(19)
(11)EP 3 047 356 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
25.03.2020 Bulletin 2020/13

(21)Application number: 14781755.5

(22)Date of filing:  18.09.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G06F 3/01(2006.01)
G06F 3/03(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2014/056184
(87)International publication number:
WO 2015/042207 (26.03.2015 Gazette  2015/12)

(54)

CONFIGURATION OF A TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY FOR CONFERENCING

KONFIGURATION EINER BERÜHRUNGSBILDSCHIRMANZEIGE FÜR KONFERENZEN

CONFIGURATION D'UN DISPOSITIF D'AFFICHAGE À ÉCRAN TACTILE ÉQUIPÉ POUR LA CONFÉRENCE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 20.09.2013 US 201314033003

(43)Date of publication of application:
27.07.2016 Bulletin 2016/30

(73)Proprietor: Microsoft Technology Licensing, LLC
Redmond, WA 98052 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • FISH, Nathan J.
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)
  • WILLIAMS, Robert
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)
  • CASE, Charlie W.
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)
  • HAVERTY, Chris M.
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)
  • OEHLER, Peter R.
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)
  • KRUSE, Ross N.
    Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 (US)

(74)Representative: Hanna Moore + Curley 
Garryard House 25/26 Earlsfort Terrace
Dublin 2, D02 PX51
Dublin 2, D02 PX51 (IE)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-99/31889
US-A1- 2007 120 971
US-A1- 2010 123 770
US-A1- 2013 076 617
WO-A2-2012/170559
US-A1- 2008 055 279
US-A1- 2013 063 537
US-B1- 6 424 373
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    BACKGROUND



    [0001] Many conferencing systems are currently available. Some such systems have video conference capabilities in which a camera is placed in a conference room, in a location that enables the camera to capture video images of people sitting around a table or focusing on a presenter from a distance.

    [0002] Such conference room solutions normally are not well equipped for a scenario in which a user approaches a screen or whiteboard or other collaborative workspace. Therefore, such systems often place a single camera above or below the workspace, in the conference room.

    [0003] Touch screen displays are also currently in wide use. Some touch screen displays can be used in a collaborative way in which local and remote users interact with a touch screen display or other collaborative work surface at their location.

    [0004] As the touch screen displays become larger, camera placement presents more challenges. Cameras mounted on top of the touch screen display often present the remote user with a camera view that is similar to that of a security camera. This is often an awkward view. This top camera placement is also unable to capture video images of people standing to the left or to the right of the collaborative work surface. When it does capture images of those people, it often only captures the tops of their heads, especially when a local user is working in close proximity to the display, and especially when the local user is directly in front of the display, which happens often when the user is drawing on or interacting with content on the collaborative work surface.

    [0005] Cameras that are mounted on the bottom of the screen are often too low to present a convenient view. In addition, they often present an awkward image, especially when a user approaches the display or is working in close proximity to the display. Also, as screens get larger, the bottom of the screen may fall near or below a standard conference room table, not allowing enough room for the camera to see above the table.

    [0006] The discussion above is merely provided for general background information and is not intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.
    US6424373 discloses an apparatus for a coordination control between a window and a camera for use in displaying an image captured by the camera in the window of a display means comprising a window control means for controlling the window according to a window operation command issued by a user, an information conversion means for converting window information supplied from the window control means into camera control information, and a camera control means for controlling the camera based on the camera control information supplied from the information conversion means. US2013063537 discloses a conference system including a first conference device and a second conference device installed at a first site, and connected with an external conference device installed at a site different from the first site.
    WO9931889 discloses an image capture system capable of combining the individual images from at least two image capture devices to produce a virtual camera for simulated line-of-sight image capture in such computer-based image capture applications as video conferencing, video telephony, video messaging, video postcards, multimedia training, and/or multimedia authoring.
    WO2012170559 discloses a video conferencing system that reduces the perspective of an image captured by a video conferencing camera by receiving a first image of a first field of view and receiving a second image of a second field of view, wherein the first image is equalized and the second image is equalized independently of the first image. US2007120971 discloses a system for generating video images and corresponding audio of multiple parties engaged in a video conference, including multiple voice transducers for receiving voice signals from the multiple parties and a video camera for capturing moving images of one of the multiple parties who is speaking.
    US2013076617 discloses an adaptive tracking system for spatial input devices provides real-time tracking of spatial input devices for human-computer interaction in a Spatial Operating Environment.
    US2008055279 discloses a pen-shaped device which includes a battery capable of being charged wirelessly from the outside, a first sensor which detects whether a pen nib has contact with a surface, a second sensor which detects movement of the pen nib in contact with the surface, a control circuit which is electrically connected to the first sensor and the second sensor, and a memory which is electrically connected to the control circuit.
    US2010123770 discloses an apparatus comprising: a plurality of video cameras each configured to capture a respective camera view of at least some participants of a conference, the camera views together including at least one view of each participant; a plurality of microphones; an audio processing module coupled to the plurality of microphones and configured to generate audio data and direction information indicative of the direction of sound received at the microphones; a composition element coupled to the video cameras and configured to generate one or more candidate people views, each people view being of an area enclosing a head and shoulders view of at least one participant; and a video director element coupled to the composition module and to the audio processing module and configured to make a selection, according to the direction information, of which at least one of the candidate people views are to be transmitted to one or more remote endpoints.

    SUMMARY



    [0007] A communication system includes a touch screen display device with first and second cameras mounted on opposite sides of the touch screen display device so a field of view for each camera is pointed inward relative to the touch screen display device. A conferencing subsystem controls conferencing communication to send and receive touch screen display signals and video signals.

    [0008] The invention is defined by the independent claim. Preferred embodiments are disclosed in the dependent claims.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0009] 

    FIGS. 1 and 2 show top views of exemplary video conferencing systems.

    FIG. 3 is a block diagram of one illustrative multimedia processing architecture.

    FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of the architecture shown in FIG. 3 in automatically powering up and powering down a multimedia system.

    FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the architecture shown in FIG. 3 in controlling outgoing video and camera switching.

    FIG. 6 shows one embodiment of a user interface display on a touch sensitive screen.

    FIG. 7 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of the architecture shown in FIG. 3 in displaying images and incoming video on the touch sensitive screen as well as in playing audio.

    FIG. 8 is one embodiment of a user interface display on the touch sensitive screen.

    FIG. 9 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of the architecture shown in FIG. 3 in performing power management based on user interactions with the system.

    FIG. 10 shows one embodiment of the architecture shown in FIG. 3 deployed in a cloud-based architecture.

    FIG. 11 is a block diagram of one illustrative computing environment.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0010] FIGS. 1 and 2 are top views of a portion of an illustrative multimedia conferencing architecture 100 in accordance with one embodiment. A more detailed block diagram of architecture 100 is described below with respect to FIG. 3. FIGS. 1 and 2 are provided to give an overall context. FIG. 1 shows that architecture 100 includes touch sensitive display device 102, a first camera 104 and a second camera 106. It will also be noted that architecture 100 includes a multimedia processing system and various other sensors and user input/output (I/O) mechanisms that are described in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 3.

    [0011] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, cameras 104 and 106 illustratively have a horizontal field of view that is larger than 90 degrees and may be, for instance, approximately 95 degrees. Cameras 104 and 106 can also each be comprised of two or more cameras with smaller horizontal fields of view, and the images from those cameras can be stitched together to obtain a composite image with a horizontal field of view that is in excess of 90 degrees. Touch sensitive display device 102 generally resides in a plane that has a longitudinal axis generally indicated by number 108. A viewing and touch sensitive display screen 110, on device 102, faces a conference room 112 that is shown, in FIG. 1, with a conference room table 114 and a plurality of chairs 116. Architecture 100 also shows two different exemplary locations that a user might occupy including a first location 118 and a second location 120. When the user is at location 118, the user may illustratively be facing the touch sensitive display screen 110 and be working on a collaborative surface displayed on the touch sensitive display screen 110 of device 102. When the user is at location 120, the user is off to the side of screen 110 and may, therefore, be making a presentation using the touch sensitive display screen 110 but generally facing conference room 112.

    [0012] FIG. 1 also shows that the user (or another user) may be in one of the chairs 116, or that the user (or another user) may be at a location such as location 122 that is located at a distance further from device 102 than either positions 118 or 120. When the user is at a location in one of chairs 116, the user may be viewing a presentation being given by another person, or attending a teleconference and viewing images on touch sensitive display screen 110. When the user is at location 122, the user may be either approaching device 102 or moving away from device 102, or simply standing or sitting at the location 122, and observing device 102.

    [0013] In FIG. 1, cameras 104 and 106 are illustratively positioned relative to device 102 so that they have overlapping fields of view that encompass a majority of conference room 112, but are generally tilted downward slightly relative to a horizontal plane in conference room 112. Because the field of view of each camera is, for instance, approximately 95 degrees, they are illustratively positioned to be directed inward relative to touch sensitive display screen 110. In one embodiment, a line 109 perpendicular to the center of the camera's field of view (generally indicated by line 111) is offset from longitudinal axis 108 by an angle α that is approximately 30 degrees. In other words, the center 111 of the field of view is directed inward toward screen 110 relative to longitudinal axis 108 so the angle formed by axis 108 and line 111 is less than 90 degrees and may be approximately 30 degrees.

