(19)
(11)EP 3 009 864 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
04.11.2020 Bulletin 2020/45

(21)Application number: 15306484.5

(22)Date of filing:  24.09.2015
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G01V 1/52(2006.01)
G01V 11/00(2006.01)
E21B 17/10(2006.01)
E21B 23/01(2006.01)
E21B 47/01(2012.01)

(54)

ANCHORING MECHANISM AND METHOD FOR DOWN-HOLE TOOL

VERANKERUNGSMECHANISMUS UND -VERFAHREN FÜR BOHRLOCHWERKZEUG

MÉCANISME D'ANCRAGE ET PROCÉDÉ POUR OUTIL DE FOND DE PUITS


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 15.10.2014 US 201414515055

(43)Date of publication of application:
20.04.2016 Bulletin 2016/16

(73)Proprietor: Sercel
44470 Carquefou (FR)

(72)Inventors:
  • NEGRE, Jean-Eric
    44470 CARQUEFOU (FR)
  • AFFRE DE SAINT ROME, Ronan
    44470 CARQUEFOU (FR)
  • DE KIMPE, Thierry
    44470 CARQUEFOU (FR)

(74)Representative: Ipsilon 
Europarc - Bat B7 3, rue Edouard Nignon
44300 Nantes
44300 Nantes (FR)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 0 345 112
US-A1- 2012 006 109
US-A1- 2001 023 791
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    BACKGROUND


    TECHNICAL FIELD



    [0001] Embodiments of the subject matter disclosed herein generally relate to an apparatus and method for safely anchoring a down-hole tool inside a well or casing.

    DISCUSSION OF THE BACKGROUND



    [0002] A down-hole tool may be a device used to conduct seismic surveys in down-hole environments, such as, for example, inside of wells used for oil and gas extraction. Down-hole tools may contain seismic sensors, for example, geophones, or other type of sensors, for example, a temperature measuring device. In order to function properly, a down-hole tool that has been lowered into a well may need to be anchored in place with the tool pressed up against the wall of the well or casing. Several tools may be connected together, top to bottom, along with other survey equipment, using a cable, and lowered into the well and/or casing.

    [0003] Figure 1 depicts an exemplary down-hole tool and Figure 2 depicts an exemplary diagram of a down-hole tool. Tool 100 may include a main housing 102, upper cable head 104, lower cable head 106, and anchoring arm 108. A logging cable 110 may be connected to the upper cable head 104 at the top and the lower cable head 106 at the bottom of the seismic tool 100. Main housing 102 may be a housing of any suitable shape and made of any suitable material for enclosing any equipment, such as, for example, sensors, motors, and other mechanical, electric, and electronic components. Upper cable head 104 and lower cable head 106 may enclose the tool 100 on the top and bottom ends, respectively, and may be made of a similar material to the main housing 102 or any appropriate material. Anchoring arm 108 allows tool 100, after being lowered into a well, to anchor itself against the wall of the well or casing. Coupling a seismic tool to the well or casing is necessary for quality seismic measurements.

    [0004] Anchoring arm 108 may be attached to main housing 102 in any suitable manner to allow anchoring arm 108 to switch between closed and open positions. Logging cable 110 may connect tool 100 to other devices, such as, for example, other seismic tools, telemetry devices, or electronic devices that allow tool 100 to transmit data to a computer. For example, tool 100 may be deployed in a string of similar tools, and may be connected to other seismic tools 100 above and below through logging cable 110. Logging cable 110 may be made of any suitable material for supporting the weight of the tools 100 as they are lowered into a well, and may also include cabling for data and power transmission. Tool 100 may receive power and control commands through the logging cable 110.

    [0005] Figure 3 depicts an exemplary diagram of an internal view of a tool 100 with a motor. To use anchoring arm 108, tool 100 may include a motor 120 within main housing 102. Motor 120 may be any suitable motor for use within tool 100, such as, for example, an electric motor. Motor 120 may be able to move anchoring arm 108 between closed and open positions, and may be controlled by commands received through logging cable 110. In most traditional down-hole tools, the motor is directly coupled to the anchoring arm. Thus, in case of power failure, it becomes difficult to operate the anchoring arm.

    [0006] Therefore, a disadvantage of the existing down-hole tools is the lack of anchoring arm's control after the tool is being deployed in the well in the event of a power failure. In addition, when deciding to change a biasing force that acts on the anchoring arm, the process of changing the biasing force is time consuming, laborious and dangerous for the maintenance personnel.

