoris, invertase (SUC2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PLB1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), and immunoglobulin.

[0038] The term "host for secretory production" used in the present disclosure refers to a host that can produce heterologous protein at high levels through introduction of an expression vector for secretory production of a heterologous protein thereinto. The host has disruption of the vacuolar protein sorting gene (VPS gene) and has disruption of the vacuolar protease B gene (PRB1 gene) simultaneously with the VPS gene.

[0039] The term "expression vector for secretory production of a heterologous protein" refers to a nucleic acid molecule having a function of expressing a target gene in a transformed host cell. The expression vector has, for example, an expression cassette, a homologous recombination region, a selection marker gene, such as an auxotrophic complementary gene or drug tolerant gene, and an autonomously replicating sequence.

[0040] The vector after transformation may be integrated into the chromosome, or it may be present in the form of an autonomously replicating vector. Examples of autonomously replicating vectors include the YEp vector, the YRp vector, and the YCp vector. In the case of the Pichia angusta, examples of vectors include, but are not particularly limited to, the pPICHOLI, pHIP, pHRP, and pHARS vectors.

[0041] The "expression cassette" is composed of a promoter and the heterologous protein gene, and it may comprise a terminator gene. A secretory signal may be a signal of the heterologous protein. Alternatively, a secretory signal that can function in a host may be fused to the heterologous protein. The expression cassette can be constructed in, for example, a plasmid such as pUC19, or it can be prepared via PCR.

[0042] Examples of techniques of yeast transformation include known techniques such as electroporation, the lithium acetate method, and the spheroplast method, although the techniques are not limited thereto.

[0043] For example, Pichia angusta is generally transformed via electroporation as described in "Highly-efficient electrotransformation of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha" (Curr. Genet., 25: 305.310.).

[0044] The term "the VPS gene" used in the present invention refers to a gene encoding a protein associated with the mechanism of protein transport to the vacuole in a methanol-assimilating yeast, namely at least one gene selected from the group consisting of VPS8, VPS10 and VPS15. More specifically, the term "VPS genes" refers to orthologous genes of the methanol-assimilating yeast corresponding to 61 types of vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes denoted as VPS1 to VPS 75 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, genes that are defined to encode proteins associated with the mechanism of protein transport to the vacuole in a methanol-assimilating yeast are within the scope of the VPS genes according to the present invention, although such genes do not exist in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

[0045] The term "orthologous genes" refers to a group of different types of genes, which are evolved from a common progenitor gene and have same functions. Thus, the degree of sequence identity between orthologous genes is not particularly limited, provided that the genes are equivalent to each other from the viewpoint of functions and evolutionary development. For example, orthologous genes have 30% or higher, preferably 50% or higher, more preferably 70% or higher, and further preferably 90% or higher sequence identity, at the amino acid level.

[0046] In the present disclosure, a single type of VPS gene may be disrupted, or a plurality of VPS genes may be disrupted, provided that the secretion productivity of a heterologous protein is improved. The secretion productivity can be improved by disrupting the VPS gene simultaneously with other genes.

[0047] Examples of other genes to be disrupted simultaneously with the VPS gene include genes that encode vacuole protease, such as carboxypeptidase Y, that is abnormally secreted extracellularly upon disruption of the VPS gene. Through disruption of the vacuole protease gene, decomposition of the heterologous protein that had been secreted can be suppressed.

[0048] In the present invention, the vacuole protease gene refers to the orthologous gene of a methanol-assimilating yeast corresponding to genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae designated as "PRB1."

[0049] Effects for improving secretion productivity can be evaluated by introducing a vector for secretory expression of a heterologous protein into a strain before gene disruption and a gene disruption strain, respectively, culturing the resulting transformed strains under the same conditions (e.g., liquid culture), and comparing the concentrations of heterologous proteins accumulated in a culture supernatant. Alternatively, the total amount of heterologous protein contained in a culture solution is divided by the amount of the yeast cells cultured (i.e., OD or a dry cell weight), and the production amounts of heterologous protein per cell may be compared.