    [0014] In one embodiment, regardless of the cameras' fields of view, the cameras are illustratively positioned so that they capture the face of the user when the user is either standing in front of screen 110 (such as at position 118) or to the side of screen 110 (such as at position 120) or further back from screen 110. Therefore, when the user is working at the touch sensitive screen 110, at least one of cameras 104 and 106 captures the user. Similarly, when the user is presenting from the screen, and is standing off to the side of the screen, at least one of cameras 104 and 106 also captures at least a portion of the user's image. Assume that the user in either of positions 118 or 120 stands a distance d from display screen 110. In one embodiment, the distance d is approximately 10-14 inches. Of course, this is an illustrative range, and the distance d could be other distances as well. In any case, cameras 104 and 106 are illustratively positioned relative to the longitudinal axis of device 102 so that they capture an image of the user who is either standing in front of screen 110 and located at least as close as 10-14 inches from the screen (or further away) and when the user is standing off to the side of device 102 and located a distance of 10-14 inches (or beyond) from the screen. In addition, the fields of view of cameras 104 and 106 illustratively capture at least a majority of conference room 112.

    [0015] FIG. 2 is a top view of another embodiment of architecture 100, in which similar items are similarly numbered to those shown in FIG. 1. However, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, cameras 104 and 106 are replaced by cameras 124 and 126, respectively. Cameras 124 and 126 illustratively have a field of view that is larger than cameras 104 and 106 in FIG. 1 and may be approximately 140 degrees. Therefore, they are positioned relative to the longitudinal axis 108 of device 102 so that their fields of view overlap in a way that is substantially parallel to, and adjacent, the surface of screen 110. The overlapping fields of view of cameras 124 and 126 are also positioned so that they, together, capture a substantial majority of conference room 112, and so that they capture an image of the user when the user is located in front of screen 110 (such as in position 118) or to the side of screen 110 (such as in position 120). In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, cameras 124 and 126 are placed so that the centers of their fields of view (represented by line 127) are perpendicular to a line 128 that is offset from axis 108 by approximately 20 degrees. In other words, the center 127 of the fields of view is directed inward toward screen 110, relative to longitudinal axis 108, so the angle formed by axis 108 and line 127 is less than 90 degrees and may be approximately 20 degrees.

    [0016] In a variety of different embodiments, as will be discussed below, device 102 switches the outgoing video for the conference between the two cameras based on a variety of different factors. In addition, device 102 controls various user input mechanisms, the displays displayed on screen 110, the power up and power down scenarios, as well as a variety of other items that influence the user's experience in interacting with device 102, based on a wide variety of different parameters, including how the user is moving, where the user is located, how the user is interacting with the device 102, etc. These are described below in greater detail.

    [0017] FIG. 3 is a more detailed block diagram of one embodiment of multimedia processing architecture 100. The more detailed diagram of multimedia processing architecture 100 includes conferencing system 130. System 130, itself, includes multimedia processing system 138 and a plurality of different user input/output (I/O) mechanisms 140. FIG. 3 also shows that conferencing system 130 can illustratively be connected for conferencing with one or more remote systems, such as a remote system 131, over a communication channel 133 so that user 132 can communicate, using conferencing system 130, with a remote user 135. Communication channel 133 can include one or more of a variety of different types of communication channels, such as a wide area network, a cellular or switched telephone network, a local area network, or a wide variety of other communication channels.

    [0018] User 132 interacts with conferencing system 130 either directly, as indicated by arrow 134, or through one or more different user devices 136. For instance, user 132 may interact with conferencing system 130 using a mobile device (such as a smart phone, a tablet computer, or a palmtop computer) using a laptop or desktop computer, etc. Of course, user 132 can also interact directly with system 130 using the various user I/O mechanisms and sensors provided in conferencing system 130.

    [0019] Multimedia processing system 138 includes data store 142. Data store 142 can include applications 144, operating systems 146, control programs 148, data 150 and other items 152. Multimedia processing system 138 also includes processor 154, touch sensitive display control component 156, conferencing subsystem 158, local/wide area network subsystems 160, near field communication component 161, collaborative display control component 162, audio control component 164, camera control component 166, power management component 168, and speech/natural language component 170. Multimedia processing system 138 can also include other sensor control systems 172 and a variety of other items as well, as indicated by block 174.

    [0020] Multimedia processing system 138 is shown as interacting with various user input/output (I/O) mechanisms and sensors 140. Such sensors and mechanisms can include touch sensitive display device 102 (also shown in FIGS. 1 and 2), one or more styluses 176, that can be held in stylus holders 177 (which, themselves, can include stylus presence sensors 179 and stylus chargers 181), cameras 104, 106, 124 and 126, collectively referred to by block 178 in FIG. 3, one or more audio speakers 180, touchless natural input device 182, microphones 184, a variety of other sensors (such as light sensors, motion sensors, sound sensors, etc.) as indicated by block 186, various connectors 187, and other user input mechanisms 188.

    [0021] FIG. 3 shows that data store 142 is a single data store and is local to multimedia processing system 138. It should be noted, however, that data store 142 can be remote from system 138, and accessed by system 138. It can also be multiple different data stores, all of which are local to system 138, all of which are remote therefrom, or some of which are local while others are remote. The illustration shown in FIG. 3 is exemplary only.

    [0022] Processor 154 is illustratively a computer processor with associated memory and timing circuitry, not separately shown. It is a functional part of system 138 and architecture 100, and is activated by the various other components or items in architecture 100 to facilitate their functionality. Although a single processor 154 is shown, multiple processors can be used, and processors can be incorporated into other components, devices or subsystems as well.

    [0023] Touch sensitive display control component 156 is illustratively a control component that controls the various displays on the touch sensitive display screen 110 of device 102. The various ways that the display can be controlled are described more specifically below with respect to FIGS. 4-9. Of course, these are exemplary descriptions only.

    [0024] Conferencing subsystem 158 illustratively provides functionality to manage and control conferencing capabilities of architecture 100. For instance, it provides the functionality to initiate communications with remote system 131 over communication channel 133. Of course, this can be performed by multiple different components as well, and the component shown in FIG. 3 is shown for the sake of example only.

    [0025] Local/wide area network subsystem 160 illustratively provides functionality for enabling communication over a local or wide area network. It can also illustratively provide functionality for performing other types of networking using wireless or wired communication.

    [0026] Near field communication component 161 illustratively provides functionality for detecting the presence (either wirelessly or using a wired connection) of other near field communication devices. Also, the other near field communication devices can detect component 161 as well. Component 161 also provides functionality for performing near field communication with any such device.

    [0027] Collaborative display control component 162 illustratively provides the functionality for generating and controlling a collaborative display on the touch sensitive display device 102. For instance, component 162 illustratively generates a collaborative note taking display, whiteboard display, etc., on the touch sensitive display device, and processes the user inputs (from local and remote users) to modify the display accordingly.

    [0028] Audio control component 164 illustratively provides the control functionality for controlling speakers 180 and microphones 184. For instance, audio control component 164 illustratively switches the active speaker based upon the location of the user relative to the display device, or based upon other parameters, as are described in more detail below.

    [0029] Camera control component 166 illustratively receives and processes a variety of parameters to control cameras 178. For instance, component 166 illustratively controls which camera is automatically selected as the active camera to provide the outgoing video signal, based upon a variety of sensed parameters. Controlling the cameras and the outgoing video signals is described in greater detail below with respect to FIGS. 5 and 6.

    [0030] Power management component 168 illustratively provides the functionality for managing the power of the various components, systems, subsystems and items in architecture 100. This can be done in a variety of different ways, such as based on sensed inputs, user position, etc. This is described in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 9.

    [0031] Speech/natural language component 170 illustratively provides the functionality for receiving, recognizing, and acting on speech inputs. For instance, component 170 can illustratively include speech recognition components, voice recognition components, natural language understanding components or other components that enable a user to speak commands or other speech inputs and have them understood and acted upon by the various items in architecture 100.

    [0032] Other sensor control system 172 illustratively receives sensor inputs from a variety of other sensors and user input mechanisms and provides command and control information based upon those inputs. This is exemplary only.

    [0033] Touch sensitive display device 102 is illustratively a large display that has touch sensing capability. For instance, device 102 can be a touch sensitive display ranging from, for instance, a twelve inch display to an 82 inch display, or an even larger display. It illustratively provides touch capability so that it can support touch gestures input by a user, using the user's finger, a stylus, another type of pen or pointer, etc. It can illustratively provide a high resolution display (such as a quad HD display) that renders text, ink, and large amounts of content in a very expeditious manner. It also illustratively provides multi-touch capability. Thus, device 102 may illustratively support unlimited touch points, sub-millimeter touch precision, near-zero parallax, ultra-low latency touch response and pen and stylus support, although these need not all be supported.

    [0034] The touch sensitive display control component 156 illustratively runs code which controls the display. Thus, display device 102 can be a presentation surface that is used by a user (or presenter) who is making a presentation to other individuals in the office. It can also illustratively be operated as a collaborative whiteboard, that enables multiple users across multiple different devices (some of which can be remote) to collaborate on a note taking system, a word processing system, a drawing system, or on any other type of system.

    [0035] In one such embodiment, touch sensitive display device 102 has a structural support or enclosure. Multimedia processing system 138 can illustratively be disposed within the structural support or enclosure. In addition, the user I/O mechanisms and sensors 140 can be mounted to, or substantially enclosed within, the structural support or enclosure.

    [0036] Styluses 176 can illustratively be connected by hardware cables they can be wireless devices that can be used as pointing devices or to perform other stylus functions, on touch sensitive display device 102. They can be held by stylus holders 177 that are mounted to touch sensitive display device 102, or its structural support or enclosure. Presence sensor 179, in each holder 177, provides a signal indicative of whether a stylus 176 is present within the holder 177. Charger 181 charges a stylus 176 that is held in holder 177. Some of the stylus functionality is described in greater detail below.