    [0007] Further, because the downhole tools are used in various wells and applications, the requirements for biasing the arm in or out differs from application to application. In one application, as noted above, when the downhole tools chain is lowered into the well and all the arms are opened and pressured onto the casing, it happens sometimes that a failure prevents from activating the arms back in order to recover the equipment. However, in another application, where the tool chain remains for a long period of time inside the well (e.g., time lapse operation), it is desirable to maintain the tool orientation from day to day. Thus, the arms of the modules in the chain must stay open for days if not months. As is known in the art, opening the arms and maintaining them in the opened position requires electrical energy and the system to be on continuously. This is expensive because of the amount of energy required and/or prone to failure because if the power goes off, the chain might collapse inside the well.

    [0008] Thus, there is a need for an apparatus and method for a down-hole tool that overcomes the above noted limitations of the existing tools.

    SUMMARY



    [0009] In one embodiment, there is a down-hole tool for use inside a well. The down-hole tool is defined by claim 1.

    [0010] According to another particular aspect, the tool comprises :
    a cap configured to be attached to the central part and to sandwich corresponding ends of the first and second translation links with the central part.

    [0011] According to another particular aspect, one of the first and second translation links is connected to the actuating mechanism while the other one of the first and second translation links is free.

    [0012] According to another particular aspect, the spring block housing and the spring stay together when the spring block's orientation is changed.

    [0013] According to another particular aspect, the actuating mechanism comprises:

    a motor; and

    a clutch located between the motor and the spring block.



    [0014] According to another particular aspect, the tool comprises:
    a brake configured to brake the motor.

    [0015] According to another particular aspect, the tool comprises:
    a gearbox located between the clutch and the spring block.

    [0016] According to another particular aspect, the tool comprises:
    a screw shaft configured to transform a rotational motion of the motor into a translation of a first translation link of the spring block.

    [0017] According to another particular aspect, the tool comprises:
    a sensor for measuring a parameter associated with the well.

    [0018] In another embodiment, there is a down-hole system for measuring a parameter associated with a well, the down-hole system is defined by claim 12.

    [0019] In still another embodiment, there is a method for changing a biasing force for a down-hole tool for use inside a well. The method defined by claim 13.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0020] The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of the specification, illustrate one or more embodiments and, together with the description, explain these embodiments. In the drawings:

    Figure 1 depicts an exemplary down-hole tool;

    Figure 2 depicts an exemplary diagram of a seismic tool;

    Figure 3 depicts an exemplary diagram of an internal view of a seismic tool with a motor;

    Figure 4 depict a down-hole tool with an actuating mechanism;

    Figure 5 depicts a linking mechanism and the actuating mechanism of the down-hole tool;

    Figure 6A shows the actuating mechanism with an anchoring arm closed and Figure 6B shows the same with the anchoring arm opened;

    Figure 7A shows the down-hole tool deployed in the well with the anchoring arm closed and Figure 7B shows the same tool with the anchoring arm opened;

    Figure 8 is a flowchart of a method for deploying a tool in a well;

    Figure 9 is a flowchart of a method for retrieving a tool from the well;

    Figure 10A is a detailed view of a spring block inside the tool and Figure 10B is a view of the spring block part that is reversed when necessary;

    Figure 11 is a flowchart of a method for deploying a tool in the well;

    Figure 12 is a flowchart of a method for retrieving a tool from the well; and

    Figure 13 depicts a system having plural tools that are deployed in a well.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0021] The following description of the embodiments refers to the accompanying drawings. The same reference numbers in different drawings identify the same or similar elements. The following detailed description does not limit the invention. Instead, the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims. In various embodiments as illustrated in the figures, a down-hole tool having an anchoring arm is discussed. However, the novel concepts are not limited to such down-hole tool, but they may apply to any device having at least one movable arm.

    [0022] Reference throughout the specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with an embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the subject matter disclosed. Thus, the appearance of the phrases "in one embodiment" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout the specification is not necessarily referring to the same embodiment. Further, the particular features, structures or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments.

    [0023] According to an embodiment, a down-hole tool is configured to be lowered inside a casing of a well. For performing a function associated with the tool, for example, measuring seismic data, the down-hole tool needs a good coupling with the environment, the casing or the well. The down-hole tool has at least an anchoring arm that is closed while the tool is being lowered into the casing and then it is opened for fixing the tool in position and ensuring a good coupling with the environment. Anchoring arm may be activated, as discussed next, by a motor. The motor may connect through a clutch to a gear box that actuates a shaft that ultimately actuates the anchoring arm. A brake mechanism may be connected to the motor for maintaining a given state of the anchoring arm, e.g., closed or open.

    [0024] As discussed now with regard to Figure 4, a down-hole tool 400 includes a housing 402 that may have a cylindrical shape. Housing 402 is shaped so that it fits inside a casing that lines a well. Housing 402 may accommodate a sensor 404 (e.g., seismic sensor, temperature sensor, pressure sensor, etc.), an anchoring arm 406 and a linking mechanism 408. Linking mechanism 408 may be connected to an actuating mechanism 410 that provides the energy for moving anchoring arm 406 between a closed position and an open position. If housing 402 and sensor 404 are removed, the positioning of the linking and actuating mechanisms 408 and 410 are illustrated in Figure 5.