[0050] The term "gene disruption" used herein refers to loss of gene functions or a significant reduction in such functions. When the VPS gene is disrupted, for example, the gene product thereof is not expressed at all. Even if the gene product of the VPS gene is expressed, it may not function normally as VPS. Such gene disruption is achieved through modification (i.e., disruption, substitution, addition, or insertion) of nucleotides in an ORF of the gene and/or modification (i.e., disruption, substitution, addition, or insertion) of nucleotides in a region where initiation or termination of transcription is controlled, such as a promoter, enhancer, or terminator region. A site and a sequence subjected to disruption, substitution, addition, or insertion are not particularly limited, provided that normal functions of the gene of interest are deprived.

[0051] In the present disclosure a method for preparing a gene disruption strain is not particularly limited. For example, a vector for gene disruption comprising a partial or full-length VPS gene sequence and a selection marker may be used to introduce the vector into a site in the vicinity of the target VPS gene via homologous recombination. Alternatively, non-homologous recombination or treatment with a mutagen may be performed.

[0052] In the present invention, the VPS gene to be disrupted is at least one gene selected from the VPS8, VPS10, and VPS15 gene. One of the above VPS genes may be subjected to disruption alone or two or more thereof may be subjected to disruption in combination.

[0053] An example of a method for antibody or antibody fragment secretion using the host for secretory production of the present invention is a method comprising culturing the host for secretory production and allowing heterologous proteins to accumulate in the culture supernatant.

[0054] A host for secretory production can be generally cultured with the use of any medium containing a nutrient source that can be utilized by a methanol-assimilating yeast.

[0055] For example, a common medium obtained by adequately mixing carbon sources, such as sugars (e.g., glucose, sucrose, and maltose), organic acids (e.g., lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, and propionic acid), alcohols (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and glycerol), carbohydrates (e.g., paraffin), fats and oils (e.g., soybean oil and rapeseed oil), or mixtures of any thereof, nitrogen sources, such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, urea, yeast extract, meat extract, peptone, and corn steep liquor, and other nutrient sources, such as inorganic salts and vitamins, can be used, and culture can be carried out in a batch or continuous system.

[0056] An antibody or antibody fragment produced with the use of the host for secretory production according to the present invention may be present in a culture supernatant, or a protein may be isolated therefrom via any technique. The protein can be isolated from a culture supernatant by performing known protein purification techniques in adequate combination.

[0057] For example, the host for secretory production is first cultured in an adequate medium, and a culture solution is subjected to centrifugation or filtration to remove yeast from the culture supernatant. The obtained culture supernatant is then subjected to techniques such as salting-out (e.g., ammonium sulfate precipitation or sodium phosphate precipitation), solvent precipitation (e.g., protein fractional precipitation with acetone or ethanol), dialysis, gel filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography, affinity chromatography, reverse phase chromatography, or ultrafiltration. Any such techniques may be carried out alone or in combination, and the heterologous protein of the present invention is isolated from the culture supernatant.

[0058] The isolated antibody or antibody fragment can be used without processing. Alternatively, such antibody or antibody fragment may be subjected to pharmacological modification such as PEGylation, modification for the purpose of impartation of enzyme or isotope functions, or other types of modification before use. Also, proteins may be used in various forms of formulations.

Examples



[0059] Hereafter, the present invention is described in greater detail with reference to the examples, although the present invention is not limited thereto. The recombinant DNA technology employed in the examples below is specifically described in the following books: Molecular Cloning 2nd Edition, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989; and Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, Greene Publishing Associates and Wiley-Interscience.

[0060] Plasmids obtained in the examples below were amplified using transformants obtained with the use of E. coli DH5α competent cells (Takara Bio Inc.) under the designated conditions.