    [0037] As briefly discussed above with respect to FIGS. 1 and 2, cameras 178 can be two different cameras, mounted to or within the structural support or enclosure of device 102, that are configured to provide a wide field of view. They illustratively support viewing people located adjacent the display device, (such as those working at display screen 110 or presenting from it) and up to 20 feet away or more. Camera control component 166 illustratively controls which camera is active, and it can also control various functions, such as cropping, pan, tilt and zoom, etc., some of which are described in greater detail below.

    [0038] Speakers 180 are illustratively physically mounted to or within the structural support or enclosure of device 102, and are located relative to display device 102, and cameras 178, so that they provide audio that corresponds to the incoming and outgoing video. By way of example, if a remote user's video image is displayed on one side of display screen 110 of device 102, then the active speaker that provides the audio for that remote user is also the speaker located on that side of the display device. Speakers 180 can be omnidirectional speakers or directional speakers, such as a sound dome or speaker array. This is described in greater detail below as well.

    [0039] Similarly, microphones 184 are in a directional microphone system and are illustratively directional microphones, (such as cardioid microphones or hyper cardioid microphones or a microphone array) that is mounted on or within the structural support or enclosure of device 102 so that it can pick up audio from various users located in different locations relative to display device 102. In one embodiment, for instance, microphones 184 are a microphone array mounted to the top of display device 102. When fully utilized, the microphone array produces a signal or set of signals that indicate where a user is located (e.g., from a left/center/right horizontal perspective). Audio control component 164 can illustratively control which microphones 184 are active based upon the location of various users relative to display device 102, and based upon other parameters as well.

    [0040] Touchless natural input device 182 is illustratively mounted to, or within, the structural support or enclosure for device 102 and can take a wide variety of different forms. For instance, in one embodiment, it includes a motion sensing input device for a game or other console. It is based around a webcam style peripheral device that enables users to control and interact with the console without touching a controller. This can be done, for instance, using a natural user interface that detects gestures and spoken commands. It can use an infrared projector and camera to track the movements of objects and individuals in three-dimensions. It can include a camera, a depth sensor and a multi-array microphone that provides full-body, three-dimensional motion capture, facial recognition and voice recognition capabilities. This is exemplary only.

    [0041] Other sensors 186 can be mounted to, or within, the structural support or enclosure, for device 102 and can include light sensors (such as for sensing when someone turns on a light in a conference room or for sensing other light conditions in the vicinity of device 102), motion sensors (for sensing things such as when individuals enter the conference room), or move about within the conference room, and sound sensors that can pick up and identify various sounds, in addition to microphones 184.

    [0042] Connectors 187 can be provided to receive connections to other devices that use VGA hardware, HDMI or DVI interfaces, etc. System 138 can automatically switch to that input source and processor 154 can treat it as an application within system 130 so a conference call can continue, while allowing the plugged-in device to share its screen.

    [0043] Of course, other or different user input mechanisms 188 can be used as well, and these can include keyboards, keypads, displayed (touch sensitive) control components such as soft keyboards, icons, links, dynamic links or tiles, buttons, and other hardware input mechanisms, such as pointing devices (like a mouse or track ball), and a wide variety of other user input mechanisms. The mechanisms can be actuated using a wide variety of different methods as well, such as voice commands, touch gestures, stylus inputs, etc.

    [0044] FIG. 4 is a flow diagram showing one embodiment of the operation of power management component 168 in automatically powering up and powering down conferencing system 130. It will be noted that system 130 can be manually powered up and powered down by a given user 132 who simply actuates an appropriate user input mechanism causing system 130 to power up or power down. For instance, user 132 can simply actuate a power button to turn the system on and off. However, FIG. 4 shows one embodiment of the operation of power management component 168 in automatically powering up or powering down the system, based on a variety of different sensed parameters.

    [0045] In one embodiment, power management component 168 first detects the presence of a user somewhere in the vicinity of system 130. This is indicated by block 200 in FIG. 4. In one embodiment, power management component 168 receives inputs from a variety of the sensors or user input mechanisms 140 that indicate that the user is present. By way of example, component 168 can receive an input from a microphone 184, a motion sensor, a camera 178, or a variety of other mechanisms that indicate that the user has walked into the conference room 112 where system 130 is deployed, or elsewhere in the vicinity of system 130. This is indicated by block 202.

    [0046] Power management component 168 can also detect (such as by a light sensor input or a camera input) that a user has turned on a light in the conference room 112 or elsewhere in the vicinity of system 130. This is indicted by block 204. Component 168 can also detect that a user is approaching the device based on an input from a camera or an input from a motion sensor or otherwise. This is indicated by block 206. Of course, component 168 can detect the user's presence in other ways as well, such as by receiving an audio input or other inputs, and this is indicated by block 208.

    [0047] Once component 168 has detected the user's presence, component 168 powers up conferencing system 130. However, in one embodiment, component 168 powers up only a subset of the parts of the system so the system is not fully powered up, in that all subsystems and components are not powered up at that time. This is indicated by block 210 in FIG. 4. By way of example, component 168 can power up the touch sensitive display device 102 but keep the backlight off, so that device 102 is not fully powered up. This is indicated by block 212. In doing this, component 168 can perform part of the power up process for the device so that when the user actually approaches the device or begins to use the device, the remaining part of the power up sequence does not take as long. However, by keeping the backlight off, device 102 is not distracting to people in its vicinity.

    [0048] Component 168 can power up other parts of the conferencing system, but keep a different subset of its components or subsystems powered down, in other ways as well. This is indicated by block 214.

    [0049] Once the user takes action relative to conferencing system 130, component 168 can analyze this action to determine whether it indicates that the user is entering a full system power up scenario. This is indicated by block 216 in FIG. 4.

    [0050] By way of example, if component 168 detects (through appropriate sensor inputs) that a user is approaching the touch sensitive display device 102, this may be a power up scenario so component 168 powers up the rest of the system. This is indicated by block 218.

    [0051] If the user approaches another user input mechanism (such as a stylus) or picks up a user input mechanism or otherwise touches a user input mechanism, this can also indicate that the user wishes to have the entire system powered up. This is indicated by block 220 in FIG. 4.

    [0052] Component 168 can also detect that user 132 has plugged in another type of user device into system 130 (such as a laptop computer, a tablet computer, a smart phone, or another device). This can be interpreted as the user wishing to power up the system as well, and this is indicated by block 222 in FIG. 4.

    [0053] Of course, if user 132 provides a voice command (which is received and understood by speech/natural language component 170) this can indicate that the user wishes to power up the system. This is indicated by block 224 in FIG. 4.

    [0054] Other processing can be performed as well, in order to determine whether the user is entering a power up scenario. For instance, where conferencing system 130 allows a user to reserve a teleconference or meeting time or to schedule a teleconference or meeting, the user may be permitted to identify the leader or presenter of the teleconference or meeting. If the leader or presenter is known to system 130 (such as by having profile data stored in data store 142 for the leader or presenter), then system 130 can identify when the leader or presenter enters the room. By way of example, it may be that the leader or presenter is carrying an RFID badge or other wireless identifying device, a smart phone or another mobile device that is known by system 130 to identify the leader or presenter. If system 130 detects the presence of that device, then system 130 can indicate to power management component 168 that the leader or presenter for the teleconference or meeting that is currently scheduled has entered the room. In that case, component 168 can power up the system as well. Of course, where the profile information for the leader or presenter includes facial recognition information, then, using a camera input, system 130 can identify that the presenter or leader has entered the room, based upon the presenter's or leader's facial features. Indentifying that the leader or presenter has entered the room or is in the vicinity of system 130 is indicated by block 226 in FIG. 4.

    [0055] It will be appreciated that system 130 (and component 168) can identify that the user wishes to power up the system in other ways as well. This is indicated by block 228. The particular ways described above are exemplary only.

    [0056] Once power management component 168 has identified a power up scenario, it illustratively turns on touch sensitive display device 102 to the fully powered up state. This is indicated by block 230 in FIG. 4. Power management of the various subsystems can be performed as well, and this is discussed in more detail below with respect to FIG. 9.

    [0057] Suffice it to say at this point, that the system is sufficiently powered up so that the user can perform various interactions with the system. Having the user interact with the system is indicated by block 232 in FIG. 4. The system 130 then performs various actions based upon the user interactions. A variety of these interactions are discussed below with respect to the remaining figures. This is indicated by block 234 in FIG. 4.

    [0058] At some point, power management component 168 detects a likely power down scenario. This is indicated by block 236. As with the power up scenario, the power down scenario can be detected using a wide variety of different inputs. By way of example, component 168 can determine (such as through an audio input 237, a camera input, a light sensor input, etc.) that all of the participants in the conference or meeting have left the conference room and have turned off the light. This is indicated by block 238 in FIG. 4.

    [0059] Component 168 can determine that there has been no pixel movement within the field of view of cameras 178 for a predetermined time. This may indicate that nobody is in the room or that the system should be powered down, because nobody is moving and no one is approaching the touch sensitive display device 102. This is indicated by block 240 in FIG. 4.

    [0060] Where the presentation or conference is a teleconference, component 168 can be notified by conferencing subsystem 158 that the user has hung up the call. This can indicate that at least part of system 130 should be powered down, and this is indicated by block 242 in FIG. 4.

