(19)
(11)EP 2 939 058 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
24.06.2020 Bulletin 2020/26

(21)Application number: 13867333.0

(22)Date of filing:  26.12.2013
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G02B 7/02(2006.01)
G02B 7/00(2006.01)
G02B 7/18(2006.01)
G02B 7/182(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2013/077848
(87)International publication number:
WO 2014/105975 (03.07.2014 Gazette  2014/27)

(54)

LOW WAVEFRONT DISTORTION OPTICAL MOUNT

OPTIKFASSUNG MIT NIEDRIGER WELLENFRONTDEFORMATION

MONTURE OPTIQUE À FAIBLE DISTORSION SUR LE FRONT DE L'ONDE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 26.12.2012 US 201261745932 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
04.11.2015 Bulletin 2015/45

(73)Proprietor: Thorlabs, Inc.
Newton, New Jersey 07860 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • D'ALESSIO, Brett
    Newton, NJ 07860 (US)
  • CABLE, Alex, Ezra
    Newton, NJ 07860 (US)

(74)Representative: Grättinger Möhring von Poschinger Patentanwälte Partnerschaft mbB 
Wittelsbacherstrasse 2b
82319 Starnberg
82319 Starnberg (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-2011/053929
SU-A1- 995 054
US-A- 6 043 863
US-A1- 2008 225 255
JP-A- 2012 247 568
US-A- 3 642 353
US-A1- 2006 132 934
US-A1- 2011 249 342
  
  • 'Mashinostroenie' SPRAVOCHNIK KONSTRUKTORA OPTIKO-MEKHANICHESKIKH PRIBOROV, POD RED. D-RA TEKHN. NAUK V. A. PANOVA. 1980, LENINGRAD, pages 271 - 274 , 281, XP008179814
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS



[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/745,932, filed December 26, 2012.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION



[0002] The present invention relates to optical mounts generally, and more specifically to optical mounts configured to reduce distortion in an optic when in use.

BACKGROUND



[0003] An optical mount is an optomechanical device that supports an optical element so as to ensure that the specifications of the optical element are not unintentionally compromised. As researchers and product developers push the boundaries of the optical sciences, there has been an increasing need for optomechanical assemblies that more fully preserve the specifications of the high performance optical elements they support. Many modern optical mounts significantly compromise the specifications of the mounted optics.

[0004] Laser quality optical elements are typically finished to very high tolerances. For example, a laser quality mirror would typically be polished flat to within 0.063 µm to 0.032 µm, or about 1/10 to 1/20 of the wavelength of red light emitted from a HeNe laser. Currently available optical mounts have been found to exert forces on the precision optics that substantially degrade their optical performance, thereby degrading the performance of the optical system in which they are being used. For example, the flatness of a laser mirror is degraded by securing it with a nylon tipped set screw driven into the optic's edge. Another example being the optical retardation of a half wave plate used to control the polarization of a light field has its polarization properties compromised when mounted in a traditional mount.

[0005] Many existing devices contain, for example, individual spring-loaded fingers to clamp the optic, each requiring individual adjustment and creating unbalanced forces of different magnitude and direction. The designs have many parts and are difficult to adjust without creating unexpected forces and stresses. Existing devices often are not adaptable for different sized optics, because, for example, spring forces are not easily adjustable.

[0006] In addition to maintaining the specifications of the mounted optics, there are advantages to maintaining access to as much of the front surface and perimeter of an optic as possible.

SUMMARY



[0007] In one embodiment, there is provided an optical mount that ensures that an optic is held in place with a very low level of optical distortion and exceptional stability. The low distortion mounting mechanism provides a quantified and adjustable set of forces that, as an additional benefit, can be made to be relatively constant over a range of environmental conditions. The location of the mounting forces are controlled so as to minimize the distorting force on the optic while providing sufficient clamping force to meet the needs of high performance optical systems.

[0008] The design described can be applied to a broad range of optical devices that reflect, transmit, or process light fields.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0009] 

FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of an optical mount in accordance with the current disclosure.