[0061] PCR was carried out using the Prime STAR HS DNA Polymerase (Takara Bio Inc.) in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Genomic DNAs were prepared from yeasts using Dr. GenTLE® (Takara Bio Inc.) in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

[0062] The MOX promoter (SEQ ID NO: 1), the MOX terminator (SEQ ID NO: 2), the LEU2 gene (SEQ ID NO: 3), and the GAP promoter (SEQ ID NO: 4) used when constructing the antibody-expressing vector and the vector for VPS gene disruption were prepared by PCR using genomic DNA of the Pichia angusta 8V strain as the template.

[0063] The mating factor α pre-pro signal gene (MFα, SEQ ID NO: 5) was prepared by PCR using genomic DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c as a template. The antibody gene was prepared by PCR using, as templates, the L-chain gene (SEQ ID NO: 6) and the H-chain gene (SEQ ID NO: 7) chemically synthesized based on the disclosed sequence information of the fully humanized anti-TNF-a antibody (adalimumab; HUMIRA®) (JP 2009-082033 A). The G418 tolerant gene (SEQ ID NO: 8) was prepared by PCR using, as a template, pMW218 (Nippon Gene). The zeocin tolerant gene (SEQ ID NO: 52) was prepared by PCR using, as a template, pPICZα (Invitrogen). The VPS8 gene (SEQ ID NO: 9), the VPS10 gene (SEQ ID NO: 10), the VPS15 gene (SEQ ID NO: 11), the VPS17 gene (SEQ ID NO: 12), the VPS21 gene (SEQ ID NO: 13), the VPS26 gene (SEQ ID NO: 14), the VPS45 gene (SEQ ID NO: 15), and the PRB1 gene (SEQ ID NO: 53) were prepared by PCR using, as a template, genomic DNA of the Pichia angusta NCYC495 strain.

(Example 1) Construction of Fab antibody-expressing vector



[0064] A gene fragment (SEQ ID NO: 16) having the HindIII-NotI-BamHI-SpeI-MunI-BglII-XbaI-EcoRI sites was fully synthesized, and the resultant was inserted into the HindIII and EcoRI sites of pUC19 to prepare pUC-1.

[0065] A gene fragment having the HindIII sites on both sides of the LEU2 was prepared by PCR using the primers 1 and 2 (SEQ ID NOs: 17 and 18), the fragment was treated with HindIII, and it was then inserted into the HindIII site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-2.

[0066] Subsequently, a gene fragment having the BamHI sites on both sides of the MOX promoter was prepared by PCR using the primers 3 and 4 (SEQ ID NOs: 19 and 20), the fragment was treated with BamHI, and it was then inserted into the BamHI site of pUC-2 to prepare pUC-3.

[0067] A gene fragment having the MunI sites on both sides of the MOX promoter was prepared by PCR using the primers 5 and 6 (SEQ ID NOs: 21 and 22), the fragment was treated with MunI, and it was then inserted into the MunI site of pUC-3 to prepare pUC-4.

[0068] A gene fragment having the XbaI site on both sides of the MOX terminator was prepared by PCR using the primers 7 and 8 (SEQ ID NOs: 23 and 24), the fragment was treated with XbaI, and it was then inserted into the XbaI site of pUC-4 to prepare pUC-PmPmTm.

[0069] A gene fragment having the SpeI site in a site upstream of MFa was prepared by PCR using the primers 9 and 10 (SEQ ID NOs: 25 and 26). A gene fragment having a 20-bp 3'-terminal fragment of MFa in a site upstream of the L-chain and the SpeI site in a site downstream of the L-chain was prepared by PCR using the primers 11 and 12 (SEQ ID NOs: 27 and 28). These gene fragments were mixed to prepare a template, and PCR was carried out using the resulting template and the primers 9 and 12 to prepare a gene fragment having the SpeI sites on both sides of a fusion gene of MFa and the L-chain. The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-PmPmTm to prepare pUC-PmLPmTm.