    [0061] Where the conference or presentation is a whiteboard presentation or another presentation using touch sensitive display device 102, component 168 can identify a potential power down scenario when the user has closed the presentation application that is being used to make the presentation. This is indicated by block 244.

    [0062] It will be appreciated that potential power down scenarios can be detected in a wide variety of other ways as well. This is indicated by block 246 in FIG. 4.

    [0063] In response to identifying a power down scenario, power management component 168 illustratively powers down conferencing system 130. This is indicated by block 248 in FIG. 4. This can be done in a variety of different ways as well. Touch sensitive display control component 156 can generate a prompt for the user on touch sensitive display device 102. For instance, the prompt can ask the user whether the user wishes to power down the system, and wait for a user input. Prompting the user is indicated by block 250 in FIG. 4. Touch sensitive display control component 156 can generate and display a power down message and power the system down without waiting for a user input. This is indicated by block 252 in FIG. 4.

    [0064] The component 168 can power down the system in a variety of other ways as well, such as by generating an audio prompt or an audio power down message, such as by simply powering the system down without generating a prompt or a message, or in other ways. This is indicated by block 254 in FIG. 4.

    [0065] FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of camera control component 166 in controlling which camera 178 (or which camera 104 and 106 or 124 and 126 in FIGS. 1 and 2) generates the outgoing video stream. In one embodiment, a power management component 168 first powers up both cameras without sending an outgoing video stream from either of them. This is indicated by block 260 in FIG. 5. Camera control component 166 then determines whether an active camera has been selected manually by either a local user or a remote user. This is indicated by block 262. By way of example, a local user 162 can illustratively approach one of cameras 178 (or touch sensitive display device 102) and actuate a suitable user input mechanism to manually select one of the cameras as the active camera. Also, in one embodiment, a remote user 135 can actuate a suitable user input mechanism to select one of the cameras as an active camera as well. If this is the case, then camera control component 166 simply activates the manually selected camera as the active camera. If not, however, then camera control component 166 performs an automatic camera selection analysis based on a variety of inputs, in order to identify one of the cameras as the camera that should be activated. Performing the automatic camera selection analysis is indicated by block 264 in FIG. 5.

    [0066] In performing the analysis, camera control component 166 can base the analysis on a wide variety of input criteria. For instance, camera control component 166 can receive an audio input 265 and analyze it to identify a location of a speaker or other parameter.

    [0067] In addition, camera control component 166 can analyze the video stream generated by the cameras to determine whether either of the cameras is blocked by a large object. If so, camera control component 166 can select the other camera as the active camera. Determining whether a camera is blocked by a large object is indicated by block 266 in FIG. 5. This may happen, for instance, where a user is making a presentation both locally, and to remote users. If the user has his or her back turned to the active camera and his or her head is closely proximate the active camera, then camera control component 166 determines that the user is blocking that camera, and selects the opposite camera as being the active camera, to provide the outgoing video.

    [0068] Also, in one embodiment, camera control component 166 can determine whether a user is facing the camera, but is in closer proximity to one camera than to the other camera. Referring, for example, to FIG. 2, if the user is located in location 118, such that the user is closer to camera 124, and facing display screen 110, then control component 166 illustratively selects camera 124 as the active camera so that the user's face can be captured, even though the user is close to the display screen 110. Using the location of a person close to the screen (such as the left side or the right side) to select a camera is indicated by block 268 in FIG. 5.

    [0069] Camera control component 166 can also receive inputs from other sensors (such as a motion sensor) to indicate whether there is movement close to one of the cameras. If so, camera control component 166 can select that camera as the active camera. Receiving a motion sensor input is indicated by block 270 in FIG. 5.

    [0070] Camera control component 166 can also use facial recognition to select the active camera. By way of example, it may be that the user's or presenter's face can be recognized by system 130, based upon facial recognition profile information, or otherwise. In that case, camera control component 166 can select, as the active camera, the particular camera that gives the best view of the presenter's or leader's face, no matter where that person is in the room. Using facial recognition to select the active camera is indicated by block 272 in FIG. 5.

    [0071] Camera control component 166 can also use inputs from other sensors or user input mechanisms in order to select the active camera. For instance, if the user touches touch sensitive display device 102 at a given location on screen 110, component 166 can select the camera closest to that location as the active camera. Further, if the user picks up or touches one of the styluses 176, component 166 can select, as the active camera, the camera that is closest to that stylus. Further, using microphone beam forming, the location of a given user's voice can be roughly located and the camera closest to that user can be selected as the active camera. This can also help for users in the room who are, for example, on the far right side of the room. Since the microphone can detect that, it can swap to the left camera which has a better view of the person on the far right side. For instance, if the presenter is making a presentation, but a member of the local audience is asking a question, the audio beam forming process can identify, in general terms, the location of that user, or the general direction of that user. Component 166 can then activate the camera that gives the best view of that location. Selecting a camera based upon locations of any user interactions with the screen or other user input devices is indicated by block 274 in FIG. 5.

    [0072] Component 166 can select a camera as the active camera in other ways as well. For example, where the component 166 receives a sensor input indicating that a member of the audience is approaching the touch sensitive display 102, component 166 can select, as the active camera, the one that gives the best view of that user's location as they approach the touch sensitive display 102. Selecting a camera as the active camera in other ways is indicated by block 276 in FIG. 5.

    [0073] Based upon the analysis, component 166 then selects one of the cameras as the active camera. This is indicated by block 278 in FIG. 5.

    [0074] Component 166 then activates the selected camera. This is indicated by block 280. In one embodiment, camera control component 166 keeps the non-selected camera on, but in a non-broadcasting state so that it does not provide the outgoing video. This can assist in the camera switching process. For instance, where component 166 switches back and forth between the cameras at a relatively frequent rate, keeping both cameras on (even though only one at a time is selected) can make the switching process quicker, because the power up sequence for the selected camera does not need to be fully under taken.

    [0075] Activating the selected camera can be done in a number of different ways as well. For instance, component 166 can first control the selected camera so that it provides the outgoing video to conferencing subsystem 158. This is indicated by block 282 in FIG. 5. Also, in one embodiment, component 166 provides some visual indication that indicates which camera is the selected and active camera. This can be done, for instance, by turning on a light (such as an LED or another source of illumination) that is mounted to device 102 closely proximate the selected camera. This is indicated by block 284. In addition, component 166 can indicate to audio control component 164 which camera is the selected camera, and audio control component 164 can then activate the speaker that is associated with the selected camera so that the speaker mounted to device 102 next to the selected camera is turned on, or made louder, etc. This is indicated by block 286. In addition, where motion sensors are located proximate each of the cameras, camera control component 166 can indicate to sensor control system 172 which of the cameras is selected as the active camera, and system 172 can then activate the motion sensor that is mounted to device 102 and located closely proximate the selected camera. This is indicated by block 288 in FIG. 5.

    [0076] Further, other actions can be taken based upon which camera is the selected camera as well. For instance, when a presenter is closely proximate the touch sensitive display device 102, and one of the cameras is activated, that may indicate that the user is closer to that camera than the opposite camera. In that case, touch sensitive display control component 156 illustratively displays the incoming video of remote users, along with the touch sensitive pallet of control components, on the side closest to the selected camera. This can make it easier for the user to control the system.

    [0077] By way of example, and again referring to FIG. 2, assume that user 132 is facing display 110 in position 118. In that embodiment, camera control component 166 illustratively selects camera 124 as the active camera to obtain an image of the user's face, when the user is located in position 118. Because the user is closer to camera 124 than to camera 126, touch sensitive display control component 156 also illustratively switches the display of the incoming video on display 110 so that it is closely proximate location 118 on display 110. Further, component 156 can display touch sensitive control mechanisms on the user interface display at a location that is close to location 118, so that the user can easily actuate those control mechanisms using touch gestures on display 110. Collocating the other displays in this way is indicated by block 290 in FIG. 5. Camera control component 166 can, of course, perform other actions based upon which camera is activated. This is indicated by block 292.

    [0078] FIG. 6 shows one embodiment of a touch sensitive display device 102, which is similar to that shown in FIG. 2. Similar items are similarly numbered. Thus, it can be seen that cameras 124 and 126 are located on the opposite sides of display screen 110. Also, they are mounted to, or within, structural support or enclosure 299 that supports touch sensitive display screen 110. Each camera has an associated light source (e.g., a LED) 300 and 302, respectively. Also, there is illustratively a speaker 304 and 306 located closely proximately camera 124 and 126, respectively. In addition, in one embodiment, motion sensors 308 and 310 are also located closely proximate cameras 124 and 126, respectively. In one embodiment, light sources 300 and 302, speakers 304 and 306 and motion sensors 308 and 310 are all mounted to, or within, structural support or enclosure 299.

    [0079] FIG. 6 also shows that light sensor 186, directional microphone system 180 and touchless natural user input device 182 are also all mounted to or within structural support or enclosure 299. They are shown near the top of device 102 but they could be located in other places as well.

    [0080] In addition, FIG. 6 shows that connectors 187 can be mounted on a video ingest board 301 that is, itself, enclosed within structural support or enclosure 299. Therefore, cabled connections can be routed directly to processor 154, or the various other items in system 138, without extra or, external, hardware.

