(19)
(11)EP 2 885 861 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
22.07.2020 Bulletin 2020/30

(21)Application number: 13750327.2

(22)Date of filing:  16.08.2013
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H02M 3/156(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/EP2013/067138
(87)International publication number:
WO 2014/027085 (20.02.2014 Gazette  2014/08)

(54)

A CURRENT-MODE CONTROLLER FOR STEP-DOWN (BUCK) CONVERTER

STROMMODUSSTEUERUNG FÜR ABWÄRTSWANDLER

CONTRÔLEUR À MODE DE COURANT POUR CONVERTISSEUR ABAISSEUR DE TENSION (BUCK)


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 17.08.2012 US 201261684225 P
05.07.2013 US 201313935630

(43)Date of publication of application:
24.06.2015 Bulletin 2015/26

(73)Proprietor: Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson (publ)
164 83 Stockholm (SE)

(72)Inventor:
  • LABBE, Benoît
    FR-38000 Grenoble (FR)

(74)Representative: Ericsson 
Patent Development Torshamnsgatan 21-23
164 80 Stockholm
164 80 Stockholm (SE)


(56)References cited: : 
CN-A- 102 364 855
DE-A1- 10 043 482
US-A1- 2011 062 932
DE-A1- 4 422 399
US-A- 5 982 160
US-B1- 6 222 356
  
  • LEI HUA ET AL: "Design Considerations for Small Signal Modeling of DC-DC Converters Using Inductor DCR Current Sensing Under Time Constants Mismatch Conditions", 2007 IEEE POWER ELECTRONICS SPECIALISTS CONFERENCE, 1 June 2007 (2007-06-01), pages 2182-2188, XP055092300, DOI: 10.1109/PESC.2007.4342346 ISBN: 978-1-42-440654-8
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

BACKGROUND



[0001] Embedded systems requiring high efficiency, high output current, and low production volume often use step down DC-DC converters, also known as buck converters. A buck converter generally employs Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) control, e.g., a PWM voltage-mode controller or a PWM current-mode controller.

[0002] Voltage-mode controllers use a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID)-type continuous transfer function, as compared to a triangle signal, to produce a modulated signal (the PWM signal). Because the PID-type function only uses the output voltage, the output filter forms a second order low pass filter with two poles. After adding an integral action to reduce steady state output error, the open-loop transfer function becomes a three-pole function. Whatever the designer does, however, the DC-DC converter is unstable without two correction zeroes. The compensation scheme required to provide such correction zeroes is highly sensitive to process variations and require a complex proper calibration system.

[0003] Current-mode controllers regulate the current supplied to a power inductor to regulate the output voltage. A current-mode controller operates using two loops: an internal current loop, which regulates the inductor current, and an outer voltage loop. Because the internal current loop forms a high bandwidth loop, the inductor may be modeled as a current source, such that the power-stage's transfer function is a first order function with a single pole defined by the output capacitor and the resistive load. The compensation required to stabilize the current-mode controller is much less complex than that required for the voltage-mode controller, and the overall performance is much better. However, current-mode controllers require measuring the inductor's current. Further, current-mode controllers may be unstable in some circumstances, e.g., when the required duty cycle is higher than 50% when the inductor's peak current is regulated, or when the required duty cycle is lower than 50% when the inductor's valley current is regulated. Current-mode controllers also have a tendency towards subharmonic oscillation, non-ideal loop responses, and an increased sensitivity to noise. Slope compensation, where a small slope is added to the measured inductor current, may be employed to overcome these difficulties.

[0004] Conventional slope compensation, however, typically increases the complexity and cost of the current-mode controller. For example, conventional slope compensation requires complex and sensitive measurement circuitry to measure the inductor current, which often requires a large biasing current. Also, commonly used instantaneous measurement circuits are not precise enough to be used in a regulated loop and do not provide a sufficient bandwidth for small duty cycles. Further, slope compensation typically results in a lower efficiency due to the required voltage drop for a direct current measurement. Also, some conventional slope-compensation circuits require a slope generator, e.g., the saw-tooth generator used for the PWM modulator, and a fast adder to add the inductor current measurement and the generated slope. When considering a 3.2 MHz switching regulator, which is a common switching frequency, the slope generator is not particularly more complex than one for voltage-mode control. The adder, however, must have a bandwidth much higher than the switching frequency, e.g., greater than ten times the switching frequency. In addition, all of the components required for this complex circuitry require a large silicon area. Thus, there remains a need for a stable current-mode controller employing less complex, but still accurate slope compensation.
US 6,222,356 B1 relates to a current mode-switching regulator for a power supply, in particular for a switched-mode power supply.
US 5,982,160 B1 relates to a DC-to-DC converter with an output inductor and a current sensor connected in parallel.
DE 44,22,399 A1 relates to a system for determining the voltage signal in a switched-mode power supply.
CN102364855A relates to a current regulator for a buck converter involving an indirect inductor current measurement and a slope compensation circuit using a current source.

SUMMARY



[0005] Aspects of the invention are defined in the independent claims. Further embodiments are defined in the dependent claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0006] 

Figure 1 shows a conventional current-mode controller without slope compensation.

Figure 2 shows a conventional current-mode controller with conventional slope compensation.

Figure 3 shows a block diagram for a current-mode regulator for a buck converter according to one exemplary embodiment.

Figure 4 shows a method of current-mode control according to one exemplary embodiment.

