(19)
(11)EP 3 033 072 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
22.07.2020 Bulletin 2020/30

(21)Application number: 14839969.4

(22)Date of filing:  12.08.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A61K 8/92(2006.01)
A61K 8/9794(2017.01)
A61K 9/10(2006.01)
A61K 38/16(2006.01)
A61Q 19/08(2006.01)
A61K 35/644(2015.01)
A61K 8/9706(2017.01)
A61K 9/06(2006.01)
A61K 36/18(2006.01)
A61Q 19/00(2006.01)
A61K 9/00(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/IB2014/002786
(87)International publication number:
WO 2015/028892 (05.03.2015 Gazette  2015/09)

(54)

REACTION PLATFORM AND METHOD FOR MAKING POLLEN BASED MATERIALS IN COMBINATION WITH BEESWAX AND USES THEREOF

REAKTIONSPLATTFORM UND VERFAHREN ZUR HERSTELLUNG VON MATERIALIEN AUF POLLENBASIS IN KOMBINATION MIT BIENENWACHS UND VERWENDUNGEN DAVON

PLATEFORME DE RÉACTION ET PROCÉDÉ DE PRODUCTION DE SUBSTANCES À BASE DE POLLEN EN COMBINAISON AVEC DE LA CIRE D'ABEILLES ET LEURS UTILISATIONS


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 12.08.2013 US 201361865011 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
22.06.2016 Bulletin 2016/25

(73)Proprietor: Decima Health Limited
Christchurch 7400 (NZ)

(72)Inventor:
  • WEIR, Iona, E.
    Waiatarua, Auckland 0612 (NZ)

(74)Representative: FRKelly 
27 Clyde Road
Dublin D04 F838
Dublin D04 F838 (IE)


(56)References cited: : 
CN-A- 103 053 893
US-A1- 2007 141 168
US-A1- 2012 156 673
US-B1- 6 270 811
GB-A- 2 485 483
US-A1- 2010 272 790
US-A1- 2013 011 349
US-B1- 7 288 265
  
  • DATABASE WPI Week 201333 Thomson Scientific, London, GB; AN 2013-E95452 XP002764626, & CN 102 784 171 A (YANG M) 21 November 2012 (2012-11-21)
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION



[0001] A process for making pollen-based products is described in connection with a reaction platform. Cosmetic and nutraceutical formulations containing pollen-based materials, including polypeptides, amino acids, fatty acid triglycerides and flavanoids in combination with beeswax suitable for administration to an individual are described.

BACKGROUND



[0002] Beehives in the natural state comprise interesting chemistry including release of valuable bioactive components of pollen that is transported into the hive, by the action of certain enzymes. However, use of the raw materials or mixtures of the beehive presents problems including separation of components, contamination by microbial flora, and/or exposure to pesticides used to eradicate pests such as mites. Thus, a method is needed to economize yet streamline production using the desired beehive components in synergistic combinations.

[0003] The present inventor (Weir, formerly known as O'Brien) has shown that plants possess internal genetic mechanisms to control the process and progression of apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death (PCD). In one instance, chromatin condensation, which is a hallmark of PCD in mammalian cells, may be reversible in plant cells during the early stages of apoptosis (O'Brien, et al., The Plant Journal (1998) 13(6): 803-814).

[0004] Pollen has a hard shell known as the sporopollenin which is very resistant to chemical degradation. Also on the surface of the pollen are proteins which cause known allergies. In one method a reaction is used to "explode" or "crack" the pollen grains under pressure followed by a protease to hydrolyse and deactivate the allergy producing proteins.

[0005] In another possible two-step reaction, pollen may be manipulated to begin germination and thus release the bioactive contents of the pollen more gently and naturally.

[0006] Therefore, if a way could be found to first open or germinate pollen grains to release beneficial components in a biotic manner, followed by addition of other beehive components, this would mimick a natural process, yet provide a novel way to obtain nutraceutical or cosmetic products.

[0007] Atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema, is a complex skin disease that is characterized by pruritus, disrupted epidermal barrier function, and immunoglobulin sensitization to various food and environmental allergens (Sohn, A., et al., "Eczema," Mt. Sinai J. Med. (2011) 78:730-739). Inflammation of the skin appears like erythema, which may include scaling and crusts (Krafchik, B.R., "Eczema," Paediatr. Child Health (2000) 5:101-105). It usually occurs due to the interaction of the genes with the environment. Patients with eczema develop a higher risk for skin infections. Skin care products including moisturizing creams are being used to treat dry and scaly skin (Loden, M., et al., "A double-blind study comparing the effect of glycerine and urea on dry, eczematous skin in atopic patients," Acta Derm. Venereol. (2002) 82:45-47). Effectiveness of such creams indicated a positive effect on the quality of life of the patients who tried the products (Eberlein, B., et al., "Adjuvant treatment of atopic eczema: assessment of an emollient containing N-palmitoylethanolamine (ATOPA study)," J. Eur. Acad. Dermatol. Venereol. (2008) 22:73-82).

[0008] If a way could be found to use plant-based materials to affect or control immune or PCD signaling pathways in mammalian cells, this would constitute a valuable contribution to the nutraceutical and medical arts.

[0009] Further, if a way could be found to use plant-based materials including pollen-based extracts for treating inflammatory or skin conditions, this would constitute a valuable contribution to the nutraceutical, cosmetic, and medical arts.

[0010] US6270811 concerns a cosmetic or pharmaceutical composition. This composition is characterised in that it contains a microbial culture compatible in cosmetics or in pharmacy or in therapy, in particular a culture of micro-organisms selected among the acetic or lactic bacteria, freeze-dried yeast, suspensions of micro-organisms, fermented organic substances, for example fermented pollen, or an inactivated culture of bacteria of the genus bifidobacterium or of bacteria related to this genus mixed with an essential oil and an acid preferably an organic acid, such as citric acid. This composition has an activity for regenerating the skin, in particular anti-wrinkle properties, for erasing old scars, for repairing burnt tissues, for promoting skin healing, for eliminating pigmentary spots and also for promoting growth or fresh growth of superficial body growth including nails, hair or hairs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0011] The invention is as set forth in the appended claims.

[0012] A pollen-based extract includes germinated pollen, beehive components, and optionally enzyme-containing material including honeydew or plant powders.

[0013] An aqueous skin cream includes the pollen-based extract and one or more of glycerine, natural oils, emollients, preservatives, vitamins, fragrance, emulsifiers, or waxes. The skin cream may be used for treatment of skin conditions or inflammation.

[0014] A method of treating or preventing a skin lesion, wound or scar caused by a skin condition selected from the group consisting of eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, rosacea, acne and actinic keratosis (AK) is provided according to the present invention, comprising administering to the individual in need of such treatment a therapeutically effective amount of an aqueous skin cream. The skin cream may be applied topically to the skin.

[0015] A process is provided to produce a pollen-based extract material, comprising at least the steps including: soaking dry pollen grains in coconut water at ambient temperature to provide soaked pollen; treating the soaked pollen with glycerol and honeydew at ambient temperature to provide a germinated pollen mixture; melting beeswax and maintaining liquid beeswax at about 65 °C; treating the melted beeswax with an equal weight of coconut oil to provide a beeswax mixture; adding the germinated pollen mixture to the beeswax mixture; stirring the combined mixtures to form a jelly; and incubating the jelly in a sealed vessel for about 72 hours at 37 °C to produce the fermented pollen-based composition. It is understood that the composition may be further fermentable by the addition of one or more components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0016] 

FIG. 1 depicts a fatty acid analysis of opened and fermented pollen.

FIG. 2 depicts a fatty acid analysis of opened and fermented pollen (both upper layer from reaction and sediment).

FIG. 3A depicts treatment of HL-60 cells in MTT assay with an extract based on coconut water having very potent cell protection activity as an unfermented "water" extract.

FIG. 3B depicts treatment of HL-60 cells in MTT assay with an extract based on coconut water having very potent cell protection activity as a fermented 2-Stage "ethanol" extract and promoting cell proliferation.

FIG. 4 depicts treatment of HL-60 cells in MTT assay with an extract based on coconut water including tamarillo powder having very potent cell protection activity as a fermented 2-Stage "ethanol" extract and promoting cell proliferation.

FIG. 5 depicts gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the opened and fermented pollen prepared according to an embodiment of the present invention. Lane markings are as follows: DE2-DE9 (12.5 µl loading), protein Markers, and DE2-DE7 (2.5 µl) loading, as described below.

FIG. 6 depicts RP-UHPLC and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) analysis of the opened and fermented pollen prepared according to an embodiment of the present invention (Example 2A), showing products of the stage 2 fermentation reaction up to 72 hrs.

FIG. 7A shows a photograph of a hand of a human patient having severe eczema before treatment

FIG. 7B shows a photograph of the eczema patient of FIG. 7A after 4 weeks of topical treatment using a fermented pollen-based cream of Example 6B.

FIG. 8A shows a photograph of an arm of a human patient having severe eczema before treatment.

FIG. 8B shows a photograph of the eczema patient of FIG. 8A after 4 weeks of topical treatment using a fermented pollen-based cream of Example 6B.

FIG. 9A shows a photograph of a leg of a human patient having psoriatic lesions before treatment.

FIG. 9B shows a photograph of the psoriasis patient of FIG. 9A after 4 weeks of topical treatment using a fermented pollen-based cream of Example 6D.

FIG. 10 depicts a bar graph showing Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index for a clinical treatment group (n = 20) receiving a skin cream (Example 6B) containing fermented pollen-based extract prepared according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11 depicts a bar graph showing Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) for a clinical treatment group (n = 20) receiving a skin cream (Example 6B) containing fermented pollen-based extract prepared according to an embodiment of the present invention.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0017] The scope of the invention is limited only by the claims Numerous specific details are set forth in the following description in order to provide a thorough understanding of the invention. These details are provided for the purpose of example and the invention may be practiced according to the claims with or without some or all of these specific details.