    [0081] FIG. 6 shows that display 110 is currently displaying a collaborative workspace 312 that allows a user to collaborate with other, remote or local users, to perform work on collaborative workspace 312. It can be seen that, in the example shown in FIG. 6, the users have generated a pie chart 314 and a set of notes 316 on the collaborative workspace. Of course, a wide variety of other content or information can be displayed on collaborative workspace 312 as well. FIG. 6 also shows that device 102 includes first and second styluses 318 and 320 located generally on longitudinally opposite sides of display screen 110. Each stylus can be located in a holster 321 and 322, respectively, (which can be holders 177 from FIG. 3 above) so that they can be removed and used by a user to point to or draw on collaborative workspace 312, or anywhere else on touch sensitive display 110. Holsters 321 and 322 are illustratively mounted to the structural support or enclosure 299. As discussed above with respect to FIG. 3, each holster 321 and 322 can have a presence sensor and a charger to sense whether the stylus is present in the holster and, if so, to charge it, if needed.

    [0082] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, camera control component 166 has identified that the user is approximately in the location 120 (shown in FIG. 2) which is closer to camera 126, than to camera 124. Therefore, camera control component 166 has illustratively selected camera 126 and activated it. In one embodiment, camera control component 166 has also illuminated light source 302 to give a visual indication that camera 126 is the active camera. Component 166 also illustratively communicates with the other components in multimedia processing system 138 to activate speaker 306 and motion sensor 310, both of which are also closer to camera 126 than to camera 124.

    [0083] Based on the selection of camera 126 as the active camera, collaborative display control component 162 moves the collaborative workspace 312 to the opposite side of display 110 so that touch sensitive display control component 156 can display the remote user video images (e.g., the incoming videos) in a location of display 110 that is closely proximate camera 126. The remote user video images are indicated by blocks 330 and 332, respectively. It can be seen that, in one embodiment, when a remote user is speaking or has indicated a desire to speak (such as by unmuting himself or herself) that remote user's corresponding video image can be enlarged (e.g., image 330 is larger than image 332).

    [0084] Further, component 156 also displays the control user input mechanisms, which can be actuated using touch gestures to control device 102, on a region of display 110 that is also closer to camera 126 than to camera 124. Because the user is located on that side of the display device 102, the displayed controls are illustratively displayed close to the user so that they can be easily actuated by the user. The displayed controls are indicated by block 334 in FIG. 6. FIG. 6 also shows that, in one embodiment, because the user is standing closer to stylus 320 then to stylus 318, system 130 illuminates a light source 336 on stylus 320 so that the user can easily identify that stylus and use it.

    [0085] Further, when the user reaches for a user input mechanism, the system can automatically display directions or other helpful information for using that mechanism. For instance, where the user reaches for one of displayed controls 334, the system can automatically display a direction display 335 describing the control.

    [0086] Referring again to the flow diagram of FIG. 5, camera control component 166 can illustratively control the non-selected camera as capturing images to provide input to analyze a variety of different things, such as the acoustic dynamics of the conference room (or the vicinity of device 102). This is indicated by block 350 in FIG. 5. By way of example, the non-selected camera (e.g., camera 124) can be used to capture images that are analyzed for facial detection or facial recognition. This is indicated by block 352. Camera 124 can also be used to capture images that are analyzed to determine the location of various people in the conference room or otherwise in the vicinity of device 102. This is indicated by block 354. The non-selected camera 124 can also be used to analyze the size of the conference room, or the acoustic characteristics of the room (such as whether it has drapes, carpeting, etc.). This is indicated by blocks 356 and 358, respectively. The non-selected camera 124 can also be used to capture images that can provide information to control component 166 in order to perform further camera switching analysis. This is indicated by block 360. Of course, the non-selected camera 124 can be used to provide other information as well. This is indicated by block 362.

    [0087] Camera control component 166 can also perform a variety of other video actions, using the cameras, based upon a variety of inputs from user input/output mechanisms and sensors 140. This is indicated by block 364 in FIG. 5. By way of example, camera control component 166 can control the selected camera to crop and un-crop the images based upon the video being captured. For instance, where a user is approaching the camera, component 166 can crop tightly to that user's face. However, where a user is moving away from the camera, component 166 can un-crop in a gradual or continuous way, or in another way. This is indicated by block 366 in FIG. 5.

    [0088] Camera control component 166 can also control the selected camera 166 to perform tilt, pan and zoom operations. This is indicated by block 368. By way of example, where the presenter or a speaker is identified, component 166 can control the selected camera to follow that person and to maintain an image of that person, using tilt, pan and zoom functions on the camera. Of course, these functions can be used to perform other operations as well.

    [0089] Control component 166 can also perform other video operations based on a variety of different inputs. This is indicated by block 370 in FIG. 5.

    [0090] In one embodiment, camera control component 166 continues to perform these operations until power management component 168 determines that a power down condition exists for that camera. This is indicated by block 372 in FIG. 5. When that happens, power management component 168 powers down the camera. This is indicated by block 374.

    [0091] FIG. 7 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of the operation of touch sensitive display control component 156 in generating a display of the incoming video, and also of displaying various other images and generating audio outputs from device 102. FIG. 8 is one exemplary user interface display. FIGS. 6-8 will now be described in conjunction with one another.

    [0092] Control component 156 first (using inputs from user input/output mechanisms and sensors 140) receives an indication as to the general position of a user. This is indicated by block 400 in FIG. 7. In one embodiment, component 156 can identify the horizontal location of the user relative to display device 102 (e.g., whether the user is closer to camera 124 or camera 126). This is indicated by block 402. However, component 156 can also illustratively identify the user's height. This is indicated by block 404. Component 156 can use cameras 124 and 126 to triangulate to obtain a distance of the user from display screen 120. This is indicated by block 406. Of course, component 156 can obtain this information from a touchless natural input device 182 or other sensors as well. In addition, component 156 can detect the user's location or position in other ways as well. This is indicated by block 408.

    [0093] Component 156 then, in conjunction with other components in system 138, controls the display of items on display 110 based upon the user's location. This is indicated by block 410 in FIG. 7. First, as described with respect to FIG. 5, camera control component 166 can activate the camera nearest the user and turn on the light 300 or 302. This is indicated by block 412. It can be seen in FIG. 6 that the user is located closer to camera 126, while in FIG. 8, the user is located closer to camera 124.

    [0094] Control component 156 also displays the incoming video nearest the user (e.g., nearest the activated camera). This is indicated by block 414. It can be seen that the remote user video images 330 and 332 are displayed in a position that is closer to the detected position of the user, relative to display screen 110. In FIG. 6, this is on the right hand side of the display, while in FIG. 8 this is on the left hand side of the display. When the incoming video images are moved from side to side, they can be controlled to perform any desired visual effect, such as sucking in to disappear, and inflating to reappear, etc.

    [0095] FIG. 7 also shows that component 156 illustratively displays the touch-sensitive controls 334 nearest the user as well. This is indicated by block 416 in FIG. 7. In FIG. 6, they are displayed on the right side of screen 110, while in FIG. 8 they are displayed on the left side of the screen. FIG. 7 also indicates that the controls can illustratively be displayed at an appropriate height. For instance, since the height of the user can be determined based upon the sensor inputs, if the user is tall, the controls can be displayed higher. If the user is shorter, the controls can be displayed lower. In addition, the touch sensitive gestures can be adjusted as well. By way of example, it is not uncommon that certain touch gestures have the user swipe from the top of the screen down, or from the left or right of the screen in the opposite direction. When the user is relatively small in stature, it may be difficult for the user to reach the top of the screen, or either side. Therefore, the touch gestures can be modified so that the user does not have to reach all the way to the top of the screen or to either side of the screen, in order to invoke the necessary control, given those types of touch gestures.

    [0096] In another embodiment, system 138 activates the user input mechanisms that are closest to the user. For instance, as described above, the stylus that is closest to the user's position may be activated. In FIG. 6, this is stylus 320, while in FIG. 8, this is stylus 318. Activating the user input devices nearest the user is indicated by block 418 in FIG. 7.

    [0097] Further, audio control component 164 activates the speaker nearest the user so that the incoming audio is played from the speaker nearest the user. This is indicated by block 420.

    [0098] Display control component 156 also illustratively displays the collaborative workspace 312 in an appropriate location. This is indicated by block 422. This can be displaying the workspace 312 closest to the user, or on the opposite side as the user, or directly in front of the user, or otherwise.

    [0099] System 138 also illustratively activates the motion and other sensors nearest the user. This is indicated by block 424. Of course, touch sensitive display control component 156 can take other actions based on the detected user position. This is indicated by block 426.

    [0100] The various components in system 138 continue to perform this type of displaying of the various components on user interface display 110, and to activate the various user input mechanisms, based upon the user position and other detected inputs until a power down condition is detected. This is indicated by block 428. When that occurs, the various components and systems and subsystems can be powered down, as desired. This is indicated by block 430.

    [0101] FIG. 9 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment in which power management component 168 manages the power for various subsystems, even when most of system 130 is powered up. For instance, component 168 first determines that the system is to be powered up either partially or fully. This is indicated by block 432 in FIG. 9. Component 168 can then be provided with inputs that allow it to determine whether anyone is relatively close to touch sensitive display device 102, or to one of the user input/output mechanisms 140. This is indicated by block 434. If so, power management component 168 powers up the subsystems near the user. This is indicated by block 436. By way of example, if the user is near stylus 320, power management component 168 provides power to that stylus, while keeping stylus 318 powered down.

    [0102] However, if, at block 434, no one is detected as being near touch sensitive display device 102, then power management component 168 illustratively powers off various subsystems that are on or near display device 102. This is indicated by block 438.