    [0025] Linking mechanism 408 includes an arm 502 connecting anchoring arm 406 to spring block 510, which is also part of the linking mechanism. Arm 502 is connected to a central part 504 that belongs to spring block 510. Central part 504 is configured to move back and forth along a longitudinal axis X of tool 400. Because anchoring arm 406 has at least one point rotatably attached to housing 402 and also one point attached to arm 502, a movement of central part 504 results in a movement of arm 502 which also results in a movement of anchoring arm 406 between the closed and opened positions. Central part 504 is configured to mate with spring block housing 511 so that central part 504 moves only along longitudinal axis X. One or more spring mechanisms or springs 512 are located inside spring block 510 and in contact with central part 504 and configured to bias central part 504 toward one end of spring block 510. In Figure 5, springs 512 are configured to bias central part 504 toward end 510a of spring block 510 so that anchoring arm 406 can open under the pressure exerted by springs 512 (assuming that actuating mechanism 410 exerts no force on central part 504). Spring block housing 511 together with springs 512 and central part 504 form an independent unit, the spring block 510, that may be easily removed from tool 400 and reversed so that springs 512 bias the anchoring arm to close.

    [0026] Central part 504 is connected to first and second translation links 520 and 522, which may be opposite to each other relative to central part 504. Translation links 520 and 522 may also be part of spring block 510. One of the translation links is connected to actuating mechanism 410 while the other one is free. Each one may have one or more seals for sealing an inside of the housing 402 from the environment. Because the pressure outside the tool may be very high, e.g., around 1800 bars, it is undesirable to have this large pressure acting on one single side of the linking mechanism as the actuating mechanism will then have to overcome this large force. Thus, two translation links 520 and 522 are provided between the environment and the inside of housing 402 so that the external pressure acting on both translation links cancel each other and the actuating mechanism does not need to expend energy for overcoming the high external pressure.

    [0027] One of the first and second translation links is connected to a screw shaft 530 that is configured to rotate within a ball nut translation mechanism 532. Ball nut translation mechanism 532 and screw shaft 530 are part of actuating mechanism 410. Screw shaft 530 is mechanically connected to a gear box 540, which is also part of the actuating mechanism 410. Actuating mechanism 410 further includes a clutch 550, a motor 560, and a braking mechanism 562.

    [0028] These components are now discussed with regard to Figures 6A and 6B, which show anchoring arm 406 closed and opened, respectively. Figure 6A shows motor 560 connected to brake mechanism 562. Motor 560 may be any type of electrical motor. Brake mechanism 562 can be controlled, for example, from a controller (not shown) at the surface, with signals transmitted through cable 110, to block a rotational motion of the motor's axle. As will be discussed later, this is advantageous when the motor is switched off, i.e., there is no power supplied to the motor. Motor 560 connects to clutch 550, which is configured to engage or disengage motor 560's axle to gearbox 540. Gearbox 540 may be used to reduce or increase a rotation speed generated by motor's axle. Gearbox 540 is connected to screw shaft 530 and transmits the rotational motion of motor's axle to screw shaft. This rotational motion is transformed into translational motion by ball nut translation mechanism 532, which is configured to move back and forth along the longitudinal axis of the tool when screw shaft 530 rotates. The translational motion of ball nut translation mechanism 532 is transmitted to the first translation link 520 to close anchoring arm 406, as illustrated in Figure 6A. This figure shows spring 512 being compressed and central part 504 being displaced away from motor 560.

    [0029] On the contrary, Figure 6B shows spring 512 biasing central part 504 so that anchoring arm 406 is open and ball nut translation mechanism 532 being displaced toward motor 560. Note that motor 560 may be replaced with a motor whose axle translates along the longitudinal axis instead of rotatating, or with a magnetic mechanism capable of actuating translation link 520. Also note in Figure 6B the second translational link 522 moving unitarily with central part 504. Figures 6A and 6B also illustrate the fixed point 620 of anchoring arm 406 attached to housing 402 and anchoring arm 406 being flush with an exterior surface of housing 402. However, anchoring arm 406 does not have to be flush with exterior surface of housing 402. Figures 6A and 6B also illustrate ball bearings 630 located around an end of screw shaft 530 for preventing the screw shaft to translate when actuated.

    [0030] One advantage of the system illustrated in Figures 6A and 6B is that spring block 510 includes spring 512 and central part 504 as a compact and independent unit, to which translational links 520 and 522 and arm 502 may be easily attached, without a need to compress or decompress spring 512. Thus, the entire spring block 510 may be removed, reversed and reattached to the tool so that the spring force makes anchoring arm 406 to close instead of opening, which is sometimes desired in the field as will be discussed later.

