(19)
(11)EP 2 857 861 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
22.07.2020 Bulletin 2020/30

(21)Application number: 14195281.2

(22)Date of filing:  24.11.2004
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G01S 15/89(2006.01)
G01S 7/52(2006.01)
A61B 8/00(2006.01)

(54)

Modular portable ultrasound systems

Modulare tragbare Ultraschallsysteme

Systèmes d'ultrasons portables modulaires


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IS IT LI LU MC NL PL PT RO SE SI SK TR

(30)Priority: 26.11.2003 US 525208 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
08.04.2015 Bulletin 2015/15

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
10180807.9 / 2267481
04812223.8 / 1695113

(73)Proprietor: Teratech Corporation
Burlington, MA 01803 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • Wong, William
    Burlington, Massachusetts 02186 (US)
  • Chiang, M Alice A
    Weston, Massachusetts 02493 (US)
  • Maurer, David
    Stoneham, Massachusetts 02180 (US)
  • Brodsky, Michael
    Brookline, Massachusetts 02445 (US)

(74)Representative: Graham Watt & Co LLP 
St. Botolph's House 7-9 St. Botolph's Road
Sevenoaks TN13 3AJ
Sevenoaks TN13 3AJ (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
US-A- 5 205 175
US-A- 5 487 386
US-A1- 2003 013 966
US-A- 5 251 631
US-A1- 2002 173 721
US-B1- 6 447 451
  
  • DALLAS SEMICONDUCTOR: "DS2433-Z01 4kbit 1-Wire EEPROM Data Sheet", DALLAS SEMICONDUCTOR DATA SHEET , 20 March 2002 (2002-03-20), pages 1-2, XP002332628, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:http://pdfserv.maxim-ic.com/en/ds/DS24 33-Z01.pdf [retrieved on 2005-06-20]
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION



[0001] Conventional ultrasound imaging systems typically include a hand-held probe coupled by cables to a large rackmounted console processing and display unit. The probe typically includes an array of ultrasonic transducers which transmit ultrasonic energy into a region being examined and receive reflected ultrasonic energy returning from the region. The transducers convert the received ultrasonic energy into low-level electrical signals which are transferred over the cable to the processing unit. The processing unit applies appropriate beam forming techniques to combine the signals from the transducers to generate an image of the region of interest.

[0002] Typical conventional ultrasound systems include a transducer array each transducer being associated with its own processing circuitry located in the console processing unit. The processing circuitry typically includes driver circuits which, in the transmit mode, send precisely timed drive pulses to the transducer to initiate transmission of the ultrasonic signal. These transmit timing pulses are forwarded from the console processing unit along the cable to the scan head. In the receive mode, beamforming circuits of the processing circuitry introduce the appropriate delay into each low-level electrical signal from the transducers to dynamically focus the signals such that an accurate image can subsequently be generated. For example, US 2003/0013966 describes a hand held ultrasound system having a balance body. US 2002/0173721 describes a graphical user interface for an imaging device. US 6,447,451 describes a mobile ultrasound diagnostic instrument and docking stand. Further examples of ultrasonic imaging apparatus can be found in US 5,487,386 and US 5,251,631.

[0003] There still remains a need to provide stand-alone processing ultrasound units with the necessary hardware, for example, connectors to enable truly portable ultrasound systems that can function on an independent platform. There is a need for an ultrasound transducer connector assembly with an electrical connector of minimal mechanical complexity, size and cost.

[0004] US 5,205,175 describes a multiple transducer selector for an ultrasound imager.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0005] The present invention relates to a hand held medical ultrasound imaging device as defined in the appended claims.

[0006] In one example, a hand held transducer probe is connected by wire or wireless connection to a lightweight processing unit including a housing and internal circuitry for processing signals received from the probe. The processing unit housing includes a display and manual and/or virtual controls that can control the display and processor operation, and a battery providing power to the processor housing and the transducer array. A preferred example includes a console of a cart system to provide control features of the modular system.

[0007] In a preferred example, the processor housing includes a transmit/receive (T/R) chip that communicates with the transducer array. A system controller communicates with the T/R chip, a local memory, a preamplifier/TGC chip, a charge domain beamformer circuit and a standard high speed communication interface such as IEEE 1394 USB connection to a system processor.

[0008] A preferred example includes a connector system to secure the cable from the transducer probe to the processor housing. The connector system preferably uses a smaller lightweight connector than prior art systems yet meeting the standard shielding and mechanical strength and integrity requirements for medical ultrasound imaging systems. A preferred example includes a circuit that identifies the type of transducer array that has been connected to the housing. The circuit can be a single integrated circuit contained in the housing connector module that communicates with the processor and can include a memory storing calibration data for each probe. The display screen will display probe type information for the user. The connector system can include a connector actuator or lock that can be manually actuated by the user to secure the male and female connector elements. In an example, a lever is rotated from a first position to a second position such that a cam element attached to the lever mates with a catch element on the cable connector element attached to the probe cable. The lever pulls the connector in and also operates to push the connector element out when actuated in the reverse direction thereby reducing the strain often caused by the user in pulling the cable connector element out of the housing connector element.

[0009] In accordance with a preferred example, the method for performing an ultrasound scan on a region of interest of a patient includes connecting a probe to a portable processing unit with a connector system, locking the connector in place, employing the onboard identification circuit to identify the probe and display probe information on the display prior to the scan, entering patient information and performing the scan. Another preferred example includes a cart system in which the processor housing and display can be connected or docked with a mobile station or cart having a control panel and a port assembly for receiving one or more transducer probes.

[0010] The foregoing and other features and advantages of the system and method for ultrasound imaging will be apparent from the following more particular description of the system and method as illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the different views.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0011] 

FIG. 1 illustrates a portable ultrasound imaging system including a hand-held probe.

FIG. 2 illustrates a modular portable system having a hand-held ultrasound transducer connected to a processing and display unit.

FIG. 3 illustrates a single board computer and beamformer circuits that form the processing unit.

FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate block diagrams of examples of a modular, portable ultrasound system including a hand-held transducer assembly interfacing with a processing unit having the beamformer electronics.

FIG. 4C illustrates a single chip, N-channel, time-multiplexed multiple beamforming processor with on-chip apodization and bandpass filter.

FIG. 5A illustrates a view of a stand alone portable ultrasound processing and display unit.

FIG. 5B illustrates an exploded view of the ultrasound processing and display unit shown in FIG. 5A

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate a 10-inch and 12-inch display, respectively, that can be included in an ultrasound stand-alone unit.

FIG. 7 is a side view of an ultrasound processing and display unit.

FIGS. 8A-8B illustrate views of a single board computer included in the ultrasound stand alone unit.

FIG. 9 illustrates a view of the configuration of the computer boards in a stand alone ultrasound unit.

FIGS. 10A-10F illustrate views of the ultrasound processing unit configured for different applications such as different processing unit configured in different applications such as different original engineering manufacture (OEM) configurations and stand alone configurations.

FIG. 11 illustrates a schematic drawing of an analog board included in an ultrasound processing unit.

FIG. 12 illustrates a schematic view of a digital board and a power supply daughter board included in an ultrasound processing unit.

FIGS. 13A-13B illustrate the pin assignment of an electrically erasable programmable read only memory (EEPROM) and an electrically programmable read only memory integrated circuits, respectively, that can be included in the

ultrasound processing unit.