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the optical mount of FIG. 1 installed on a bracket with the optical mount shown semi-transparent.

FIG. 3 shows a side view of internal elements of the optical mount of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 shows a side view of internal elements of the optical mount of FIG. 1 shown in FIG. 3 installed in a housing that is shown in semi-transparent.

FIG. 5 shows one embodiment of a retaining element for use in the optical mount of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6A and 6B show the use of the embodiment of the retaining element of FIG. 5 in calibrating the optical mount of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is one embodiment of an optic setup using certain special features of the optical mount of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 8A and 8B show one embodiment of a finite element analysis illustrating pressures on an optic mounted in the optical mount of FIG. 1 compared to a finite element analysis applied to an optic mounted in a traditional side mount.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS



[0010] The description of illustrative embodiments according to principles of the present invention is intended to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings, which are to be considered part of the entire written description. In the description of embodiments of the invention disclosed herein, any reference to direction or orientation is merely intended for convenience of description and is not intended in any way to limit the scope of the present invention. Relative terms such as "lower," "upper," "horizontal," "vertical," "above," "below," "up," "down," "top" and "bottom" as well as derivative thereof (e.g., "horizontally," "downwardly," "upwardly," etc.) should be construed to refer to the orientation as then described or as shown in the drawing under discussion. These relative terms are for convenience of description only and do not require that the apparatus be constructed or operated in a particular orientation unless explicitly indicated as such. Terms such as "attached," "affixed," "connected," "coupled," "interconnected," and similar refer to a relationship wherein structures are secured or attached to one another either directly or indirectly through intervening structures, as well as both movable or rigid attachments or relationships, unless expressly described otherwise. Moreover, the features and benefits of the invention are illustrated by reference to the exemplified embodiments. Accordingly, the invention expressly should not be limited to such exemplary embodiments illustrating some possible non-limiting combination of features that may exist alone or in other combinations of features; the scope of the invention being defined by the claims appended hereto.

[0011] This disclosure describes the best mode or modes of practicing the invention as presently contemplated. This description is not intended to be understood in a limiting sense, but provides an example of the invention presented solely for illustrative purposes by reference to the accompanying drawings to advise one of ordinary skill in the art of the advantages and construction of the invention. In the various views of the drawings, like reference characters designate like or similar parts.

[0012] It is important to note that the embodiments disclosed are only examples of the many advantageous uses of the innovative teachings herein. In general, statements made in the specification of the present application do not necessarily limit any of the various claimed inventions. Moreover, some statements may apply to some inventive features but not to others. In general, unless otherwise indicated, singular elements may be in plural and vice versa with no loss of generality.

[0013] FIG. 1 shows an optical mount front plate 100 in accordance with the current disclosure. Optical mount front plate 100 contains components for accurately locating and maintaining at least one optic 110 within a housing 120 while minimizing and controlling forces on optic 110 and maintaining access to the majority of a first surface 160 and perimeter 180 of optic 110. While optic 110 is illustrated as a disk in the described embodiments, it will be appreciated that other geometric shapes or configurations may be used. Generally, optic 110 is stabilized in optical mount 100 between at least one restraining element 130 and at least one force application element 140. The optic is held between restraining element 130 having at least one contact point with the first surface 160 of optic 110 and force application element 140 having at least one contact point with a second surface 170 of optic 110 corresponding to the contact point of restraining element 130 with the first surface 160, with the two elements combining to exert a clamping force on a small portion of optic 110. Force application element 140 is in turn held in place by retaining element 150, which may be used to adjust the force applied by force application element 140 to optic 110.

[0014] In the embodiment shown, optic 110 is a disk with a first surface 160, a second surface 170 opposite the first surface 160, and a perimeter 180 having a thickness and a central axis 190 perpendicular to the first surface of the disk. Pressure between restraining element 130 and force application element 140 accurately locates and maintains optic 110 in one dimension along central axis 190.