    [0103] By way of example, if no one is near the display device 102, then power management component 168 can power down the touch sensing mechanisms on the display device. This is indicated by block 440. Also, if no one is near device 102, then power management component 168 can power down both styluses. This is indicated by block 442. Power management component 168 can power down other subsystems or components as well. This is indicated by block 444.

    [0104] When power management component 168 is provided with various inputs that indicate that a user is approaching the display device, power management component 168 illustratively powers up the appropriate components or subsystems. This is indicated by block 446. For instance, if a user is approaching the right hand side of the display device, then power management component 168 may illustratively power up the corresponding stylus or other user input mechanisms on that side of device 102. Powering up the subsystems near the user is indicated by block 448 in FIG. 9.

    [0105] Power management component 168 illustratively continues to control power management of the system in these various ways until a power down scenario is detected. This is indicated by block 450. When that occurs, power management component 168 powers down the desired systems, subsystems, components, etc. This is indicated by block 452.

    [0106] This is not an exhaustive list of power management features, and others can be implemented as well. For example, system 130 can have knowledge of a calendar for the device 102 or conference room in which it is located. Component 168 can use the time and date when meetings are supposed to start, along with attendee information, to control power management. Component 168 can, for instance, automatically power up device 102 and call other attendees of a meeting, or call into a conference call, without user interaction. This can be done based on meeting start time and conference call or attendee information.

    [0107] FIG. 10 is a block diagram of architecture 100, shown in FIG. 1, except that it's elements are disposed in a cloud computing architecture 500. Cloud computing provides computation, software, data access, and storage services that do not require end-user knowledge of the physical location or configuration of the system that delivers the services. In various embodiments, cloud computing delivers the services over a wide area network, such as the internet, using appropriate protocols. For instance, cloud computing providers deliver applications over a wide area network and they can be accessed through a web browser or any other computing component. Software or components of architecture 100 as well as the corresponding data, can be stored on servers at a remote location. The computing resources in a cloud computing environment can be consolidated at a remote data center location or they can be dispersed. Cloud computing infrastructures can deliver services through shared data centers, even though they appear as a single point of access for the user. Thus, the components and functions described herein can be provided from a service provider at a remote location using a cloud computing architecture. Alternatively, they can be provided from a conventional server, or they can be installed on client devices directly, or in other ways.

    [0108] The description is intended to include both public cloud computing and private cloud computing. Cloud computing (both public and private) provides substantially seamless pooling of resources, as well as a reduced need to manage and configure underlying hardware infrastructure.

    [0109] A public cloud is managed by a vendor and typically supports multiple consumers using the same infrastructure. Also, a public cloud, as opposed to a private cloud, can free up the end users from managing the hardware. A private cloud may be managed by the organization itself and the infrastructure is typically not shared with other organizations. The organization still maintains the hardware to some extent, such as installations and repairs, etc.

    [0110] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 10, some items are similar to those shown in FIGS. 1-3 and they are similarly numbered. FIG. 10 specifically shows that multimedia processing system 138 is located in cloud 502 (which can be public, private, or a combination where portions are public while others are private). Therefore, user 132 uses touch sensitive display device 102 to access those systems through cloud 502.

    [0111] FIG. 10 also depicts another embodiment of a cloud architecture. FIG. 10 shows that it is also contemplated that some elements of architecture 100 are disposed in cloud 502 while others are not. By way of example, data store 142 can be disposed outside of cloud 502, and accessed through cloud 502. In another embodiment, collaborative display control component 162 (or other components) is also outside of cloud 502. Regardless of where they are located, they can be accessed directly by device 504, through a network (either a wide area network or a local area network), they can be hosted at a remote site by a service, or they can be provided as a service through a cloud or accessed by a connection service that resides in the cloud. All of these architectures are contemplated herein.

    [0112] It will also be noted that architecture 100, or portions of it, can be disposed on a wide variety of different devices. Some of those devices include servers, desktop computers, laptop computers, tablet computers, or other mobile devices, such as palm top computers, cell phones, smart phones, multimedia players, personal digital assistants, etc.

    [0113] FIG. 11 is one embodiment of a computing environment in which architecture 100, or parts of it, (for example) can be deployed. With reference to FIG. 11, an exemplary system for implementing some embodiments includes a general-purpose computing device in the form of a computer 810. Components of computer 810 may include, but are not limited to, a processing unit 820 (which can comprise processor 154), a system memory 830, and a system bus 821 that couples various system components including the system memory to the processing unit 820. The system bus 821 may be any of several types of bus structures including a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, and a local bus using any of a variety of bus architectures. By way of example, and not limitation, such architectures include Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) bus, Micro Channel Architecture (MCA) bus, Enhanced ISA (EISA) bus, Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) local bus, and Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus also known as Mezzanine bus. Memory and programs described with respect to FIG. 3 can be deployed in corresponding portions of FIG. 11.

    [0114] Computer 810 typically includes a variety of computer readable media. Computer readable media can be any available media that can be accessed by computer 810 and includes both volatile and nonvolatile media, removable and non-removable media. By way of example, and not limitation, computer readable media may comprise computer storage media and communication media. Computer storage media is different from, and does not include, a modulated data signal or carrier wave. It includes hardware storage media including both volatile and nonvolatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules or other data. Computer storage media includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical disk storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by computer 810. Communication media typically embodies computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules or other data in a transport mechanism and includes any information delivery media. The term "modulated data signal" means a signal that has one or more of its characteristics set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media includes wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared and other wireless media. Combinations of any of the above should also be included within the scope of computer readable media.

    [0115] The system memory 830 includes computer storage media in the form of volatile and/or nonvolatile memory such as read only memory (ROM) 831 and random access memory (RAM) 832. A basic input/output system 833 (BIOS), containing the basic routines that help to transfer information between elements within computer 810, such as during start-up, is typically stored in ROM 831. RAM 832 typically contains data and/or program modules that are immediately accessible to and/or presently being operated on by processing unit 820. By way of example, and not limitation, FIG. 11 illustrates operating system 834, application programs 835, other program modules 836, and program data 837.

    [0116] The computer 810 may also include other removable/non-removable volatile/nonvolatile computer storage media. By way of example only, FIG. 11 illustrates a hard disk drive 841 that reads from or writes to non-removable, nonvolatile magnetic media, a magnetic disk drive 851 that reads from or writes to a removable, nonvolatile magnetic disk 852, and an optical disk drive 855 that reads from or writes to a removable, nonvolatile optical disk 856 such as a CD ROM or other optical media. Other removable/non-removable, volatile/nonvolatile computer storage media that can be used in the exemplary operating environment include, but are not limited to, magnetic tape cassettes, flash memory cards, digital versatile disks, digital video tape, solid state RAM, solid state ROM, and the like. The hard disk drive 841 is typically connected to the system bus 821 through a non-removable memory interface such as interface 840, and magnetic disk drive 851 and optical disk drive 855 are typically connected to the system bus 821 by a removable memory interface, such as interface 850.

    [0117] Alternatively, or in addition, the functionality described herein can be performed, at least in part, by one or more hardware logic components. For example, and without limitation, illustrative types of hardware logic components that can be used include Field-programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), Program-specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), Program-specific Standard Products (ASSPs), System-on-a-chip systems (SOCs), Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLDs), etc.

    [0118] The drives and their associated computer storage media discussed above and illustrated in FIG. 11, provide storage of computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules and other data for the computer 810. In FIG. 11, for example, hard disk drive 841 is illustrated as storing operating system 844, application programs 845, other program modules 846, and program data 847. Note that these components can either be the same as or different from operating system 834, application programs 835, other program modules 836, and program data 837. Operating system 844, application programs 845, other program modules 846, and program data 847 are given different numbers here to illustrate that, at a minimum, they are different copies.

    [0119] A user may enter commands and information into the computer 810 through input devices such as a keyboard 862, touch screen 110, a microphone 863, and a pointing device 861, such as a mouse, trackball or touch pad. Other input devices such as those described above with respect to FIG. 3 can be used, and still others (not shown) may include a joystick, game pad, satellite dish, scanner, or the like. These and other input devices are often connected to the processing unit 820 through a user input interface 860 that is coupled to the system bus, but may be connected by other interface and bus structures, such as a parallel port, game port or a universal serial bus (USB). A visual display 891 or other type of display device is also connected to the system bus 821 via an interface, such as a video interface 890. In addition to the monitor, computers may also include other peripheral output devices such as speakers 897 and printer 896, which may be connected through an output peripheral interface 895.

    [0120] The computer 810 is operated in a networked environment using logical connections to one or more remote computers, such as a remote computer 880. The remote computer 880 may be a personal computer, a hand-held device, a server, a router, a network PC, a peer device or other common network node, and typically includes many or all of the elements described above relative to the computer 810. The logical connections depicted in FIG. 11 include a local area network (LAN) 871 and a wide area network (WAN) 873, but may also include other networks. Such networking environments are commonplace in offices, enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets and the Internet.

    [0121] When used in a LAN networking environment, the computer 810 is connected to the LAN 871 through a network interface or adapter 870. When used in a WAN networking environment, the computer 810 typically includes a modem 872 or other means for establishing communications over the WAN 873, such as the Internet. The modem 872, which may be internal or external, may be connected to the system bus 821 via the user input interface 860, or other appropriate mechanism. In a networked environment, program modules depicted relative to the computer 810, or portions thereof, may be stored in the remote memory storage device. By way of example, and not limitation, FIG. 11 illustrates remote application programs 885 as residing on remote computer 880. It will be appreciated that the network connections shown are exemplary and other means of establishing a communications link between the computers may be used.