[0018] A safe and effective pollen-based skin cream has been provided containing beeswax and optionally enzymes, which can be administered in a therapeutically effective amount to an individual for treating or preventing a skin lesion, wound or scar. The pollen-based skin cream may be applied topically to the skin.

[0019] Pollen has a hard shell known as the sporopollenin which is very resistant to chemical degradation. Also on the surface of the pollen are proteins which cause known allergies. In one method a reaction is used to "explode" or "crack" the pollen grains under pressure (a commonly use abiotic approach) followed by use of a protease to hydrolyse and deactivate the allergy producing proteins. Optionally, a peptidase may then be used to create peptides from the soup or mixture created.

[0020] Instead of trying to explode the pollen grain (which did partially work), an attempt was made to manipulate or treat the pollen grains to begin germination and thus naturally release their contents thus optimizing the bioactivity and providing a far more targeted product. This may be considered a "biotic" approach to open the pollen. If the pollen grains are exploded then the compounds released are more in response to stress (which is good for some medical conditions), but if they are gently released through germination then they promote cell renewal and repair, as discussed previously. By using the biotic germination approach, the viable pollen grains began germinating whilst the damaged or dead pollen grains remained and could be filtered out. Thus this approach was also an improvement through removal of the dead pollen grains.

[0021] In one embodiment, it has been discovered that a two step process can be used to produce a pollen-based extract material, including opening and/or germinating pollen grains using a biotic method, and reacting the treated pollen grains with one or more beehive components, such as, for example, beeswax, propolis, etc.

[0022] Development of fermentation method and opening of pollen grains.

[0023] Initially, small amounts of dry pollen (25 g) were mixed with white sugar (5 g) and active yeast (5 g) in water (500 mL), inside of a sealed stainless steel bottle. At ambient temperature this mixture produced fermentation after about 72 hours, with production of alcohol and attendant alcoholic odor.

[0024] Follow on experiments performed with raw honey (Manuka, Rewa Rewa, clover) and honeydew from beech trees in Southern New Zealand (Nothofagus spp.) beech forests (isolated from the New Zealand beech scale insect Ultracoelostoma assimile (Maskell)). Within New Zealand this insect occurs mainly in South Island and is most common on black beech (N. solandri solandri) and mountain beech (N. s. cliffortioides), but generally any beech will suffice (Gaze, et al., N.Z. J. Ecol. (1983) 6:33-37). In these experiments the fermentation reaction occurred within about 24 hr at higher temperatures (37 °C, 42 °C, or 65 °C), while it took 48 hr at 25 °C. It was shown that about 66% of the pollen grains open. Also, the use of honeydew did not produce an alcoholic odor, but instead a very golden yellow oily soup.

[0025] Analysis of fatty acid (FA) content was performed after fermentation and pollen grain opening, as shown in Figures 1 and 2 (NZLabs, Auckland, New Zealand). See also, Preparative examples A and B below for exemplary filtration of sediment after fermentation.

[0026] The results of the FA analyses indicates clearly that in the opened pollen grains the fatty acid content was preserved and protected. The key thing that this experiment demonstrated was that the fatty acids were released from the pollen, while in non-exploded pollen there were no fatty acids in the soup that was analyzed.

[0027] Development of Reaction Platform.

[0028] Once a way had been found to efficiently open pollen grains, reaction of the pollen grain contents and other components from the beehive (such as beeswax, propolis, etc.) was performed. The process was developed via several preparative examples as described below.

[0029] It was found that honeydew (from Southern Beech Forests) which contains insect enzymes worked better than raw honey. Honeydew is a substance that is defecated from scale insects on beech trees as they eat the sap. This honeydew is a honey substance but contains enzymes from the scale insects and their "gut microflora, including fructophilic lactic acid bacteria." This finding led to the conclusion that honeydew contains enzymes from the scale insect and from the various bacteria, which of course was also in certain raw honeys that were tested. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that the honeydew enzymes would be similar to the bee saliva and thus also aid in the second stage of the process.

[0030] Description of ingredients used in the representative two step process in various useful forms are as follows.

[0031] Raw pollen: contains fatty acids, polypeptides, EPA, DHA, long-chain alkanes, hormones, vitamins, phytohormones, cellulose, lignin, and flavanoids.

[0032] Raw beeswax: contains pheromones, phytic acid, chitin, and fatty acids.

[0033] Raw honey: contains naturally occurring bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria.

[0034] Honeydew: contains potassium, sugars, insect enzymes and fructophilic lactic acid bacteria.

[0035] Pineapple powder: contains bromelain, a homologous serine protease, and peptidase enzymes; contains potassium.

[0036] Alternative plant powders containing flavanoids and/or enzymes: tamarillo (antioxidant and enzymes), blackcurrant (antioxidant/cellular repair/brain function), kawa kawa (bladder and digestive health/antioxidant/anti-inflammatory/ detoxifying/acne), propolis (acne), pine bark (female hormone regulation and sunscreen), acai, pomengranate, cherry (sleep aid/melatonin), kiwifruit, paw paw, and feijoa. Freeze dried plant powders can be prepared as follows. A pulp of the desired plant is prepared, such as pineapple, tamarillo, kawa kawa, etc. The resulting pulp is frozen down to -20 °C over 48 hours and then freeze dried. Alternatively, useful freeze-dried plant powders are available from Alaron GMP Manufacturers (Alaron Products, Nelson, New Zealand). Alternatively, spray dried or even fresh plant sources can be used in the reaction, for example pineapple stem and fruit was originally used prior to access of freeze dried powders.

[0037] Other useful plant components may include, but are not limited to: apple flesh or skin; avocado pulp or skin; beech bark or leaves; blueberries, blackberries; acai berries, ginger; grape skin; hemp oil; rimu bark or leaves; turmeric; onion; orange; kiwifruit - flesh, skin, or seeds; kauri bark or leaves; kohe kohe; mango; manuka oil or leaves; noni; olives - waste, skin or oil; grape seed oil, argan oil, jojoba oil, and pohutakawa.

[0038] Coconut milk, i.e., Cononut water: contains hormones and nutrients. Coconut water/milk is obtained by buying fresh coconuts and draining the fresh milk just prior to use. Commercially available coconut milk can be used but cannot be pasteurized.

[0039] Coconut oil: contains polypeptides, fatty acids, EPA, DHA, and in particular myristic acid. One useful brand is Home Essentials brand, 100%.

[0040] Mussel oil: contains polypeptides, fatty acids, EPA, and DHA.

[0041] Certain beehive components, for example honey, honeydew, pollen, beeswax, raw propolis are sourced from Scott Apiaries, Trading as Hanmer Bees, Hanmer Springs, North Canterbury, New Zealand. Propolis can be prepared for use as a water extraction by treating 25 g propolis/ 50 mL water in a dark sealed glass vessel, with gentle rotation for 5 days at 28 °C.

[0042] Glycerol (i.e., glycerine) is available from Sigma Aldrich (St. Louis, Missouri).

[0043] Water may be filtered, sterilized rain water, distilled water, deionized water, RO water, and the like.

[0044] Preparative Example A (including Pineapple powder)

[0045] The following ingredients were blended: raw pollen (50 g), raw beeswax (25 g), pineapple powder (12.5 g), raw honey (12.5 g), glycerol (12.5 g), and water (1000 mL). After blending the reaction mixture in a stainless steel container was heated to 60 °C and stirred for 15 min. At this point the steel container was anaerobically sealed and pressurized to 120 psi. The container was stored at 60 °C for 24 hours. During this period pressure builds up in the container, and the mixture became bubbly and exothermic. Within 16 to 24 hours the reaction naturally stopped. The solution was then filtered to remove sediments. This reaction product extract was heated, poured into a cream formula (e.g., Ex. 3), and whipped using an egg beater manually until smooth (i.e. having a viscous even consistency).

[0046] This reaction resulted in a reaction product solution that still possessed protease activity, peptides and triglycerides.

[0047] In this manner the reaction product was formulated at 5 wt% in a commercially available aqueous cream (see, e.g., Experimental Aqueous Cream Formulation, Example 3). This formulated reaction product was trialled on subjects with various skin disorders. This reaction product worked on age spots, crusty eczema, psoriasis, herpes, corpus molluscum and acne. However, the reaction product caused irritation when used on inflammed eczema or lupus.

[0048] Preparative Example B (including Pineapple powder and Tamarillo powder)

[0049] The following ingredients were blended: raw pollen (50 g), raw beeswax (25 g), pineapple powder (6.25 g), tamarillo powder (6.25 g), mussel oil (25 g), honey (12.5 g), glycerol (12.5 g), and water (1000 mL). After blending the reaction mixture in a stainless steel container was heated to 60 °C and stirred for 15 min. At this point the steel container was anaerobically sealed and pressurized to 120 psi. The container was stored at 37 °C for 24 hours. During this period pressure builds up in the container, and the mixture became bubbly and exothermic. Within 16 to 24 hours the reaction naturally stopped. The solution was then filtered to remove sediments.

[0050] In this experiment the temperature was lowered to protect the plant powders. This process resulted in peptides, esterified fatty acids and esterified flavanoids. This lower temperature also protected the amino acids and vitamins from the pollen from heat denaturation. It is further contemplated that other oils may be used in place of mussel oil, including, but not limited to a combination of mussel oil/coconut oil (1:1 wt/wt).

[0051] To the extent the above reactions are producing and/or undergoing fermentation, the pollen-based material produced is considered to be fermentable.