FIG. 14 illustrates a semiconductor one-wire identification integrated circuit chip installed in transducer assemblies.

FIG. 15A illustrates a view of a graphical user interface display screen showing the appropriate transducer parameters upon connection of a transducer probe with the ultrasound processing unit.

FIG. 15B illustrates in tabular from characteristics of the ID chip system.

FIG. 15C illustrates a process sequence using the ID chip system.

FIG. 15D shows a schematic circuit diagram for a multiple connector assembly.

FIG. 15E illustrates a schematic circuit diagram for a multiplexed multiconnector system for transducer arrays.

FIG. 15F illustrates another preferred schematic circuit diagram for a multiconnector system for transducer arrays.

FIG. 16 illustrates an ultrasound processing unit and an ultrasound transducer connector.

FIGS. 17A and 17B illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly.

FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the ultrasound transducer connector assembly illustrated in FIGS. 17A and 17B.

FIGS. 19A, 19B and 19C illustrate detailed views of the ultrasound transducer connector assembly including sectional views.

FIG. 20 illustrates a view of an ultrasound processing unit with an ultrasound transducer connector assembly having a lock.

FIGS. 21A and 21B illustrate a close-up view of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly inserted into an ultrasound processing unit and a cut-away view of the inserted ultrasound transducer connector assembly, respectively, showing a sliding lever.

FIGS. 22A and 22B illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly inserted into an ultrasound processing unit having a lever to secure the connector assembly.

FIGS. 23A and 23B illustrate further details of the lever and an exploded view of the lever assembly of an ultrasound processing unit.

FIGS. 24A-24D illustrate different views of the ultrasound processing unit showing the ultrasound transducer connector assembly.

FIG. 25 illustrates a view of the ultrasound processing unit showing a partial view of the lever for the transducer connector assembly.

FIGS. 26A and 26B illustrate further views of the ultrasound processing unit showing the ultrasound transducer connector assembly.

FIGS. 27A-27C illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector.

FIGS. 28A-28C illustrate views of an alternate example of an ultrasound transducer connector.

FIG. 29 illustrates a schematic view of an ultrasound system including an ultrasound console having a remote hardware keypad.

FIG. 30 illustrates a schematic diagram of an ultrasound console.

FIGS. 31A-31F illustrate examples of a modular ultrasound imaging system in accordance with the invention.

FIGS. 32A - 32D illustrate a preferred cart system for use in conjunction with a modular ultrasound imaging system.

FIG. 33 illustrates a modular system having a plurality of transducer connectors.

FIG. 34 is a schematic circuit diagram of a modular cart system.



[0012] The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of preferred examples, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the different views. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION



[0013] Preferred examples of the present invention include modular, portable ultrasound systems that can be used as a stand-alone system. The preferred examples integrate the display with the processing unit which is then connected to different ultrasound transducer probes. Preferred examples as described in U.S. Patent Application No. 10/386,360, filed on March 11, 2003, include a display integrated on the ultrasound transducer. The operator can easily view the image and operate the probe or scan head, as well as perform operations in the same local area with the other hand. The data/video processing unit is also compact and portable, and may be placed close to the operator or alternatively at a remote location. Optionally, in another example, a display is also integrated into the data/video processing unit. The processing unit also provides an external monitor port for use with traditional display monitors.

[0014] FIG. 1 illustrates a portable ultrasound imaging system 10 including a hand-held ultrasound transducer with integrated display and a portable processing unit. The ultrasound transducer 14 comprises any of the standard ultrasound transducer arrays. The interface 12 delivers signals from the array 14 to an interface processor housing 16 that can include a system controller and beamformer as described in detail below. A second cable interface 11 can include a Firewire (IEEE 1394) connection delivering a beamformed representation for further processing to a personal computer 15.

[0015] FIG. 2 illustrates a modular portable system having an ultrasound transducer connected to a processing and display unit. In this example, the video and power wires for the
display are integrated with the transducer data wires for the transducer to form a single cable assembly 24 that connects the ultrasound transducer to the portable data/video processing unit 26.

[0016] The data/video processing unit 16 is compact and portable. In a preferred example, the beamformer electronics is an integral part of the processing unit and communicating with a single board computer 110 using a Firewire (IEEE 1394) cable as illustrated in FIG. 4A.

[0017] FIG. 3 illustrates the single board computer and beamformer circuits that form the processing unit. FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate block diagrams of a modular, portable ultrasound system including a hand-held transducer assembly interfacing with a processing unit.

[0018] The beamformer electronics is moved inside the processing unit to further reduce the size and weight of the hand-held transducer as illustrated in FIG. 4B. The processing unit 138 can comprise a compact single board 44 computer and the beamformer electronics as illustrated in FIG. 3. The beamformer electronics includes a digital processing printed circuit board and an analog processing printed circuit board 48. The beamforming electronics communicates with the single board computer via a Firewire (IEEE 1394) chip.

[0019] An operating environment for the system includes a processing system with at least one high speed processing unit and a memory system. In accordance with the practices of persons skilled in the art of computer programming, the present invention is described with reference to acts and symbolic representations of operations or instructions that are performed by the processing system, unless indicated otherwise. Such acts and operations or instructions are sometimes referred to as being "computer-executed", or "processing unit executed."

[0020] It will be appreciated that the acts and symbolically represented operations or instructions include the manipulation of electrical signals by the processing unit. An electrical system with data bits causes a resulting transformation or reduction of the electrical signal representation, and the maintenance of data bits at memory locations in the memory system to thereby reconfigure or otherwise alter the processing unit's operation, as well as other processing of signals. The memory locations where data bits are maintained are physical locations that have particular electrical, magnetic, optical, or organic properties corresponding to the data bits.

[0021] The data bits may also be maintained on a computer readable medium including magnetic disks, optical disks, organic disks, and any other volatile or non-volatile mass storage system readable by the processing unit. The computer readable medium includes cooperating or interconnected computer readable media, which exist exclusively on the processing system or is distributed among multiple interconnected processing systems that may be local or remote to the processing system.

[0022] The compact single board computer has a printed circuit board size of a 5 ¼ inch disk drive or a 3 ¼ inch disk drive. One example uses a NOVA-7800-P800 single board computer in a 5 ¼ inch form factor, with a low power Mobile Pentium-III 800 MHz processor, 512 Mbytes of memory, and has on board interface ports for Firewire (IEEE 1394), local area network (LAN), Audio, integrated device electronics (IDE), personal computer memory card international association (PCMCIA) and Flash memories.

[0023] For some dedicated applications, the entire ultrasound system includes the hand-held ultrasound transducer with an integrated display and the portable data/video processing unit. The system can be operated without any controls other than power on/off. For other applications, the system is equipped with an optional operator interface such as buttons and knobs, either on the processing unit, or integrated in the transducer assembly, or both. The processing unit can provide an additional video output to drive an external monitor, or optionally an integrated display on the processing unit itself.

[0024] The microprocessor in FIG. 4B provides the functionality for down conversion, scan conversion, M-mode, Doppler processing, color flow imaging, power Doppler, spectral Doppler and post signal processing.

[0025] FIG. 4C illustrates a single chip, N-channel time-multiplexed beamforming processor with on-chip apodization and bandpass filter. Beamforming circuits in accordance with preferred examples are described in U.S. Patent No. 6,379,304, issued on April 30, 2002.

