(19)
(11)EP 3 050 348 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
27.11.2019 Bulletin 2019/48

(21)Application number: 14847033.9

(22)Date of filing:  18.09.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H04W 28/02(2009.01)
H04W 76/38(2018.01)
H04W 76/18(2018.01)
H04W 72/04(2009.01)
H04W 40/22(2009.01)
H04W 24/10(2009.01)
H04L 1/16(2006.01)
H04L 12/803(2013.01)
H04L 29/08(2006.01)
H04W 52/02(2009.01)
H04W 84/12(2009.01)
G06F 9/48(2006.01)
H04W 76/27(2018.01)
H04W 76/14(2018.01)
H04W 40/24(2009.01)
H04W 36/32(2009.01)
H04W 24/04(2009.01)
H04L 1/18(2006.01)
H04L 5/00(2006.01)
H04W 48/16(2009.01)
H04W 8/00(2009.01)
H04W 92/20(2009.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2014/056247
(87)International publication number:
WO 2015/047858 (02.04.2015 Gazette  2015/13)

(54)

MITIGATION OF TRAFFIC CONGESTION IN DUAL CONNECTIVITY SYSTEMS

ABSCHWÄCHUNG VON VERKEHRSÜBERLASTUNGEN IN SYSTEMEN MIT DOPPELTER KONNEKTIVITÄT

ATTÉNUATION DE CONGESTION DE TRAFIC DANS DES SYSTÈMES À DOUBLE CONNECTIVITÉ


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 26.09.2013 US 201361883127 P
27.06.2014 US 201414317900

(43)Date of publication of application:
03.08.2016 Bulletin 2016/31

(73)Proprietor: Intel IP Corporation
Santa Clara, CA 95054 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • SIVANESAN, Kathiravetpillai
    Richardson, Texas 75082 (US)
  • KOC, Ali
    Portland, Oregon 97229 (US)
  • VANNITHAMBY, Rath
    Portland, Oregon 97229 (US)

(74)Representative: Goddar, Heinz J. 
Boehmert & Boehmert Anwaltspartnerschaft mbB Pettenkoferstrasse 22
80336 München
80336 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-B1- 1 516 501
WO-A1-2013/070162
US-A1- 2009 116 426
US-A1- 2011 188 377
WO-A1-2011/017460
US-A1- 2009 103 478
US-A1- 2010 039 938
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    BACKGROUND



    [0001] Wireless mobile communication technology uses various standards and protocols to transmit data between a node (e.g., a transmission station) and a wireless device (e.g., a mobile device). Some wireless devices communicate using orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) in a downlink (DL) transmission and single carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) in an uplink (UL) transmission. Standards and protocols that use orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) for signal transmission include the third generation partnership project (3GPP) long term evolution (LTE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard (e.g., 802.16e, 802.16m), which is commonly known to industry groups as WiMAX (Worldwide interoperability for Microwave Access), and the IEEE 802.11 standard, which is commonly known to industry groups as WiFi.

    [0002] In 3GPP radio access network (RAN) LTE systems, the node can be a combination of Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (E-UTRAN) Node Bs (also commonly denoted as evolved Node Bs, enhanced Node Bs, eNodeBs, or eNBs) and Radio Network Controllers (RNCs), which communicates with the wireless device, known as a user equipment (UE). The downlink (DL) transmission can be a communication from the node (e.g., eNodeB) to the wireless device (e.g., UE), and the uplink (UL) transmission can be a communication from the wireless device to the node.

    [0003] In homogeneous networks, the node, also called a macro node, can provide basic wireless coverage to wireless devices in a cell. The cell can be the area in which the wireless devices are operable to communicate with the macro node. Heterogeneous networks (HetNets) can be used to handle the increased traffic loads on the macro nodes due to increased usage and functionality of wireless devices. HetNets can include a layer of planned high power macro nodes (or macro-eNBs) overlaid with layers of lower power nodes (small-eNBs, micro-eNBs, pico-eNBs, femto-eNBs, or home eNBs [HeNBs]) that can be deployed in a less well planned or even entirely uncoordinated manner within the coverage area (cell) of a macro node. The lower power nodes (LPNs) can generally be referred to as "low power nodes", small nodes, or small cells.

    [0004] In LTE, data can be transmitted from the eNodeB to the UE via a physical downlink shared channel (PDSCH). A physical uplink control channel (PUCCH) can be used to acknowledge that data was received. Downlink and uplink channels or transmissions can use time-division duplexing (TDD) or frequency-division duplexing (FDD).