    [0031] With the tool described above, an operation of deploying and removing the tool from a casing is now discussed. Figures 7A-B generically shows tool 400 being deployed inside well 700. Casing 702 was inserted inside well 700 and cemented in place, for example, with cement 704. Figure 7A shows tool 400 having anchoring arm 406 in the closed position, i.e., substantially parallel to housing 402. Logging cable 110 is taut because of the weight of tool 400. Figure 7A shows logging cable 110 extending past tool 400, which suggests that other tools are attached to tool 400. However, in one application, it is possible that a single tool is suspended from logging cable 110.

    [0032] After it is determined that tool 400 is at the desired position (e.g., desired depth), motor 560, clutch 550 and gearbox 540 may be activated (as discussed next), for moving anchoring arm 406 from the closed position to the open position illustrated in Figure 7B. In this way, a good coupling is established between tool 400 and the environment, in this case casing 702. Further, tool 400 becomes fixed relative to casing 702.

    [0033] The process of opening and closing anchoring arm 406 is now discussed with regard to Figure 8. In step 800, just before the tool 400 is inserted inside the well, its mechanisms may be checked. Note that this step is optional. In step 802, tool 400, having anchoring arm 406 in the closed position, is lowered inside the casing. When tool 400 arrives at its intended destination, a command (from a controller located on the ground that is in electric communication with the tool) is sent in step 804 to open the clutch. The process illustrated in Figure 8 assumes that spring block 510 is positioned inside tool 400 to bias anchoring arm 406 to open. However, the friction within the motor and/or clutch and/or gearbox is higher than the spring force, and thus, the springs 512 cannot open anchoring arm 406. However, when the clutch is opened in step 804, the friction is reduced and the spring force moves anchoring arm 406 from the closed position to the open position, as illustrated in Figure 7B. Thus, at this time, tool 400 is fixed relative to the casing. However, to strengthen this position and enhance the coupling with the environment, in step 806 the clutch is closed and in step 808 the motor is actuated (by another signal received from the controller) to further open anchoring arm 406. This is achieved by pushing central part 504 away from motor 560. Thus, extra force is applied on anchoring arm. However, it is not desirable to keep the motor on for long time periods. Thus, prior to switching the motor off, and to ensure that the extra force applied to the anchoring arm is not lost, brake 562 is turned on in step 810 to "freeze" the motor, i.e., to prevent the axle of the motor to rotate in an opposition direction that will allow central part 504 to move away from motor 560. Brake 562 consumes less power than the motor and is configured to work for long periods of time.

    [0034] At this time, motor 560 is turned off in step 812 and tool 400 is fixed in place, with a larger force than the traditional tools. Also, motor 560 is turned off, relieving the stress that is usually present when the motor is on. Further, the tool is safe from falling inside the well in case of power failure as spring 512 biases continuously anchoring arm 406 toward casing 702.

    [0035] When the time comes to remove the tool from the well, the following operations, as illustrated in Figure 9, may be followed. Assuming that the clutch is closed, in step 900, the motor is turned on, i.e., power is supplied to the motor and in step 902 the brake is turned off. In step 904 the motor is actuated to return central part 504 to its original position, i.e., the position that closes anchoring arm 406. The closing of the anchoring arm is achieved in step 906. Then, in step 908, it is possible to turn the motor off and the friction produced by the motor, clutch and gearbox may be enough to overcome the spring force developed by spring 512. If that is not the case, the motor is left on. Alternatively, the brake may be turned on and the motor off to maintained the spring 512 in a compressed position, i.e., with the anchoring arm closed. Then, in step 910, the tool is raised and removed from the well.

    [0036] However, if the spring block 510 is reversed, one or more of the steps discussed above for lowering and raising the tool into and out of the well also changes as now discussed. Prior to discussing the process of inserting and removing the tool from the well, the spring block 510 is shown in more detail in Figure 10A for a better understanding of the easiness of changing its orientation. Note that when in the field, it is time consuming to take apart the tool and change the way in which the spring biases the anchoring arm. With the spring block illustrated in Figure 10A, this operation becomes quick and safe as the spring 512 does not have to be decompressed and then re-oriented as in the traditional tools.

    [0037] Figure 10A shows spring block 510 including a spring block housing 1010 that accommodates spring 512. Two end plates 1012 and 1024 are attached to the ends of spring block housing 1010 for keeping in place spring 512. Central part 504 is configured to be placed over spring block housing 1010 and spring 512 and the central part has two holes 504A and 504 for accommodating first and second translational links 520 and 522. A cap 1020 with corresponding holes 1020A and 1020B fits over central part 504 and maintains the ends of translational links 520 and 522 fixed relative to the central part. In one application, central part 504, by being in direct contact with spring 512, unitarily moves with spring 512 along the longitudinal axis of tool 400.

