(19)
(11)EP 3 027 872 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
29.04.2020 Bulletin 2020/18

(21)Application number: 14832816.4

(22)Date of filing:  29.07.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
F02C 9/48(2006.01)
G01N 21/17(2006.01)
F02K 3/06(2006.01)
G01N 21/35(2014.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2014/048607
(87)International publication number:
WO 2015/017405 (05.02.2015 Gazette  2015/05)

(54)

METHOD TO IMMOBILIZE AN ENTRAPPED CONTAMINANT WITHIN A HONEYCOMB STRUCTURE

VERFAHREN ZUR IMMOBILISIERUNG VON IN EINER WABENSTRUKTUR EINGESCHLOSSENEN KONTAMINANTEN

PROCÉDÉ POUR IMMOBILISER UN CONTAMINANT PIÉGÉ À L'INTÉRIEUR D'UNE STRUCTURE EN NID D'ABEILLES


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 01.08.2013 US 201361861196 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
08.06.2016 Bulletin 2016/23

(73)Proprietor: United Technologies Corporation
Farmington, CT 06032 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • HOLLAND, Brian K.
    Mason, Michigan 48854 (US)
  • BOGUE, William
    Hebron, Connecticut 06248 (US)
  • DENTON, Jeffrey
    Jackson, Michigan 49203 (US)

(74)Representative: Dehns 
St. Bride's House 10 Salisbury Square
London EC4Y 8JD
London EC4Y 8JD (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
US-A- 4 065 322
US-A1- 2009 026 182
US-A1- 2009 188 748
US-A1- 2012 206 717
US-B1- 6 328 810
US-A1- 2006 091 182
US-A1- 2009 165 926
US-A1- 2012 206 717
US-B1- 6 328 810
  
  • Martin A. Elliott: "Chemistry of coal utilization: second supplementary volume / prepared under the guidance of the committee on chemistry of Coal Utilization", 1 January 1981 (1981-01-01), Wiley, New York, XP055357798, ISBN: 978-0-471-07726-8 pages 665-670,
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

BACKGROUND



[0001] This disclosure relates generally to immobilization of an entrapped contaminant and, more particularly, to a weld repair.

[0002] Titanium alloys have been of considerable interest in many applications due to their highly desirable performance characteristics. Among other things, they provide low density, high strength, fatigue resistance, corrosion resistance, and good strength-to-weight ratio. Titanium alloys have been of benefit in many environments, including aerospace.

[0003] Due in part to these highly desirable performance characteristics, aerospace components with a titanium honeycomb and skins are commonly utilized in areas that may be subjected to various fluids and high temperatures. Normal operations may result in damage to the components requiring repair processing at temperatures which may cause the service fluids and the titanium to chemically interact. There are often considerable economic incentives to repair these components by methods such as welding, brazing or wide-gap brazing. Fluid penetration from service use, cleaning, or manufacture/repair processing, however, may complicate these repairs, especially components with honeycomb structure which have limited or no access for conventional cleaning methods.

[0004] US 6328810 B1, US 2012/206717 A1 and US 2009/165926 A1 disclose prior art methods and arrangements.

SUMMARY



[0005] The invention relates to a method according to claim 1.

[0006] In a further embodiment of the present disclosure, the identifying of the contaminate includes comparing a measured spectrum to a predetermined spectrum.

[0007] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes performing the specific thermal cycle above an evaporation temperature of the contaminate but below an alpha case formation temperature.

[0008] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes performing the specific thermal cycle within an inert environment relative to a substrate.

[0009] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes: removing a test section from the component; and thermally processing the test section with the component.

[0010] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes confirming thermal cleaning via the test section.

[0011] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes destructive testing the test section.

[0012] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the component further includes an internal honeycomb and the fluid contaminate is disposed within the internal honeycomb.

[0013] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes: identifying the contaminate with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

[0014] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the method also includes removing a test section from the component prior to thermally processing the test section with the component.

[0015] In a further aspect, the invention relates to an aerospace component according to claim 11.

[0016] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the honeycomb structure is manufactured of titanium.

[0017] In a further embodiment of any of the foregoing embodiments of the present disclosure, the aerospace component is an outer sleeve of an exhaust nozzle.