    [0005] US 2009/0103478 A1 relates to a method and apparatus for discarding a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) service data unit (SDU) are disclosed. A PDCP layer sets a timer and discards a PDCP SDU upon expiration of the timer. The timer may be set upon receiving the PDCP SDU from an upper layer or upon submitting the PDCP SDU to a lower layer for transmission. The timer and a radio link control (RLC) discard timer may be coordinated. Alternatively, the PDCP layer may discard the PDCP SDU based on a notification from an RLC layer or based on a PDCP status report.

    [0006] WO 2011/017460A1 describes utilizing the Internet capability in mobile devices/networks to deliver broadcast multimedia to a device. The broadcast can be video, audio, and so forth. Initially the broadcast multimedia is transmitted at high data rates (and in unicast mode) in order for a buffer associated with mobile device to be built to a very long buffer length. When the long buffer length is reached, the multimedia can be delivered at real-time rates. The multimedia delivered at real times rates can be unicast mode or in multicast mode. If the buffer is depleted, a mobile device that is part of a multicast group can autonomously disassociated from the group until the buffer length is restored.

    SUMMARY



    [0007] The invention is defined by the subject matter of the independent claims. Advantageous embodiments are subject to the dependent claims.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0008] Features and advantages of the disclosure will be apparent from the detailed description which follows, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which together illustrate, by way of example, features of the disclosure; and, wherein:

    FIGS. 1A-1E illustrate dual connectivity architectures in accordance with an example;

    FIG. IF illustrates an architecture of a user equipment (UE) operable to support dual connectivity in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 2 illustrates a legacy user plane packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 3A illustrates a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in a master evolved node B (MeNB) in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 3B illustrates a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in a user equipment (UE) in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 4 depicts functionality of computer circuitry of a master evolved node B (MeNB) operable to mitigate traffic congestion in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 5 depicts a flowchart of a method for mitigating traffic congestion in accordance with an example;

    FIG. 6 depicts functionality of computer circuitry of a master evolved node B (MeNB) operable to mitigate traffic congestion in accordance with an example; and

    FIG. 7 illustrates a diagram of a wireless device (e.g., UE) in accordance with an example.



    [0009] Reference will now be made to the exemplary embodiments illustrated, and specific language will be used herein to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended.

    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0010] It should also be understood that terminology employed herein is used for the purpose of describing particular examples only and is not intended to be limiting. The same reference numerals in different drawings represent the same element. Numbers provided in flow charts and processes are provided for clarity in illustrating steps and operations and do not necessarily indicate a particular order or sequence.

    [0011] An initial overview of technology embodiments is provided below and then specific technology embodiments are described in further detail later. This initial summary is intended to aid readers in understanding the technology more quickly but is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the technology nor is it intended to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter.

    [0012] In 3GPP LTE Release 12.0, user equipments (UEs) may connect to more than one cell site simultaneously. For example, the UE may connect to a master evolved node B (MeNB) and at least one secondary evolved node B (SeNB) simultaneously. When the UE connects to two cells, the UE may receive data bearers from both cells at substantially the same time. The multiple bearers may be sent to the UE based on a location of an S1-U termination and location of the bearer split. In one example, the S1-U may be terminated at the MeNB and the bearer split may be performed at a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in the MeNB.

    [0013] FIG. 1A illustrates an example of a dual connectivity architecture for a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB). The S1-U may be terminated at the MeNB and the bearer split may occur at the MeNB. In addition, independent radio link controls (RLCs) may be present in the MeNB and the SeNB for the split bearers. The MeNB may be connected to an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) via an S1 interface. For example, the MeNB may be connected to a serving gateway (S-GW) or mobility management entity (MME) via the S1 interface. The MeNB may include a PDCP layer, an RLC layer and a media access channel (MAC) layer. The SeNB may include an RLC layer and a MAC layer. The MeNB may receive data and/or control information from higher layers at the PDCP layer (e.g., IP layer or application layer). In one example, the data or control information may be communicated from the PDCP layer in the MeNB to the RLC and MAC layers in the MeNB. In addition, the data or control information may be communicated, from the PDCP layer in the MeNB, to the RLC layer in the SeNB via an X2 interface.

    [0014] FIG. 1B illustrates another example of a dual connectivity architecture for a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB). The S1-U may be terminated at the SeNB, and both the SeNB and the MeNB may include independent packet data convergence protocols (PDCPs), i.e., no bearer split. The MeNB and the SeNB may be connected to an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) via an S1 interface. For example, the MeNB and the SeNB may be connected to a serving gateway (S-GW) or mobility management entity (MME) via the S1 interface. The MeNB may include a PDCP layer, a radio link control (RLC) layer and a media access channel (MAC) layer. In addition, the SeNB may include a separate PDCP layer, RLC layer and MAC layer. The PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive data or control information from higher layers, and the PDCP layer in the SeNB may receive data or control information from higher layers.