    [0038] With this configuration, spring block 510 can be easily removed from the tool, reversed and reinstalled. This is due to the fact that the spring 512 does not have to be unwinded during the spring block removal. In this regard, Figure 10B shows part of the spring block 510 and how the spring 512 is contained inside it, which makes the removal of spring block 510 easy and quick. Another advantage provided by one or more of these embodiments is the easy maintenance of the translating seals. As it is quite common to have to change the seals on high pressure and high temperature tools, this operation takes a considerable amount of time and generally needs the motor's removal and all the movement transformation parts, i.e., clutch, gearbox, etc. The spring block and the fact that the translation links can be unscrewed quickly without the need of removing the motor or another movement transformation parts allow a quick seal's replacement.

    [0039] In other words, according to an embodiment there is a method for changing a biasing force for a down-hole tool for use inside a well. The method includes a step of removing an anchoring arm that is rotatably attached to a housing of the tool; a step of detaching a cap from a central part of a spring block; and a step of reversing an orientation of the spring block. A movement of the central part results in the movement of the anchoring arm between open and closed positions.

    [0040] Considering that the spring block has been reversed and the spring now biases anchoring arm to be in the closed position, a process for lowering the tool inside the casing is now discussed with regard to Figure 11. In step 1100, the tool and its components may optionally be checked. For example, the controller may send various signals for verifying the brake, motor and clutch. In step 1102, the tool is lowered into the casing and in step 1104 the clutch is closed to engage the motor with one of the translational links. In step 1106 the motor is turned on and in step 1108, after the tool has arrived at its intended destination, the motor is actuated to open the arm. Note that the motor works now against the spring, which biases the arm to be closed. When enough force has been applied to the arm, the brake is applied in step 1110 and then, the motor may optionally be turned off.

    [0041] When the time to remove the tool from the well comes, as illustrated in Figure 12, the brake is turned off in step 1200 and the clutch is opened in step 1202, which makes the arm to close in step 1204 due to the spring force, which this time is pulling the arm toward the tool. If the spring force is not enough to close the arm, the clutch may be closed and the motor actuated to bring the arm in the closed position. Then, in step 1206 the tool is removed from the well. Note that with this configuration in which the spring biases the anchoring arm toward the tool's housing it might be easier to remove the tool from the well in case of power failure, as the spring will automatically close the arm.

    [0042] Figure 13 depicts a system 1300 having plural down-hole tools 1302 to 1310 deployed within a well 1320. Note that down-hole tools 1302 to 1310 are shown in the figure as different units to indicate that it is not necessary that all the tools are the same. After tools 1302 to 1310 have been deployed within the well 1320 and have reached their desired positions, anchoring arms of the tools may be opened to anchor the tools. For example, as depicted in Figure 13, anchoring arms 406 of tools may be opened as discussed in the previous embodiments. Tools 1302 to 1310 are configured to receive command signals from computer 1330 along logging cables 1340. A controller 1332 may be linked through cable 1334 to computer 1330 and configured to coordinate the opening and closing of each arm of the tools. Controller 1332 and/or computer 1330 may also coordinate the motors, clutches, and breaks of each of the tools. In one application, any information send by the tools to the surface 1350 of the well may be received and stored in computer 1330 and/or controller 1332. Computer 1330 and controller 1332 may be integrated in a single unit, that may be portable (e.g., located on a truck or any other movable device). Connecting cable 1336 that connects controller 1332 to a telemetry device 1360 may have one or more strength members for being able to support the weight of all tools 1302 to 1310. Telemetry device 1360 may receive all the information from the tools (e.g., seismic data, temperature, pressure, information about the status of the tool, motor, clutch, anchoring arm, etc.) and partially process it so that the computer 1330 can read this information.

    [0043] One or more advantages of the above-discussed embodiments are now discussed. Because of the novel design of the spring box, it is now easy to change the way in which the arm is biased, i.e., biased to open or close, depending on the application. Thus, if the tool chain is intended to be deployed inside the well for a long period of time for time lapse operation, the spring box may be configured to bias the arm in the open position, thus not requiring any electrical energy for staying open. This feature is advantageous because the electrical energy is expensive and because, even if there is a power failure at the tool chain, the chain remains in position due to the mechanical bias and thus, it prevents the chain from collapsing inside the well or getting stuck inside the well.

    [0044] If the chain is used in two successive operations, one requiring to bias the arm in the open position and the next operation requiring to bias the arm in the close position, reversing the orientation of the spring block is now easy and time efficient, because only the anchoring mechanism is disassembled and reversed, contrary to the existing devices for which the entire device has to be disassembled.

    [0045] The disclosed embodiments provide an apparatus and method for a down-hole tool having a motor and a clutch and/or a reversible spring block. It should be understood that this description is not intended to limit the invention. On the contrary, the exemplary embodiments are intended to cover alternatives, modifications and equivalents, which are included in the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. Further, in the detailed description of the exemplary embodiments, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the claimed invention. However, one skilled in the art would understand that various embodiments may be practiced without such specific details.