[0052] In an embodiment, the pollen-opening fermentation reactions can be performed as described in a sealed steel container or other appropriate pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, the pollen-opening fermentation reactions can be performed as described aerobically in appropriate plastic or glass containers or reaction vessels.

[0053] One problem to this point was that all other competitors, and the process as described herein involved cracking open the pollen grain to release the contents within (an abiotic approach). What was most desired was a biotic method to produce those bioactive components in an enhanced state of bioactivity, as in when a pollen grain begins to germinate. At this point the contents are prepared during the osmosis process to be bioavailable to optimal germination.

[0054] The plant cell germination process is equivalent to embryogenesis in humans and thus optimal for cell renewal, division, wound repair, etc.

[0055] Coconut milk (a.k.a. coconut water) is known to contain all the nutrients required for embryogenesis and the plant hormones including indoleacetic acid, gibberillin, and auxins, which stimulate cell division and growth. Coconut milk also contains potassium required for germination via osmosis. One study found that coconut milk (now known as coconut water) may be used to turn plant cells totipotent and to grow from a single cell into a whole new plant. This was carried out with the species lisianthus in which no one has previously been able to regenerate as it was recalcitrant to normal hormone stimulants (O'Brien, et al., Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture (1993) 33: 31-37).

[0056] Instead of cracking open the pollen grain, a biotic method is shown herein to trigger germinaton and thus activate it, that is produce enhanced bioactivity. Without being bound by theory, it is believed that if the pollen grain were germinated, then enzymes in honeydew and/or from the pollen itself can provide the protease/peptidase enzymatic reactions that other components could provide (e.g., Lactobacillus or pineapple powder).

[0057] Pollen grains will begin to germinate based on an osmotic uptake of potassium. If used in the reaction platform, honey/honeydew and pineapple all contain enough potassium to trigger this reaction, particularly at warmer temperatures. Coconut milk is also very high in potassium and thus the combination of the potassium with the phyto-hormones result in triggering germination.

[0058] By using the coconut water it incorporates into the product the minerals and growth hormones contained within the coconut water. These components work in synergy with the pollen to promote cell renewal and cellular repair, in contrast to the stressor effects of cracking or rupturing pollen.

[0059] The methods described above may be further understood in connection with the following Examples.

REFERENCE EXAMPLE 1 (Reaction Platform)



[0060] The following ingredients were blended: raw pollen (50 g), coconut milk (200 ml), and honeydew (12.5 g). These three ingredients were warmed to 30 °C and stirred for 30 minutes to stimulate germination. Next, the following ingredients were added: melted raw beeswax (25 g), glycerol (12.5 g), and water (1000 ml). Optional ingredients may include: coconut oil, pineapple powder, or other plant powders (as listed above). Depending on what components are added and the end desired medical or nutraceutical treatment the reaction is either carried out at 25 °C, 30 °C, 37 °C, 42 °C, or 65 °C. The reaction platform can be carried out either anaerobically or aerobically.

EXAMPLE 2 (Two stage reaction platform)



[0061] All reactions performed below are incubated anaerobically for 72 hours at 37 °C. Optionally, beeswax may be used at 37 °C resulting in the reaction more anaerobic as it forms a solid wax layer over the other components. If this reaction is left for 7 days the beeswax is digested by the enzymes and becomes part of the solution (i.e., self-emulsifying).

EXAMPLE 2A (Eczema/Psoriasis)



[0062] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Beeswax 25 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 200 ml


[0063] (Stage 1) Pollen was soaked in coconut water for 30 minutes at 25 °C. Concurrently the beeswax was melted in a stainless steel bowl, which is sitting in boiling water. Once the beeswax was melted it was stirred vigorously for 5 minutes, and the bowl placed into the incubator at 65 °C resulting in the beeswax remaining liquid.

[0064] After 60 minutes soaking, glycerol was then stirred into the pollen mixture, followed by the honeydew. This mixture is then stirred for 30 minutes at 25 °C, which completed part 1. Next, the coconut oil was stirred into the melted beeswax, which completed part 2.

[0065] The pollen mixture (part 1) was then stirred into the beeswax mixture (part 2) and the whole mixture stirred vigorously by hand for about 15 minutes until a thick jelly formed (Stage 1 ends). It is noted that stirring by hand was laborious and that magnetic stirring on a hot plate would be useful.

[0066] (Stage 2) This jelly mixture was then placed into a stainless steel container with a screw sealable lid, and incubated at 37 °C for a minimum of 72 hours, which produced the isolated 2-stage extract (Stage 2 ends).

[0067] In a preferred embodiment, plant powders (or other useful plant parts) such as tamarillo, kawa kawa, and the like, may be added after the jelly is formed, then the whole mixture subjected to heating under sealed conditions and/or fermentation. In an alternative embodiment, after the jelly is formed, if any other components such as, for example, pineapple powder, fruit powder, etc. are required, these are added as the mixture cools. That is, tamarillo, kawa kawa, etc. can be added after the end of Stage 2.

[0068] In a further embodiment, other components such as, for example, pineapple powder, tamarillo, kawa kawa, fruit powder, etc. may be added after the end of Stage 2 and heated.

[0069] It is understood that the stage 2 fermentation process can be carried out in a range from about 24 hours to 168 hours. In one preferred embodiment, incubation is carried out at 37 °C for about 24 hrs to 72 hrs. In a more preferred embodiment, incubation is carried out at 37 °C for about 72 hrs.

[0070] In another alternative embodiment, increases in coconut water content of stage 1 can reduce manufacturing costs.

[0071] In another disclosure, the melted beeswax (or part 2 component) can be maintained at lower temperatures (e.g., 42 °C, or 37 °C) in order to preserve other more sensitive components (such as amino acids, peptides, or fatty acids). In this disclosure, the beeswax self-emulsifies into the final product mixture.

EXAMPLE 2B (Age spots/ Actinic keratosis)



[0072] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Beeswax 25 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 200 ml
Pineapple powder 12.5 g

EXAMPLE 2C (Antimicrobial and Wound healing)



[0073] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Beeswax 25 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 200 ml
Propolis 5 ml*
* Added at the end of the reaction. Propolis is prepared as 25g/50 ml water.

EXAMPLE 2D (Anti-viral - herpes, shingles, corpus molluscum, chicken pox)



[0074] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Beeswax 25 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 200 ml
Kawa Kawa powder 12.5 g
Propolis 5 ml*
* Added at the end of the reaction. Propolis is prepared as 25g/50 ml water.


[0075] In following examples 2E, 2F and 2G beeswax is omitted, so the solution is more liquid (less viscous) upon addition of the oil, and the reaction takes another 24-48 hours to complete.

RERERENCE EXAMPLE 2E (Cosmetic - Beauty/ anti-aging)



[0076] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 180 ml
Algae water 20 ml*
* Micro algae is grown to an exponential phase, centrifuged and slurry added to reaction vessel just prior to fermentation at 30 °C.
Optionally, 12.5 g blackcurrant powder is added to this example as an antioxidant.

EXAMPLE 2F (Core Formula - Optional Tamarillo)



[0077] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 200 ml
Tamarillo powder (optional) 12.5 g

REFERENCE EXAMPLE 2G (Cosmetic - Beauty/ female hormonal)



[0078] 
IngredientWeight (g)
Pollen 50 g
Coconut Oil 25 g
Glycerol 12.5 g
Honeydew 12.5 g
Coconut Water 180 ml
Algae water 20 ml*
Pine bark powder a 12.5 g
* Micro algae is grown to an exponential phase, centrifuged and slurry added.
a Pine bark powder is prepared by hot water extraction of pine bark, then freeze drying.

Chemical analysis



[0079] Reaction samples made in accordance with the principles of the invention, namely Example 2A or 2B, were analyzed to assess how the chemical components in these mixtures changed during incubation. Phytochemical analysis was performed by liquid chromatograph-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), and the protein/peptide composition was assessed by SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), using standard methods.

[0080] After 0 hrs (starting material) to 72 hrs of incubation in the stage 2 fermentation reaction, the samples were thoroughly mixed and a portion (1.0-1.5 g) extracted with ethanol. Pineapple powder was added to starting material DE5 and DE7 (Ex. 2A with or without beeswax, respectively) after time 0 for incubation in accordance with Example 2B. The resulting extracts were analyzed by LC-MS using reversed-phase ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-UHPLC) and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI).

[0081] Now referring to Figure 5, the samples tested were as follows:

DE2: Extract sample 2A, without beeswax, 72 hrs

DE3: Extract sample 2A, 72 hrs

DE4: Extract sample 2B, without beeswax, 24 hrs

DE5: Extract sample 2A, 0 hrs (starting material - Stage 1)

DE6: Extract sample 2B, 24 hrs

DE7: Extract sample 2A, without beeswax, 0 hrs (starting material - Stage 1)

DE8: Extract sample 2B, without beeswax, 72 hrs

DE9: Extract sample 2B, 72 hrs



[0082] A 12.5% reduced SDS-PAGE gel was used. The markers were Biorad #161-0373, stain type: All Blue (Bio-Rad Lab., Hercules, California).

[0083] Generally, Figure 5 shows that the larger molecular weight proteins were degraded or digested into smaller molecular weight protein components as part of the 2-stage process.

[0084] Samples DE5 and DE7 were the (stage 1) starting materials for the 2-stage process and showed that a significant amount of protein in the sample was of a large molecular weight (>250 kD) - so much so that much of it did not enter the gel. Samples DE2 and DE3 showed a significant band between 50 and 75 kD (which was also present in lesser amounts in the remaining samples). Another band at about 25kD appeared in samples DE4, DE6 and DE8, and to a lesser extent in DE9.

[0085] Samples DE4, DE6 and DE8 showed significant staining at molecular weights less than 15kD. Samples DE2, DE3 and DE9 showed protein/peptides to a lesser extent in this range.