    [0015] FIG. 1C illustrates yet another example of a dual connectivity architecture for a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB). The S1-U may be terminated at the MeNB and the bearer split may occur at the MeNB. In addition, master-slave radio link controls (RLCs) may be present in the MeNB and the SeNB for the split bearers. The MeNB may be connected to an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) via an S1 interface. For example, the MeNB may be connected to a serving gateway (S-GW) or mobility management entity (MME) via the S1 interface. The MeNB may include a PDCP layer, an RLC layer and a media access channel (MAC) layer. The SeNB may include an RLC layer and a MAC layer. The MeNB may receive data and/or control information from higher layers (e.g., IP layer or application layer) at the PDCP layer. In one example, the data or control information may be communicated from the PDCP layer in the MeNB to the RLC and MAC layers in the MeNB. In addition, the data or control information may be communicated, from the RLC layer in the MeNB, to the RLC layer in the SeNB via an X2 interface.

    [0016] FIG. ID illustrates yet another example of a dual connectivity architecture for a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB). The S1-U may be terminated at the MeNB and no bearer split may occur at the MeNB. In addition, an independent radio link control (RLC) may be present at the SeNB. The MeNB may be connected to an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) via an S1 interface. For example, the MeNB may be connected to a serving gateway (S-GW) or mobility management entity (MME) via the S1 interface. The MeNB may include a PDCP layer, an RLC layer and a media access channel (MAC) layer. The SeNB may include an RLC layer and a MAC layer. The MeNB may receive data and/or control information from higher layers at the PDCP layer. In one example, the data or control information may be communicated from the PDCP layer in the MeNB to the RLC and MAC layers in the MeNB. In addition, the data or control information may be communicated, from the PDCP layer in the MeNB, to the RLC layer in the SeNB via an X2 interface.

    [0017] FIG. IE illustrates yet another example of a dual connectivity architecture for a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB). The S1-U may be terminated at the MeNB and no bearer split may occur at the MeNB. In addition, a master-slave radio link control (RLC) may be present for the SeNB bearers. The MeNB may be connected to an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) via an S1 interface. For example, the MeNB may be connected to a serving gateway (S-GW) or mobility management entity (MME) via the S1 interface. The MeNB may include a PDCP layer, an RLC layer and a media access channel (MAC) layer. The SeNB may include an RLC layer and a MAC layer. The MeNB may receive data and/or control information from higher layers (e.g., IP layer or application layer) at the PDCP layer. In one example, the data or control information may be communicated from the PDCP layer in the MeNB to the RLC and MAC layers in the MeNB. In addition, the data or control information may be communicated, from the RLC layer in the MeNB, to the RLC layer in the SeNB via an X2 interface.

    [0018] The dual connectivity architectures described in FIGS. 1A-1E are further discussed in 3GPP Technical Review (TR) 36.842 Version 12.0.0.

    [0019] FIG. IF illustrates exemplary architecture of a user equipment (UE). The UE may be configured to communicate with a master evolved node B (MeNB) and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB) in a dual connectivity architecture. The UE may include a PDCP layer, a RLC layer and a MAC layer. The PDCP layer in the UE may receive data and/or control information from the MeNB. In addition, the PDCP layer in the UE may receive data and/or control information from the SeNB. In one example, the data or control information may be communicated from the PDCP layer in the UE to lower layers in the UE (e.g., the RLC and MAC layers).

    [0020] In one configuration, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive packets (e.g., PDCP SDU packets or PDCP PDU packets) from higher layers in the downlink. The higher layers may include the IP layer or application layer in the MeNB. The PDCP layer may temporarily store the packets in a retransmission buffer. In other words, the packets may be temporarily stored in the retransmission buffer until the packets are ready to be communicated (i.e., retransmitted) in downlink to the UE or the SeNB. For example, the packets in the retransmission buffer may be communicated from the MeNB to the UE via a MeNB radio link. As another example, the packets in the retransmission buffer may be communicated from the MeNB to the SeNB via a SeNB radio link.

    [0021] In one example, the retransmission buffer may have a limited capacity. Therefore, the retransmission buffer may discard the packets according to a discard counter. In other words, if the packet has been in the retransmission buffer for a predefined period of time, the packet may be flushed to clear space in the retransmission buffer for additional packets.

    [0022] A potential overflow may be detected at the retransmission buffer in the downlink when the retransmission buffer is filling up with packets. In other words, the number of packets in the retransmission buffer may be approaching a defined maximum. Alternatively, the potential overflow may be detected at a reordering buffer in the uplink when the reordering buffer is filling up with packets. The potential overflow may result from delay or capacity constraints of an X2 interface between the MeNB and the SeNB, the MeNB radio link between the MeNB and the UE, and/or the SeNB radio link between the SeNB and the UE. In other words, the packets may be stalled at the retransmission buffer when the delay or capacity constraints are preventing the packets from being communicated to the UE and/or SeNB. In another example, the packets may be stalled at the retransmission buffer due to problems in the RLC or MAC layers of the SeNB.