    [0122] It should also be noted that the different embodiments described herein can be combined in different ways. That is, parts of one or more embodiments can be combined with parts of one or more other embodiments. All of this is contemplated herein.

    [0123] Although the subject matter has been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described above. Rather, the specific features and acts described above are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claims.


    Claims

    1. A communication system, comprising:

    a touch screen display device (110) having a touch sensitive display screen (102);

    a first camera (124) mounted to a first longitudinal side of the touch screen display device (110) and having a horizontal field of view in excess of 90 degrees and centered along a line that is offset from a longitudinal axis of the touch screen display device (110), toward the touch screen display device (110), by an angle alpha, the angle alpha being less than 90 degrees;

    a second camera (126) mounted to a second longitudinal side of the touch screen display device (110) and having a horizontal field of view in excess of 90 degrees and centered along a line that is offset from a longitudinal axis of the touch screen display device (110), toward the touch screen display device (110), by an angle alpha, the angle alpha being less than 90 degrees; and

    a conferencing subsystem (158) that controls conferencing communication with a remote system to send touch screen display signals indicative of user interactions with the touch screen display device (110) to the remote system and to receive and display incoming video images from the remote system, and

    a camera control component (166) configured to automatically select one of the first and second camera (126) closest to a location where a user touches the touch sensitive display screen (102) of the touch screen display device (110) as the active camera (124) to provide outgoing video during the conference;

    characterized in that the first and second camera (126) are mounted to the touch screen display device (110) so at least one of the fields of view for the first and second camera (126) captures an image located as close to the touch sensitive display device (110) as distance d, the distance d being 25,4-35,56 cm (10-14 inches), along an entire longitudinal length of a display screen on the touch sensitive display device (110).


     
    2. The communication system of claim 1 wherein the first and second camera (126) each comprise a plurality of cameras, providing images that are combined to obtain the horizontal field of view in excess of 90 degrees.
     
    3. The communication system of claim 1 wherein:

    a first light is mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate the first camera (124), the first light being illuminated when the camera control component (166) selects the first camera (124) as the active camera; and

    a second light is mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate the second camera (126), the second light being illuminated when the camera control component (166) selects the second camera (126) as the active camera.


     
    4. The communication system of claim 1 wherein:
    the camera control component (166) is configured to analyze the video stream generated by the cameras to determine whether either of the first and the second camera (126) is blocked by a large object, and if so, camera control component (166) is configured to select the other camera as the active camera.
     
    5. The communication system of claim 1 wherein:
    the camera control component (166) is configured to determine whether a user is facing one of the cameras (124, 126), but is in closer proximity to one camera (124) than to the other camera (126).
     
    6. The communication system of claim 1 wherein:
    the camera control component (166) is configured to identify that a user is approximately in a location (120) which is closer to the second camera (126), than to the first camera (124), and to select the second camera (126) and activate it.
     
    7. The communication system of claim 1 wherein:
    the camera control component (166) is configured to display touch-sensitive controls (334) on the touch sensitive display screen (102) nearest to a user.
     
    8. The communication system of claim 3 further comprising:

    a first stylus holder, mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) proximate the display screen, the first stylus holder including a stylus presence sensor that provides a stylus presence signal indicative of a stylus (318) being held in the first stylus holder, and a stylus charger that charges the stylus (318); and

    a second stylus holder, mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) proximate the display screen, the second stylus holder including a stylus presence sensor that provides a stylus presence signal indicative of a stylus (320) being held in the second stylus holder, and a stylus charger that charges the stylus (320).


     
    9. The communication system of claim 3 further comprising:

    a first directional speaker mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate the first camera (124);

    a second directional speaker mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate second camera (126), the first and second directional speakers providing audio from a remote system;

    a first motion sensor mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate the first camera (124);

    a second motion sensor mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) closely proximate the second camera (126);

    a light sensor mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110); and

    a directional microphone system.


     
    10. The communication system of claim 3 further comprising:
    a touchless natural input device mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110), and configured to sense depth and skeletal information indicative of locations of people relative to the touch sensitive display device (110).
     
    11. The communication system of claim 3 further comprising:

    a computer processor, mounted within a structural enclosure for the touch sensitive display device (110);

    a video ingest board mounted within the structural enclosure for the touch sensitive display device (110) and having connectors for receiving cabled connections, signals transmitted through the cabled connections being routed to the computer processor within the structural enclosure; and

    a near field communication component mounted to the touch sensitive display device (110) and configured to sense presence of near field communication devices and connect to the near field communication devices for communicating with the touch sensitive display device (110).


     
    12. The communication system of claim 1 further comprising:

    a power management component (168) configured to detect the presence of a user in the vicinity of the system (130) by receiving inputs from a variety of sensors or user input mechanisms (140) that indicate that the user is present;

    and configured to power up at least a subset of the parts of the system once the power management component (168) has detected the user's presence.


     
    13. The communication system of claim 12 further being configured to detect the presence of a device carried by a leader or a presenter for the teleconference or meeting, and to indicate to the power management component (168) that the leader or presenter for the teleconference or meeting that is currently scheduled has entered the room so that in response thereto the power management component (168) can power up the system.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Kommunikationssystem, umfassend:

    eine Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110), die einen berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigebildschirm (102) aufweist;

    eine erste Kamera (124), die an einer ersten Längsseite der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist und ein horizontales Ansichtsfeld von mehr als 90 Grad aufweist und entlang einer Linie zentriert ist, die von einer Längsachse der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110), in Richtung der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110), um einen Winkel Alpha versetzt ist, wobei der Winkel Alpha kleiner als 90 Grad ist;

    eine zweite Kamera (126), die an einer zweiten Längsseite der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist und ein horizontales Ansichtsfeld von mehr als 90 Grad aufweist und entlang einer Linie zentriert ist, die von einer Längsachse der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110), in Richtung der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110), um einen Winkel Alpha versetzt ist, wobei der Winkel Alpha kleiner als 90 Grad ist; und

    ein Konferenz-Subsystem (158), das eine Konferenzkommunikation mit einem Fernsystem steuert, um Signale einer Berührungsbildschirmanzeige, die auf Nutzerinteraktionen mit der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110) hinweisen, an das Fernsystem zu senden und eingehende Videobilder von dem Fernsystem zu empfangen und anzuzeigen, und

    ein Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166), das dazu ausgestaltet ist, automatisch entweder die erste oder die zweite Kamera (126), die am nächsten an einer Stelle ist, an welcher ein Nutzer den berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigebildschirm (102) der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110) berührt, als aktive Kamera (124) auszuwählen, um ein ausgehendes Video während der Konferenz bereitzustellen;

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die erste und die zweite Kamera (126) an der Berührungsbildschirmanzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert sind, so dass wenigstens eines der Ansichtsfelder für die erste und zweite Kamera (126) ein Bild erfasst, das so nah an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) wie der Abstand d ist, wobei der Abstand d 25,4 bis 35,56 cm (10 bis 14 Zoll) beträgt, entlang einer gesamten Länge in Längsrichtung eines Anzeigebildschirms auf der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110).


     
    2. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei die erste und die zweite Kamera (126) jeweils eine Mehrzahl von Kameras umfassen, die Bilder bereitstellen, die kombiniert werden, um das horizontale Ansichtsfeld von mehr als 90 Grad zu erhalten.
     
    3. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei:

    ein erstes Licht an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der ersten Kamera (124) montiert ist, wobei das erste Licht erleuchtet wird, wenn das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) die erste Kamera (124) als aktive Kamera auswählt; und

    ein zweites Licht an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der zweiten Kamera (126) montiert ist, wobei das zweite Licht erleuchtet wird, wenn das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) die zweite Kamera (126) als aktive Kamera auswählt.


     
    4. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei:
    das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) dazu ausgestaltet ist, den Videostream zu analysieren, der von den Kameras erzeugt wird, um zu bestimmen, ob entweder die erste oder die zweite Kamera (126) von einem großen Objekt blockiert wird, und wenn ja, das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) dazu ausgestaltet ist, die andere Kamera als aktive Kamera auszuwählen.
     
    5. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei:
    das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) dazu ausgestaltet ist, zu bestimmen, ob ein Nutzer einer der Kameras (124, 126) zugewandt ist, aber näher an einer Kamera (124) als an der anderen Kamera (126) ist.
     
    6. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei:
    das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) dazu ausgestaltet ist, festzustellen, dass ein Nutzer ungefähr an einer Position (120) ist, die näher an der zweiten Kamera (126) als an der ersten Kamera (124) ist, und die zweite Kamera (126) auszuwählen und zu aktivieren.
     
    7. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, wobei:
    das Kamerasteuerungsbauteil (166) dazu ausgestaltet ist, berührungsempfindliche Steuerungen (334) auf dem berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigebildschirm (102) am nächsten an einem Nutzer anzuzeigen.
     
    8. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 3, ferner umfassend:

    eine erste Taststifthalterung, die an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in der Nähe des Anzeigebildschirms montiert ist, wobei die erste Taststifthalterung einen Taststiftgegenwartssensor umfasst, der ein Taststiftgegenwartssignal bereitstellt, das darauf hinweist, dass ein Taststift (318) in der ersten Taststifthalterung gehalten wird, und ein Taststiftladegerät, das den Taststift (318) lädt; und

    eine zweite Taststifthalterung, die an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in der Nähe des Anzeigebildschirms montiert ist, wobei die zweite Taststifthalterung einen Taststiftgegenwartssensor umfasst, der ein Taststiftgegenwartssignal bereitstellt, das darauf hinweist, dass ein Taststift (320) in der zweiten Taststifthalterung gehalten wird, und ein Taststiftladegerät, das den Taststift (320) lädt.