[0015] Restraining element 130 and force application element 140 contact optic 110 at discrete locations on the surfaces 160, 170 of optic 110. Preferably, the elements contact optic 110 at the periphery of the surfaces 160, 170 of the optic 110 adjacent to perimeter 180. Restraining element 130 contacts discrete locations on the first surface 160 of optic 110 and force application element 140 contacts discrete locations on the second surface 170 of optic 110 wherein the discrete locations on the first 160 and second 170 surfaces are opposite each other and adjacent to perimeter 180 at substantially the same radial location. Restraining element 130 and force application element 140 thereby combine to form a clamp maintaining the location of optic 110 along axis 190.

[0016] In order to ensure that they maintain discrete contact locations directly opposite each other on the surfaces 160, 170 of optic 110, restraining element 130 and force application element 140 are located relative to housing 120. In the illustrated embodiment, restraining element 130 is an extension of housing 120, and the location relative to housing 120 is therefore known. Force application element 140 is keyed to a notch 200 in housing 120 in order to consistently locate it relative to restraining element 130 for applying a clamping force.

[0017] Optic 110 may further be accurately located in a lateral plane of the first surface 160 by providing a home position with an element (not shown) that provides the necessary force to secure optic 110 in the lateral plane. In some applications, this force is adjustable over a range, and calibrated so as to provide a known impact on the optical distortion of a device in which the optic is used. In some embodiments, tolerances in the lateral plane of optic 110 are less critical than along axis 190. In such embodiments, optic 110 may be restrained by traditional means along the lateral plane. A nylon tipped set screw may be used as a force element and a double bored mounting feature can be used as a well-defined restraint.

[0018] In the embodiment shown, restraining element 130 is a set of three tabs 132 (FIG. 2), or fingers extending from housing 120 and cradling optic 110. In the embodiment shown, restraining element 130 extends from housing 120 along axis 190 before turning in order to form a cradle for optic 110. Such an extension allows access to most of first surface 160 and perimeter 180 of optic 110. Since perimeter 180 is largely exposed, restraining element 130 may be further configured to allow a laser beam to pass close to the edge of optic 110 in the spaces between the tabs or fingers 132. Restraining element 130 may further include elements for locating optic 110 in the plane of the first surface 160. One non-limiting example of such an element (not shown) may include a lateral force generating element in at least one of the restraining elements 130 which applies lateral force in order to have optic 110 rest on kinematic contact points maintained in the remaining restraining elements 130. In such an embodiment, the force that drives optic 110 into the kinematic restraint is adjustable within an appropriate range, or through the application of a fixed calculated force. Restraining element 130 may also include a set of discrete landing points incorporated into the body 120 of optical mount 100. Such landing points may be, for example, raised relative to a circumferential lip of housing 120. In alternative embodiments, restraining element 130 may be any other type of restraint that maintains contact with optic 110 at discrete locations on the first surface 160 of optic 110. For example, this may be achieved with individual precision ground ball bearings that act to provide nearly perfect point contact between element 130 and the optic 110.

[0019] In the illustrated embodiment, force application element 140 is a wave spring with three points in contact with optic 110. A wave spring used may have a range of shapes, sizes, displacements, and spring constants, as long as the number of contact points between the wave spring and optic 110 matches the number of contact points between restraining element 130 and optic 110, and each contact point corresponds to a restraining element. The notch 200 may control the rotational orientation of the spring about axis 190.

[0020] In alternative embodiments, force application element 140 may be, for example, a series of compression springs, extension springs, spring clips, permanent magnets, electro-magnets, or other mechanisms used to apply force. Force application element 140 may be any device for applying force to optic 110 at discrete locations on the surface of the optic 110. In some embodiments, for example, force application element 140 may be a pusher ring and compression spring assembly. In such an assembly, a pusher ring may have three contact points for contacting the second surface 170 of optic 110 at discrete locations. While three contact points are illustrated, it will be appreciated that other numbers of contact points are possible. Additionally, it is anticipated that for some special applications, the location and number of the contact points may not be, and/or may not directly correspond. This may be desirable if, for example, the application requires a specific set of forces to be applied to the optic so as to alter its relaxed shape.