[0086] Thus, the size profile of proteins in the incubated samples over time is overtly smaller compared to the starting material (DE5 and DE7), either with or without pineapple powder enzymes, or with or without beeswax.

[0087] Turning now to Figure 6, the progression of the stage 2 incubation was observed and analyzed for reaction products. The samples tested were as follows:

DE5: Extract sample 2A, 0 hrs (starting material - Stage 1), as above

DE6': Extract sample 2A, 24 hrs

DE9': Extract sample 2A, 48 hrs

DE11': Extract sample 2A, 72 hrs



[0088] The progression of the stage 2 fermentation reaction showed a pattern of compounds that were determined to be dicaffeoyl quinic acid isomers, and, it is believed, dicaffeoyl tartaric acid ester or ether compounds. As shown in Fig. 6, after 72 hours, it was observed that multiple isomers of the phenolic compound dicaffeoyl quinic acid had formed, which is an indicator or marker of the 2-stage reaction. It is believed that multiple dicaffeoyl tartaric acid ester or ether isomers formed as well (e.g., a tetramethyl ether of the caffeoyl portions). These samples have been shown to contain substantial amounts of the caffeoyl quinic acid isomers, and, it is believed, dicaffeoyl tartaric acid ester or ether compounds (i.e., chicoric acid derivatives, including methyl ethers or esters).

[0089] Thus, while not intended to be bound by theory, peptides are created in the 2-stage method according to a process of "lipophilization" or "lipolyzation" in which protein is digested, phenolic compounds are isomerized or methylated, and fatty acids may be involved in esterification reactions to produce useful and beneficial new products. In another embodiment, it is expected that hydroxylation and/or acetylation of flavonoids may occur in conjunction with fatty acids. In another embodiment, it is expected that hydrolysis of tannins, or glycosylation of aglycones may occur during the 2-stage fermentation reaction. In yet another embodiment, it is expected that hydroxylation of fatty acids may occur during the 2-stage fermentation reaction. In fact, the lipid composition of the 2-stage reaction product produced increased lipid content as observed by HPLC analysis.

[0090] An emollient cream was developed as follows.

EXAMPLE 3 (Experimental Aqueous Cream Formulation)



[0091] 
IngredientWt/Wt (%)
Cetostearyl Alcohol 8.1%
White soft paraffin 15.0%
Liquid paraffin 6.0%
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate 0.9%
Phenoxyethano l 1.0%
Purified Water 70.0%


[0092] Aqueous cream without the extracts added was used as the placebo, thus the prerequisite was that the addition of the extract had to be clinically significantly better than the aqueous cream which is the current non-steroidal anti-eczema treatment.

[0093] Accordingly, the use of parabens significantly inhibited efficacy of the extract in several human volunteers. Phenoxyethanol did not fully inhibit but still reduced efficacy extract in several human volunteers, which was hypothesized as due to the bacteriocidal properties. Similar results to parabens were found with methyl parahydroxybenzoate, i.e. efficacy of the extract was significantly reduced.

[0094] Next, a batch of aqueous cream and was prepared using Geogard 221, a bacteriostatic preservative as a replacement for phenoxyethanol and/or parabens, containing dehydroacetic acid 8%, benzyl alcohol 87% (available from Lonza, Allendale, New Jersey). This formulation provided full efficacy of the extract when tested in several human volunteers. Thus, the type of preservative was found to be important, arguably an additive having more "natural product" similarity.

EXAMPLE 4 (Natural Base Cream Formulation)



[0095] 
IngredientWt/Wt (%)
Cetostearyl Alcohol 8.1%
Cetomacrogol* 15.0%
Glycerine 2.5%
Crodamol (coconut oil) 2.0%
Beeswax 2.0%
Geogard** 0.5%
Purified Water 70.0%
* Cetomacrogol 1000, a PEG polymer
** Geogard 221


[0096] Thus, a useful aqueous cream formulation was discovered that is very stable and uses no bacteriocidal preservatives. This material is a beautiful soft cream that may be applied to human skin.

[0097] To the base cream of Example 4 was added the two-stage extract of Example 2A in an amount of 5% by wt. based on the total weight of the formulation. Useful amounts of the two-stage extract can range from about 0.5% by wt. to about 10% by wt. based on the total weight of the formulation. A preferred range of the two-stage extract can range from about 0.5% by wt. to about 5% by wt. based on the total weight of the formulation.

[0098] In addition, essential oil or fragrance was added to the base cream of Example 4, in that tangerine oil extract was added in an amount of 0.4% by wt. based on the total weight of the formulation. Useful amounts of one or more essential oils can range from about 0.4% by wt. to about 1% by wt. based on the total weight of the formulation.

EXAMPLE 5 (Testing of Base Cream including Example 2A Extract)



[0099] The base cream of Example 4 including 5 wt% Example 2A extract and 0.4 wt% tangerine oil extract was tested as follows using human volunteers (Table 1).
TABLE 1
Subject No.SexAgeSkin/Inflammatory ConditionResult
1 M 51 psoriasis on limbs redness and scaly skin cleared within 5 days
2 F 6 corpus molluscum skin cleared within 4 days
3 F 48 lupus history of steroids, showed reduced flare ups and severity
4 F 35 lupus history of steroids, showed reduced flare ups and severity
5 F 22 lupus used instead of steroids, redness reduced, no need for steroids
6 F 58 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
7 M 65 agespots, solar keratosis over 2 weeks crusted and exfoliated off
8 F 15 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
9 F 23 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
10 M 45 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
11 M 28 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
12 F 33 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
13 F 16 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
14 F 42 eczema over 4 days itching, redness and infection cleared
15 M 58 psoriasis redness and scaly skin reduced
16 M 22 psoriasis redness and scaly skin reduced
17 F 17 psoriasis redness and scaly skin reduced
18 M 51 athletes foot/jock itch fungal infection clears


[0100] As shown in Table 1, this formulation cleared the eczema and psoriasis on the volunteers. Subjects 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10 spent a week with no cream and then trialled Example 6 cream (below) prepared for the clinical trial with equivalent results to Example 4.

EXAMPLE 6A (Skin Cream Formulation)



[0101] A skin cream formulation was prepared as follows.
IngredientWt (%)
Olivem 1000 ECO CERT (Cetearyl Olivate & Sorbitan Olivate) 7
Shea Butter Organic 2
Macadamia Nut Oil Organic 4
Myristyl Myristate 2
Safflower Oil Organic 4
Glycerine 2
Geogard** 1
Vitamin E 2
2-Stage Extract (Example 2A) 5
Tangerine Fragrance (tangerine oil extract) 1
Deionized Water 70
** Geogard 221


[0102] Olivem 1000, available from B&T Srl (Milan, Italy), is a nonionic, non-ethoxylated self-emulsifying system derived from olive oil for oil-in-water creams and lotions.

[0103] Initial testing using Example 6A in human volunteers as in Example 5 gave similar results with respect to eczema and psoriasis, etc.

EXAMPLE 6B (Skin Cream Formulation)



[0104] In a further embodiment, a skin cream formulation was prepared.
IngredientWt (%)
Olivem 1000 ECO CERT (Cetearyl Olivate & Sorbitan Olivate) 7
Shea Butter Organic 2
2-Stage Extract (Example 2A) 1 10
Safflower Oil Organic 3
Macadamia Nut Oil Organic 2
Deionized Water 70
Glycerine 2
Geogard 221 1
Vitamin E 2
Tangerine Fragrance (tangerine essential oil) 1
1 lipolyzed fatty acid and peptides, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5 as described herein.


[0105] The final formulation is an off-white viscous cream, pH 4.0-5.0. Microbiological properties: aerobic plate count: (30 °C) 377 cfu/g; yeast and mold: <1 cfu/g. The cream may be applied topically by hand to a human skin surface.

[0106] In an embodiment, the 2-stage extract may be used in a range of from about 1% by weight to about 10% by weight. In another embodiment, water may be used in a range of from about 70% by weight to about 90% by weight. Increases in water content, and/or alternatively, increases in coconut water content of stage 1 (as discussed above) can reduce manufacturing costs.

[0107] The cream formulation of Example 6B was tested in a clinical trial as follows.

EXAMPLE 6C (Clinical Study - Eczema)



[0108] The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Example 6B in the treatment of mild to moderate eczema, including reducing the appearance of lesions, reducing the symptoms of itching and scaling, and reducing redness.

Clinical Study Design



[0109] This study was designed as an open-label, adaptive-design pilot study.

[0110] Otherwise healthy subjects, 18-70 years of age, with mild to moderate eczema were included in the study. A total of n=40 subjects were screened, and from this, n=21 were randomized; however, only n=20 subjects completed the study. Other standard inclusion/exclusion criteria were used. Adverse events were monitored. Initial IRB approval of the protocol was granted by the MaGil IRB (Rockville, MD). All recruitment materials were approved by the IRB prior to use.

[0111] The study duration was up to 5 weeks for each subject comprising 5 visits, with the testing phase being 30 days (approx. 4 weeks).

V1: Screening Visit - Day -7

V2: Day 0 - Baseline

V3: Day 7

V4: Day 15

V5: Day 30 - End of Study



[0112] Subjects were required to undergo a 7-day washout of any and all treatments for eczema.

[0113] Dermatologic Assessments. Dermatologic examinations by a qualified practitioner were performed. This assessment includes the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) an evaluation and grading of lesion quality. Subjects completed the Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI), a self-assessment on each subject's own skin condition.

[0114] Photographs. Subjects were photographed to examine and evaluate skin lesion(s), which were identified by anatomical location and size.