[0070] A gene fragment having the BglII site in a site upstream of MFa was prepared by PCR using the primer 13 (SEQ ID NO: 29) and the primer 10. A gene fragment having a 20-bp 3'-terminal fragment of MFa in a site upstream of the Fd-chain and the BglII site in a site downstream of the Fd-chain was prepared by PCR using the primers 14 and 15 (SEQ ID NOs: 30 and 31). These gene fragments were mixed to prepare a template, and PCR was carried out using the resulting template and the primers 13 and 15 to prepare a gene fragment having the BglII sites on both sides of a fusion gene of MFa and the Fd-chain. The resulting gene fragment was treated with BglII and inserted into the BglII site of pUC-PmLPmTm to prepare pUC-PmLPmFTm.

[0071] This expression vector is designed to allow expression of the L-chain and the Fd-chain of the Fab antibody under the control of the different MOX promoters.

(Example 2) Development of Fab antibody-expressing strain



[0072] The Fab antibody-expressing vector prepared in Example 1 was cleaved at the EcoRV or NruI site in the MOX terminator gene to prepare a linearized fragment, and Pichia angusta was transformed using the resulting fragment. Transformation was carried out as described below.

[0073] Pichia angusta BY4329 cells (NCYC495-derived, leu1-1) were inoculated into 3 ml of YPD medium (1% Bacto Yeast Extract (Difco), 2% Bacto Tryptone (Difco), and 2% glucose) and subjected to shake culture at 37°C overnight to obtain a pre-culture solution. The obtained pre-culture solution (500 µl) was inoculated into 50 ml of YPD medium, shake culture was conducted at 30°C until OD 600 reached 1 to 1.5, and the culture product was centrifuged at 3,000 x g and 20°C for 10 minutes to harvest cells.

[0074] The cells were suspended in 10 ml of 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) containing 250 µl of 1M DTT (final concentration: 25 mM), and the suspension was incubated at 37°C for 15 minutes. After the cells were harvested by centrifugation at 3,000 x g and 4°C for 10 minutes, the cells were resuspended in 50 ml of ice-cooled STM buffer (270 mM sucrose, 10 mM Tris-HCl, and 1 mM magnesium chloride; pH 7.5). After the cells were harvested by centrifugation at 3,000 x g and 4°C for 10 minutes, the cells were resuspended in 25 ml of ice-cooled STM buffer. After the cells were harvested by centrifugation at 3,000 x g and 4°C for 10 minutes, the cells were suspended in 250 µl of ice-cooled STM buffer, and the resulting suspension was designated as a competent cell solution.

[0075] The competent cell solution (60 µl) was mixed with 3 µl of a solution of linearized Fab antibody-expressing vector (the amount of DNA: 0.5 to 1 µg), and the mixture was transferred into an electroporation cuvette (a disposable cuvette; electrode gap: 2 mm; BM Equipment Co., Ltd.) and subjected to electroporation at 7.5 kV/cm, 10 µF, and 900 Ω. Thereafter, cells were suspended in 1 ml of YPD medium, and the suspension was then allowed to stand at 37°C for 1 hour. Thereafter, cells were harvested by centrifugation at 3,000 x g at room temperature for 5 minutes, the harvested cells were washed in 1 ml of YNB medium (0.67% yeast nitrogen base (Difco), 1% glucose), and the cells were harvested from the suspension again by centrifugation at 3,000 x g at room temperature for 5 minutes. The cells were suspended in an adequate amount of YNB medium, the resulting cell suspension was applied to the YNB selection agar plate, and the cells grown as a result of stationary culture at 37°C for 3 days were selected. Thus, Fab antibody-expressing strains were obtained.

(Example 3) VPS8 gene disruption



[0076] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 989 to 3395 of the VPS8 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 9) was prepared by PCR using primers 16 and 17 (SEQ ID NOs: 32 and 33). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS8.

[0077] A fragment having the HindIII site in a site upstream of the GAP promoter and the 5'-terminal sequence of the G418 tolerant gene in a site downstream of the GAP promoter was prepared by PCR using primers 18 and 19 (SEQ ID NOs: 34 and 35). A fragment having the HindIII site in a site downstream of the G418 tolerant gene was prepared by PCR using primers 20 and 21 (SEQ ID NOs: 36 and 37). With the use of these two fragments as templates and primers 18 and 21, PCR was carried out to obtain a fragment having the HindIII sites in sites upstream and downstream of the G418 tolerant gene under the control of the GAP promoter.