[0021] Optical mount front plate 100 further contains features for easing integration into existing applications. Optical mount front plate 100 comprises, for example, an indentation 210 (FIG. 1) including pads 220 for locating the optical mount front plate 100 relative to an optical mount back plate 300. Optical mount front plate 100 further comprises four spring holes 230 for affixing the optical mount front plate 100 to the optical mount back plate 300.

[0022] FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of a perspective view of the optical mount front plate 100 of FIG. 1 installed on an optical mount back plate 300 with the optical mount front plate 100 shown semi-transparent. The optical mount back plate 300 contains fine adjustment screws 310 for mating with indentations 210 and pads 220 on optical mount front plate 100. Mounting screw holes 320 are provided to fix the optical mount front plate 100 within a larger optical setup. Fine adjustment screws 310 may be adjustable within bracket 300 in order to control the distance between optical mount front plate 100 and optic mount back plate 300 at three locations. Optic mount back plate 300 can in turn be attached to a larger structure for use in various optical and optomechanical applications. The front plate 100 is kinematically restrained to sit on the three fine adjustment screws 310 by the force provided by four springs 330.

[0023] FIGS. 3 - 4 show a side view of one embodiment of internal elements of the optical mount front plate 100 of FIG. 1, where FIG. 3 shows the internal elements alone, and FIG. 4 shows the internal elements installed in a housing 120 shown in semi-transparent for purposes of illustration. Shown in FIGS. 3 - 4 are optic 110, force application element 140, and retaining element 150. Force application element 140 applies force to the second surface 170 of optic 110, and lies between optic 110 and retaining element 150. In the illustrated embodiment, the internal elements are placed in a cylindrical bore 400 in housing 120.

[0024] When installing optic 110 in optical mount front plate 100, a user first inserts optic 110 into bore 400 of housing 120 so that the first surface 160 of optic 110 rests on restraining element 130 which extends from the end of bore 400. When optic 110 rests on restraining element 130, substantial portions of perimeter 180 of optic 110 are exposed, in addition to almost the entire first surface 160.

[0025] The user then inserts force application element 140 so that it rests on second surface 170 of optic 110. In the embodiment shown, force application element 140 is a wave spring keyed so that it contacts second surface 170 of the optic 110 along the circumference of optic 110 adjacent to the same point along perimeter 180 of optic 110 as restraining element 130 contacts first surface 160.

[0026] Following the insertion of force application element 140, retaining element 150 is inserted and adjusted to complete the assembly. The amount of force applied to optic 110 by force application element 140 is governed by retaining element 150. Bore 400 may have threading 410 and retaining element 150 may be a threaded retaining ring fitted to bore 400.

[0027] FIG. 5 shows a retaining element 150 for use in the optical mount front plate 100 of FIG. 1, and FIG. 6 show the use of the retaining element 150 of FIG. 5 in calibrating the optical mount front plate 100 of FIG. 1. During installation of optic 110, a threaded retaining element 150 which includes a boss 500 may be inserted and rotated on threading 410 until boss 500 touches optic 110. Boss 500 may extend beyond force application element 140 by, for example, extending through the center of a wave spring. When contact is made between optic 110 and boss 500 as shown in FIG. 6A, force application element 140 is in a known state. In some embodiments, a specialized retaining element 150 is used wherein the retaining element 150 has a compression stop feature that touches the second surface 170 of the optic 110 to lock retaining element 150 at a specified compression. A user may then rotate retaining element 150 in the opposite direction of the initial insertion by a designated amount using, for example, a spanner wrench. In some embodiments, repeatability may be enhanced by marking a spanner wrench with angular markings that work in concert with markings on optical mount front plate 100 so that the user can rotate retaining element 150 by a known amount in order to reduce the force applied by a known amount. Retaining element 150 may be tuned so that the appropriate rotation is, for example, one full rotation. In loosening retaining element 150 by a known amount, a suitable amount of space may be left between boss 500 and second surface 170, allowing force application element 140 to flex an appropriate amount, as shown in FIG. 6B.