     
    9. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 3, ferner umfassend:

    einen ersten Richtlautsprecher, der an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der ersten Kamera (124) montiert ist;

    einen zweiten Richtlautsprecher, der an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der zweiten Kamera (126) montiert ist, wobei der erste und der zweite Richtlautsprecher Audio aus einem Fernsystem bereitstellen;

    einen ersten Bewegungssensor, der an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der ersten Kamera (124) montiert ist;

    einen zweiten Bewegungssensor, der an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) in unmittelbarer Nähe der zweiten Kamera (126) montiert ist;

    einen Lichtsensor, der an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist; und

    ein Richtmikrofonsystem.


     
    10. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 3, ferner umfassend:
    eine berührungslose natürliche Eingabevorrichtung, die an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist und dazu ausgestaltet ist, Tiefe- und Skelettinformationen abzutasten, die auf Positionen von Menschen relativ zur berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) hinweisen.
     
    11. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 3, ferner umfassend:

    einen Computerprozessor, der innerhalb eines strukturellen Gehäuses für die berührungsempfindliche Anzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist;

    eine Videoaufnahmetafel, die innerhalb des strukturellen Gehäuses für die berührungsempfindliche Anzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist und Anschlüsse zur Aufnahme von kabelgebundenen Verbindungen aufweist, wobei Signale, die durch die kabelgebundenen Verbindungen übertragen werden, an den Computerprozessor innerhalb des strukturellen Gehäuses geleitet werden; und

    ein Nahfeld-Kommunikationsbauteil, das an der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) montiert ist und dazu ausgestaltet ist, die Gegenwart von Nahfeld-Kommunikationsvorrichtungen abzutasten und eine Verbindung mit den Nahfeld-Kommunikationsvorrichtungen zur Kommunikation mit der berührungsempfindlichen Anzeigevorrichtung (110) aufzubauen.


     
    12. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend:

    ein Leistungsverwaltungsbauteil (168), das dazu ausgestaltet ist, die Gegenwart eines Nutzers in der Nähe des Systems (130) durch Empfangen von Eingaben von einer Vielzahl von Sensoren oder Nutzereingabemechanismen (140), die anzeigen, dass der Nutzer anwesend ist, zu erfassen;

    und das dazu ausgestaltet ist, wenigstens einen Untersatz der Teile des Systems hochzufahren, sobald das Leistungsverwaltungsbauteil (168) die Gegenwart des Nutzers erfasst hat.


     
    13. Kommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 12,
    das ferner dazu ausgestaltet ist, die Gegenwart einer Vorrichtung zu erfassen, die von einem Leiter oder einem Moderator der Telekonferenz oder der Besprechung getragen wird, und dem Leistungsverwaltungsbauteil (168) anzuzeigen, dass der Leiter oder Moderator der Telekonferenz oder der Besprechung, die derzeit angesetzt ist, den Raum betreten hat, so dass ansprechend darauf das Leistungsverwaltungsbauteil (168) das System hochfahren kann.
     


    Revendications

    1. Système de communication, comprenant :

    un dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) ayant un écran d'affichage tactile (102) ;

    une première caméra (124) montée sur un premier côté longitudinal du dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) et ayant un champ de vision horizontal supérieur à 90 degrés et centré le long d'une ligne qui est décalée d'un axe longitudinal du dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110), vers le dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110), selon un angle alpha, l'angle alpha étant inférieur à 90 degrés ;

    une seconde caméra (126) montée sur un second côté longitudinal du dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) et ayant un champ de vision horizontal supérieur à 90 degrés et centré le long d'une ligne qui est décalée d'un axe longitudinal du dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110), vers le dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110), selon un angle alpha, l'angle alpha étant inférieur à 90 degrés ; et

    un sous-système de conférence (158) qui commande la communication de conférence avec un système à distance pour envoyer des signaux d'affichage à écran tactile indiquant des interactions de l'utilisateur avec le dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) au système à distance et pour recevoir et afficher des images vidéo entrantes depuis le système à distance, et

    un composant de commande de caméra (166) configuré pour sélectionner automatiquement l'une des première et seconde caméras (126) la plus proche d'un emplacement où un utilisateur touche l'écran d'affichage tactile (102) du dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) comme caméra active (124) afin de fournir une vidéo sortante pendant la conférence ;

    caractérisé en ce que les première et seconde caméras (126) sont montées sur le dispositif d'affichage à écran tactile (110) de sorte qu'au moins l'un des champs de vision pour les première et seconde caméras (126) capture une image située aussi proche du dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) comme la distance d, la distance d étant de 25,4 à 35,56 cm (10 à 14 pouces), sur toute la longueur longitudinale d'un écran d'affichage sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110).


     
    2. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les première et seconde caméras (126) comprennent chacune une pluralité de caméras, fournissant des images qui sont combinées pour obtenir le champ de vision horizontal supérieur à 90 degrés.
     
    3. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel :

    une première lumière est montée sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la première caméra (124), la première lumière étant éclairée lorsque le composant de commande de caméra (166) sélectionne la première caméra (124) comme caméra active ; et

    une seconde lumière est montée sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la seconde caméra (126), la seconde lumière étant éclairée lorsque le composant de commande de caméra (166) sélectionne la seconde caméra (126) comme caméra active.


     
    4. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel :
    le composant de commande de caméra (166) est configuré pour analyser le flux vidéo généré par les caméras afin de déterminer si la première et la seconde caméra (126) sont bloquées par un objet de grande taille, et si c'est le cas, le composant de commande de caméra (166) est configuré pour sélectionner l'autre caméra comme caméra active.
     
    5. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel :
    le composant de commande de caméra (166) est configuré pour déterminer si un utilisateur fait face à l'une des caméras (124, 126), mais est plus proche d'une caméra (124) que de l'autre caméra (126).
     
    6. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel :
    le composant de commande de caméra (166) est configuré pour identifier qu'un utilisateur se trouve approximativement dans un emplacement (120) qui est plus proche de la seconde caméra (126) que de la première caméra (124), et pour sélectionner la seconde caméra (126) et l'activer.
     
    7. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, dans lequel :
    le composant de commande de caméra (166) est configuré pour afficher des commandes tactiles (334) sur l'écran d'affichage tactile (102) le plus proche d'un utilisateur.
     
    8. Système de communication selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :

    un premier porte-stylet, monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité de l'écran d'affichage, le premier porte-stylet comportant un capteur de présence de stylet qui fournit un signal de présence de stylet indiquant qu'un stylet (318) est maintenu dans le premier support de stylet, et un chargeur de stylet qui charge le stylet (318) ; et

    un second porte-stylet, monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité de l'écran d'affichage, le second porte-stylet comportant un capteur de présence de stylet qui fournit un signal de présence de stylet indiquant qu'un stylet (320) est maintenu dans le second support de stylet, et un chargeur de stylet qui charge le stylet (320).


     
    9. Système de communication selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :

    un premier haut-parleur directionnel monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la première caméra (124) ;

    uns second haut-parleur directionnel monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la seconde caméra (126), les premier et second haut-parleurs directionnels fournissant le son depuis un système à distance ;

    un premier capteur de mouvement monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la première caméra (124) ;

    un second capteur de mouvement monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) à proximité immédiate de la seconde caméra (126) ;

    un capteur de lumière monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) ; et

    un système de microphone directionnel.


     
    10. Système de communication selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :
    un dispositif de saisie naturelle sans contact monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110), et configuré pour détecter des informations de profondeur et de squelette indiquant des emplacements de personnes par rapport au dispositif d'affichage tactile (110).
     
    11. Système de communication selon la revendication 3, comprenant en outre :

    un processeur informatique, monté à l'intérieur d'une enceinte structurelle pour le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) ;

    une carte d'acquisition vidéo montée à l'intérieur de l'enceinte structurelle pour le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) et ayant des connecteurs pour recevoir des connexions câblées, les signaux transmis par les connexions câblées étant acheminés vers le processeur informatique à l'intérieur de l'enceinte structurelle ; et

    un composant de communication en champ proche monté sur le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110) et configuré pour détecter la présence de dispositifs de communication en champ proche et se connecter aux dispositifs de communication en champ proche afin de communiquer avec le dispositif d'affichage tactile (110).


     
    12. Système de communication selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre :

    un composant de gestion d'énergie (168) configuré pour détecter la présence d'un utilisateur à proximité du système (130) en recevant des entrées depuis une variété de capteurs ou de mécanismes d'entrée d'utilisateur (140) qui indiquent que l'utilisateur est présent ;

    et configuré pour mettre sous tension au moins un sous-ensemble des parties du système une fois que le composant de gestion d'énergie (168) a détecté la présence de l'utilisateur.


     
    13. Système de communication selon la revendication 12, étant en outre configuré pour détecter la présence d'un dispositif porté par un animateur ou un présentateur de la téléconférence ou la réunion, et pour indiquer au composant de gestion d'énergie (168) que l'animateur ou le présentateur de la téléconférence ou la réunion qui est actuellement programmée est entré dans la salle de sorte que, en réponse à cela, le composant de gestion d'énergie (168) peut mettre le système sous tension.
     




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    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description