Figure 5 shows a circuit diagram of an inner-loop control circuit according to one exemplary embodiment.

Figure 6 shows an exemplary signal diagram for the current-mode regulator of Figures 3 and 5.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0007] Figure 1 shows a conventional current-mode controller 10 for a buck converter (also known as a step-down or DC-DC voltage regulator). The current-mode controller 10, which also may be referred to herein as a current-mode regulator, includes an outer voltage loop 20, including an inductor 22, and an internal current loop 30, which regulates the inductor's current. Internal current loop 30 includes a current measurement circuit 32 in line with the inductor 22, a comparator 34, a switching controller 36, and a switching network 38. The current measurement circuit 32 measures the inductor current IL directly, and provides the measured current in the form of a measured voltage VL to the comparator 34. Based on a comparison between VL and an input control voltage Vctrl, the switching controller 36 controls the switching network 38 to selectively connect the inductor 22 to an input supply voltage Vbat or to ground.

[0008] Outer voltage loop 20 includes the inductor 22 and a compensation circuit 24. The outer voltage loop 20 generates a regulator output voltage Vo in the load 50 based on the inductor current IL. The compensation circuit 24 generates the control voltage Vctrl applied to the inner current loop 30 based on Vref, and optionally based on Vo. For example, the compensation circuit 24 may generate the control voltage Vctrl according to:

where kp, kd, and ki represent arbitrary defined regulator parameters. The operations of compensation circuit 22 are well known in the art, and thus are not discussed further herein.

[0009] The current-mode controller 10 of Figure 1 is unstable for duty cycles exceeding 50% when the inductor's peak current is regulated, or for duty cycles less than 50% when the inductor's valley current is regulated. To overcome this problem, slope compensation may be added to the measured inductor current, as shown in Figure 2. To that end, an adder 40 may be inserted between the comparator 34 and the current measurement node 32 to enable a fixed slope, represented in Figure 2 by the sawtooth signal, to be directly added to the measured inductor current/voltage to generate a slope compensated measurement voltage Vf applied to the input of the comparator 34.

[0010] While conventional slope compensation techniques, such as the one shown in Figure 2, resolve many problems associated with current-mode controllers, conventional slope compensation techniques are not suitable for all applications. For example, slope compensation requires complex and sensitive measurement circuitry to measure the inductor current, which often requires a large biasing current. Also, commonly used instantaneous measurement circuits are not precise enough to be used in a regulated loop and do not provide a sufficient bandwidth for small duty cycles. Further, the current measurement circuit 32 causes a voltage drop at the input to the inductor 22, and therefore, impacts the efficiency of the associated buck converter. Typical regulators also have high switching frequencies, e.g., 3.2 MHz. In order to add the desired slope compensation, such regulators require a high speed adder 40 having a bandwidth significantly greater, e.g., ten times greater, than the switching frequency. In addition, all of the components required for this solution require a large silicon area. Thus, conventional solutions are not always suitable for high speed regulators and/or electronic devices having limited silicon area.

[0011] Figure 3 shows an exemplary current-mode regulator 100 providing current-mode control according to one exemplary embodiment. The illustrated solution provides the requisite slope compensation without incurring the above-noted problems associated with conventional solutions. To that end, the solution of Figure 3 applies slope compensation to an inductor current indirectly measured by a current measurement circuit in the feedback portion of the inner current loop 180.

[0012] Current-mode regulator 100 comprises an inductor 110, e.g., a power inductor, having an inductance L operative to generate an instantaneous inductor current IL, and to deliver an average inductor current ILO and output voltage Vo to a load circuit 160. The inner current loop 180 includes a slope circuit 120, a state decision circuit 130, a switching network 140, and a current measurement circuit 150. The state decision circuit 130 controls the switching network 140 to connect the inductor to an input voltage, e.g., Vbat, or a second voltage, e.g., ground, responsive to a control voltage and a slope compensated measurement voltage Vf input to the state decision circuit 130. While Figure 3 shows that the switching network 140 connects the inductor to Vbat or ground, it will be appreciated that other voltages may be used where the input voltage is greater than the second voltage. For example, the input voltage could be 0V, and the second voltage could be -5V. The current measurement circuit 150 indirectly measures the inductor current IL as described further below, where the indirect current measurement IL' is assumed to approximately equal the voltage drop across the inductor VL. Because the current measurement circuit 150 is not connected in series with the inductor 110, it does not negatively impact the efficiency of the current-mode regulator 100.

[0013] The slope circuit 120 connects between an output of the inductor 110 and an input to the current measurement circuit 150 to apply a time-varying voltage Vslp having a positive slope to the measurement voltage VL generated by the current measurement circuit 150 to generate the slope compensated measurement voltage Vf. The applied slope compensation increases the stability of the regulator by increasing a slope of VL, e.g., when the inductor 110 is connected to the input voltage Vbat. In the illustrated embodiment, the slope circuit 120 avoids the adder 40 associated with conventional solutions by using a slope capacitor 122 connected in parallel with a switch 124. The voltage VLX at the input to the inductor 110 (or optionally the inductor voltage VL) controls switch 124 such that the switch closes when VLX is at a first voltage, e.g., ground, to discharge the capacitor 122. The switch opens when VLX changes to a second voltage, e.g., Vbat, to charge the capacitor 122. As a result, the capacitor 122 generates the slope compensated measurement voltage Vslp at the output of the slope circuit 120. In some embodiments, the slope circuit 120 may further include a current source 126 coupled to the slope capacitor 122 to inject additional current ib into the slope capacitor 122 to increase the slope of the slope compensation voltage Vslp when switch 124 is open.