[0026] FIG. 5A illustrates a view of a stand alone portable ultrasound processing and display unit. The processing unit includes a motherboard single board computer. In an example, the motherboard has the following requirements that are fulfilled by a Pentium M, 512 MB of RAM or more, 10 GB hard drive, hard drive-free configuration. It includes a flash memory (approximately 1 GB) with a larger RAM (approximately 1 GB). The display that can be integrated into the processing unit may include a 10-inch or 12-inch display, having 1024 x 768 resolution, 200 Nits brightness as a minimum
(after touch screen), 250 desirable, 400:1 contrast ratio, and have a large viewing angle. The ultrasound module can be connected using a 6 pin Firewire connection. The ultrasound module operates with 12 watt as maximum power.

[0027] The graphical user interface includes a touch screen having no drift, and providing for finger operation (no RF pens). The ports for the processing unit include at least 2 universal serial bus (USB) ports to connect an external keyboard, mouse, CDW, and an Ethernet port. The processing unit provides for battery operation, two hours minimum at peak processing power of 7 watt required for ultrasound.

[0028] The processing unit provides for modularity with a removable processing unit 208 residing inside the ultrasound system. An ultrasound control pad module 212 and custom keyboard 204 can be made removable or configurable. The module 200 itself can also be used as an outside remote control module (USB or wireless) or as an OEM building block. The display module 202 can be made configurable (10-inch or 12-inch), Sun readable or configurable with different platforms. The module has a stand, as illustrated in FIG. 7. There is a protective cover for the display and controls. The unit may be re-used as a stand. A probe holder may be located on the side or on the top of the unit. The probe holder may also be engaged from the side when needed. The probe holder is easy to clean. A handle is provided for ease of carrying the unit. A universal mount that accommodates different holders, for example, tripods, arms, stands, is provided. The ultrasound unit can be docked and is rugged.

[0029] FIG. 5B illustrates an exploded view of the ultrasound processing and display unit shown in FIG. 5A. The unit 200 includes the modular display 202, the ultrasound processing unit 208 that includes the beamforming circuitry, a keyboard 204, a control pad module 204, a battery module 206 and the single board computer 214.

[0030] FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate a 10-inch and 12-inch display, respectively, that can be included in an ultrasound stand-alone unit. As described hereinbefore, the display provides a resolution of 1024 x 768 and a large viewing angle.

[0031] FIG. 7 is a side view of an ultrasound processing and display unit having a stand.

[0032] FIGS. 8A-8B illustrates views of a single board computer included in the ultrasound stand alone unit. FIG. 8A illustrates a view of a single board computer 270 used in the ultrasound portable unit including the interface ports. The interfaces include video graphics adapter (VGA) 281, a local area network (LAN) interface 282, a IEEE 1394 interface 283 and a PS/2 bus interface 284 which has a microchannel architecture. Further, the interfaces include a universal serial bus (USB) interface 285, a COMI interface 286 which is a serial communications port, a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) interface 297 for PC-cards and a CFII interface 288. FIG. 8B illustrates a view 300 of an embedded mobile Pentium III processor single board computer with interfaces for VGA, LAN, audio, IEEE and video capture.

[0033] FIG. 9 illustrates a view of the configuration 310 of the computer boards in a stand alone ultrasound unit. An analog board 312 is spaced from a digital board 322. A transducer socket 314 having a at least a 160 pin socket is provided. A power supply daughter board 320 is provided and spaced from the analog and digital boards by a separator 316. A plurality of interfaces are also provided, for example, IEEE 1394 interface 318, and a Deutsch Industrie Norm (DIN) connector 324 which is a multipin connector conforming to the specifications of the German National Standards Organization.

[0034] FIGS. 10A-10F illustrate views of the ultrasound processing unit configured for different applications such as different processing unit configured in different applications such as different original engineering manufacture (OEM) configurations and stand alone configurations. An example includes the motherboard, display driver and ultrasound interface in the housing with the provisions for plug-in transducer arrays. An alternate example includes stand-alone unit with a plug-in transducer array.

[0035] FIG. 10A illustrates an OEM configuration having a basic aluminum box with mounting holes. FIG. 10B illustrates the ultrasound processor inside a housing. FIG. 10C illustrates the ultrasound processing unit inside a PC drive bay. FIG. 10D illustrates an OEM configuration with FIG. 10E is a view of a stand-alone configuration three transducer connectors. A multiplexor can be used to select which connector signals are being processed, having an OEM housing, a single board computer, a LCD, and a battery module. FIG. 10F illustrates
the processing unit that can be connected in an OEM configuration or be a stand-alone unit.

[0036] An interlock is included to sense if a probe is present and to determine the calibration coefficient. A one wire identification (ID) chip for identifying the transducer is included. The computer can be preprogrammed with signal conditioning for each probe. By effectively connecting the probe, the circuit identifies the probe and accesses the preprogrammed conditions for that probe. Calibration coefficients are stored for each probe in the memory of the processing unit. The system can include multiple connection ports that allows for the connection of two or three probes to one system using a multiplexed interface.

[0037] FIG. 11 illustrates a schematic drawing of an analog board included in an ultrasound processing unit. A transducer connector is accommodated in region 452.

[0038] FIG. 12 illustrates a schematic view of a digital board 470 and a power supply daughter board 472 included in an ultrasound processing unit. Also provided is a mini-DIN interface 474, and IEEE 1394 interfaces 476, 484.

[0039] FIGS. 13A-13B illustrate the pin assignment of an electrically erasable programmable read only memory (EEPROM) and an electrically programmable read only memory integrated circuits, respectively, that can be included in the ultrasound processing unit.

[0040] FIG. 13A illustrates a 4096 bits, one-wire EEPROM that assures absolute identity as no two parts are alike. The memory is partitioned into sixteen 256-bit pages for packetizing data. This EEPROM identifies and stores relevant information about each ultrasound transducer to which it is associated. It is easily interfaced with using a single port pin of a microcontroller. The 4 Kb, one-wire EEPROM can be, for example, but not limited to a DS2433 circuit provided by Dallas Semiconductor.

[0041] FIG. 13B illustrates, for example, a DS2502/5/6 UNW UniqueWare™ add only memory chip provided by Dallas Semiconductor. The EPROM can be a 1024 bits, 16 kbits or 65 kbits memory and can communicate with the economy of one signal plus ground.

[0042] The medical ultrasound systems use many transducers depending upon the application. These systems also identify which transducer is attached at any given time.

[0043] In addition to identifying the transducer type, examples also identify the individual probe of the same type, such that calibration information can be associated with a particular probe. The one-wire ID circuits described with respect to FIGS. 13A and 13B provide identification of each transducer and corresponding calibration information by installing the semiconductor one-wire identification chips in each transducer assembly as shown in FIG. 14. FIG. 14 illustrates a semiconductor one-wire identification integrated circuit chip installed in transducer assemblies.

[0044] Each ID chip has a unique serial number, plus a writable/readable memory for storage of calibration or additional identification data. In an ultrasound application, the serial number and probe type information are accessed from memory upon probe insertion. The information is used to call up the appropriate transducer parameters and the new probe is then made available to the user on the display screen, as shown in FIG. 15A. FIG. 15A illustrates a view of a graphical user interface display screen showing the appropriate transducer parameters upon connection of a transducer probe with the ultrasound processing unit.