[0018] The foregoing features and elements as well as the operation thereof will become more apparent in light of the following description and the accompanying drawings. It should be understood, however, the following description and drawings are intended to be exemplary in nature and non-limiting.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0019] Various features will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the disclosed non-limiting embodiments. The drawings that accompany the detailed description can be briefly described as follows:

FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-section of a nacelle assembly for a high bypass gas turbine engine;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an aerospace component represented as an exhaust duct of the nacelle assembly;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of an outer sleeve for the exhaust duct;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a method to immobilize an entrapped fluid;

FIG. 5 is a graphical representation of a scan from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an exhaust duct with a test sample removed.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0020] FIG. 1 schematically illustrates a gas turbine engine 20. The gas turbine engine 20 is disclosed herein as a two-spool turbo fan that generally incorporates a fan section 22, a compressor section 24, a combustor section 26 and a turbine section 28. Generally, the fan section 22 drives air along a bypass flowpath and into the compressor section 24. The compressor section 24 drives air along a core flowpath for compression and communication into the combustor section 26, which then expands and directs the air through the turbine section 28.

[0021] The gas turbine engine 20 is received within a nacelle assembly 60, to establish a bypass flow path B and a core flow path C. A thrust reverser 62 (illustrated schematically) may be located within the nacelle assembly 60 for selective deployment into the bypass flow path B to provide a thrust reversing function. Although depicted as a turbofan in the disclosed non-limiting embodiment, it should be understood that the concepts described herein are not limited to use with turbofans as the teachings may be applied to other types of turbine engines as well as other structures, for example, but not limited to low bypass engine case structures.

[0022] The example nacelle assembly 60 includes a core nacelle 64 at least partially surrounded by a fan nacelle 66. The core nacelle 64 typically includes an exhaust nozzle 68. The exhaust nozzle 68 in the disclosed non-limiting embodiment includes an inner sleeve 70 and an outer sleeve 72 typically manufactured of titanium alloy (also shown in FIG. 2). Referring to FIG. 3, the inner sleeve 70 generally includes a perforated inner skin 74 and an outer skin 76 while the outer sleeve 72 generally includes an inner skin 78 and an outer skin 80 with a honeycomb structure 82 therebetween. It should be appreciated that various other components, materials and constructions thereof will also benefit herefrom.

[0023] Under some operational conditions, a contaminate such as oil from, for example, a bearing compartment 30 (illustrated schematically in FIG. 1) may escape through worn seals as the engine cools and pool on the inner sleeve of the exhaust nozzle 68. It should be appreciated that other bearing compartments in other engine locations, as well as other engine architectures may also be subject to fluid penetration. Furthermore, although oil is utilized as the example contaminate herein, other contaminates inclusive of, but not limited to, oil byproducts, kerosene based fuels, glycols, polyalkylinglycols (PAG), transmission fluids, cleaning fluids etc., as well as mixtures thereof may also be at issue. Oil also frequently coagulates and can pick up particulate debris and form a generally non-"fluid" layer such as typically described as "grime" which may be considered contaminates as defined herein. In addition, other contaminates typical of manufacturing processes, may also be considered contaminates as defined herein.

[0024] With reference still to FIG. 3, the perforated inner skin 74 facilitates the evaporation of the example oil contaminate from within the inner sleeve 70 during engine operation, however, thermal cycling of the oil and the exhaust nozzle 68 may cause thermal stress that may lead to cracks in the outer skin 76. Once the oil penetrates the inner sleeve 70, especially via a puncture or crack damage, the oil or contaminate pools on or inside the outer sleeve 72. The outer sleeve 72 is not perforated, so the oil remains trapped between the inner sleeve outer skin 76 and the inner skin 78 of the outer sleeve 72. The outer sleeve 72 may then crack due to the same thermal cycling such that oil may further penetrate into the honeycomb structure 82. The oil within the honeycomb structure 82 may thereby impair weld repairs of the outer sleeve 72.