[0078] The G418 tolerant gene was inserted into the HindIII site in the VPS8 gene of pUC-VPS8 to prepare pUC-Δvps8. pUC-Δvps8 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS8 gene disruption having the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the HindIII site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 989 to 3395 of the VPS8 gene.

[0079] The resulting vector for VPS8 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS8 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS8 gene was obtained.

(Example 4) VPS10 gene disruption



[0080] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 3029 to 4484 of the VPS10 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 10) was prepared by PCR using primers 22 and 23 (SEQ ID NOs: 38 and 39). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS10.

[0081] A fragment having the Bsp1407I site in a site upstream of the GAP promoter and the 5'-terminal sequence of the G418 tolerant gene in a site downstream of the GAP promoter was prepared by PCR using the primer 24 (SEQ ID NO: 40) and the primer 19. A fragment having the Bsp1407I site in a site downstream of G418 tolerant gene was prepared by PCR using the primer 20 and the primer 25 (SEQ ID NO: 41). With the use of these two fragments as templates and primers 24 and 25, PCR was carried out to obtain a fragment having the Bsp1407I sites in sites upstream and downstream of the G418 tolerant gene under the control of the GAP promoter.

[0082] The G418 tolerant gene was inserted into the Bsp1407I site in the VPS10 gene of pUC-VPS10 to prepare pUC-Δvps10. pUC-Δvps10 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS10 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the Bsp1407I site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 3029 to 4484 of the VPS10 gene.

[0083] The resulting vector for VPS10 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS10 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS10 gene was obtained.

(Example 5) VPS15 gene disruption



[0084] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 506 to 2112 of the VPS15 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 11) was prepared by PCR using primers 26 and 27 (SEQ ID NOs: 42 and 43). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS15.

[0085] The G418 tolerant gene prepared in Example 4 was inserted into the Bsp1407I site in the VPS15 gene of pUC-VPS15 to prepare pUC-Δvps15. pUC-Δvps15 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS15 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the Bsp1407I site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 506 to 2112 of the VPS15 gene.

[0086] The resulting vector for VPS15 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS15 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS 15 gene was obtained.

(Example 6) VPS17 gene disruption



[0087] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 106 to 1512 of the VPS17 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 12) was prepared by PCR using primers 28 and 29 (SEQ ID NOs: 44 and 45). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS17.

[0088] The G418 tolerant gene prepared in Example 4 was inserted into the Bsp1407I site in the VPS17 gene of pUC-VPS17 to prepare pUC-Δvps17. pUC-Δvps17 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS17 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the Bsp1407I site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 106 to 1512 of the VPS17 gene.

[0089] The resulting vector for VPS17 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS17 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS17 gene was obtained.

(Example 7) VPS21 gene disruption



[0090] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 31 to 605 of the VPS21 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 13) was prepared by PCR using primers 30 and 31 (SEQ ID NOs: 46 and 47). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS21.

[0091] The G418 tolerant gene prepared in Example 3 was inserted into the HindIII site in the VPS21 gene of pUC-VPS21 to obtain pUC-Δvps21. pUC-Δvps21 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS21 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the HindIII site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 31 to 605 of the VPS21 gene.

[0092] The resulting vector for VPS21 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS21 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS21 gene was obtained.

(Example 8) VPS26 gene disruption



[0093] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 31 to 882 of the VPS26 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 14) was prepared by PCR using primers 32 and 33 (SEQ ID NOs: 48 and 49). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS26.

[0094] The G418 tolerant gene under the control of the GAP promoter prepared in Example 4 was inserted into the Bsp1407I site in the VPS26 gene of pUC-VPS26 to prepare pUC-Δvps26. pUC-Δvps26 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS26 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the Bsp1407I site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 31 to 882 of the VPS26 gene.