[0014] A compensation circuit 170, which is part of an outer voltage loop, may be used to generate the control voltage Vctrl input to the state decision circuit 130 based on a reference voltage Vref, and optionally based on the output voltage Vo, as previously discussed. While Figure 3 shows a compensation circuit 170, the current-mode regulator 100 does not require one because operation without voltage compensation may also be implemented. In this case, the reference voltage Vref is used as the control voltage, and is connected directly to the state decision circuit 130.

[0015] Figure 4 shows an exemplary method 200 executed by the current-mode regulator 100 of Figure 3. The current-mode regulator 100 generates an output voltage Vo at an output end of the inductor and across a load 160 based on the inductor current IL, the inductance L of the inductor, and an inductor voltage VL applied across the inductor (block 210). The slope circuit 120 generates a slope compensation voltage Vslp based on a measurement of the inductor voltage VL (block 220). The inner current loop 180 regulates the inductor current IL based on a control voltage Vctrl, an indirect measurement of the inductor current IL', which approximately represents the inductor voltage VL, and the slope compensation voltage Vslp (block 230).

[0016] Figure 5 shows circuit details for an exemplary implementation of the inner current loop 180. As shown in Figure 5, the state decision circuit 130 comprises a comparator 132 and a switching controller 134. Comparator 132 compares the slope compensated measurement voltage Vf to the control voltage Vctrl. Responsive to the output of the comparator 132, the switching controller 134 generates a state signal, which is input to the switching network 140. The switching network 140 comprises a power bridge 142 of transistors connected on one end to the input voltage 144, e.g., Vbat, and on the other end to a second voltage 146, e.g., ground. Responsive to the state signal, the power bridge 142 selectively connects the input of the inductor 110 to the input voltage Vbat 144 or ground 146.

[0017] Figure 5 also shows circuit details for an exemplary current measurement circuit 150, which comprises a passive resistor-capacitor network. In the example of Figure 5, the passive network comprises a resistor 152 coupled in series with a measurement capacitor 154, where a first end of the resistor 152 connects to the inductor input, a second end of the resistor 152 and a first end of the capacitor 154 connects to the comparator 132, and a second end of the capacitor 154 connects to the slope circuit 120. The slope compensated measurement voltage Vf is provided from the node between the resistor 152 and the capacitor 154, where the voltage Vcf across the capacitor Cf represents the inductor voltage as measured by the current measurement circuit 150. While the passive network of Figure 5 shows only one capacitor and one resistor, it will be appreciated multiple capacitors and/or multiple resistors may be used to form the resistance Rf and capacitance Cf of the passive network of the current measurement circuit 150.

[0018] Current measurement circuit 150 generates the slope compensated measurement voltage Vf based on Rf, Cf, and Vslp. For example, the current measurement circuit 150 may generate the slope compensated measurement voltage Vf by combining the output voltage Vo and the slope compensation voltage Vslp with the measured inductor voltage Vcf according to:

where ILO represents the average output current applied to the load 160 by the inductor 110, and IL represents the instantaneous inductor current, and t - to is the time used to generate the slope compensation voltage. Equation (2) shows that the changing part of the indirectly measured inductor current is represented with a gain, e.g., L/RfCf, while the fixed part is represented by RLILO.

[0019] Figure 6 shows a signal diagram for the main signals involved in the current-mode regulator 100 of Figures 3 and 5. At the rising edge of the clock signal clk, the switching controller 134 output signal ("state") has a value of 0, which results in VLX = Vbat. Accordingly, switch 124 opens and the slope-compensation capacitor Cslp 122 charges. The voltage Vslp across the slope compensation capacitor 122 rises with the current source current ib and the rate of rise of the voltage across the slope compensation capacitor 122. The voltage Vcf across the sensing capacitor 154 in the current measurement circuit rises with a slope proportional to the inductor current. Thus, the voltage Vf output by the current measurement circuit 150 represents the inductor current (which is approximately equivalent to the measurement voltage VL) plus an arbitrary positive slope provided by the slope circuit 120, which is designed to stabilize the current-mode regulator 100. When Vf = Vctrl, the comparator 132 resets the switching controller 134, tying the output VLX of the power-bridge, and thus the inductor input, to ground, reducing the inductor current IL. The switch 124 also closes to discharge the slope compensation capacitor 122. This process therefore regulates the inductor current.

[0020] The signal diagram of Figure 6 is for a current-mode regulator 100 configured to operate in a peak mode, e.g., to regulate the peak (e.g., upper peak of the current ripple) of the inductor current. Such "peak" current-mode control is most suitable for duty cycles less than or equal to 50%. When the duty cycle exceeds 50%, the current-mode regulator 100 may be configured to operate in a valley mode, e.g., to regulate the valley (e.g., lower peak of the current ripple) of the inductor current. For example, switch 124 closes for the valley mode when the inductor input is tied to the input voltage, and opens when the inductor input is tied to ground. The modification for valley mode operations may be achieved, for example, by controlling switch 124 with the inverse of VLX, e.g., VLX.