[0045] In addition to the identification, each transducer is unique and it is desirable to calibrate out these differences. Therefore, software executable instructions are provided by the ultrasound applications control for storing and retrieving individual calibration data to the ID chip. Examples of calibration differences can include electrical, acoustic and mechanical differences. These may be used, but are not limited to, procedures such as mounting of needle guides for biopsy, three-dimensional positioning sensing devices and transducer element variation calibration.

[0046] A method of probe type identification is usually provided by using multiple connector pins which are tied to logic zero or one. To differentiate between 32 probe types, 5 connector wires are required. In the one-wire method, only a single wire is required, and the data is passed between the probe and the host system serially.

[0047] The invention incorporates a read/writable non-volatile memory chip (ID chip) in the transducer termination board, as shown in FIG. 14. An example of the memory chip is the Dallas Semiconductor DS2433 One-wire Identification chip with 4096 bits of non-volatile storage. Other non-volatile read/writable memory can be used, but the One-wire chip has the advantage of using only one signal wire and one ground wire, and does not require additional pins for power supply. The identification circuit can also include a radio frequency wireless link that connects to the probe housing to identify the type of probe sending data to the ultrasound system.

[0048] The memory of the ID chip is organized as 128 words of 32 bits wide, divided into four segments: The IDENTIFICATION segment, the USAGE segment, the FACTORY segment and the USER segment shown in FIG. 15B.

[0049] The IDENTIFICATION segment holds the information which identifies the transducer type and hardware revision and serial number. The Ultrasound Application reads these information when a transducer is attached to a system and performs the appropriate set up based on the transducer type and hardware revisions. This segment is written at the factory and is not modifiable by the user.

[0050] The USAGE segment holds the statistical information about the usage of the transducer. The first entry logs the serial number and date when the transducer is first used outside of the factory (the Inauguration System Serial # and Date code). The second and third entries in this segment logs the serial number and the date of the two systems most recently the transducer was attached to. The Date Code values are Julian date of the connection date minus the Julian date of January 1, 2000. The 16 bit date code field can store dates of more than a century starting from the year 2000. The 16 but date code filed can store dates of more than a century starting from the year 2000. The fourth word of the USAGE segment is a counter which increments once per 5 minutes when a transducer is attached and activated in a system. These statistical information are updated in the field by the Ultrasound Application software, and is not modifiable by the user. The values are set to zeroes before the transducer leaves the factory. These statistical information are read and recorded when a transducer is returned to the factory for service.

[0051] The FACTORY segment holds the factory calibration information for the transducer. Examples of factory calibration data are the per element gain and propagation delay fine adjustments. When a transducer is attached and activated by the Ultrasound Application, the application first reads the transducer ID information from the IDENTIFICATION segment and loads up the appropriate set ups for that particular transducer type. The application then reads the FACTORY segment and applies the fine adjustments to the transducer set up. This segment is written at the factory and is not modifiable by the user.

[0052] The USER segment is reserved for the end user to store post-factory calibration data. Example of post-factory calibration data are position information of needle guide brackets and 3-D position sensing mechanism. The USER segment is the only segment which the user application software can modify.

[0053] FIG. 15C shows the software flow-chart of a typical transducer management module within the ultrasound application program.

[0054] When a TRANSDUCER ATTACHE event is detected, the Transducer Management Software Module first reads the Transducer Type ID and hardware revision information from the IDENTIFICATION Segment. The information is used to fetch the particular set of transducer profile data from the hard disk and load it into the memory of the application program. The software then reads the adjustment data from the FACTORY Segment and applies the adjustments to the profile data just loaded into memory. The software module then sends a TRANSDUCER ATTACHE Message to the main ultrasound application program, which uses the transducer profile already loaded and perform ultrasound imaging. The Transducer Management Software Module then waits for either a TRANSDUCER DETACH event, or the elapse of 5 minutes. If a TRANSDUCER DETACH is detected, the transducer profile data set is removed from memory and the module goes back to wait for another TRANSDUCER ATTACHE event. If a 5 minutes time period expires without TRANSDUCER DETACH, the software module increments the Cumulative Usage Counter in the USAGE Segment, and waits for another 5 minutes period or a TRANSDUCER DETACH event.

[0055] There are many types of ultrasound transducers. They differ by geometry, number of elements, and frequency response. For example, a linear array with center frequency of 10 to 15 MHz is better suited for breast imaging, and a curved array with center frequency of 3 to 5MHz is better suited for abdominal imaging.

[0056] It is often necessary to use different types of transducers for the same or different ultrasound scanning sessions. For ultrasound systems with only one transducer connection, the operator will change the transducer prior to the start of a new scanning session.

[0057] In some applications, it is necessary to switch among different types of transducers during one ultrasound scanning session. In this case, it is more convenient to have multiple transducers connected to the same ultrasound system, and the operator can quickly switch among these connected transducers toy hitting a button on the operator console, without having to physically detach and re-attach the transducers, which takes a longer time.

[0058] The switching among different connected transducers can be implemented either by arrays of relays 554 as seen in FIG. 15E, or by arrays of high voltage Multiplexer integrated circuits 556, as seen in FIG. 15F (switching between two 128-elements transducers). These relays or MUXVIC's form an additional layer of circuits between the ultrasound transmitter/receiver circuits and the transducer connectors.

[0059] The present invention utilizes a system that performed a method of multi-transducer switching using multiple Transmit/Receive integrated circuits 562, 564 as seen in FIG. 15D, without the use of relays or commercial multiplexer integrated circuits. A typical two transducer switching circuit using an integrated circuits in accordance with the invention deliver signals to the amplifier and beamformer circuit 565.

[0060] The Transmit/Receive integrated circuit includes multiple channel devices with a programmable waveform generator and high voltage driver for each transducer element, and a receive routing circuit for each element pair. The receive output is programmable to receive from transducer element 566 or 568 of the element pair, or turned off. The outputs of multiple integrated circuits are wired together. Connection to different transducers in the same system is achieved by programming the On/Off states of individual receive channels among the multiple integrated circuits, and by programming the transmit sequence of each of the transmit channels on all of the integrated circuits.

[0061] One advantage of this approach is the higher integration over the use of commercial available relays and multiplexer chips, especially when compared to a relay switching approach, because relays are mechanical devices and are generally larger. There are two versions of these, Transmit/Receive integrated circuits, one version has 64 transducer element channels and another version has 32 transducer channels. This high channel count integration of at least 32 channels combined with the small high pin density transducer connector, allows implementation of a multiple transducer configuration in a very compact size.

[0062] Another advantage is the elimination of an extra circuit layer, when compared to the multiplexer chips approach. Typical commercial multiplexer chips suitable for ultrasound channel switching typically have an ON resistance of greater than 20 ohms (example, Supertex HV20220), and therefore have measureable attenuation of both the transmit and receive signals compared with a direct connection in a single transducer system. The present approach has identical transmit/receive circuit for single transducer system, or multiple transducers system, with no additional signal attenuation resulting from adding the multiple transducers switching function.

[0063] Yet another advantage of the present approach is the added ability to operate a very large element count transducer with a true full transmit aperture. For example, a 128 channel ultrasound engine can operate a 768 element linear array by adding a one to six multiplexer array. A traditional implementation using relays of multiplexers can switch among six segments of 128 elements each across the entire 768 elements at any one time. The present approach will have 768 programmable transmitter, and therefore can use any size of transmit aperture anywhere on transducer array, including using the entire 768 element at the same time. The ability to use larger than 128 element transmit aperture allows the ultrasound system to have better penetration and resolution, compared to systems that are limited to 128.