[0095] The resulting vector for VPS26 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS26 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS26 gene was obtained.

(Example 9) VPS45 gene disruption



[0096] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 647 to 1697 of the VPS45 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 15) was prepared by PCR using primers 34 and 35 (SEQ ID NOs: 50 and 51). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-VPS45.

[0097] The G418 tolerant gene prepared in Example 4 under the control of the GAP promoter was inserted into the Bsp1407I site in the VPS45 gene of pUC-VPS45 to prepare pUC-Δvps45. pUC-Δvps45 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for VPS45 gene disruption comprising the G418 tolerant gene inserted into the Bsp1407I site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 647 to 1697 of the VPS45 gene.

[0098] The resulting vector for VPS45 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing G418 at 0.5 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the VPS45 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS45 gene was obtained.

(Example 10) PRB1 gene disruption



[0099] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 51 to 1400 of the PRB1 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 53) was prepared by PCR using primers 36 and 37 (SEQ ID NOs: 54 and 55). The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-PRB1.

[0100] A zeocin tolerant gene fragment was prepared by PCR using primers 38 and 39 (SEQ ID NOs: 56 and 57).

[0101] The zeocin tolerant gene fragment prepared above was inserted into the EcoRV site in the PRB1 gene of pUC-PRB1 to prepare pUC-Δprb1. pUC-Δprb1 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for PRB1 gene disruption comprising the zeocin tolerant gene inserted into the EcoRV site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 51 to 1400 of the PRB1 gene.

[0102] The resulting vector for PRB1 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2 and the Fab antibody-expressing strains with disruption of the VPS (VPS8, VPS10, and VPS15) genes described in Examples 3 to 5, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing zeocin at 0.1 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the PRB1 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the PRB1 gene and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with double disruption of the PRB1 and VPS genes were obtained.

(Comparative Example 1) PEP4 gene disruption



[0103] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 51 to 1000 of the PEP4 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 58) was prepared by PCR using primers 40 and 41 (SEQ ID NOs: 59 and 60) and genomic DNA of the Pichia angusta NCYC495 strain as the template. The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-PEP4.

[0104] The zeocin tolerant gene fragment prepared in Example 10 was inserted into the ScaI site in the PEP4 gene of pUC-PEP4 to prepare pUC-Δpep4. pUC-Δpep4 was treated with SpeI to construct a gene for PEP4 gene disruption comprising the zeocin tolerant gene inserted into the ScaI site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 51 to 1400 of the PEP4 gene.

[0105] The resulting vector for PEP4 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2 and the Fab antibody-expressing strains with disruption of the VPS (VPS8, VPS10, and VPS15) genes described in Examples 3 to 5, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing zeocin at 0.1 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the PEP4 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the PEP4 gene and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with double disruption of the PEP4 and VPS genes were obtained.

(Comparative Example 2) YPS1 gene disruption



[0106] A fragment having the SpeI sites in sites upstream and downstream of a sequence of nucleotides 501 to 1700 of the YPS1 ORF (SEQ ID NO: 61) was prepared by PCR using primers 42 and 43 (SEQ ID NOs: 62 and 63) and genomic DNA of the Pichia angusta NCYC495 strain as the template. The resulting gene fragment was treated with SpeI and inserted into the SpeI site of pUC-1 to prepare pUC-YPS1.

[0107] The zeocin tolerant gene fragment prepared in Example 10 was inserted into the EcoRV site in the YPS1 gene of pUC-YPS1 to prepare pUC-Δyps1. pUC-Δyps1 was treated with SpeI to construct a vector for YPS1 gene disruption comprising the zeocin tolerant gene inserted into the EcoRV site of the sequence comprising nucleotides 501 to 1700 of the YPS1 gene.

[0108] The resulting vector for YPS1 gene disruption was used to transform the Fab antibody-expressing strain described in Example 2 and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the VPS (VPS10) gene described in Example 4, and colonies were selected on the YNB plate containing zeocin at 0.1 g/l. PCR was carried out to confirm that the vector for gene disruption had been inserted into the YPS1 gene, and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with disruption of the YPS1 gene and the Fab antibody-expressing strain with double disruption of the YPS1 and VPS genes were obtained.