[0021] The indirect current measurement, and the associated slope compensation, provides many advantages over conventional current-mode control solutions. First, the current-mode regulator 100 disclosed herein provides improved efficiency because it uses indirect current measurement, and therefore, eliminates the need for direct current measurement circuitry inline with the inductor. The disclosed current-mode regulator 100 also requires significantly fewer components, and thus, much less silicon area to build. For example, the disclosed current-mode regulator 100 eliminates the need for a ramp generator. Further, the current-mode regulator 100 disclosed herein uses less bias current because it does not require a complex polarization scheme. The disclosed current-mode regulator 100 also does not require a complex internal calibration circuitry if proper output component selection is achieved, which may reduce the starting time and further reduces the required silicon area.

[0022] The amplifier and the comparator can be the same as that used by a voltage-mode controller (reuse-facility).

[0023] Various elements of the current-mode regulator 100 disclosed herein are described as some kind of circuit, e.g., a state decision circuit, a current measurement circuit, a slope compensation circuit, etc. Each of these circuits may be embodied in hardware and/or in software (including firmware, resident software, microcode, etc.) executed on a controller or processor, including an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC).

[0024] The Present embodiments are to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended claims are intended to be embraced therein.


Claims

1. A current-mode regulator (100) for a buck converter with an inductor 110, the current-mode regulator comprising:

an inner current loop circuit (180) configured to be connected to an input node of the inductor (110) and an output node of the inductor (110),

the inner current loop circuit (180) configured to regulate the inductor current based on a control voltage, an indirect measurement of the inductor current, and a slope compensation voltage (Vslp),

the inner current loop circuit (180) comprising:

- a current measurement circuit (150) comprising a series circuit of a resistor (152) and a sensing capacitor (154);

- a slope circuit (120) configured to be connected to the output node of the inductor (110) and connected to the current measurement circuit (150) and configured to generate the slope compensation voltage based on the voltage at the input node of the inductor (110);

- the current measurement circuit (150) being configured to generate a measured voltage combining the output voltage, the slope compensation voltage and a voltage across the sensing capacitor (154) based on the voltage at the input node of the inductor (110); and

wherein the slope circuit (120) comprises:

a slope capacitor (122) configured to be connected to the output node of the inductor (110) and configured to generate the slope compensation voltage; and

a switch (124) operatively connected in parallel with the slope capacitor (122) and configured to selectively actuate responsive to the voltage at the input node of the inductor (110) such that:

- the switch (124) closes when a voltage at the input node of the inductor (110) is at a first voltage to discharge the slope capacitor (122); and

- the switch (124) opens when the voltage at the input node of the inductor (110) is at a second voltage different from the first voltage to charge the slope capacitor (122), thereby generating the slope compensation voltage having a positive slope based on the capacitor (122) and generating the voltage across the sensing capacitor (154) with a slope proportional to the inductor current,

the current measurement circuit (150) further providing a slope compensated measurement voltage (Vf) from the node between the resistor (152) and the capacitor (154), whereby the slope compensated measurement voltage (Vf) is compared with a control voltage (Vctrl) in order to control a power bridge circuit (142) of the buck converter.


 
2. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 1 wherein the inner current loop circuit (180) comprises:

a state decision circuit (130) configured to generate a state logic signal based on the control voltage and the measured voltage; and

said power bridge circuit (142), which is configured to generate an inductor input voltage at the input end of the inductor (110) based on the state logic signal; wherein

the slope circuit (120) is configured to be connected between the output node of the inductor (110) and an input to the current measurement circuit (150).


 
3. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 2 further comprising a compensation circuit (170) operatively connected to the input of the state decision circuit (130), the compensation circuit (170) configured to generate the control voltage based on an input reference voltage.
 
4. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 3 wherein the compensation circuit (170) is further configured to generate the control voltage based on an output voltage at the output node.
 
5. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 3 wherein the compensation circuit (170), the state decision circuit (130), the power bridge circuit (142), and the inductor (110) form an outer voltage loop for the buck converter.
 
6. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 1 wherein the slope circuit (120) further comprises:
a current source (126) coupled to the slope capacitor (122) and configured to inject additional current into the slope capacitor (122) to increase the slope of the slope compensation voltage such that the slope of the slope compensation voltage is derived based on the additional current and the slope capacitor (122) when the switch (124) is open.
 
7. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 1 wherein the inductor (110) and inner current loop comprise one of
a peak regulation circuit configured to operate responsive to the control voltage when a duty cycle of the buck converter is less than or equal to 50%, and
a valley regulation circuit configured to operate responsive to the control voltage when a duty cycle of the buck converter is greater than or equal to 50%.
 
8. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 7 wherein for the peak regulation circuit, the switch (124) opens when the second voltage is less than the first voltage, and wherein for the valley regulation circuit, the switch (124) opens when the second voltage is greater than the first voltage.
 
9. The current-mode regulator (100) of claim 2 wherein the current-mode regulator (100) is configured to operate responsive to at least one of the control voltage and one or more operating conditions when the duty cycle of the buck converter is greater than or equal to 50% and when the duty cycle of the buck converter is less than 50%.
 