    [0046] Although the features and elements of the present exemplary embodiments are described in the embodiments in particular combinations, each feature or element can be used alone without the other features and elements of the embodiments or in various combinations with or without other features and elements disclosed herein.

    [0047] This written description uses examples of the subject matter disclosed to enable any person skilled in the art to practice the same, including making and using any devices or systems and performing any incorporated methods. The patentable scope of the subject matter is defined by the claims, and may include other examples that occur to those skilled in the art. Such other examples are intended to be within the scope of the claims.


    Claims

    1. A down-hole tool (400) for use inside a well (700) comprising:

    - a housing (402);

    - an anchoring arm (406) rotatably attached to the housing (402) and configured to move between an open position and a closed position;

    - a spring block (510) configured to have a central part (504) that moves along a longitudinal axis (X) of the housing (402) which results in the movement of the anchoring arm (406) between the open or closed positions, said spring block (510) comprising a spring (512) in contact with central part (504) and configured to bias central part (504) toward one end of the spring block (510) so that the anchoring arm (406) can open or close under the pressure exerted by the spring (512) ; and

    - an actuating mechanism (410) connected to the central part (504) and configured to move the central part (504) along the longitudinal axis,

    wherein the spring block (510) is attached to the housing (402) and detachable from the housing (402), and wherein the spring block (510) is configured, when located inside the housing (402) with a first orientation, to bias the anchoring arm (406) to close, and, when located with a second orientation, opposite to the first orientation, to bias the anchoring arm (406) to open.
     
    2. The tool of Claim 1, wherein the spring block (510) is configured to be removed from the down-hole tool (400) without removing the actuating mechanism (410).
     
    3. The tool of any of Claims 1 to 2, wherein the spring block (510) comprises:

    - a spring block housing (511) within which said spring (512) is located; and

    - first and second translation links (520, 522) attached at opposite ends of the central part (504).


     
    4. The tool of Claim 3, further comprising a cap (1020) configured to be attached to the central part (504) and to sandwich corresponding ends of the first and second translation links (520, 522) with the central part (504).
     
    5. The tool of any of Claims 3 to 4, wherein one of the first and second translation links (520, 522) is connected to the actuating mechanism (410) while the other one of the first and second translation links is free.
     
    6. The tool of any of Claims 3 to 5, wherein the spring block housing (511) and the spring (512) stay together when the spring block's orientation is changed.
     
    7. The tool of any of Claims 1 to 6, wherein the actuating mechanism (410) comprises:

    - a motor (560); and

    - a clutch (550) located between the motor (560) and the spring block (510).


     
    8. The tool of Claim 7, further comprising a brake (562) configured to brake the motor (560).
     
    9. The tool of any of Claims 7 to 8, further comprising a gearbox (540) located between the clutch (550) and the spring block (510).
     
    10. The tool of any of Claims 7 to 9, further comprising a screw shaft (530) configured to transform a rotational motion of the motor (560) into a translation of a first translation link (520) of the spring block (510).
     
    11. The tool of any of Claims 1 to 10, further comprising a sensor (404) for measuring a parameter associated with the well (700).
     
    12. A down-hole system (1300) for measuring a parameter associated with a well (1320), the down-hole system (1300) comprising:

    - a controller (1332) located at the surface (1350) of the well;

    - at least one down-hole tool (1302, 1310) according to any of Claims 1 to 11; and

    - a connecting cable (1334) connecting the controller (1332) to the at least one down-hole tool (1302).


     
    13. A method for changing a biasing force for a down-hole tool for use inside a well, said down-hole tool according to claim 4, the method comprising:

    - removing the anchoring arm that is rotatably attached to the housing of the tool;

    - detaching the cap from the central part of the spring block; and

    - reversing an orientation of the spring block,

    - wherein a movement of the central part results in the movement of the anchoring arm between open and closed positions,

    wherein the spring block, when located inside the housing with a first orientation biases the anchoring arm to close and when located with a second orientation, opposite to the first orientation, biases the anchoring arm to open.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Bohrlochwerkzeug (400) zur Verwendung innerhalb einer Quelle (700), umfassend:

    - ein Gehäuse (402);

    - einen Verankerungsarm (406), der drehbar an das Gehäuse (402) befestigt und konfiguriert ist, um sich zwischen einer offenen Position und einer geschlossenen Position zu bewegen;