[0028] In an alternative embodiment, the retaining element may be a stepped retaining ring (not shown) with a flat contact area to fully compress force application element 140 against optic 110. A series of graduations in ½ degree to 2 degree increments could be made available on optical mount front plate 100 or a spanner wrench that mates with such retaining element. The graduated scale could be fixed or rotatable so that it can be used to define a clear starting point. After compressing force application element 140, such retaining element is backed away from full compression. The graduated scale could then be used in conjunction with, for example, a vernier scale to provide fractions of a degree resolution for the setting of such retaining element.

[0029] If a user is installing a retaining element without a boss, the retaining element may be tightened to a desired preload using a torque force meter. Retaining element 150 and optical mount 110 could be supplied with very fine threads to further enhance the setting of the magnitude of the compressive force that holds the optic.

[0030] Optical mounts are generally designed to hold a specific range of optical elements, in terms of size. For example, an optical mount may be designed to support a 25.4 mm diameter mirror that is anywhere from 4 mm to 10mm thick. In some embodiments, a set of accessory parts are therefore provided for optical mount front plate 100 for fitting various optics. The parts can be replaced so as to achieve the prescribed level of performance desired for a given optic. A combination of such accessory parts is useful over a specified range of optics 110 and may provide, for example, a customized fit for an optic 110 that would otherwise not fit in optical mount front plate 100. Such accessory parts are inexpensive relative to optical mount front plate 100 and can be replaced in order to configure optical mount front plate 100 for a specified optic 110 or range of optics. Optical mount front plate 100 may be available in a specified set of sizes, and accessory parts could be used to modify optical mount front plate 100 for use with optics between the sizes in the set. Accessory parts could be configured through, for example, modifying the magnitude of the force applied by force application element 140, so as to provide the best possible performance for the type, shape, and thickness of the optic 110 used.

[0031] Accessory parts may modify other characteristics of optical mount front plate 100. For example, accessory parts may be exchanged in order to produce varying outcomes, such as trading immunity from environmental vibrational forces for lower wavefront distortion. As such, a plot of wavefront distortion as a function of the applied force may guide the choice of accessory parts for a given optical element. Additionally, retaining element 150 would allow for some tuning. Data required for such tuning may be made available through, for example, a plot or lookup data table. Such tuning may be critical when mounting, for example, thin, distortion sensitive polarization optics, or thicker optics that are finished to exacting tolerances that must not be compromised through distortions for the mounting. Such tuning may also be critical where some distortion can be tolerated in exchange for higher clamping forces to ensure the long term stability of the optic. In some embodiments, retaining element 150 is used for tuning. In other embodiments, tuning can be manual, electrical, pneumatic, or dynamic in order to respond to time varying needs of an application.

[0032] Embodiments of the disclosed optical mount provide reliable performance across a range of temperatures, making it ideal for long lifetime instruments deployed in harsh environments. In embodiments using a wave spring as force application element 140, forces on optic 110 are relatively unchanged over temperature changes, as the spring can absorb strain generated by thermal expansions. Beam pointing stability and low optical distortion make it ideal for use in sealed instruments with long intervals between service. Acceptable levels of distortion are maintained over extended periods of time. Optical mount front plate 100 further provides for a field selectable trade-off between optical distortion and the magnitude of the restraining forces used to secure the optic. Optical mount front plate 100 further provides for allowing a beam to pass close to an optic's 110 edge, with face mount clamping and a full ring style optic frame.

[0033] FIG. 7 shows one embodiment of an optic setup using features of the optical mount 100 of FIG. 1. Two optical mount front plates 100 having optics 610, 620 that are configured so that a beam 600 reflects off both optics and continues in a controlled direction. Optical mount front plate 100 allows the beam 600 to pass close to perimeter 180 of a first optic 610 after reflecting off a second optic 620. Restraining element 130 is configured to allow beam 600 to pass close to perimeter 180.