[0115] Dispensing Procedures. The following were dispensed at this visit:

Subjects were given a one-week supply of study product (Example 6B cream) and instruct to apply it twice a day. Subjects were given a daily dosing diary.

Instruction: Patients were instructed to apply the cream topically to the affected area(s) twice per day. That is, patients with eczema were instructed to apply the cream topically to a given lesion twice per day.

Dosages: Based on the clinical trial presented herein, average Example 6B cream use per day, per patient was 2.46 g. Average Example 6B cream use per lesion was 1.52 g.

Data Analysis. Statistical Software for Social Sciences (SPSS version 19) was used to run all descriptive and inferential analyses for all endpoints.



[0116] The primary objective was to assess the reduction in the appearance of lesions by examining skin lesion photographs (Figures 7A-7B and 8A-8B). The second objective was to assess the reduction in the symptoms of itching, scaling, and redness via different dermatologic assessments, as shown in Table 1A.
TABLE 1A
EndpointVisit/DayChangeSignificanceP-value
Severity of Eczema Baseline vs. Visit 5 (Day 30) Decreased overall lesions Yes 0.001
VAS SYMPTOM SCORE (ITCHING) W ee k 1 vs. Week 2 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.001
Week 1 vs. Week 3 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.011
W ee k 1 vs. Week 4 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.031
VAS SYMPTOM SCORE (SCALING) W ee k 1 vs. Week 2 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.0001
Week 1 vs. Week 3 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.003
W ee k 1 vs. Week 4 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.031
VAS SYMPTOM SCORE (REDNESS) W ee k 1 vs. Week 2 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.005
Week 1 vs. Week 3 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.001
Week 1 vs. Week 4 Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.043
SCORAD INDEX Baseline vs. Visit 3 (Day 7) Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.049
Baseline vs. Visit 5 (Day 30) Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.004
Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI) Baseline vs. Visit 5 (Day 30) Decreased from Baseline Yes 0.031
VITALS (Weight) Baseline vs. Visit 5 (Day 30) Increased from Baseline Yes 0.032


[0117] Visual analogue scale (VAS) Symptom Score for Itching, Scaling, and Redness. Subjects were also required to undergo Dermatologic Assessment for Itching, Scaling and Redness of the Eczema Skin Lesions. Analyses revealed significant decreases in the Average VAS Symptom Score for Itching, Scaling, and Redness from Week 1 to Weeks 2, 3, and 4 (p-value≤0.05, for all time points).

[0118] In accordance with Table 1A, Itching (VAS) Symptom Score was reduced -30.27% from baseline from week 1 to week 4.

[0119] In accordance with Table 1A, Scaling (VAS) Symptom Score was reduced -30.53% from baseline from week 1 to week 4.

[0120] In accordance with Table 1A, Redness (VAS) Symptom Score was reduced -33.95% from baseline from week 1 to week 4.

[0121] Severity of Eczema was found to have statistically significant changes from Baseline to Day 30 (p-value≤0.05). Overall, moderate eczema was reported to decrease in severity and 19.44% lesions had disappeared by Day 30. It is noted that the majority of the moderate to severe lesions were also reduced (based on a count of lesions, and also assessment of type: mild, moderate, or severe). See Table 1A.

[0122] It was also observed that the overall average size (length X width) of the eczema skin lesions decreased substantially upon treatment with the topical cream. For example, average length was reduced -23.8% (from 6.3 cm to 4.8 cm), while average width was reduced -22.8% (from 3.9 cm to 3.0 cm).

[0123] SCORAD is a clinical tool used to assess the extent and severity of eczema (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis). Dermatologists may use this tool before and after treatment to determine whether the treatment has been effective.

[0124] The Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index was used as the standardized ratings scale for eczema. This composite scoring index was developed by the European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis in 1993. It has undergone testing for validity and reliability and has shown sensitivity change in trials of topical steroids and UV-A therapy. It combines an assessment of disease extent using the rule of nines with 6 clinical features of disease intensity (assessed at a single representative site), plus a visual analogue score for itch and sleep loss. The index has shown agreement with global assessments of disease severity as well as with various circulatory factors thought to reflect disease activity in atopic dermatitis.

[0125] In accordance with Table 1A, within-subject analyses showed that subjects in the treatment group had statistically significant decreases in the average SCORAD index score from baseline to Day 7 (p-value=0.049) and Day 30 (p-value=0.004). Moreover, consistent decreases from Baseline to all time points were noted and the largest decrease was found at Day 30 (-49.11%). Figure 10 shows the SCORAD results.

[0126] Subjects completed the Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI), a self-assessment on each subject's own skin condition. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) consists of 10 questions concerning patients' perception of the impact of skin diseases on different aspects of their health related quality of life over the last week.

[0127] In accordance with Table 1A, the Average Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores of the subjects were shown to have constant decreases from baseline to all time points, with the largest decrease at Day 30 (-48.03%). Statistically significant changes were observed from baseline to Day 30 (p-value≤0.05). Figure 11 shows the DLQI results.

[0128] The vital scores of the subjects were also assessed from Day 0 to Day 30. It was observed that the subjects had no statistically significant changes in their Body Temperature, Systolic Blood Pressure, Diastolic Blood Pressure, Pulse Rate, and Respiratory Rate from baseline to any time point despite exhibiting either an increasing or decreasing trend. On the other hand, significant but minor increase in Weight was observed from baseline to Day 15 (p≤0.05). In accordance with Table 1A, on Day 15 weight increased +0.81% (about 1.2 lbs), and by Day 30, weight increased +0.97% (about 1.5 lbs) respectively, compared to baseline. This result could be valuable from a nutritional standpoint for patients suffering from various conditions or diseases as described herein.

[0129] There were no adverse events or serious adverse events reported for this study.

[0130] In conclusion, the results of the clinical study indicated that product Example 6B was effective in treating mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, as demonstrated by the reduction in the size of skin lesions along with other hallmarks of the disease such as itching, scaling and redness.

[0131] It is expected that the skin cream will successfully treat symptoms associated with eczema, psoriasis, and related inflammatory conditions when applied topically. The cream is generally applied topically to the skin in a manner substantially covering the affected surface area. The cream may be formulated as a cosmetic, pharmaceutical, or nutraceutical composition, including a pharmaceutically or nutraceutically acceptable carrier, respectively.

[0132] Useful therapeutic dosages of the skin cream (Example 6B) can range, but are not limited to, from about 1 g to about 5 g in a human individual. Another narrower suitable dose range is from about 1 g to about 2 g, for example, 1-2 g/lesion. Another useful therapeutic dosage for application to human skin is from about 0.5 g/lesion to about 1.5 g/lesion.

[0133] The skin cream (Examples 6A-6D) can be provided in daily dosages of from about 1 g to about 5 g, in a human patient, for example. Another narrower suitable dosage range is from about 1 g to about 2 g daily. Another narrower suitable dosage range is from about 1 g to about 3 g daily.

EXAMPLE 6D (Psoriasis)



[0134] A test cream of was prepared by substituting the 2-Stage Extract (Example 2B) for Extract 2A in Example 6C.

[0135] A psoriasis patient having scaly outbreaks on a leg (Figure 9A) was treated with the psioriasis test cream. Topical application of the cream (as shown above in Example 6C) over 4 weeks provided a noticeable improvement by reducing encrustation and scaling. (Figure 9B).

[0136] It is further contemplated that the 2-Stage reaction platform as described herein can be used to produce oral formulations of pollen-based reaction products in combination with the components of beehives. Such products may include a 2-stage reaction mixture which has been freeze dried or lyophilized, then appropriately formulated for oral administration.

REFERENCE EXAMPLE 7 (Cell Protection Assay)



[0137] The MTT assay has been adapted to measure whether an extract could protect the cells from apoptosis (programmed cell death) either by:
  1. 1. Oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide, or
  2. 2. DNA damage using etoposide (chemotherapy drug).


[0138] The MTT assay is traditionally used to measure the cytotoxicity of a compound/extract. This is done by measuring cell proliferation of the cells by the reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) to formazan in the mitochondria of living cells. If the cells are stressed or dying they cannot carry out this reaction and thus OD (optical density) is low. If the cells are functioning well in the presence of the extract then cell proliferation occurs. Therefore OD directly relates to the number of viable (living) cells.

[0139] In Figures 3A, 3B and 4 as shown, the higher the OD the more living cells present. None of the extracts show cytotoxicity as the bar is the same height as the cell only treatment.

[0140] The traditional MTT assay was adapted to measure cell protection by an extract. This provides a measure of whether the extract protects cells from stress. HL-60 cells were tested. As exemplified in Figure 3A, the premise of the assay is as follows:
  1. 1. cells only - only has cells growing for 48 hours;
  2. 2. cells plus hydrogen peroxide. The cells are grown for 24 hours and then hydrogen peroxide a pro-oxidant is added for a further 24 hours. Hydrogen peroxide is toxic to cells and thus inhibits growth even killing cells;
  3. 3. cells plus etoposide. The cells are grown for 24 hours and then etoposide a chemotherapy drug is added for a further 24 hours. Etoposide is very toxic to cells and kills by damaging DNA and preventing cell division and thus cell proliferation. Thus etoposide results in inhibiting cellular growth and ultimately cellular death;
  4. 4. extract only is the cells incubated with the extract for 48 hours. If the extract is toxic to the cells then the OD would be lower than the cell only treatment;
  5. 5. extract plus hydrogen peroxide the extract is added for 24 hours to the cells and then the hydrogen peroxide is added. If the extract can protect the mitochondria against the oxidative stress (i.e. free radicals) from the hydrogen peroxide then the cells will continue to grow; and
  6. 6. extract plus etoposide. The extract is added for 24 hours to the cells and then the etoposide is added. If the extract can protect the DNA against the etoposide chemotherapy then the cells will continue to grow.