(Example 11) Measurement of amount of Fab antibody secreted



[0109] The VPS gene disruption strains and the double-disruption strains of the VPS and PRB1 genes obtained in Examples 3 to 10 and original strains (undisrupted strains) used for preparation of these gene disruption strains were subjected to sandwich ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to analyze the amount of Fab antibodies secreted in the culture supernatant.

[0110] The culture supernatant was prepared in the manner described below. Specifically, Fab antibody-expressing strains were inoculated into 2 ml of BMGMY medium (1% Bacto Yeast Extract, 2% peptone, 1.34% yeast nitrogen base, 0.4 mg/l biotin, 100 mM potassium phosphate (pH 6.0), 1% glycerol, and 1% methanol), shake culture was performed at 30°C for 72 hours, and the culture supernatant was prepared by centrifugation at 15,000 rpm and 4°C for 1 minute.

[0111] Sandwich ELISA was performed in the manner described below. The anti-human IgG (Fab-specific) affinity isolated antigen specific antibody (SIGMA) diluted 5,000-fold with an immobilization buffer (a 0.1 N sodium bicarbonate solution; pH 9.6) was applied to an ELISA plate (MaxiSoap, Nunc) at 50 µl/well, and the resultant was subjected to incubation at 4°C overnight. Thereafter, the solution was removed from the wells, Immunoblock (Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co., Ltd.) diluted 5-fold was added at 250 µl/well, and the resultant was allowed to stand at room temperature for 1 hour to block the wells.

[0112] The wells were washed three times with PBST (PBS (Takara Bio Inc.) + 0.1% Tween 20), serial dilutions of the standard proteins (anti-human IgG Fab, Rockland) and the diluted culture supernatant were added at 50 µl/well, and the reaction was allowed to proceed at room temperature for 1 hour. The solution was removed from the wells, the wells were washed two times with PBST, a secondary antibody solution diluted 8,000-fold with a PBSTIB (PBST + 1/50-diluted Immunoblock) solution (secondary antibody: Anti-human IgG (Fab-specific)-peroxidase conjugate antibody developed in goat affinity isolated antibody, SIGMA) was added at 50 µl/well, and the reaction was allowed to proceed at room temperature for 1 hour.

[0113] The solution was removed from the wells, the wells were washed four times with PBST, the SureBlue TMB 1-component microwell peroxidase substrate (KPL) was added at 100 µl/well, and the reaction solution was allowed to stand at room temperature for 20 minutes. The reaction was terminated with the addition of the TMB stop solution (KPL) at 100 µl/well, and the absorbance at 450 nm was then measured using a microplate reader (BenchMark Plus, Bio-Rad). The antibodies in the culture supernatant were quantified using the calibration curve for the standard protein. Thus, accumulation of antibodies secreted in the culture supernatant was confirmed.

[0114] The PEP4 gene disruption strain obtained in Comparative Example 1 and the YPS1 gene disruption strain obtained in Comparative Example 2 were inspected in the same manner concerning the amount of antibodies secreted in the culture supernatant.

[0115] The results are shown in Table 1 and Table 2 below.
Table 1
StrainFab (mg/l)
Undisrupted strain 4.6
VPS8-disruption strain (Example 3) 6.3
VPS10-disruption strain (Example 4) 6.2
VPS15-disruption strain (Example 5) 6.1
VPS17-disruption strain (Example 6) 5.6
VPS21-disruption strain (Example 7) 5.4
VPS26-disruption strain (Example 8) 5.2
VPS45-disruption strain (Example 9) 4.8
Table 2
StrainFab (mg/l)
PRB1-disruption strain (Example 10) 4.1
PRB1/VPS8 double-disruption strain (Example 10) 8.6
PRB1/VPS10 double-disruption strain (Example 10) 10.3
PRB1/VPS15 double-disruption strain (Example 10) 9.1
PEP4-disruption strain (Comparative Example 1) 4.8
PEP4/VPS8 double-disruption strain (Comparative Example 1) 4.6
PEP4/VPS10 double-disruption strain (Comparative Example 1) 4.5
PEP4/VPS15 double-disruption strain (Comparative Example 1) 4.0
YPS1-disruption strain (Comparative Example 2) 4.8
YPS1/VPS10 double-disruption strain (Comparative Example 2) 4.5