[0034] The optical mount front plate 100 can be applied to a broad range of optical devices that reflect, transmit, or process light fields. It can be used to mount, for example, a plano mirror, a muti-order wave plate, or a plano-convex lens. The range of optical devices to which optical mount front plate 100 can be applied is expanded by the design features described above. Because optical mount front plate 100 requires only discrete clamping points around the perimeter of optic 110, designs can provide enhanced access to the edges of the optic, allowing, for example, for excess material around optic 110 to be removed. Since the discrete clamping points are minimal, designs may allow for optics 110 mounted in close proximity to each other. Designs may also be implemented in optical devices, such as mirror mounts, containing pitch and yaw movement, a fixed optic holder, and a rotational mount used to fix the location in all degrees of freedom but allow for a rotational axis of an optic. Additionally, optical mount front plate 100 is symmetrical in a preferred embodiment, allowing the mount to be flipped 90 degrees to operate in both left and right orientations while providing the same functionality.

[0035] FIG. 8A and 8B shows one embodiment of a finite element analysis (FEA) illustrating pressures on an optic 110 mounted in the optical mount front plate 100 of FIG. 1 and compares the pressures to those on an optic 110 mounted in a typical side mount of the prior art. The finite element analysis of FIG. 8A shows optical distortion and strain on the front of optic 110 when mounted in optical mount front plate 100. However, very little optical distortion appears on optic 110, and the strain that does exist appears only at the perimeter 180 of optic 110, and primarily at the three contact points where restraining element 130 and force application element 140 contact optic 110.

[0036] FIG. 8B shows an FEA applied to an optic 110 mounted in a traditional side mount, which leads to pressure gradients across the surface of the optic 110.

[0037] While the present invention has been described at some length and with some particularity with respect to the several described embodiments, it is not intended that it should be limited to any such particulars or embodiments or any particular embodiment, but it is to be construed with references to the appended claims so as to provide the broadest possible interpretation of such claims in view of the prior art and, therefore, to effectively encompass the intended scope of the invention.

[0038] All examples and conditional language recited herein are intended for pedagogical purposes to aid the reader in understanding the principles of the invention and the concepts contributed by the inventor to furthering the art, and are to be construed as being without limitation to such specifically recited examples and conditions. Moreover, all statements herein reciting principles, aspects, and embodiments of the invention, as well as specific examples thereof, are intended to encompass both structural and functional equivalents thereof. Additionally, it is intended that such equivalents include both currently known equivalents as well as equivalents developed in the future, i.e., any elements developed that perform the same function, regardless of structure.


Claims

1. An optic and an optical mount for mounting the optic, wherein
the optic is a disk having a first surface, a second surface opposite the first surface, a perimeter having a thickness, and a central axis perpendicular to the first surface of the disk, the optical mount comprising:

at least one restraining element for the optic having at least one discrete contact point adjacent to the perimeter of the optic and configured to make contact on the first surface of the optic at the periphery; and

at least one force element having at least one discrete contact point adjacent to the perimeter of the optic and configured to make contact on the second surface of the optic at the periphery,

wherein each discrete contact point to make contact on the first surface of the optic has a corresponding discrete contact point to make contact on the second surface of the optic at substantially the same radial location, so that the pressure between restraining element and force element maintains the optic in one dimension along the central axis,

wherein the at least one restraining element further includes a lateral force generating element which applies lateral force in order to have the optic rest on kinematic contact points maintained in the remaining restraining elements.


 
2. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one force element is a wave spring.
 
3. The optic and the optical mount of claim 2, wherein the wave spring contacts the second surface of the optic in a plurality of locations and wherein each contact point corresponds to a restraining element.
 
4. The optic and the optical mount of claim 3, further comprising:

a housing containing the at least one restraining element and the wave spring; and

at least one spring receiving notch;

wherein the spring receiving notch controls the rotational orientation of the spring about an axis perpendicular to the first surface.


 
5. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one force element is a plurality of compression springs maintained within a housing.
 
6. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one force element is a plurality of magnets maintained within a housing.
 
7. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one restraining element is at least one tab extending from a housing.
 
8. The optic and the optical mount of claim 7, wherein the at least one restraining element is three tabs extending from a housing.
 