[0025] With reference to FIG. 4, a method 100 to immobilize an entrapped contaminant, according to one disclosed non-limiting embodiment, initially includes identification of the fluid contaminate (step 102). It should be appreciated that although the outer sleeve 72 is utilized in this disclosed non-limiting embodiment, other components with an entrapped contaminant will also benefit herefrom, especially those where the fluid entrapment is not accessible by conventional cleaning methods.

[0026] Identification of the fluid contaminate may proceed via a scan from, for example, a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to obtain a measure spectrum 200 (see FIG. 5). A hand-held FTIR unit such as 4200 FlexScan Series FTIR manufactured by Agilient Technologies of Santa Clara, CA, USA can expedite the process through performance of an onsite assessment of the contaminants in situ. It should be appreciated that other identification systems inclusive of but not limited to, Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Chromatography, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and/or other such chemical identification process that provides the desired chemical identification.

[0027] In one example, the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) inspection of the contamination utilizes a Spherical Diamond ATR probe, and a ZnSe crystal with a scan of wave numbers ranging from 4000 - 800 cm-1 with a minimum of 32 scans per spectra with 2 to 3 representative spectra measured per contaminant sample. The 2 to 3 representative measured spectra are cross-compared to ensure accurate sampling and proper technique. That is, the 2-3 representative spectra assure a proper spectrum is obtained. The 2-3 representative spectra are taken to ensure the accuracy of the spectra from each sample. They are then cross-compared to ensure their fidelity. This is performed on the actual part samples and on the control species, oil, skydrol, etc. before used as qualification data. Each "scan" or "spectra" using FTIR actually scans the sample 32 times before recording/reporting a spectra. This can be adjusted from 16 up to 150 depending on the user's discretion, type of sample and ambient environmental conditions. For example, field scans of an unknown material in an uncontrolled environment typically require the higher number of scans to ensure relevant and accurate spectra.

[0028] The measured spectrum 200 is then compared to one or more control spectra 202 (FIG. 5) to identify the contaminant(s) such as gear oil or hydraulic fluid (step 104) in the chemical fingerprint wave number range of 2000 - 800 cm-1. Chemical fingerprint is determined by peak locations, relative signal intensity at those locations and peak to peak ratios between unique identifiers. The 4000 - 2000 cm-1 need not be used as it does not present unique chemical identifiers to distinguish between organic compounds. Contaminates or mixtures thereof that are specifically identified may then be thermally processed to clean for weld repair as further described. That is, the weld repair is performed with specific regard to the identified contamination.

[0029] In one non-limiting example, certain characteristic peaks are identified in the scanned spectrum, if those peaks align with or are centered on specific wave numbers within the spectrum that correspond to a specific contamination, then that contamination is 'identified' in that test section. With the suspected presence of contaminate mixtures, a correlated range of mixtures is used as the reference, or a second analysis technique, especially chromatography or TGA may be used

[0030] A test section 90 is then removed (step 106; see FIG. 6). This test section 90 may then be further segmented 90A, 90B, 90C to provide multiple samples for multiple tests. The test section 90 may be from a damaged area which is to be weld repaired.

[0031] The outer sleeve 72 is then thermally processed with the section 90 (step 108) via a specific thermal cycle. The specific thermal cycle is used to perform a controlled evaporation of the volatiles and a controlled coking of remaining contaminants. Consideration is given to accessibility of the entrapped contaminant(s) whereby additional venting holes are created and/or damage is locally removed to facilitate gas flowpath to relieve pressure variants caused by thermal cycling. The specific thermal cycle is performed at a heating rate to mitigate pressure variants, and a temperature above the evaporation temperature of the contaminate but below the alpha case formation temperature of the parent substrate, such as titanium, and/or thermal limitation criteria of other substrates, e.g. high temperature steel(s). That is, the temperature of the specific thermal cycle should be limited to prevent chemical reaction between contaminate and substrate. Alpha case is typically an alpha-stabilized enriched phase occurring on titanium and its alloys when exposed to heated air or oxygen. Alpha case is brittle, and tends microcracking of the substrate which reduces the parent substrate's performance and its fatigue properties. Alpha case can be avoided by processing in a vacuumed environment. Additionally, pressure and/or vacuum may be used to mitigate internal pressure variants of bonded components and/or lower evaporation temperatures of the contaminant(s).