[0116] As shown in Table 1, the amount of Fab secretion increased as a result of disruption of the VPS gene. As shown in Table 2, the amount of Fab secretion further increased as a result of double-disruption of the VPS and PRB1 genes. In the case of double-disruption of the VPS and PEP4 genes or the VPS and YPS1 genes, however, the amount of Fab secretion did not increase any more.

Industrial Applicability



[0117] The present invention can be used in the field of production of antibodies or antibody fragments used for treatment of diseases.

SEQUENCE LISTING



[0118] 

<110> KANEKA Corporation

<120> Method for producing heteroproteins using yeast whose VPS genes are disrupted
<130> B110046

<150> JP 2011-054637
<151> 2011-3-11

<160> 63

<170> PatentIn version 3.1

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<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 52



<210> 53
<211> 1557
<212> DNA
<213> Pichia angusta

<400> 53



<210> 54
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 54
ataaactagt gttctcgctt gtgaaacaga   30

<210> 55
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 55
tataactagt gcgtcccaga actcagtcaa   30

<210> 56
<211> 20
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 56
gatcccccac acaccatagc   20

<210> 57
<211> 20
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 57
gacgtgtcag tcctgctcct   20

<210> 58
<211> 1242
<212> DNA
<213> Pichia angusta

<400> 58

<210> 59
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 59
ataaactagt ggtctccgtg gccgatgcca   30

<210> 60
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 60
tataactagt tctggtactg tccagaccat   30

<210> 61
<211> 1731
<212> DNA
<213> Pichia angusta

<400> 61



<210> 62
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 62
ataaactagt caccgttgac tgctcgcaat   30

<210> 63
<211> 30
<212> DNA
<213> Artificial

<220>
<223> artificial

<400> 63
tataactagt gcgcacaaaa ccgcacacaa   30




Claims

1. A method for producing an antibody or antibody fragment, characterized by comprising using Pichia angusta with disruption of the vacuolar protein sorting gene (VPS gene) and with disruption of the vacuolar protease B gene (PRB1 gene) simultaneously with the VPS gene as a host for secretory production of the antibody or antibody fragment, wherein the VPS gene is at least one gene selected from the group consisting of VPS8, VPS10, and VPS15.
 


Ansprüche

1. Verfahren zum Herstellen eines Antikörpers oder Antikörperfragments, charakterisiert durch das Umfassen der Verwendung von Pichia angusta mit Störung des vakuolären Proteinsortierungs-Gens (VPS-Gen) und mit Störung des vakuolären Protease-B-Gens (PRB1 Gen) simultan mit dem VPS-Gen, als ein Wirt für sekretorische Herstellung des Antikörpers oder Antikörperfragments, wobei das VPS-Gen mindestens ein Gen ausgewählt aus der Gruppe bestehend aus VPS8, VPS10 und VPS15 ist.
 


Revendications

1. Procédé de production d'un anticorps ou d'un fragment d'anticorps, caractérisé en ce qu'il comprend l'utilisation de Pichia angusta avec une interruption du gène de tri protéique vacuolaire (gène VPS) et avec une interruption du gène de protéase B vacuolaire (gène PRB1) simultanément avec le gène VPS en tant qu'hôte pour la production sécrétoire de l'anticorps ou du fragment d'anticorps, dans lequel le gène VPS est au moins un gène sélectionné dans le groupe consistant en VPS8, VPS10, et VPS15.
 




REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description




Non-patent literature cited in the description