9. The optic and the optical mount of claim 8, wherein a first tab has a pushing element having at least one contact point on a peripheral surface of the optic to secure the optic against the second and third tab.
 
10. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one restraining element extends from a housing along an axis perpendicular to the first surface and forms a cradle for the optic.
 
11. The optic and the optical mount of claim 10, wherein a majority of a perimeter of the optic is exposed.
 
12. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the at least one restraining element is a pad mounted on a housing.
 
13. The optic and the optical mount of claim 1, wherein the force element is compressed against the optic by a retaining ring.
 
14. The optic and the optical mount of claim 13, wherein the retaining ring further comprises a boss.
 
15. The optic and the optical mount of claim 13, wherein a force applied by the force element on the optic is adjusted with the retaining ring.
 
16. The optic and the optical mount of claim 15, wherein the force element is in a bore in a housing wherein the bore is threaded so that the force from the retaining ring can be adjusted by rotating the retaining ring.
 


Ansprüche

1. Optik und Optikhalterung zum Befestigen der Optik, wobei
die Optik eine Scheibe ist, die eine erste Oberfläche, eine zweite Oberfläche gegenüberliegend der ersten Oberfläche, einen Umfang mit einer Dicke und eine Mittelachse senkrecht zu der ersten Oberfläche der Scheibe aufweist, wobei die Optikhalterung Folgendes aufweist:

mindestens ein Halteelement für die Optik, das mindestens einen diskreten Kontaktpunkt anliegend an dem Umfang der Optik aufweist und dazu ausgelegt ist, Kontakt auf der ersten Oberfläche der Optik am Randbereich herzustellen; und

mindestens ein Kraftelement, das mindestens einen diskreten Kontaktpunkt anliegend an dem Umfang der Optik aufweist und dazu ausgelegt ist, Kontakt auf der zweiten Oberfläche der Optik am Randbereich herzustellen,

wobei jeder diskrete Kontaktpunkt zum Herstellen von Kontakt auf der ersten Oberfläche der Optik derart einen entsprechenden diskreten Kontaktpunkt zum Herstellen von Kontakt auf der zweiten Oberfläche der Optik an im Wesentlichen der gleichen radialen Position aufweist, dass der Druck zwischen dem Halteelement und dem Kraftelement die Optik in einer Dimension entlang der Mittelachse hält,

wobei das mindestens eine Halteelement ferner ein laterales Krafterzeugungselement aufweist, das laterale Kraft ausübt, damit die Optik auf kinematischen Kontaktpunkten, die in den verbleibenden Halteelementen enthalten sind, aufliegen.


 
2. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das mindestens eine Kraftelement eine Wellenfeder ist.
 
3. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 2, wobei die Wellenfeder die zweite Oberfläche der Optik an einer Vielzahl von Stellen berührt und wobei jeder Kontaktpunkt einem Halteelement entspricht.
 
4. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 3, die ferner Folgendes aufweisen:

ein Gehäuse, das das mindestens eine Halteelement und die Wellenfeder enthält; und

mindestens eine Federaufnahmekerbe;

wobei die Federaufnahmekerbe die Drehausrichtung der Feder um eine Achse senkrecht zu der ersten Oberfläche steuert.


 
5. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das mindestens eine Kraftelement eine Vielzahl an Druckfedern ist, die in einem Gehäuse enthalten sind.
 
6. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das mindestens eine Kraftelement eine Vielzahl an Magneten ist, die in einem Gehäuse enthalten sind.
 
7. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das mindestens eine Kraftelement mindestens eine Nase ist, die sich von einem Gehäuse erstreckt.
 
8. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 7, wobei das mindestens eine Halteelement drei Nasen ist, die sich von einem Gehäuse erstrecken.
 
9. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 8, wobei eine erste Nase ein Drückelement aufweist, das mindestens einen Kontaktpunkt auf einer Randfläche der Optik aufweist, um die Optik an die zweite und dritte Nase gedrückt zu befestigen.
 
10. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei sich das mindestens eine Halteelement von einem Gehäuse entlang einer Achse senkrecht zu der ersten Oberfläche erstreckt und eine Aufnahme für die Optik bildet.
 
11. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 10, wobei ein Großteil des Umfangs der Optik freigelegt ist.
 
12. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das mindestens eine Halteelement ein Block ist, der an einem Gehäuse angebracht ist.
 
13. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Kraftelement durch einen Haltering gegen die Optik gedrückt wird.
 
14. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 13, wobei der Haltering ferner einen Vorsprung aufweist.
 
15. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 13, wobei eine Kraft, die von dem Kraftelement auf der Optik angelegt wird, durch den Haltering eingestellt wird.
 
16. Optik und Optikhalterung nach Anspruch 15, wobei sich das Kraftelement in einer Bohrung in einem Gehäuse befindet, wobei die Bohrung derart ein Gewinde aufweist, dass die Kraft von dem Haltering durch Drehen des Halterings eingestellt werden kann.
 


Revendications

1. Optique et monture optique pour le montage de l'optique, dans laquelle
l'optique est un disque ayant une première surface, une deuxième surface opposée à la première surface, un périmètre ayant une épaisseur, et un axe central perpendiculaire à la première surface du disque, la monture optique comprenant :

au moins un élément de retenue pour l'optique ayant au moins un point de contact discret adjacent au périmètre de l'optique et configuré pour établir le contact sur la première surface de l'optique à la périphérie ; et

au moins un élément de force ayant au moins un point de contact discret adjacent au périmètre de l'optique et configuré pour établir le contact sur la deuxième surface de l'optique à la périphérie,

dans laquelle chaque point de contact discret, pour établir un contact sur la première surface de l'optique, a un point de contact discret correspondant pour établir un contact sur la deuxième surface de l'optique sensiblement au même emplacement radial, de sorte que la pression entre l'élément de retenue et l'élément de force maintient l'optique dans une dimension le long de l'axe central,

dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de retenue comprend en outre un élément de génération de force latérale qui applique une force latérale afin d'avoir l'optique qui repose sur des points de contact cinématiques maintenue dans les éléments de retenue résiduels.


 
2. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de force est un ressort ondulé.
 
3. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 2, dans laquelle le ressort ondulé contacte la deuxième surface de l'optique dans une pluralité d'emplacements et dans laquelle chaque point de contact correspond à un élément de retenue.
 
4. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :

un boîtier contenant l'au moins un élément de retenue et le ressort ondulé ; et

au moins une encoche de réception de ressort ;

dans laquelle l'encoche de réception de ressort contrôle l'orientation de rotation du ressort autour d'un axe perpendiculaire à la première surface.


 
5. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de force est une pluralité de ressorts de compression maintenus dans un boîtier.
 
6. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de force est une pluralité d'aimants maintenus dans un boîtier.
 
7. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de retenue est au moins une patte s'étendant à partir d'un boîtier.
 
8. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 7, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de retenue est trois pattes s'étendant à partir d'un boîtier.
 
9. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 8, dans laquelle une première patte a un élément de poussée ayant au moins un point de contact sur une surface périphérique de l'optique pour fixer l'optique contre la deuxième et troisième patte.
 
10. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de retenue s'étend à partir d'un boîtier le long d'un axe perpendiculaire à la première surface et forme un berceau pour l'optique.
 
11. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 10, dans laquelle une majorité d'un périmètre de l'optique est exposée.
 
12. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'au moins un élément de retenue est une patte montée sur un boîtier.
 
13. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle l'élément de force est comprimé contre l'optique par une bague de retenue.
 
14. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 13, dans laquelle la bague de retenue comprend en outre un bossage.
 
15. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 13, dans laquelle une force appliquée par l'élément de force sur l'optique est réglée avec la bague de retenue.
 
16. Optique et monture optique selon la revendication 15, dans laquelle l'élément de force est dans un alésage dans un boîtier, dans laquelle l'alésage est fileté de sorte que la force de la bague de retenue peut être réglée par rotation de la bague de retenue.
 




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Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description