10. A method of controlling a buck converter with an inductor (110) using current-mode control, the current-mode control regulating an inductor current of the inductor, the method comprising:

generating (210) an output voltage at an output end of the inductor based on the inductor current, the inductance of the inductor, and an inductor voltage applied across the inductor;

regulating (230) the inductor current based on a control voltage, an indirect measurement of the inductor current, and the slope compensation voltage;

generating (220) a slope compensation voltage based on the voltage applied at an input node of the inductor; and

generating a slope compensated measurement voltage combining the output voltage, the slope compensation voltage and a voltage across a sensing capacitor based on the voltage at the input node of the inductor (110), said sensing capacitor being comprised in a series circuit of a resistor and the sensing capacitor;

wherein generating (220) the slope compensation voltage comprises:

closing a switch operatively connected in parallel with a slope compensation capacitor when the voltage applied across the inductor is at a first voltage to discharge the slope capacitor; and

opening the switch when the voltage applied across the inductor is at a second voltage different from the first voltage to charge the slope capacitor thereby generating the slope compensation voltage having a slope based on the slope capacitor and generating the voltage across the sensing capacitor with a slope proportional to the inductor current;

the method further comprising:
providing the slope compensated measurement voltage from the node between the resistor and the capacitor, whereby the slope compensated measurement voltage is compared with a control voltage in order to control a power bridge circuit of the buck converter.


 
11. The method of claim 10 wherein opening the switch to generate the slope compensation voltage based on the slope capacitor comprises opening the switch to generate the slope compensation voltage based on the slope capacitor and the indirect measurement of the inductor current.
 
12. The method of claim 10 wherein regulating (230) the inductor current comprises:

generating a state logic signal based on the control voltage and the measured voltage;

generating an inductor input voltage at an input end of the inductor based on the state logic signal using the power bridge circuit;

indirectly measuring the inductor current, using the series circuit of the resistor and the sensing capacitor based on the inductor input voltage;

generating the measured voltage based on the indirectly measured inductor current and the slope compensation voltage;

regulating the inductor current based on the control voltage and the measured voltage.


 
13. The method of claim 10 further comprising generating the control voltage based on an input reference voltage.
 
14. The method of claim 13 wherein generating the control voltage based on the input reference voltage comprises generating the control voltage based on the input reference voltage and the output voltage.
 
15. The method of claim 10 further comprising injecting additional current from a current source into the slope capacitor to increase the slope of the slope compensation voltage such that the slope of the slope compensation voltage is derived based on the additional current and the slope capacitor when the switch is open.
 
16. The method of claim 10 wherein the current-mode control comprises at least one of a peak current-mode control configured to operate when a duty cycle of the buck converter is less than 50%, and a valley current-mode control configured to operate when a duty cycle of the buck converter exceeds 50%.
 
17. The method of claim 10 wherein the current-mode control is configured to operate when the duty cycle of the buck converter exceeds 50% and when the duty cycle of the buck converter is less than 50%.
 


Ansprüche

1. Strommodusregler (100) für einen Abwärtswandler mit einem Induktor 110, wobei der Strommodusregler Folgendes umfasst:

eine innere Stromschleifenschaltung (180), die konfiguriert ist, um mit einem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) und einem Ausgangsknoten des Induktors (110) verbunden zu sein,

wobei die innere Stromschleifenschaltung (180) konfiguriert ist, um den Induktorstrom basierend auf einer Steuerspannung, einer indirekten Messung des Induktorstroms und einer Neigungskompensationsspannung (Vslp) zu regulieren,

wobei die innere Stromschleifenschaltung (180) Folgendes umfasst:

- eine Strommessschaltung (150), umfassend eine Reihenschaltung eines Widerstands (152) und eines Sensorkondensators (154);

- eine Neigungsschaltung (120), die konfiguriert ist, um mit dem Ausgangknoten des Induktors (110) verbunden zu sein und mit der Strommessschaltung (150) verbunden zu sein, und die konfiguriert ist, um die Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf der Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) zu erzeugen;

- wobei die Strommessschaltung (150) konfiguriert ist, um eine gemessene Spannung zu erzeugen, die die Ausgangsspannung, die Neigungskompensationsspannung und eine Spannung über den Sensorkondensator (154) basierend auf der Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) kombiniert; und

wobei die Neigungsschaltung (120) Folgendes umfasst:

einen Neigungskondensator (122), der konfiguriert ist, um mit dem Ausgangsknoten des Induktors (110) verbunden zu sein und konfiguriert ist, um die Neigungskompensationsspannung zu erzeugen; und

einen Schalter (124), der parallel mit dem Neigungskondensator (122) operativ verbunden ist und konfiguriert ist, um selektiv zu betätigen, als Reaktion auf die Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110), sodass:

- der Schalter (124) schließt, wenn eine Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) bei einer ersten Spannung ist, um den Neigungskondensator (122) zu entladen; und

- der Schalter (124) öffnet, wenn die Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) bei einer zweiten Spannung ist, die anders als die erste Spannung ist, um den Neigungskondensator (122) zu laden, wodurch die Neigungskompensationsspannung erzeugt wird, die eine positive Neigung hat, basierend auf dem Kompensator (122), und die Spannung über den Sensorkondensator (154) erzeugt wird, mit einer Neigung proportional zu dem Induktorstrom,

wobei die Strommessschaltung (150) ferner eine neigungskompensierte Messspannung (Vf) von dem Knoten zwischen dem Widerstand (152) und dem Kondensator (154) bereitstellt, wodurch die neigungskompensierte Messspannung (Vf) mit einer Steuerspannung (Vctrl) verglichen wird, um eine Leistungsbrückenschaltung (142) des Abwärtswandlers zu steuern.