[0032] Controlled evaporation typically maintains the pressure increase from evaporation to not exceed the rate at which the pressure can be released from the component. The heating rate, external pressure and any additionally installed venting paths may be used to facilitate the controlled evaporation - in the case of the welded patch, the open hole for the patch also operates as a vent.

[0033] The specific thermal cycle is determined, in part, by the type of contaminate identified via FTIR analysis in step 104. The specific thermal cycle is performed at a temperature above an evaporation temperature of the contaminate but below the alpha case formation temperature or the temperature at which the contaminate chemically reacts with or diffuses in to the substrate. Alpha case is an oxygen-enriched phase that may be of particular concern on titanium and its alloys when exposed to heated air or oxygen or in the presence of carbon sources. Alpha case is brittle, and tends to be prone to microcracks which propagate in to the substrate and will reduce the metal's performance and its fatigue properties. Alpha case can be avoided by processing in a vacuumed or inert environment. Vacuum has additional advantage when the dominant cleaning requirement can be accomplished by controlled evaporation.

[0034] The thermal processing may be performed within a furnace having an inert atmosphere of, for example, Argon at temperatures of 700 - 750F (371-400 C) for a titanium alloy component. The internal honeycomb cells are thereby saturated with inert gas sufficient to prevent formation of deleterious alpha case. It should be appreciated that other temperatures and environments may be utilized for substrates other than titanium. Typically, the furnace is cleaned after each contaminate soaked component is thermally processed or stress relieved.

[0035] For the example gear oil soaked outer sleeve 72, the volatile evolution and coking processes from the specific thermal cycle do not result in excessive pressures within the honeycomb 82 due to pressure communication features in the honeycomb. The remaining coked oil is condensed (semi-evaporated state)) and thermally decomposed to reduce or prevent weld line intrusion thereby negating porosity, low-notch toughness and brittleness effects at the weld line typically caused by aforementioned contaminants. The interior surfaces of at least one test section 90 may then be tested by metallographic methods (step 110). The testing is performed to, for example, ensure there is no alpha case, oxygen rich layer, or soft alpha beyond predetermined limits for a sound weld. It should be appreciated that various tests including destructive tests may be performed.

[0036] The outer sleeve 72 is then weld repaired (step 112). It should be appreciated that other repairs may also then be performed without degradation of the skins, honeycomb or weldments. Components subject to such contaminants are thereby readily weld repaired due to the immobilization of the contaminants.

[0037] It should be appreciated that although the method is described with respect to the example outer sleeve 72, the method may be utilized with different thermal cycles for other fluids or other substrates beyond titanium to immobilize entrapped contaminants within various components and thereby permit weld or braze repairs to be performed. Other components include but are not limited to Lower Aft Pylon Fairings of similar substrates where such contaminants exist.

[0038] It should be understood that relative positional terms such as "forward," "aft," "upper," "lower," "above," "below," and the like are with reference to the normal operational attitude of the vehicle and should not be considered otherwise limiting.

[0039] It should be understood that like reference numerals identify corresponding or similar elements throughout the several drawings. It should also be understood that although a particular component arrangement is disclosed in the illustrated embodiment, other arrangements will benefit herefrom.

[0040] Although particular step sequences are shown, described and claimed, it should be understood that steps may be performed in any order, separated or combined unless otherwise indicated and will still benefit from the present disclosure.

[0041] The foregoing description is exemplary rather than defined by the limitations within. Various non-limiting embodiments are disclosed herein, however, one of ordinary skill in the art would recognize that various modifications and variations in light of the above teachings will fall within the scope of the appended claims. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the disclosure may be practiced other than as specifically described. For that reason the appended claims should be studied to determine true scope and content.


Claims

1. A method of weld repairing an aerospace honeycomb component (72), comprising:

identifying a contaminant in the component (72);

immobilizing the contaminant within the component (72) via a specific thermal cycle related to the contaminant;

wherein the thermal cycle is adapted for controlled evaporation of contaminant volatiles and controlled coking of remaining contaminant; and

weld repairing the component (72) subsequent to immobilizing the contaminant.