[0064] FIG. 16 illustrates an ultrasound processing unit and an ultrasound transducer connector. An ultrasound transducer is coupled to its associated ultrasound processing unit 572 via a cable, which is routed into an ultrasound transducer connector assembly 574 and, mates with a corresponding terminal located on ultrasound console. A sliding lever is included to secure the connector to the processing unit.

[0065] FIGS. 17A and 17B illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly. The ultrasound transducer connector assembly 18 shows a connector housing. FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the ultrasound transducer connector assembly illustrated in FIGS. 17A and 17B. An electrical connector 606 may have 160 contacts or more. The connector assembly housing 604, 610 interfaces with a cable 602 which in turn is coupled to an ultrasound transducer.

[0066] FIGS. 19A, 19B and 19C illustrate detailed views of the ultrasound transducer connector assembly including sectional views. A cable 640 is attached to a first end of connector housing element 630. A close-up view 620 of connector assembly element 620 is seen in FIG. 19A. A side view 650 is shown in FIG. 19C.

[0067] The movable connector component has electrical contacts that mate with the stationary connector component having stationary electrical contacts on the processing unit. For mating, the movable connector component is brought towards the stationary connector component. Initially, there is a gap separating the movable electrical contacts from stationary electrical contacts, so that the contacts are not subjected to any friction or insertion force. A locking mechanism draws in the movable connector component which is received in a recess of the stationary connector component. The lever slides from right to left causing the movable connector component to close into the recess and contact the corresponding stationary electrical contacts to make an electrical connection. The ultrasound transducer connectors minimize the physical stress exerted upon their electrical contacts, thus avoiding wear and potential damage to the contacts.

[0068] FIG. 20 illustrates a view of an ultrasound processing unit with an ultrasound transducer connector assembly 674 having a lock 672. FIGS. 21A and 21B illustrate a close-up view of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly inserted into a ultrasound processing unit and a cut-away view of the inserted ultrasound transducer connector assembly, respectively, showing a sliding lever. The connector is drawn in the end of the housing when inserted and locked and is ejected when detached. The connector assembly allows for a one-hand operation. An example includes a sash lock similar to a window lock. The lever includes a lever action which also yields a significant mechanical advantage as it translates insertion force to a lateral action of the lock. The lever for the connector assembly is resistant to abusive use as it has rails which act with the lever to eliminate twists applied to the connector. A rotating catch is used to eject the connector after use.

[0069] FIGS. 22A and 22B illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector assembly inserted into an ultrasound processing unit 700 having a lever 732 shown in the detailed portion 720, to secure the connector assembly.

[0070] FIGS. 23A and 23B illustrate further details 730 of the lever 732 and an exploded view 740 of the lever assembly of
an ultrasound processing unit. The lever assembly includes a spring 742 which being a resilient member, assists in drawing the lever 744 into the locked position.

[0071] FIGS. 24A-24D illustrate several views of the ultrasound processing unit showing the ultrasound transducer connector assembly. Circuit boards are mounted in FIGS. 24B and 24C along with the connector assembly.

[0072] FIG. 25 illustrates a view of the ultrasound processing unit 800 showing a partial view of the lever for the transducer connector assembly.

[0073] FIGS. 26A and 26B illustrate further views 810, 820 of the ultrasound processing unit showing the ultrasound transducer connector assembly.

[0074] FIGS. 27A-27C illustrate views of an ultrasound transducer connector. The maximum voltage of the ultrasound transducer connector can be 100 volts. The connector can include 160 or 240 pins or more. The base plate protects the pins and rises up into position during printed circuit board insertion. In one example the connector assembly includes, but is not limited to, a Molex® 53941 right angle docking station board-to-board shielded plug.

[0075] FIGS. 28A-28C illustrate views of an alternate example of an ultrasound transducer connector. The connector assembly includes, but is not limited to, a Molex® 54145 right angle docking station board-to-board shielded receptacle. Alternatively, a molex®3441 connector can be used. These a small high density pin connectors having a pin pitch of less than 1mm, and preferably 0.8mm or less. The connectors can have 160 pins, 192 pins, 250pins or more. When this system is used in connection with the insertion and release mechanism described in connection with FIGS. 20-26, this provides a secure and reliable connection assembly that fits within a smaller and lighter assembly for portable applications. Note that there is a probe present pin is an interlock to indicate that a probe has been inserted correctly.

[0076] FIG. 31 illustrates a schematic view of an ultrasound system including an ultrasound console having a remote hardware keypad. The system includes a console 950 connected with a USB/PS/2 interface to a host computer 960.

[0077] FIG. 32 illustrates a schematic diagram of an ultrasound console. A universal serial bus (USB) console is used for a remote hardware keypad. This hardware user interface in accordance with a preferred example displaces a software graphical user interface and allows any ultrasound imaging control function to be accessed via a control keypad. The controls are communicated with a host computer through a USB port.

[0078] In a preferred example, the ultrasound console includes a USB device and USB Driver which is implemented with a FTDI USB245M controller chip, for example. This integrated chip is simple as it can be integrated into the console without requiring a custom device driver. The USB Console uses the FTDI supplied dynamic link library (DLL) device driver in accordance with a preferred example of the present invention.

[0079] The console may be made up of at least four types of hardware functions: buttons, potentiometers, trackball, and LEDs. The buttons are momentary switches. The architecture allows for 128 buttons. The potentiometers are either linear slide potentiometers for time gain control (TGC), or rotary dials for GAINs . Each potentiometer can have a position reading between 0 and 255. A digital potentiometer with clickers is considered to be a button, not a potentiometer. One example includes 11 potentiometers: 8 slide switches numbered from 0 to 7, for TGC and three rotary dial potentiometers numbered 8 to 10.

[0080] In a preferred example, a trackball is a stand-alone unit which communicates with the host system via a PS/2 interface or USB interface. The trackball may go to the host system directly, or combined with the console the USB interface via a USB hub.

[0081] In a preferred example, light emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided on the console and can be individually addressed to turn on or off. A preferred example has 8 LEDs, numbered from 0 to 7, and the LEDs are located at the buttons #0 to 7 respectively.

[0082] A preferred example includes a software interface protocol from the console to a host system. When a button is pressed or a potentiometer position is changed, a three byte message is sent from the console to the host. Tables 1 and 2 illustrate, respectively, the message sent by using a button and a potentiometer.
Table 1
Button Message
 Bit 76543210
Byte #0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Byte #1 0 Button number
Byte #2 X X X X X X   X
Table 2
Potentiometer Message
 Bit 76543210
Byte #0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Byte #1 0 Potentiometer number
Byte #2 Potentiometer position value


[0083] The host may send a "Query" command to the console, and the console responds by sending Potentiometer Messages for every potentiometer on the console in accordance with a preferred example. Messages can be sent back-to-back in a preferred example.