 
2. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei die innere Stromschleifenschaltung (180) Folgendes umfasst:

eine Zustandsentscheidungsschaltung (130), die konfiguriert ist, um ein Zustandslogiksignal basierend auf der Steuerspannung und der gemessenen Spannung zu erzeugen; und

die Leistungsbrückenschaltung (142), die konfiguriert ist, um eine Induktoreingangsspannung an dem Eingangsende des Induktors (110) basierend auf dem Zustandslogiksignal zu erzeugen; wobei

die Neigungsschaltung (120) konfiguriert ist, um zwischen dem Ausgangsknoten des Induktors (110) und einer Eingabe an die Strommessschaltung (150) verbunden zu sein.


 
3. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 2, ferner umfassend eine Kompensationsschaltung (170), die mit der Eingabe der Zustandsentscheidungsschaltung (130) operativ verbunden ist, wobei die Kompensationsschaltung (170) konfiguriert ist, um die Steuerspannung basierend auf einer Eingangsbezugsspannung zu erzeugen.
 
4. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 3, wobei die Kompensationsschaltung (170) ferner konfiguriert ist, um die Steuerspannung basierend auf einer Ausgangsspannung an dem Ausgangsknoten zu erzeugen.
 
5. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 3, wobei die Kompensationsschaltung (170), die Zustandsentscheidungsschaltung (130), die Leistungsbrückenschaltung (142) und der Induktor (110) eine äußere Spannungsschleife für den Abwärtswandler bilden.
 
6. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Neigungsschaltung (120) ferner Folgendes umfasst:
eine Stromquelle (126), die mit dem Neigungskondensator (122) gekoppelt und konfiguriert ist, um zusätzlichen Strom in den Neigungskondensator (122) zu injizieren, um die Neigung der Neigungskompensationsspannung zu erhöhen, sodass die Neigung der Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf dem zusätzlichen Strom und dem Neigungskondensator (122) abgeleitet ist, wenn der Schalter (124) geöffnet ist.
 
7. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Induktor (110) und die innere Stromschleife eines aus Folgendem umfassen
eine Spitzensteuerschaltung, die konfiguriert ist, um als Reaktion auf die Steuerspannung zu arbeiten, wenn ein Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers weniger als oder gleich 50 % ist, und
eine Talsteuerschaltung, die konfiguriert ist, um als Reaktion auf die Steuerspannung zu arbeiten, wenn ein Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers größer als oder gleich 50 % ist.
 
8. Strommodusregler (100) nach 7, wobei, für die Spitzensteuerschaltung, sich der Schalter (124) öffnet, wenn die zweite Spannung weniger als die erste Spannung ist, und wobei, für die Talsteuerschaltung, sich der Schalter (124) öffnet, wenn die zweite Spannung größer als die erste Spannung ist.
 
9. Strommodusregler (100) nach Anspruch 2, wobei der Strommodusregler (100) konfiguriert ist, um als Reaktion auf mindestens eines aus der Steuerspannung und einem oder mehreren Betriebszuständen zu arbeiten, wenn der Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers größer als oder gleich 50 % ist und wenn der Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers weniger als 50 % ist.
 
10. Verfahren des Steuerns eines Abwärtswandlers mit einem Induktor (110) unter Verwendung einer Strommodussteuerung, wobei die Strommodussteuerung einen Induktorstrom des Induktors reguliert, wobei das Verfahren Folgendes umfasst:

Erzeugen (210) einer Ausgangsspannung an einem Ausgangsende des Induktors, basierend auf dem Induktorstrom, der Induktivität des Induktors und einer Induktorspannung, die über den Induktor angelegt wird;

Regulieren (230) des Induktorstroms basierend auf einer Steuerspannung, einer indirekten Messung des Induktorstroms und der Neigungskompensationsspannung;

Erzeugen (220) einer Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf der Spannung, die an einem Eingangsknoten des Induktors angelegt wird; und

Erzeugen einer neigungskompensierten Messspannung, die die Ausgangsspannung, die Neigungskompensationsspannung und eine Spannung über einen Sensorkondensator basierend auf der Spannung an dem Eingangsknoten des Induktors (110) kombiniert, wobei der Sensorkondensator in einer Reihenschaltung eines Widerstands und des Sensorkondensators enthalten ist,

wobei das Erzeugen (220) der Neigungskompensationsspannung Folgendes umfasst:

Schließen eines Schalters, der parallel mit einem Neigungskompensationskondensator operativ verbunden ist, wenn die Spannung, die über den Induktor angelegt wird, bei einer ersten Spannung ist, um den Neigungskondensator zu entladen; und

Öffnen des Schalters, wenn die Spannung, die über den Induktor angelegt wird, bei einer zweiten Spannung ist, die anders als die erste Spannung ist, um den Neigungskondensator zu laden, wodurch die Neigungskompensationsspannung mit einer Neigung erzeugt wird, basierend auf dem Neigungskondensator, und die Spannung über den Sensorkondensator mit einer Neigung erzeugt wird, die proportional zu dem Induktorstrom ist;

wobei das Verfahren ferner Folgendes umfasst:
Bereitstellen der neigungskompensierten Messspannung von dem Knoten zwischen dem Widerstand und dem Kondensator, wodurch die neigungskompensierte Messspannung mit einer Steuerspannung verglichen wird, um eine Leistungsbrückenschaltung des Abwärtswandlers zu steuern.


 
11. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei das Öffnen des Schalters, um die Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf dem Neigungskondensator zu erzeugen, das Öffnen des Schalters umfasst, um die Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf dem Neigungskondensator und der indirekten Messung des Induktorstroms zu erzeugen.
 
12. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei das Regulieren (230) des Induktorstroms Folgendes umfasst:

Erzeugen eines Zustandslogiksignals basierend auf der Steuerspannung und der gemessenen Spannung;

Erzeugen einer Induktoreingangsspannung an einem Eingangsende des Induktors basierend auf dem Zustandslogiksignal unter Verwendung der Leistungsbrückenschaltung;

indirektes Messen des Induktorstroms unter Verwendung der Reihenschaltung des Widerstands und des Sensorkondensators basierend auf der Induktoreingangsspannung;

Erzeugen der gemessenen Spannung basierend auf dem indirekt gemessenen Induktorstrom und der Neigungskompensationsspannung;

Regulieren des Induktorstroms basierend auf der Steuerspannung und der gemessenen Spannung.


 
13. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, ferner umfassend das Erzeugen der Steuerspannung basierend auf einer Eingangsbezugsspannung.
 
14. Verfahren nach Anspruch 13, wobei das Erzeugen der Steuerspannung basierend auf der Eingangsbezugsspannung das Erzeugen der Steuerspannung basierend auf der Eingangsbezugsspannung und der Ausgangsspannung umfasst.
 
15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, ferner umfassend das Injizieren von zusätzlichem Strom von einer Stromquelle in den Neigungskondensator, um die Neigung der Neigungskompensationsspannung zu erhöhen, sodass die Neigung der Neigungskompensationsspannung basierend auf dem zusätzlichen Strom und dem Neigungskondensator abgeleitet ist, wenn der Schalter geöffnet ist.
 
16. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei die Strommodussteuerung mindestens eines aus einer Spitzenstrommodussteuerung, die konfiguriert ist, um zu arbeiten, wenn ein Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers weniger als 50 % ist, und einer Talstrommodussteuerung, die konfiguriert ist, um zu arbeiten, wenn ein Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers 50 % übersteigt.
 
17. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei die Strommodussteuerung konfiguriert ist, um zu arbeiten, wenn der Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers 50 % übersteigt und wenn der Arbeitszyklus des Abwärtswandlers weniger als 50 % ist.
 


Revendications

1. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) pour un convertisseur dévolteur avec un inducteur 110, le régulateur de mode de courant comprenant :

un circuit en boucle de courant intérieur (180) configuré pour être connecté à un nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) et un nœud de sortie de l'inducteur (110),

le circuit en boucle de courant intérieur (180) étant configuré pour réguler le courant d'inducteur sur la base d'une tension de commande, d'une mesure indirecte du courant d'inducteur, et d'une tension de compensation de pente (Vslp),

le circuit en boucle de courant intérieur (180) comprenant :

- un circuit de mesure de courant (150) comprenant un circuit en série d'une résistance (152) et d'un condensateur de détection (154) ;

- un circuit de pente (120) configuré pour être connecté au nœud de sortie de l'inducteur (110), et connecté au circuit de mesure de courant (150) et configuré pour générer la tension de compensation de pente sur la base de la tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) ;

- le circuit de mesure de courant (150) étant configuré pour générer une tension mesurée combinant la tension de sortie, la tension de compensation de pente et une tension sur le condensateur de détection (154) sur la base de la tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) ; et

dans lequel le circuit de pente (120) comprend :

un condensateur de pente (122) configuré pour être connecté au nœud de sortie de l'inducteur (110) et configuré pour générer la tension de compensation de pente ; et

un commutateur (124) fonctionnellement connecté en parallèle au condensateur de pente (122) et configuré pour sélectivement s'actionner en réponse à la tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) de telle sorte que :

- le commutateur (124) se ferme lorsqu'une tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) est à une première tension pour décharger le condensateur de pente (122) ; et

- le commutateur (124) s'ouvre lorsque la tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) est à une seconde tension différente de la première tension pour charger le condensateur de pente (122), ainsi générant la tension de compensation de pente ayant une pente positive sur la base du condensateur (122) et générant la tension sur le condensateur de détection (154) avec une pente proportionnelle au courant d'inducteur,

le circuit de mesure de courant (150) fournissant en outre une tension de mesure compensée de pente (Vf) à partir du nœud entre la résistance (152) et le condensateur (154), moyennant quoi la tension de mesure compensée de pente (Vf) est comparée à une tension de commande (Vctrl) afin de commander un circuit à pont électrique (142) du convertisseur dévolteur.


 
2. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le circuit en boucle de courant intérieur (180) comprend :

un circuit de décision d'état (130) configuré pour générer un signal logique d'état sur la base de la tension de commande et de la tension mesurée ; et

ledit circuit à pont électrique (142), qui est configuré pour générer une tension d'entrée d'inducteur à l'extrémité d'entrée de l'inducteur (110) sur la base du signal logique d'état ; dans lequel

le circuit de pente (120) est configuré pour être connecté entre le nœud de sortie de l'inducteur (110) et une entrée du circuit de mesure de courant (150).


 
3. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 2, comprenant en outre un circuit de compensation (170) fonctionnellement connecté à l'entrée du circuit de décision d'état (130), le circuit de compensation (170) étant configuré pour générer la tension de commande sur la base d'une tension de référence d'entrée.
 
4. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 3, dans lequel le circuit de compensation (170) est en outre configuré pour générer la tension de commande sur la base d'une tension de sortie au nœud de sortie.
 
5. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 3, dans lequel le circuit de compensation (170), le circuit de décision d'état (130), le circuit à pont électrique (142), et l'inducteur (110) forment une boucle de tension extérieure pour le convertisseur dévolteur.
 
6. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le circuit de pente (120) comprend en outre :
une source de courant (126) couplée au condensateur de pente (122) et configurée pour injecter un courant supplémentaire dans le condensateur de pente (122) pour augmenter la pente de la tension de compensation de pente de telle sorte que la pente de la tension de compensation de pente soit déduite sur la base du courant supplémentaire et du condensateur de pente (122) lorsque le commutateur (124) est ouvert.
 
7. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'inducteur (110) et la boucle de courant intérieure comprennent un de
un circuit de régulation de crête configuré pour fonctionner en réponse à la tension de commande lorsqu'un cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est inférieur ou égal à 50 %, et
un circuit de régulation de creux configuré pour fonctionner en réponse à la tension de commande lorsqu'un cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est supérieur ou égal à 50 %.
 
8. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 7, dans lequel, pour le circuit de régulation de crête, le commutateur (124) s'ouvre lorsque la seconde tension est inférieure à la première tension, et dans lequel, pour le circuit de régulation de creux, le commutateur (124) s'ouvre lorsque la seconde tension est supérieure à la première tension.
 
9. Régulateur de mode de courant (100) selon la revendication 2, dans lequel le régulateur de mode de courant (100) est configuré pour fonctionner en réponse à au moins une de la tension de commande et d'une ou de plusieurs conditions de fonctionnement lorsque le cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est supérieur ou égal à 50 % et lorsque le cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est inférieur à 50 %.
 
10. Procédé de commande d'un convertisseur dévolteur avec un inducteur (110) en utilisant une commande de mode de courant, la commande de mode de courant régulant un courant d'inducteur de l'inducteur, le procédé comprenant :

la génération (210) d'une tension de sortie à une extrémité de sortie de l'inducteur sur la base du courant d'inducteur, de l'inductance de l'inducteur, et d'une tension d'inducteur appliquée sur l'inducteur ;

la régulation (230) du courant d'inducteur sur la base d'une tension de commande, d'une mesure indirecte du courant d'inducteur, et de la tension de compensation de pente ;

la génération (220) d'une tension de compensation de pente sur la base de la tension appliquée à un nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur ; et

la génération d'une tension de mesure compensée de pente combinant la tension de sortie, la tension de compensation de pente et une tension sur un condensateur de détection sur la base de la tension au nœud d'entrée de l'inducteur (110), ledit condensateur de détection étant compris dans un circuit en série d'une résistance et du condensateur de détection ;

dans lequel la génération (220) de la tension de compensation de pente comprend :

la fermeture d'un commutateur fonctionnellement connecté en parallèle à un condensateur de compensation de pente lorsque la tension appliquée sur l'inducteur est à une première tension pour décharger le condensateur de pente ; et

l'ouverture du commutateur lorsque la tension appliquée sur l'inducteur est à une seconde tension différente de la première tension pour charger le condensateur de pente, ainsi générant la tension de compensation de pente ayant une pente sur la base du condensateur de pente et générant la tension sur le condensateur de détection avec une pente proportionnelle au courant d'inducteur ;

le procédé comprenant en outre :
la fourniture de la tension de mesure compensée de pente à partir du nœud entre la résistance et le condensateur, moyennant quoi la tension de mesure compensée de pente est comparée à une tension de commande afin de commander un circuit à pont électrique du convertisseur dévolteur.


 
11. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel l'ouverture du commutateur pour générer la tension de compensation de pente sur la base du condensateur de pente comprend l'ouverture du commutateur pour générer la tension de compensation de pente sur la base du condensateur de pente et de la mesure indirecte du courant d'inducteur.
 
12. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la régulation (230) du courant d'inducteur comprend :

la génération d'un signal logique d'état sur la base de la tension de commande et de la tension mesurée ;

la génération d'une tension d'entrée d'inducteur à une extrémité d'entrée de l'inducteur sur la base du signal logique d'état en utilisant le circuit à pont électrique ;

la mesure indirecte du courant d'inducteur, en utilisant le circuit en série de la résistance et le condensateur de détection sur la base de la tension d'entrée d'inducteur ;

la génération de la tension mesurée sur la base du courant d'inducteur indirectement mesuré et de la tension de compensation de pente ;

la régulation du courant d'inducteur sur la base de la tension de commande et de la tension mesurée.


 
13. Procédé selon la revendication 10, comprenant en outre la génération de la tension de commande sur la base d'une tension de référence d'entrée.
 
14. Procédé selon la revendication 13, dans lequel la génération de la tension de commande sur la base de la tension de référence d'entrée comprend la génération de la tension de commande sur la base de la tension de référence d'entrée et de la tension de sortie.
 
15. Procédé selon la revendication 10, comprenant en outre l'injection de courant supplémentaire provenant d'une source de courant dans le condensateur de pente pour augmenter la pente de la tension de compensation de pente de telle sorte que la pente de la tension de compensation de pente soit déduite sur la base du courant supplémentaire et du condensateur de pente lorsque le commutateur est ouvert.
 
16. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la commande de mode de courant comprend au moins une d'une commande de mode de courant de crête configurée pour fonctionner lorsqu'un cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est inférieur à 50 %, et d'une commande de mode de courant de creux configurée pour fonctionner lorsqu'un cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur dépasse 50 %.
 
17. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la commande de mode de courant est configurée pour fonctionner lorsque le cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur dépasse 50 % et lorsque le cycle de service du convertisseur dévolteur est inférieur à 50 %.
 




Drawing























Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description