    - einen Federblock (510), der konfiguriert ist, um einen zentralen Teil (504) aufzuweisen, der sich entlang einer Längsachse (X) des Gehäuses (402) bewegt, was zu einer Bewegung des Verankerungsarms (406) zwischen der offenen oder geschlossenen Position führt, wobei der Federblock (510) eine Feder (512) in Kontakt mit dem zentralen Teil (504) umfasst und konfiguriert ist, um den zentralen Teil (504) hin zu einem Ende des Federblocks (510) vorzuspannen, so dass sich der Verankerungsarm (406) unter dem Druck öffnen und schließen kann, der von der Feder (512) ausgeübt wird;

    und einen Betätigungsmechanismus (410), der mit dem zentralen Teil (504) verbunden und konfiguriert ist, um den zentralen Teil (504) entlang der Längsachse zu bewegen, wobei der Federblock (510) an das Gehäuse (402) befestigt und vom Gehäuse (402) abnehmbar ist, und wobei der Federblock (510) konfiguriert ist, wenn er sich innerhalb des Gehäuses (402) mit einer ersten Ausrichtung befindet, um den Verankerungsarm (406) vorzuspannen, und, wenn er sich mit einer zweiten Ausrichtung gegenüber der ersten Ausrichtung befindet, den Verankerungsarm (406) vorzuspannen, um sich zu öffnen.
     
    2. Werkzeug nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Federblock (510) konfiguriert ist, um vom Bohrlochwerkzeug (400) entfernt zu werden, ohne den Betätigungsmechanismus (410) zu entfernen.
     
    3. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 2, wobei der Federblock (510) Folgendes umfasst:

    - ein Federblockgehäuse (511), innerhalb dessen sich die Feder (512) befindet; und

    - eine erste und zweite Übertragungsverknüpfung (520, 522), die an entgegengesetzte Enden des zentralen Teils (504) befestigt ist.


     
    4. Werkzeug nach Anspruch 3, weiter umfassend eine Kappe (1020), die konfiguriert ist, um an den zentralen Teil (504) befestigt zu sein, und entsprechende Enden der ersten und zweiten Übertragungsverknüpfung (520, 522) mit dem zentralen Teil (504) einzuklemmen.
     
    5. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 3 bis 4, wobei eine der ersten und zweiten Übertragungsverknüpfung (520, 522) mit dem Betätigungsmechanismus (410) verbunden ist, während die andere der ersten und zweiten Übertragungsverknüpfung frei ist.
     
    6. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 3 bis 5, wobei das Federblockgehäuse (511) und die Feder (512) zusammenbleiben, wenn die Ausrichtung des Federblocks geändert ist.
     
    7. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 6, wobei der Betätigungsmechanismus (410) Folgendes umfasst:

    - einen Motor (560); und

    - eine Kupplung (550), die sich zwischen dem Motor (560) und dem Federblock (510) befindet.


     
    8. Werkzeug nach Anspruch 7, weiter umfassend eine Bremse (562), die konfiguriert ist, um den Motor (560) zu bremsen.
     
    9. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 7 bis 8, weiter umfassend ein Getriebe (540), das sich zwischen der Kupplung (550) und dem Federblock (510) befindet.
     
    10. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 7 bis 9, weiter umfassend eine Schraubenwelle (530), die konfiguriert ist, um eine Drehbewegung des Motors (560) in eine Übertragung einer ersten Übertragungsverknüpfung (520) des Federblocks (510) umzuwandeln.
     
    11. Werkzeug nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 10, weiter umfassend einen Sensor (404) zum Messen eines Parameters, der mit der Quelle (700) assoziiert ist.
     
    12. Bohrlochsystem (1300) zum Messen eines Parameters, der mit einer Quelle (1320) assoziiert ist, wobei das Bohrlochsystem (1300) Folgendes umfasst:

    - eine Steuervorrichtung (1332), die sich an der Oberfläche (1350) der Quelle befindet;

    - mindestens ein Bohrlochwerkzeug (1302, 1310) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 11; und

    - ein Verbindungskabel (1334), das die Steuervorrichtung (1332) mit dem mindestens einen Bohrlochwerkzeug (1302) verbindet.


     
    13. Verfahren zur Änderung einer Vorspannungskraft für ein Bohrlochwerkzeug zur Verwendung innerhalb einer Quelle, das Bohrlochwerkzeug nach Anspruch 4, wobei das Verfahren weiter Folgendes umfasst:

    - Entfernen des Verankerungsarms, der drehbar an das Gehäuse des Werkzeugs befestigt ist;

    - Abnehmen der Kappe vom zentralen Teil des Federblocks; und

    - Umkehren einer Ausrichtung des Federblocks,

    - wobei eine Bewegung des zentralen Teils zu einer Bewegung des Verankerungsarms zwischen der offenen und geschlossenen Position führt,

    wobei der Federblock, wenn er sich innerhalb des Gehäuses mit einer ersten Ausrichtung befindet, den Verankerungsarm vorspannt, um sich zu schließen, und, wenn er sich mit einer zweiten Ausrichtung gegenüber der ersten Ausrichtung befindet, den Verankerungsarm vorspannt, um sich zu öffnen.
     