 
2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the identifying of the contaminant includes comparing a measured spectrum (200) to a predetermined spectrum (202).
 
3. The method as recited in claim 1 or 2, further comprising:
identifying the contaminant with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.
 
4. The method as recited in claim 1, 2 or 3, further comprising removing a test section (90) from the component (72) prior to thermally processing the test section (90) with the component (72).
 
5. The method as recited in claim 1, 2 or 3, further comprising:

removing a test section (90) from the component (72); and

thermally processing the test section (90) with the component (72).


 
6. The method as recited in claim 4 or 5, further comprising confirming thermal cleaning via the test section (90).
 
7. The method as recited in claim 4, 5 or 6, further comprising destructive testing the test section (90).
 
8. The method as recited in any preceding claim, further comprising performing the specific thermal cycle above an evaporation temperature of the contaminant but below an alpha case formation temperature of the component (72).
 
9. The method as recited in any preceding claim, further comprising performing the specific thermal cycle within an inert environment relative to a substrate.
 
10. The method as recited in any preceding claim, where the component (72) further comprises an internal honeycomb and the contaminant includes a fluid contaminant that is disposed within the internal honeycomb.
 
11. An aerospace component (72), comprising:

a honeycomb structure (82) with a thermally decomposed contaminant and a weld repair;

wherein the aerospace component (72) is thermally processed via a specific thermal cycle related to the contaminant, wherein the specific thermal cycle is adapted to perform a controlled evaporation of contaminant volatiles and a controlled coking of remaining contaminant, and wherein the specific thermal cycle is adapted to immobilize the contaminant.


 
12. The aerospace component as recited in claim 11, wherein the honeycomb structure (82) is manufactured of titanium.
 
13. The aerospace component as recited in claim 11 or 12, wherein the aerospace component (82) is an outer sleeve (72) of an exhaust nozzle (68).
 


Ansprüche

1. Verfahren zum Schweißreparieren einer Luftfahrtwabenkomponente (72), das Folgendes umfasst:

Identifizieren eines Kontaminanten in der Komponente (72);

Immobilisieren des Kontaminanten in der Komponente (72) über einen spezifischen thermischen Zyklus in Zusammenhang mit dem Kontaminanten;

wobei der thermische Zyklus für die kontrollierte Verdampfung von flüchtigen Bestandteilen des Kontaminanten und das kontrollierte Verkoken des verbleibenden Kontaminanten angepasst ist; und

Schweißreparieren der Komponente (72) im Anschluss an das Immobilisieren des Kontaminanten.


 
2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Identifizieren des Kontaminanten das Vergleichen eines gemessenen Spektrums (200) mit einem vorbestimmten Spektrum (202) beinhaltet.
 
3. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, ferner Folgendes umfassend:
Identifizieren des Kontaminanten mittels der Fourier-Transformations-Infrarotspektroskopie.
 
4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, 2 oder 3, ferner umfassend das Entfernen eines Testabschnitts (90) von der Komponente (72) vor der thermischen Behandlung des Testabschnitts (90) mit der Komponente (72).
 
5. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, 2 oder 3, ferner Folgendes umfassend:

Entfernen eines Testabschnitts (90) von der Komponente (72); und

thermisches Behandeln des Testabschnitts (90) mit der Komponente (72).


 
6. Verfahren nach Anspruch 4 oder 5, ferner umfassend das Bestätigen der thermischen Reinigung durch den Testabschnitt (90).
 
7. Verfahren nach Anspruch 4, 5 oder 6, ferner umfassend das zerstörende Testen des Testabschnitts (90).
 
8. Verfahren nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend das Ausführen des spezifischen thermischen Zyklus über einer Verdampfungstemperatur des Kontaminanten, aber unter einer Alpha-Case-Bildungstemperatur der Komponente (72).
 
9. Verfahren nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend das Ausführen des spezifischen thermischen Zyklus in einer inerten Umgebung in Bezug auf ein Substrat.
 
10. Verfahren nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die Komponente (72) ferner eine Innenwabenstruktur umfasst und wobei der Kontaminant einen Fluidkontaminanten beinhaltet, der innerhalb der Innenwabenstruktur angeordnet ist.
 