[0141] Potent extracts such as tamarillo, apple skin, and kawa kawa may be used to assess bioactivity. For example, tamarillo extracts were prepared and either reacted as described above by adding tamarillo powder just before sealing the container (prior to Stage 2), or not reacting but adding tamarillo powder after the reaction was completed (either after Stage 2, or entirely omitting Stage 2). By reacting with the other components it appears that the bioactivity is either enhanced or even changed which is either because the lipids in the reaction mixture are synergistically enhancing bioactivity by acting as a lipid membrane carrier, and/or by esterifying the flavonoids. In the following examples, "water" samples mean that the tamarillo extract or coconut water extract without tamarillo (as in Ex. 2F) was not reacted or fermented in Stage 2, while "ethanol" samples mean that the tamarillo extract or coconut water extract without tamarillo (as in Ex. 2F) was reacted and fermented in Stage 2.

[0142] Thus the MTT assay was performed as a standard method using Example 2F without tamarillo (at 1:16 dilution) as a "water" extract, meaning that in this case Stage 2 fermentation was not performed. This extract demonstrated potent efficacy in that it is not cytotoxic and protected the cells from the DNA damaging and free radical stress. It was shown in Figure 3A that the extract based on coconut water (without tamarillo) has very potent cell protection activity as a "water" extract, and also in Figure 3B that the extract based on coconut water (without tamarillo) is even more potent as an "ethanol" extract in promoting cell proliferation.

[0143] Next, the same assay protocol was performed using the tamarillo extract (Ex. 2F) described above. The tamarillo "water" extract on its own has shown partially reduced cell growth, and has potent cell protection bioactivity against hydrogen peroxide and etoposide. When incorporated into the fermentation reaction to provide a tamarillo "ethanol" extract, there was significant cell proliferation and cell protection, as shown in Figure 4 (i.e. protection provided from "Tam"). Thus the bioactivity of tamarillo has been synergistically changed by the reaction.

[0144] The inventive extracts tested in this example demonstrated potent efficacy in that they are not cytotoxic and have protected the cells from the DNA damaging and free radical stress. It is noted that both hydrogen peroxide and etoposide induce apoptosis. That is how chemotherapy works - it induces DNA damage and then the cell dies. The results from these experiments demonstrate that the inventive extracts have potent cell protection activity, not only against oxidative stress but also against DNA damaging chemotherapy. Therefore these results demonstrated that these extracts protect against induction of apoptosis.

REFERENCE EXAMPLE 8 (Immune Assays)



[0145] Flow cytometry was performed using standard methods to measure cytokine expression using dual labelled antibody markers for IL-10 and TNF α (BioActives Research New Zealand Ltd., Auckland, N.Z.). For this experiment the cells were treated in the following way:
1. cells only - only has cells growing for 48 hours;
2. (control) cells plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cells are grown for 24 hours and then LPS a pro-inflammatory bacterial toxin is added for a further 24 hours;
3. extract only is the cells incubated with the extract for 48 hours; and
4. extract plus LPS. The extract is added for 24 hours to the cells and then the LPS is added.
TABLE 2
ExtractLPS(-) /TNFLPS(-) /IL-10LPS(+) /TNFLPS(+) /IL-10
Control 19.7 13.3 31.7 9.7
Ex. 2F (Coconut "water" - no tamarillo) 21.3 23.9 19.1 19.5
Ex. 2F Tamarillo "water" 22.1 24.8 19.1 20.2
Ex. 2F Tamarillo "ethanol" 19.9 24.8 19.3 21.5


[0146] TNF is a proinflammatory cytokine. An increase in TNF indicates inflammation. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) is a bacterial toxin which in this assay was used to induce inflammation (TNF went from an average of 19.9 to 31.7).

[0147] IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine and has been implicated in reducing allergic responses such as eczema. By increasing IL-10, TNF is decreased along with other inflammatory cytokines. LPS also by triggering an increase in TNF results in a cascade that reduces IL-10. As shown in Table 2, coconut and tamarillo extracts prepared in accordance with the invention maintained, in the presence of LPS, TNF expression at a normal level whilst increasing IL-10 to counter the pro-inflammatory attack.

EXAMPLE 9 (Acne Cream Formulation)



[0148] In a further embodiment, an acne treatment cream formulation was prepared.
IngredientWt (%)
Olivem 1000 ECO CERT (Cetearyl Olivate & Sorbitan Olivate) 7
Aloe vera gel 2
2-Stage Extract (modified Example 2C) 2 8.5
Hazelnut oil 2
Blackcurrant oil 1.5
Kiwifruit seed oil 1.5
Deionized Water 70
Bioactive honey (Manuka) 2
Geogard 221 1
Vitamin E 1
Vitamin C 0.5
Vitamin A 0.5
Kiwifruit powder 1
Totara extract 0.5
Fragrance 1
2 no beeswax is included.


[0149] Beeswax is omitted since it is not conducive to skin treatment for acne.

[0150] Optionally, salicylic acid up to 2.0% of the total weight of the composition may be added. In one embodiment, 0.5% by weight salicylic acid is added.

[0151] Totara extract is obtained from tree bark of a native species.

[0152] It is expected that the acne cream will successfully treat symptoms associated with acne, and related inflammatory conditions when applied topically. The cream is generally applied topically to the skin in a manner substantially covering the affected surface area. The cream may be formulated as a cosmetic, pharmaceutical, or nutraceutical composition, including a pharmaceutically or nutraceutically acceptable carrier, respectively.

[0153] The cosmetic (or cosmeceutical), or nutraceutical compositions of the present invention may be administered in combination with a nutraceutically acceptable carrier. The active ingredients in such formulations may comprise from 1% by weight to 99% by weight, or alternatively, 0.1% by weight to 99.9% by weight. Alternatively, the active ingredients can range from about 5% by weight to about 75% by weight, or from about 10% by weight to about 75% by weight. "Nutraceutically acceptable carrier" means any carrier, diluent or excipient that is compatible with the other ingredients of the formulation and not deleterious to the user. Useful excipients include microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, calcium stearate, any acceptable sugar (e.g., mannitol, xylitol), and for cosmetic use an oil-base is preferred.

[0154] The topical pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention may be administered in combination with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. The active ingredients in such formulations may comprise from 1% by weight to 99% by weight, or alternatively, 0.1% by weight to 99.9% by weight. "Pharmaceutically acceptable carrier" means any carrier, diluent or excipient that is compatible with the other ingredients of the formulation and not deleterious to the user.

[0155] In accordance with certain embodiments, the topical pharmaceutical compositions disclosed herein can be provided in the form of an ointment, cream, lotion, gel or other transdermal delivery systems as described in L.V. Allen, Jr., et al., Ansel's Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems, 9th Ed., pp. 272-293 (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011).

[0156] Ointments, as used herein, refer to semi-solid preparations including an ointment base having one or more active ingredients incorporated or fused (i.e., melted together with other components of the formulation and cooled with constant stirring to form a congealed preparation) therein. The ointment base may be in the form of: an oleaginous or hydrocarbon base (e.g., petrolatum or a petrolatum/wax combination); an absorption base which permits the incorporation of aqueous solution resulting in the formation of a water-in-oil emulsion (e.g., hydrophilic petrolatum) or which is a water-in-oil emulsion that permits the incorporation of additional quantities of aqueous solutions (e.g., lanolin); a water-removable base which are oil-in-water emulsions that may be diluted with water or aqueous solutions (e.g., hydrophilic ointment, USP); or a water-soluble base that do not contain oleaginous components (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG) formulations which combine PEGs having an average molecular below 600 with a PEG having an average molecular weight above 1,000); and the like.

[0157] Creams, as used herein, refer to semisolid preparations containing one or more active, fermented pollen-based material, or medicinal agent dissolved or dispersed in either a water-in-oil emulsion or an oil-in-water emulsion or in another type of water-washable base. Generally, creams are differentiated from ointments by the ease with which they are applied/spread onto a surface such as the skin and the ease with which they are removed from a treated surface.

[0158] Lotions, as used herein, refer to suspensions of solid materials in an aqueous vehicle. Generally, lotions have a non-greasy character and increased spreadability over large areas of the skin than ointments, creams, and gels.

[0159] Gels, as used herein, refer to semisolid systems including a dispersion of small and/or large molecules in an aqueous liquid vehicle which is rendered jellylike by the addition of a gelling agent. Suitable gelling agents include, but are not limited to, synthetic macromolecules (e.g., carbomer polymers), cellulose derivatives (e.g., carboxymethylcellulose and/or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose), and natural gums (e.g., tragacanth gum, carrageenan, and the like). Gel preparations may be in the form of a single-phase gel in which the active or medicinal ingredients are uniformly dispersed throughout the liquid vehicle without visible boundaries or a two-phase gel wherein flocculants or small distinct particles of the active or medicinal ingredient are dispersed within the liquid vehicle.

[0160] Transdermal preparations may be formed from an ointment, cream, or gel that has been combined with a penetration enhancer and are designed to deliver an active or medicinal ingredient systemically. Penetration enhancers include, for example, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethanol, propylene glycol, glycerine, PEG, urea, dimethyl acetamide, sodium lauryl sulfate, poloxamers, Spans, Tweens, lecithin, and/or terpenes amongst others.

[0161] Other suitable semi-solid forms for use as cosmetic and/or topical pharmaceutical compositions include pastes (preparations containing a larger proportion of solid material rendering them stiffer than ointments) and glycerogelatins (plastic masses containing gelatin, glycerine, water, and an active or medicinal ingredient).