    Revendications

    1. Outil de fond de puits (400) destiné à être utilisé à l'intérieur d'un puits (700) comprenant :

    - une enceinte (402) ;

    - un bras d'ancrage (406) relié de manière rotative à l'enceinte (402) et configuré pour se déplacer entre une position ouverte et une position fermée ;

    - un bloc de ressort (510) configuré pour avoir une partie centrale (504) qui se déplace le long d'un axe longitudinal (X) de l'enceinte (402) et qui provoque le mouvement du bras d'ancrage (406) entre les positions ouverte ou fermée, ledit bloc de ressort (510) comprenant un ressort (512) en contact avec la partie centrale (504) et configuré pour solliciter la partie centrale (504) vers une extrémité du bloc de ressort (510) de sorte que le bras d'ancrage (406) puisse s'ouvrir ou se fermer sous la pression exercée par le ressort (512) ; et

    - un mécanisme d'actionnement (410) relié à la partie centrale (504) et configuré pour déplacer la partie centrale (504) le long de l'axe longitudinal,

    dans lequel le bloc de ressort (510) est fixé sur l'enceinte (402) et peut être détaché de l'enceinte (402), et dans lequel le bloc de ressort (510) est configuré, lorsqu'il se trouve à l'intérieur de l'enceinte (402) dans une première orientation, pour solliciter le bras d'ancrage (406) afin qu'il se ferme, et, lorsqu'il se trouve dans une seconde orientation, opposée à la première orientation, pour solliciter le bras d'ancrage (406) afin qu'il s'ouvre.
     
    2. Outil selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le bloc de ressort (510) est configuré pour être retiré de l'outil de fond de puits (400) sans retirer le mécanisme d'actionnement (410).
     
    3. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 2, dans lequel le bloc de ressort (510) comprend :

    - une enceinte de bloc de ressort (511) dans laquelle ledit ressort (512) se trouve ; et

    - une première et une seconde liaisons de translation (520, 522) fixées aux extrémités opposées de la partie centrale (504).


     
    4. Outil selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre un embout (1020) configuré pour être fixé sur la partie centrale (504) et pour prendre en sandwich les extrémités correspondantes de la première et de la seconde liaisons de translation (520, 522) avec la partie centrale (504).
     
    5. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 3 à 4, dans lequel l'une de la première et de la seconde liaisons de translation (520, 522) est reliée au mécanisme d'actionnement (410) tandis que l'autre de la première et de la seconde liaisons de translation est libre.
     
    6. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 3 à 5, dans lequel l'enceinte de bloc de ressort (511) et le ressort (512) restent ensemble lorsque l'orientation du bloc de ressort est changée.
     
    7. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 6, dans lequel le mécanisme d'actionnement (410) comprend :

    - un moteur (560) ; et

    - un embrayage (550) situé entre le moteur (560) et le bloc de ressort (510).


     
    8. Outil selon la revendication 7, comprenant en outre un frein (562) configuré pour freiner le moteur (560).
     
    9. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 7 à 8, comprenant en outre une boîte de vitesses (540) située entre l'embrayage (550) et le bloc de ressort (510).
     
    10. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 7 à 9, comprenant en outre un arbre à vis (530) configuré pour transformer un mouvement de rotation du moteur (560) en une translation d'une première liaison de translation (520) du bloc de ressort (510).
     
    11. Outil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 10, comprenant en outre un capteur (404) destiné à mesurer un paramètre associé au puits (700).
     
    12. Système de fond de puits (1300) destiné à mesurer un paramètre associé à un puits (1320), le système de fond de puits (1300) comprenant :

    - un contrôleur (1332) situé au niveau de la surface (1350) du puits ;

    - au moins un outil de fond de puits (1302, 1310) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 11 ;
    et

    - un câble de raccordement (1334) destiné à relier le contrôleur (1332) à l'outil de fond de puits au moins (1302).


     
    13. Procédé de changement d'une force de sollicitation destinée à un outil de fond de puits destiné à être utilisé à l'intérieur d'un puits, ledit outil de fond de puits étant selon la revendication 4, le procédé comprenant :

    - le retrait du bras d'ancrage qui est relié de manière rotative à l'enceinte de l'outil ;

    - le détachement de l'embout de la partie centrale du bloc de ressort ; et

    - l'inversion d'une orientation du bloc de ressort,

    - dans lequel un mouvement de la partie centrale provoque le mouvement du bras d'ancrage entre des positions ouverte et fermée,

    dans lequel le bloc de ressort, lorsqu'il se trouve à l'intérieur de l'enceinte dans une première orientation, sollicite le bras d'ancrage afin qu'il se ferme et, lorsqu'il se trouve dans une seconde orientation, opposée à la première orientation, sollicite le bras d'ancrage afin qu'il s'ouvre.
     




    Drawing