11. Luftfahrtkomponente (72), die Folgendes umfasst:

eine Wabenstruktur (82) mit einem thermisch zersetzten Kontaminanten und einer Schweißreparatur;

wobei die Luftfahrkomponente (72) über einen spezifischen thermischen Zyklus im Zusammenhang mit dem Kontaminanten thermisch behandelt ist, wobei der spezifische thermische Zyklus dazu angepasst ist, eine kontrollierte Verdampfung von flüchtigen Bestandteilen des Kontaminanten und das kontrollierte Verkoken des verbleibenden Kontaminanten durchzuführen, und wobei der spezifische thermische Zyklus dazu angepasst ist, den Kontaminanten zu immobilisieren.


 
12. Luftfahrzeugkomponente nach Anspruch 11, wobei die Wabenstruktur (82) aus Titan hergestellt ist.
 
13. Luftfahrzeugkomponente nach Anspruch 11 oder 12, wobei die Luftfahrzeugkomponente (82) eine äußere Hülse (72) einer Abgasdüse (68) ist.
 


Revendications

1. Procédé de réparation par soudure d'un composant aérospatial en nid d'abeilles (72), comprenant :

l'identification d'un contaminant dans le composant (72) ;

l'immobilisation du contaminant à l'intérieur du composant (72) par l'intermédiaire d'un cycle thermique spécifique associé au contaminant ;

dans lequel le cycle thermique est conçu pour une évaporation contrôlée de substances volatiles contaminantes et la cokéfaction contrôlée du reste du contaminant ; et

la réparation par soudure du composant (72) à la suite de l'immobilisation du contaminant.


 
2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'identification du contaminant comporte la comparaison d'un spectre mesuré (200) à un spectre prédéterminé (202).
 
3. Procédé selon la revendication 1 ou 2, comprenant en outre :
l'identification du contaminant à l'aide de la spectroscopie infrarouge de transformée de Fourier.
 
4. Procédé selon la revendication 1, 2 ou 3, comprenant en outre le retrait d'une section de test (90) du composant (72) avant le traitement thermique de la section de test (90) avec le composant (72).
 
5. Procédé selon la revendication 1, 2 ou 3, comprenant en outre :

le retrait d'une section de test (90) du composant (72) ; et

le traitement thermique de la section de test (90) avec le composant (72).


 
6. Procédé selon la revendication 4 ou 5, comprenant en outre la confirmation du nettoyage thermique par l'intermédiaire de la section de test (90).
 
7. Procédé selon la revendication 4, 5 ou 6, comprenant en outre le test destructif de la section de test (90).
 
8. Procédé selon une quelconque revendication précédente, comprenant en outre l'exécution du cycle thermique spécifique au-dessus d'une température d'évaporation du contaminant mais en dessous d'une température de formation d'alpha-case du composant (72).
 
9. Procédé selon une quelconque revendication précédente, comprenant en outre l'exécution du cycle thermique spécifique dans un environnement inerte par rapport à un substrat.
 
10. Procédé selon une quelconque revendication précédente, dans lequel le composant (72) comprend en outre un nid d'abeilles interne et le contaminant comporte un contaminant liquide qui est disposé à l'intérieur du nid d'abeilles interne.
 
11. Composant aérospatial (72), comprenant :

une structure en nid d'abeilles (82) avec un contaminant thermiquement décomposé et une réparation par soudure ;

dans lequel le composant aérospatial (72) est thermiquement traité par l'intermédiaire d'un cycle thermique spécifique associé au contaminant, dans lequel le cycle thermique spécifique est conçu pour exécuter une évaporation contrôlée de substances volatiles contaminantes et une cokéfaction contrôlée du reste du contaminant, et dans lequel le cycle thermique spécifique est conçu pour immobiliser le contaminant.


 
12. Composant aérospatial selon la revendication 11, dans lequel la structure en nid d'abeilles (82) est fabriquée à partir de titane.
 
13. Composant aérospatial selon la revendication 11 ou 12, dans lequel le composant aérospatial (82) est un manchon externe (72) d'une buse d'échappement (68).
 




Drawing























Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description