[0084] A preferred example also includes a software interface protocol from a host system to a console. The host can send messages to the console to turn LEDs on/off, or to query the current readings of every potentiometer. Tables 3, 4 and 5 provide the LED-On message, LED-Off message and a query message, respectively, in accordance with a preferred example.
Table 3
LED-ON Message
 Bit 76543210
Byte #0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Byte #1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Byte #2 0 LED number
Table 4
LED-OFF Message
 Bit 76543210
Byte #0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Byte #1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
Byte #2 0 LED number
Table 5
Query Message
 Bit 76543210
Byte #0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Byte #1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Byte #2 0 X X X X X X X


[0085] FIG. 30 illustrates the USB console for remote key pad in accordance with a preferred example of the present invention. It is a hardware user interface and allows any ultrasound imaging control function to be accessed via a "traditional" control key pad. The control keys include, trackball with right and left enter keys, dedicated Freeze/live key, dedicated Save key, 8 Slide potentiometers each with a lateral movement to control the TGC gain, dedicated overall B-mode gain control pot, dedicated overall Color Flow Imaging gain control potentiometer, dedicated overall Pulsed Wave Spectral Doppler gain control pot, dedicated B-mode selection key, dedicated Power Doppler-mode selection key, dedicated Color Flowing Imaging-mode selection key, dedicated Pulsed Wave Spectral Doppler selection key, dedicated M-mode selection key, and dedicated Triplex selection key.

[0086] An LED is provided on each mode selection key. Once a mode is selected by a user, the selected mode-control key lights up.

[0087] The basic module system is an external peripheral 16, 26 to a personal computer as shown generally in FIGS 1-3 or a basic system configuration of the system pairs it with an off-the-shelf notebook computer with a firewire port. An important advantage of this configuration is that the system gets its power from the notebook computer via the single Firewire cable. No additional power supply is needed. The combination of the peripheral 16, 26 and the notebook computer can both run on the battery of the computer, making the system very portable.

[0088] The modular system can be structured as a transformable system: a fully portable ultrasound system consisting of the ultrasound module and a notebook computer in a single portable suitcase, and which can be converted into a full feature cart system for stationary use.

[0089] The suitcase configuration shown in FIGS 31A-31F integrates the ultrasound module and the notebook computer into a single suitcase package. An off-the-shelf consumer notebook computer 1004 with control panel or keyboard 1008 and display 1006 is secured to the suitcase using a low cost molded bracket 1005 shaped for the particular notebook model. Alternate notebook computer models can be used with a different molded bracket.

[0090] As seen in FIG 31F, the ultrasound module 1018 is situated in the base 1016 and base cover 1015 and top 1012. A handle 1002 can be extended from the housing base 1010 so that a user can carry the system with one hand. The system can be connected to, or dock with a console of a cart system seen in FIGS 32A-32D this example utilizes a mobile cart system for use in connection with a portable ultrasound imaging system. Shown in FIG. 33 is a system having a plurality of transducer cable connectors 1144, 1146.

[0091] This system can use the switching systems described in connection with FIGS. 15D-15F, for example.

[0092] The cart system 1100 uses a base assembly 1108 and a USB hub 1220. The base assembly can be connected to a docking bay 1222 that receives the processor housing 1000. A preferred example of the docking bay system as seen in FIG. 34 provides electrical interface connections between the base assembly and the processor housing at docking connector 1205. The base assembly can further include a control panel 1150 such that the user can control certain operations of the ultrasound system using control elements on the control panel 1150.

[0093] The cart configuration docks the suitcase module 1000 to a cart 1100 with a full operator console 1118. Once docked, the cart and the suitcase together forms a full feature roll-about system 1200 shown in the schematic control circuit diagram of FIG. 34 that may have other peripherals added, such as printers and video recorders. The docking mechanism is a simple, cable-less mating connection, very much like the desk top docking station for a notebook computer. This easy docking scheme allows the user to quickly attach or detach the suitcase to convert the system between stationary use (cart), and portable use.

[0094] The user console 1118 on the cart is designed with a USB interface. The electronics on the console gets its power from the USB bus from the battery in housing 100, eliminating the need for an additional power source. However, parts 1211 and 1362 with transformer 1360 and outlets 1324, 1326 can also be used for power distribution and access. The user console is attached to the notebook computer via the USB port of the notebook computer, routed through the docking connector of the suitcase.

[0095] An alternate design of the user console 1118 duplicates the cart base console design in a smaller portable console with the same USB interface. This portable console can be plugged into the suitcase without the cart.

[0096] With a USB powered console, the cart system can operate solely on the notebook computer battery without the need for being connected to the wall AC power outlet, or, when the cart system is running on wall AC power, it can continue to operate during power outage.

[0097] The cart system duplicates many of the notebook computer peripheral ports so that the cart system has as much features as a full blown computer, such as network connection 1203 and printer ports second USB hub 1320 to printer 1340. A VCR, 1350 can receive S Video through docking connections 1205, 1222 from processor 1004. There is also an Svideo port 1207. The first USB hub 1220 is connected via docking parts with the computer USB port and with the second hub 1320. Control elements 1150 can be used to operate the cart system 1200 through hub 1220. The portable system 1000 has one or more connector and beamformer system 1014 with 1394 interface an EKG port 1208, a microphone port 1204, ethernet port 1203, USB port 1202, Svideo port 1207 and power access 1201. The console 1118 has power access 1211, ethernet 1212, USB port 1213, microphone 1216 and EKG port 1214. DC 1302 and USB 1306 connections run from the console to the lower base unit6 1300.

[0098] In view of the wide variety of examples to which the principles of the present invention can be applied, it should be understood that the illustrated examples are exemplary only, and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the present invention. For example, the steps of the flow diagrams may be taken in sequences other than those described, and more or fewer elements may be used in the block diagrams. While various elements of the preferred examples have been described as being implemented in software, other examples in hardware or firmware implementations may alternatively be used, and vice-versa.

[0099] It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that methods involved in the system and method for determining and controlling contamination may be embodied in a computer program product that includes a computer usable medium. For example, such a computer usable medium can include a readable memory device, such as, a hard drive device, a CD-ROM, a DVD-ROM, or a computer diskette, having computer readable program code segments stored thereon. The computer readable medium can also include a communications or transmission medium, such as, a bus or a communications link, either optical, wired, or wireless having program code segments carried thereon as digital or analog data signals.

[0100] The claims should not be read as limited to the described order or elements unless stated to that effect. Therefore, all embodiments that come within the scope of the following claims are claimed as the invention.


Claims

1. A handheld medical ultrasound imaging device comprising:

a plurality of hand held transducer assemblies (22, 104), each transducer assembly including a probe housing, a transducer array, and a cable (24) with a first transducer connector;

a hand held portable processing unit (26, 50, 122, 200, 240, 250) connectable to each of the hand held transducer assemblies (22, 104) with the cable and the first transducer connector at one of one or more connectors on the processing unit, the processing unit having an integrated touch screen display (106, 202) configured to display an ultrasound image wherein the display is mounted integral with a processor operative in response to the integrated touch screen display, a memory system, a battery, and an ultrasound beamformer processing circuit (118, 208) wherein the touch screen display and the ultrasound beamformer processing circuit are communicably connected to the processor, the processor being operative in response to finger operation of the integrated touch screen display to operate a graphical user interface configured to display the selectable types of transducer assemblies and corresponding transducer parameters upon connection of the transducer assembly (22, 104)on the touch screen display, wherein the portable processing unit further comprises a plurality of computer programs including a scan conversion program, a Doppler processing program and a transducer identification program.


 
2. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the transducer assembly (22, 104) further comprises a probe identification circuit configured to store probe calibration information, the probe identification circuit preferably comprising a writable and readable memory.
 
3. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the hand held portable processing unit has a processor circuit board, a digital circuit board and an analog circuit board, which are stacked.
 
4. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the hand held portable processing unit further comprises one or more of an Ethernet port, a USB port, a video port, a microphone port, an EKG port, and a power source connector.
 
5. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the hand held portable processing unit further comprises a system controller connected to the beamformer processing circuit.
 
6. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit further comprises transmit/receive integrated circuits with at least 32 transducer channels.
 
7. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit is operable without any controls other than power on/off.
 
8. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit is configured to operate at 12 Watts as maximum power.
 
9. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit is connectable to a keyboard.
 
10. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit has software instructions operable to perform a needle guide procedure.
 
11. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processing unit is dockable; or the processing unit is connectable to a cart, the cart including a power source connecter.
 
12. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the transducer array is connected to a transmit and receive circuit which is connected to a digital control circuit and the beamformer processing circuit.
 
13. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the first transducer connector has at least 160 pins with a pin pitch of less than 1 mm; or preferably the first transducer connector has at least 250 pins and a pin pitch of 0.8mm or less.
 
14. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the plurality of different transducer assemblies comprises transducer assemblies having different operating frequencies and/or geometries which are attachable to the processing unit.
 
15. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 further comprising a handle and optionally including a stand.
 
16. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the display is a 10 inch display or wherein the display is a 12 inch display.
 
17. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the display has a minimum brightness of 200 Nits for viewing the touchscreen display.
 
18. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the touchscreen is configured to operate a Doppler operation, a b-mode operation, a TGC gain control, or a color flow control.
 
19. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processor comprises a single board computer.
 
20. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the processor is configured to process Doppler image data that is displayed on the display.
 
21. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 further comprising a multiplexor to select from a plurality of transducer assemblies.
 
22. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 further comprising a needle guide device.
 
23. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 further comprising a switching circuit to select one transducer assembly for operation from a plurality of connected transducer assemblies.
 
24. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1 wherein the transducer assembly comprises 128 transducer elements.
 
25. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 2, further comprising a single wire identification circuit.
 
26. The handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 25, wherein the probe identification circuit is configured to store usage data, identification data and calibration data, the usage data including dates of use of the transducer assembly.
 
27. A medical ultrasound imaging device comprising the handheld medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 1, and further comprising a base assembly configured to receive the hand held portable processing unit, the hand held portable processing unit having a first docking connector configured to electrically connect to a second docking connector on the base assembly, the base assembly further comprising a cart.
 
28. The medical ultrasound imaging device of claim 27, further comprising a control console on the base assembly which is operationally connected to the processor and has a plurality of control elements configured to control an image processing operations of the processor to display ultrasound image data on the display.
 


Ansprüche

1. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät, umfassend:

eine Vielzahl von handgehaltenen Wandlerbaugruppen (22, 104), wobei jede Wandlerbaugruppe ein Sondengehäuse, ein Wandler-Array und ein Kabel (24) mit einem ersten Wandlerstecker beinhaltet;

eine handgehaltene tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit (26, 50, 122, 200, 240, 250), die mit jeder der handgehaltenen Wandlerbaugruppen (22, 104) mit dem Kabel und dem ersten Wandlerstecker an einem von einem oder mehreren Anschlüssen an der Verarbeitungseinheit verbindbar ist, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit eine integrierte Touchscreen-Anzeige (106, 202) aufweist, die zum Anzeigen eines Ultraschallbilds konfiguriert ist, wobei die Anzeige integral mit einem Prozessor, der als Reaktion auf die integrierte Touchscreen-Anzeige arbeitet, einem Speichersystem, einer Batterie und einer Ultraschallstrahlformer-Verarbeitungsschaltung (118, 208) angebracht ist, wobei die Touchscreen-Anzeige und die Ultraschallstrahlformer-Verarbeitungsschaltung kommunizierend mit dem Prozessor verbunden sind, wobei der Prozessor als Reaktion auf eine Fingerbedienung der integrierten Touchscreen-Anzeige betriebsfähig ist, um eine graphische Benutzerschnittstelle zu bedienen, die zum Anzeigen der die auswählbaren Typen von Wandlerbaugruppen und entsprechenden Wandlerparameter bei Verbindung der Wandlerbaugruppe (22, 104) auf der Touchscreen-Anzeige konfiguriert ist, wobei die tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit ferner eine Vielzahl von Computerprogrammen einschließlich eines Abtastkonvertierungsprogramms, eines Doppler-Verarbeitungsprogramms und eines Wandler-Identifikationsprogramms umfasst.


 
2. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Wandlerbaugruppe (22, 104) ferner eine Sonden-Identifizierungsschaltung umfasst, die zum Speichern von Sonden-Kalibrierungsinformationen konfiguriert ist, wobei die Sonden-Identifizierungsschaltung vorzugsweise einen beschreibbaren und lesbaren Speicher umfasst.
 
3. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die handgehaltene tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit eine Prozessorleiterplatte, eine digitale Leiterplatte und eine analoge Leiterplatte aufweist, die gestapelt sind.
 
4. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die handgehaltene tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit ferner einen oder mehrere Ethernet-Anschlüsse, einen USB-Anschluss, einen Video-Anschluss, einen Mikrofon-Anschluss, einen EKG-Anschluss und einen Stromquellenanschluss umfasst.
 
5. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die handgehaltene tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit ferner einen Systemcontroller umfasst, der mit der Strahlformer-Verarbeitungsschaltung verbunden ist.
 
6. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit ferner integrierte Sende-/Empfangsschaltungen mit mindestens 32 Wandlerkanälen umfasst.
 
7. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit ohne weitere Bedienelemente mit Ausnahme des Ein- und Ausschaltens der Stromversorgung betrieben werden kann.
 
8. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit so konfiguriert ist, dass sie mit 12 Watt als maximaler Leistung arbeitet.
 
9. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit an eine Tastatur anschließbar ist.
 
10. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit über Software-Befehle verfügt, mit denen ein Nadelführungsverfahren durchgeführt werden kann.
 
11. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit andockbar ist; oder
wobei die Verarbeitungseinheit an einen Wagen anschließbar ist, wobei der Wagen einen Stromquellenanschluss aufweist.
 
12. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Wandler-Array mit einer Sende- und Empfangsschaltung verbunden ist, die mit einer digitalen Steuerschaltung und der Strahlformer-Verarbeitungsschaltung verbunden ist.
 
13. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei der erste Wandlerstecker mindestens 160 Stifte mit einem Stiftabstand von weniger als 1 mm aufweist; oder
wobei vorzugsweise der erste Wandlerstecker mindestens 250 Stifte und einen Stiftabstand von 0,8 mm oder weniger aufweist.
 
14. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Vielzahl von unterschiedlichen Wandlerbaugruppen Wandlerbaugruppen mit unterschiedlichen Betriebsfrequenzen und/oder Geometrien umfassen, die an der Verarbeitungseinheit anbringbar sind.
 
15. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend einen Handgriff und optional beinhaltend einen Ständer.
 
16. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Anzeige eine 10-Zoll-Anzeige ist oder wobei die Anzeige eine 12-Zoll-Anzeige ist.
 
17. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Anzeige eine Mindesthelligkeit von 200 Nits zur Betrachtung der Touchscreen-Anzeige aufweist.
 
18. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Touchscreen zum Ausführen einer Doppler-Operation, einer b-Mode-Operation, einer TGC-Verstärkungsregelung oder einer Farbflussregelung konfiguriert ist.
 
19. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Prozessor einen Einplatinencomputer umfasst.
 
20. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Prozessor zur Verarbeitung von Doppler-Bilddaten konfiguriert ist, die auf der Anzeige angezeigt werden.
 
21. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend einen Multiplexer zum Auswählen aus mehreren Wandlerbaugruppen.
 
22. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend eine Nadelführungsvorrichtung.
 
23. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend einen Schaltkreis zum Auswählen einer Wandlerbaugruppe zum Betrieb aus einer Vielzahl von angeschlossenen Wandlerbaugruppen.
 
24. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Wandlerbaugruppe 128 Wandlerelemente umfasst.
 
25. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 2, ferner umfassend eine Einzeldraht-Identifizierungsschaltung.
 
26. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 25, wobei die Sonden-Identifizierungsschaltung konfiguriert ist, um Nutzungsdaten, Identifikationsdaten und Kalibrierungsdaten zu speichern, wobei die Nutzungsdaten die Daten für die Verwendung der Wandlerbaugruppe beinhalten.
 
27. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät, umfassend das medizinische Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 1 und ferner umfassend eine Basisanordnung, die zur Aufnahme der handgehaltenen tragbaren Verarbeitungseinheit konfiguriert ist, wobei die handgehaltene tragbare Verarbeitungseinheit einen ersten Andockverbinder aufweist, der zur elektrischen Verbindung mit einem zweiten Andockverbinder an der Basisanordnung konfiguriert ist, wobei die Basisanordnung ferner einen Wagen umfasst.
 
28. Medizinisches Ultraschall-Bildgebungs-Handgerät nach Anspruch 27, ferner umfassend eine Steuerkonsole an der Basisanordnung, die operativ mit dem Prozessor verbunden ist und mehrere Steuerelemente aufweist, die zum Steuern einer Bildverarbeitungsoperation des Prozessors konfiguriert sind, um Ultraschall-Bilddaten auf der Anzeige anzuzeigen.
 


Revendications

1. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif, comprenant :

une pluralité d'ensembles transducteurs portatifs (22, 104), chaque ensemble transducteur comprenant un boîtier de sonde, un réseau de transducteurs et un câble (24) comportant un premier connecteur de transducteur ;

une unité de traitement portable à main (26, 50, 122, 200, 240, 250) pouvant être reliée à chacun des ensembles transducteurs portatifs (22, 104) à l'aide du câble et du premier connecteur de transducteur au niveau d'un ou de plusieurs connecteurs sur l'unité de traitement, l'unité de traitement comportant un écran d'affichage tactile intégré (106, 202) configuré pour afficher une image d'ultrasons, l'écran étant monté solidaire d'un processeur fonctionnant en réponse à l'écran d'affichage tactile intégré, un système de mémoire, une batterie et un circuit de traitement de formeur de faisceaux d'ultrasons (118, 208), l'écran d'affichage tactile et le circuit de traitement de formeur de faisceaux d'ultrasons étant reliés en communication au processeur, le processeur fonctionnant en réponse à l'actionnement à l'aide du doigt de l'écran d'affichage tactile intégré pour faire fonctionner une interface utilisateur graphique configurée pour afficher les types sélectionnables d'ensembles transducteurs et les paramètres de transducteurs correspondants lors de la connexion de l'ensemble transducteur (22, 104) sur l'écran d'affichage tactile, l'unité de traitement portatif comprenant en outre une pluralité de programmes informatiques comprenant un programme de conversion de balayage, un programme de traitement Doppler et un programme d'identification de transducteur.


 
2. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'ensemble transducteur (22, 104) comprend en outre un circuit d'identification de sonde configuré pour stocker des informations d'étalonnage de sonde, le circuit d'identification de sonde comprenant de préférence une mémoire inscriptible et lisible.
 
3. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement portable à main comporte une carte de circuit imprimé de processeur, une carte de circuit imprimé numérique et une carte de circuit imprimé analogique, lesquelles sont empilées.
 
4. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement portable à main comprend en outre un port Ethernet et/ou un port USB et/ou un port vidéo et/ou un port micro et/ou un port EKG et/ou un connecteur de source d'alimentation.
 
5. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement portable à main comprend en outre un dispositif de commande de système relié au circuit de traitement de formeur de faisceau.
 
6. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement comprend en outre des circuits intégrés d'émission/de réception comportant au moins 32 canaux de transducteur.
 
7. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement peut fonctionner sans aucune commande autre que la mise sous tension/hors tension.
 
8. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement est configurée pour fonctionner à 12 watts comme puissance maximale.
 
9. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement peut être reliée à un clavier.
 
10. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement comporte des instructions logicielles servant à exécuter une procédure de guidage d'aiguille.
 
11. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'unité de traitement est connectable ; ou
l'unité de traitement peut être reliée à un chariot, le chariot comprenant un connecteur de source d'alimentation.
 
12. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le réseau de transducteurs est relié à un circuit d'émission et de réception qui est relié à un circuit de commande numérique et au circuit de traitement de formeur de faisceau.
 
13. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le premier connecteur de transducteur comporte au moins 160 broches présentant un pas de broche inférieur à 1 mm ; ou
le premier connecteur de transducteur comportant de préférence au moins 250 broches et un pas de broche d'au plus 0,8 mm.
 
14. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la pluralité d'ensembles transducteurs différents comprennent des ensembles transducteurs présentant différentes fréquences et/ou géométries de fonctionnement qui peuvent être appliquées à l'unité de traitement.
 
15. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre une poignée et éventuellement un support.
 
16. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'écran est un écran de 10 pouces, ou dans lequel l'écran est un écran de 12 pouces.
 
17. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'écran présente une luminosité minimale de 200 Nits permettant de visualiser l'écran d'affichage tactile.
 
18. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'écran tactile est configuré pour actionner un fonctionnement Doppler, un fonctionnement en mode b, une commande de gain TGC ou une commande de flux de couleur.
 
19. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le processeur comprend un ordinateur à carte unique.
 
20. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le processeur est configuré pour traiter des données d'image Doppler qui sont affichées sur l'écran.
 
21. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un multiplexeur pour sélectionner parmi une pluralité d'ensembles transducteurs.
 
22. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un dispositif de guidage d'aiguille.
 
23. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un circuit de commutation permettant de sélectionner un ensemble transducteur pour le faire fonctionner à partir d'une pluralité d'ensembles transducteurs reliés.
 
24. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'ensemble transducteur comprend 128 éléments transducteurs.
 
25. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 2, comprenant en outre un circuit d'identification à fil unique.
 
26. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 25, dans lequel le circuit d'identification de sonde est configuré pour stocker des données d'utilisation, des données d'identification et des données d'étalonnage, les données d'utilisation comprenant des dates d'utilisation de l'ensemble transducteur.
 
27. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons comprenant le dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons portatif selon la revendication 1, et comprenant en outre un ensemble base configuré pour recevoir l'unité de traitement portable à main, l'unité de traitement portable à main comportant un premier connecteur d'accueil configuré pour se connecter électriquement à un second connecteur d'accueil sur l'ensemble base, l'ensemble base comprenant en outre un chariot.
 
28. Dispositif d'imagerie médicale à ultrasons selon la revendication 27, comprenant en outre une console de commande sur l'ensemble base, laquelle est reliée de manière fonctionnelle au processeur et comporte une pluralité d'éléments de commande configurés pour amener les opérations de traitement d'image du processeur à afficher des données d'image à ultrasons sur l'écran.
 




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Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description