[0162] In other embodiments the topical and/or cosmetic compositions can be prepared in accordance with dosage forms as described in Sample Preparation of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, B. Nickerson, Ed. (New York: Springer, 2011).In addition, shampoos or other types of cleansing products are contemplated. Also, topical sprays are contemplated including sprays useful for one or more applications to the skin, back, neck, arms, legs, and torso, for example.

[0163] For oral administration, fermented pollen-based extract, or a solid formulation thereof such as lyophilized powder, may be combined with one or more solid inactive ingredients for the preparation of tablets, capsules, pills, powders, granules or other suitable dosage forms. For example, the active agent may be combined with at least one excipient such as fillers, binders, humectants, disintegrating agents, solution retarders, absorption accelerators, wetting agents, absorbents, or lubricating agents. Other useful excipients include magnesium stearate, calcium stearate, mannitol, xylitol, sweeteners, starch, carboxymethylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, silica, gelatin, silicon dioxide, and the like.

Routes of Administration



[0164] The fermented pollen-based extract may be administered topically.

[0165] The treatment may be carried out for as long a period as necessary, either in a single, uninterrupted session, or in discrete sessions. The treating physician will know how to increase, decrease, or interrupt treatment based on patient response. According to one embodiment, treatment is carried out for from about four to about five weeks. The treatment schedule may be repeated as required.

[0166] Furthermore, it is believed that this technology and process may be applied to other reaction platforms. The aforementioned examples describe a technology platform in which different starting materials can be added depending on the desired end product. By altering the settings, e.g. aerobic/anaerobic, temperature and pressure different end product compounds are obtained. The end products resulting from the reaction platform are analogous to those produced in nature. These compounds mimic those in nature which control immune and cell death signaling pathways and can be used to treat a range of immune and apoptosis related diseases.

[0167] In an alternative embodiment, a technology platform may comprise a bioreactor, that uses naturally occurring chemical reactions to produce modified or new bioactive compounds that regulate mammalian cell signaling. These chemical reactions can be applied to any plant, microbial, marine or insect derived extract to create bioactive components that interact directly with the human signaling pathways to regulate immune and cell death responses.

[0168] The use of the terms "a," "an," "the," and similar referents in the context of describing the presently claimed invention (especially in the context of the claims) are to be construed to cover both the singular and the plural, unless otherwise indicated herein or clearly contradicted by context. Recitation of ranges of values herein are merely intended to serve as a shorthand method of referring individually to each separate value falling within the range, unless otherwise indicated herein, and each separate value is incorporated into the specification as if it were individually recited herein. All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., "such as") provided herein, is intended merely to better illuminate the invention and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the invention unless otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element as essential to the practice of the invention.


Claims

1. A process for making a pollen-based fermentable composition comprising the steps of:

(a) soaking dry pollen grains in coconut water at ambient temperature to provide soaked pollen;

(b) treating the soaked pollen with glycerol and honeydew at ambient temperature to provide a germinated pollen mixture;

(c) melting beeswax and maintaining liquid beeswax at about 65 °C;

(d) treating the melted beeswax with an equal weight of coconut oil to provide a beeswax mixture;

(e) adding the germinated pollen mixture to the beeswax mixture;

(f) stirring the combined mixtures to form a jelly; and

(g) incubating the jelly in a sealed vessel for about 72 hours at 37 °C to produce the fermented pollen-based composition.


 
2. The process of claim 1, wherein the soaked pollen is germinated.
 
3. The process of claim 1, wherein the pollen is about twice the weight of the beeswax, and wherein the glycerol and honey dew are about half the weight of the beeswax.
 
4. The process of claim 1, wherein an enzyme-containing component is added prior to or after step (g).
 
5. The process of claim 4, wherein the enzyme-containing component is selected from the group consisting of pineapple powder, tamarillo powder, kawa kawa powder, kiwifruit powder, honey, additional honeydew, and mixtures thereof.
 
6. The process of claim 1 or 4, further comprising step (h) adding a substance to stop fermentation selected from propolis, pine bark powder, or mixtures thereof.
 
7. A fermented pollen-based extract composition made according to the process of claim 1.
 
8. The fermented pollen-based extract composition of claim 7, comprising one or more peptides, and one or more fatty acids, optionally, further comprising at least one dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA) isomer selected from the group consisting of 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, and 4,5-diCQA.
 
9. A skin cream containing 1-10% by weight of a fermented pollen-based extract composition made according to the process of claim 1 and comprising one or more peptides, one or more fatty acids, and at least one dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA) isomer selected from the group consisting of 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, and 4,5-diCQA for use in the treatment or prevention of a skin lesion, wound or scar in an individual.
 
10. The skin cream for use according to claim 9, wherein the individual is a human; and wherein the skin lesion, wound or scar is caused by a skin condition selected from the group consisting of eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, rosacea, acne and actinic keratosis (AK).
 
11. The skin cream for use according to claim 10, wherein the skin condition is eczema and the skin cream is applied to one or more skin lesions in an amount of about 0.5 g to about 3 g per day.
 
12. A topical skin cream composition, comprising:

a fermented pollen-based extract composition made according to the process of claim 1 and comprising one or more peptides, one or more fatty acids, and at least one dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA) isomer selected from the group consisting of 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, and 4,5-diCQA, present in an amount of about 1-10% by weight based on the total weight of the composition;

an emulsifying oil containing cetearyl olivate and sorbitan olivate, present in an amount of about 7% by weight based on the total weight of the composition;

at least one botanical oil component, present in an amount of about 5-7% by weight based on the total weight of the composition;

glycerine, present in an amount of about 2-4% by weight based on the total weight of the composition; and

water, present in an amount of about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the composition.


 
13. The topical skin cream of claim 12, further comprising at least one vitamin selected from Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and mixtures thereof, the at least one vitamin present in an amount of about 1-2% by weight based on the total weight of the composition; or
wherein the at least one botanical oil component is selected from the group consisting of shea butter, safflower oil, macadamia nut oil, hazel nut oil, blackcurrant oil, kiwifruit seed oil, grape seed oil, argan oil, jojoba oil, and mixtures thereof.
 
14. A method of cosmetic treatment or prevention of a skin condition in an individual selected from the group consisting of moles, age spots or wrinkles, the method comprising topically administering to the individual a skin cream containing 1-10% by weight of a fermented pollen-based extract composition made according to the process of claim 1 and comprising one or more peptides, one or more fatty acids, and at least one dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA) isomer selected from the group consisting of 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, and 4,5-diCQA.
 
15. A skin cream containing 1-10% by weight of a fermented pollen-based extract composition made according to the process of claim 1 and comprising one or more peptides, one or more fatty acids, and at least one dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA) isomer selected from the group consisting of 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, and 4,5-diCQA, for use in a method of treating photodamage, the method comprising topically administering to the individual in need of such treatment an effective amount of the skin cream.
 


Ansprüche

1. Verfahren für die Herstellung einer auf Pollen basierten, fermentierbaren Zusammensetzung, das die folgenden Schritte umfasst:

(a) Einweichen von trockenen Pollenkörnern in Kokoswasser bei Umgebungstemperatur, um eingeweichten Pollen bereitzustellen;

(b) Behandeln des eingeweichten Pollens mit Glycerol und Honigtau bei Umgebungstemperatur, um eine gekeimte Pollenmischung bereitzustellen;

(c) Schmelzen von Bienenwachs und Aufrechterhalten des flüssigen Bienenwachses bei etwa 65 °C;

(d) Behandeln des geschmolzenen Bienenwachses mit einem gleichen Gewicht an Kokosöl, um eine Bienenwachsmischung bereitzustellen;

(e) Zugeben der gekeimten Pollenmischung zu der Bienenwachsmischung;

(f) Rühren der vereinigten Mischungen, um ein Gelee zu bilden; und

(g) Inkubieren des Gelees in einem abgedichteten Gefäß für etwa 72 Stunden bei 37 °C, um die fermentierte, auf Pollen basierte Zusammensetzung zu erzeugen.


 
2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei der eingeweichte Pollen gekeimt ist.
 
3. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Pollen etwa das Doppelte des Gewichts des Bienenwachses aufweist und wobei das Glycerol und der Honigtau etwa die Hälfte des Gewichts des Bienenwachses aufweisen.
 
4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei eine Enzym-haltige Komponente vor oder nach Schritt (g) zugegeben wird.
 
5. Verfahren nach Anspruch 4, wobei die Enzym-haltige Komponente aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: Ananaspulver, Tamarillopulver, Kava-Kava-Pulver, Kiwifruchtpulver, Honig, zusätzlichem Honigtau und Mischungen davon.
 
6. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 oder 4, das weiter den folgenden Schritt umfasst: (h) Zugeben einer Substanz, um die Fermentation zu stoppen, die aus Propolis, Pinienrindenpulver oder Mischungen davon ausgewählt ist.
 
7. Auf fermentiertem Pollen basierte Extraktzusammensetzung, die gemäß dem Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 hergestellt ist.
 
8. Auf fermentiertem Pollen basierte Extraktzusammensetzung nach Anspruch 7, die ein oder mehrere Peptide und eine oder mehrere Fettsäuren umfasst, die optional weiter mindestens ein Dicaffeoylchinasäure (diCQA)-Isomer umfasst, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA und 4,5-diCQA.
 
9. Hautcreme, die 1-10 Gewichts-% einer auf fermentiertem Pollen basierten Extraktzusammensetzung enthält, die gemäß dem Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 hergestellt ist und ein oder mehrere Peptide, eine oder mehrere Fettsäuren und mindestens ein Dicaffeoylchinasäure (diCQA)-Isomer umfasst, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA und 4,5-diCQA, für die Verwendung bei der Behandlung oder Prävention einer Hautläsion, Wunde oder Narbe bei einem Individuum.
 
10. Hautcreme für die Verwendung nach Anspruch 9, wobei das Individuum ein Mensch ist und
wobei die Hautläsion, Wunde oder Narbe durch eine Hauterkrankung verursacht ist, die aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: Ekzem, Psoriasis, Dermatitis, Rosazea, Akne und aktinischer Keratose (AK).
 
11. Hautcreme für die Verwendung nach Anspruch 10, wobei die Hauterkrankung Ekzem ist und die Hautcreme auf einer oder mehreren Hautläsionen in einer Menge von etwa 0,5 g bis etwa 3 g pro Tag aufgetragen wird.
 
12. Topische Hautcremezusammensetzung, die Folgendes umfasst:

eine auf fermentiertem Pollen basierte Extraktzusammensetzung, die gemäß dem Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 hergestellt ist und ein oder mehrere Peptide, eine oder mehrere Fettsäuren und mindestens ein Dicaffeoylchinasäure (diCQA)-Isomer umfasst, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA und 4,5-diCQA, die in einer Menge von etwa 1-10 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt;

ein Emulgieröl, das Cetearylolivat und Sorbitanolivat enthält, das in einer Menge von etwa 7 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt;

mindestens eine Pflanzenölkomponente, die in einer Menge von etwa 5-7 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt;

Glycerin, das in einer Menge von etwa 2-4 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt; und

Wasser, das in einer Menge von etwa 70 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt.


 
13. Topische Hautcreme nach Anspruch 12, die weiter mindestens ein Vitamin umfasst, das aus Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E und Mischungen davon ausgewählt ist, wobei das mindestens eine Vitamin in einer Menge von etwa 1-2 Gewichts-%, bezogen auf das Gesamtgewicht der Zusammensetzung, vorliegt; oder
wobei die mindestens eine Pflanzenölkomponente aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: Sheabutter, Safloröl, Macadamianussöl, Haselnussöl, Samenöl der schwarzen Johannisbeere, Samenöl der Kiwifrucht, Traubenkernöl, Arganöl, Jojobaöl und Mischungen davon.
 
14. Verfahren zur kosmetischen Behandlung oder Prävention eines Hautzustands bei einem Individuum, der aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Leberflecken, Altersflecken oder Falten besteht, wobei das Verfahren die topische Verabreichung an das Individuum einer Hautcreme umfasst, die 1-10 Gewichts-% einer auf fermentiertem Pollen basierten Extraktzusammensetzung enthält, die gemäß dem Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 hergestellt ist und ein oder mehrere Peptide, eine oder mehrere Fettsäuren und mindestens ein Dicaffeoylchinasäure (diCQA)-Isomer umfasst, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA und 4,5-diCQA.
 
15. Hautcreme, die 1-10 Gewichts-% einer auf fermentiertem Pollen basierten Extraktzusammensetzung enthält, die gemäß dem Verfahren nach Anspruch 1 hergestellt ist und ein oder mehrere Peptide, eine oder mehrere Fettsäuren und mindestens ein Dicaffeoylchinasäure (diCQA)-Isomer umfasst, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Folgenden besteht: 1,3-diCQA, 1,4-diCQA, 1,5-diCQA, 3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA und 4,5-diCQA, für die Verwendung in einem Verfahren zur Behandlung von Lichtschädigung, wobei das Verfahren die topische Verabreichung an das Individuum, das eine derartige Behandlung benötigt, einer wirksamen Menge der Hautcreme umfasst.
 


Revendications

1. Procédé de préparation d'une composition fermentescible à base de pollen, comprenant les étapes consistant à :

(a) faire tremper des grains de pollen secs dans de l'eau de coco à température ambiante, afin de fournir du pollen trempé ;

(b) traiter le pollen trempé par du glycérol et du miellat à température ambiante, afin de fournir un mélange de pollen germé ;

(c) faire fondre de la cire d'abeille et maintenir la cire d'abeille liquide à environ 65°C ;

(d) traiter la cire d'abeille fondue par un poids égal d'huile de coco, afin de fournir un mélange de cire d'abeille ;

(e) ajouter le mélange de pollen germé au mélange de cire d'abeille ;

(f) placer les mélanges combinés sous agitation afin de former une gelée ; et

(g) incuber la gelée dans un récipient fermé hermétiquement pendant environ 72 heures à 37°C, afin de produire la composition à base de pollen fermenté.


 
2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le pollen trempé est germé.
 
3. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le pollen fait environ deux fois le poids de la cire d'abeille, et où le glycérol et le miellat font environ la moitié du poids de la cire d'abeille.
 
4. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel un composant contenant des enzymes est ajouté avant ou après l'étape (g).
 
5. Procédé selon la revendication 4, dans lequel le composant contenant des enzymes est choisi dans le groupe constitué par une poudre d'ananas, une poudre de tamarillo, une poudre de kawa-kawa, une poudre de kiwi, du miel, du miellat supplémentaire, et des mélanges de ceux-ci.
 
6. Procédé selon la revendication 1 ou 4, comprenant en outre l'étape (h) d'addition d'une substance afin de stopper la fermentation, choisie parmi la propolis, une poudre d'écorce de pin, ou des mélanges de celles-ci.
 
7. Composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté, préparée selon le procédé selon la revendication 1.
 
8. Composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté selon la revendication 7, comprenant un ou plusieurs peptides, et un ou plusieurs acides gras, éventuellement, comprenant en outre au moins un isomère de l'acide dicafféoylquinique (diCQA) choisi dans le groupe constitué par le 1,3-diCQA, le 1,4-diCQA, le 1,5-diCQA, le 3,4-diCQA, le 3,5-diCQA, et le 4,5-diCQA.
 
9. Crème pour la peau, contenant 1-10% en poids d'une composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté, préparée selon le procédé selon la revendication 1, et comprenant un ou plusieurs peptides, un ou plusieurs acides gras, et au moins un isomère de l'acide dicafféoylquinique (diCQA) choisi dans le groupe constitué par le 1,3-diCQA, le 1,4-diCQA, le 1,5-diCQA, le 3,4-diCQA, le 3,5-diCQA, et le 4,5-diCQA, pour une utilisation destinée au traitement ou à la prévention d'une lésion, d'une blessure ou d'une cicatrice cutanée chez un individu.
 
10. Crème pour la peau pour une utilisation selon la revendication 9, dans laquelle l'individu est un être humain ; et
où la lésion, la blessure ou la cicatrice cutanée est provoquée par une condition de la peau choisie dans le groupe constitué par l'eczéma, le psoriasis, la dermatite, l'acné rosacée, l'acné et la kératose actinique (KA).
 
11. Crème pour la peau pour une utilisation selon la revendication 10, dans laquelle la condition de la peau est l'eczéma et la crème pour la peau est appliquée à une ou plusieurs lésions cutanées selon une quantité allant d'environ 0,5 g à environ 3 g par jour.
 
12. Composition de crème pour la peau topique, comprenant :

une composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté, préparée selon le procédé selon la revendication 1, et comprenant un ou plusieurs peptides, un ou plusieurs acides gras, et au moins un isomère de l'acide dicafféoylquinique (diCQA) choisi dans le groupe constitué par le 1,3-diCQA, le 1,4-diCQA, le 1,5-diCQA, le 3,4-diCQA, le 3,5-diCQA, et le 4,5-diCQA, présente selon une quantité d'environ 1-10% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition ;

une huile émulsifiante contenant de l'olivate de cétéaryle et de l'olivate de sorbitane, présente selon une quantité d'environ 7% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition ;

au moins un composant d'huile botanique, présent selon une quantité d'environ 5-7% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition ;

du glycérol, présent selon une quantité d'environ 2-4% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition ; et

de l'eau, présente selon une quantité d'environ 70% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition.


 
13. Crème pour la peau topique selon la revendication 12, comprenant en outre au moins une vitamine choisie parmi la vitamine A, la vitamine C, la vitamine E, et des mélanges de celles-ci ; la au moins une vitamine étant présente selon une quantité d'environ 1-2% en poids, sur la base du poids total de la composition ; ou
où le au moins un composant d'huile botanique est choisi dans le groupe constitué par le beurre de karité, l'huile de carthame, l'huile de noix de macadamia, l'huile de noisette, l'huile de cassis, l'huile de graines de kiwi, l'huile de pépins de raisin, l'huile d'argan, l'huile de jojoba, et des mélanges de ceux-ci.
 
14. Méthode destinée au traitement ou à la prévention cosmétique d'une condition de la peau chez un individu, choisie dans le groupe constitué par les nævus, les taches de vieillesse ou les rides, la méthode comprenant l'administration par voie topique à l'individu d'une crème pour la peau contenant 1-10% en poids d'une composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté, préparée selon le procédé selon la revendication 1, et comprenant un ou plusieurs peptides, un ou plusieurs acides gras, et au moins un isomère de l'acide dicafféoylquinique (diCQA) choisi dans le groupe constitué par le 1,3-diCQA, le 1,4-diCQA, le 1,5-diCQA, le 3,4-diCQA, le 3,5-diCQA, et le 4,5-diCQA.
 
15. Crème pour la peau contenant 1-10% en poids d'une composition d'extrait à base de pollen fermenté, préparée selon le procédé selon la revendication 1, et comprenant un ou plusieurs peptides, un ou plusieurs acides gras, et au moins un isomère de l'acide dicafféoylquinique (diCQA) choisi dans le groupe constitué par le 1,3-diCQA, le 1,4-diCQA, le 1,5-diCQA, le 3,4-diCQA, le 3,5-diCQA, et le 4,5-diCQA, pour une utilisation dans une méthode destinée au traitement des photo-dommages, la méthode comprenant l'administration par voie topique à l'individu ayant besoin d'un tel traitement, d'une quantité efficace de la crème pour la peau.
 




Drawing















































Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description




Non-patent literature cited in the description