    [0023] When the packets remain in the retransmission buffer for a period of time that exceeds the discard counter (e.g., due to the delay or capacity constraints), the packets may be removed from the retransmission buffer. However, some of the packets may be unnecessarily flushed in the retransmission buffer. In other words, these packets need to be communicated to the UE, but were stalled in the retransmission buffer for longer than the discard counter because of the delay or capacity constraints. Therefore, the discard counter may be extended based on a type of traffic associated with the packets. As a result, flushing of the retransmission buffer due to slow delivery of the packets to the UE and/or SeNB may be avoided. For example, the discard counter may be extended when the packets are related to delay-tolerant traffic (i.e., no time constraints). On the other hand, the discard counter may not be extended when the packets are related to delay-sensitive traffic, such as voice over internet protocol (VoIP) or video streaming. Therefore, the packets in the retransmission buffer may not be discarded as quickly (i.e., the discard counter is extended) when the packets are related to delay-tolerant traffic, and alternatively, the packets at the retransmission buffer may be discarded according to the discard counter when the packets are related to delay-sensitive traffic.

    [0024] In one example, the PDCP mechanism in the UE and MeNB is dependent on COUNT to prevent replay attacks. The COUNT may be maintained at the UE and MeNB and can be incremented for every transmitted PDCP PDU. To provide robustness against lost packets, least significant bits of the COUNT are carried as PDCP sequence numbers (SNs). A length of the PDCP SN may be increased to multiple bits, thereby extending the discard counter in the retransmission buffer.

    [0025] In one configuration, the number of packets (e.g., PDCP SDU packets or PDCP PDU packets) in the retransmission buffer in the PDCP layer of the MeNB may increase due to latency of the X2 connection. For example, the X2 connection between the MeNB and the SeNB may experience delay or capacity constraints, and therefore, the packets may be stalled in the retransmission buffer of the MeNB. The PDCP layer in the MeNB may drop one or more packets to mitigate the potential overflow at the retransmission buffer. In addition, and according to the invention, the PDCP layer in the MeNB drops one or more packets in the retransmission buffer in order to indicate to upper layers, such as the internet protocol (IP) layer or application layer, to slow down a rate of packet transmissions to the PDCP layer in the MeNB. In other words, the dropping of packets at the retransmission buffer indicates an overflow buffer status to the IP layer, and in response, the IP layer can send fewer packets to the PDCP layer in the MeNB. As a result, the number of packets stored in the retransmission buffer may be reduced and overflow at the retransmission buffer can be avoided.

    [0026] In addition, when the DL discard timer expires at the MeNB, some of the PDCP packets in the retransmission buffer may have been transmitted as PDCP PDUs to the RLC layer and to lower layers in the MeNB. As an example, when the DL discard timer expires, there are five PDCP packets in the retransmission buffer (e.g., A, B, C, D and E). The packets A and B may have been already sent to the RLC layer, but the ACKs have not yet been received. If the packets A and B are discarded, then the UE may be notified that packets A and B were discarded.

    [0027] When the PDCP layer of the MeNB drops one or more packets from the retransmission buffer, the PDCP layer in the UE does not know which packets are dropped. Rather, when the UE does not receive the packets on time from the MeNB, the UE may believe that the packets are delayed, the packets were lost over the air and/or the packets are going to be retransmitted to the UE from the MeNB. Therefore, the UE may unnecessarily wait for the packets without realizing that the packets have been dropped at the MeNB. In one configuration, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may send a list of packets (e.g., PDCP PDUs) to the PDCP layer in the UE, wherein the list of packets indicate packets that were dropped at the MeNB. In addition, the list of packets may include an identifier associated with each of the dropped packets. As an example, when the UE reassembles the packets, the UE may know that packets X and Y were dropped at the MeNB and that the UE should not wait for these packets to arrive at the UE. Thus, the list of packets may enable the UE to distinguish between dropped packets and delayed packets.

    [0028] In one configuration, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive a plurality of packets from higher layers (e.g., IP layer or application layer). The PDCP layer in the MeNB may calculate a downlink split ratio (i.e., the percentage of packets that are to be served directly to the UE using the MeNB link and the percentage of packets that are to be served to the UE via the SeNB using the SeNB link). As an example, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive ten packets. The PDCP layer may push six of the ten packets (i.e., 60%) to the UE via the SeNB and the remaining four packets (i.e., 40%) may be pushed down through the MeNB link to the UE. In other words, the 60/40 relationship may describe the downlink split ratio at the PDCP layer in the MeNB. When the retransmission buffer in the MeNB is approaching a predefined capacity (e.g., due to X2 interface delay, MeNB radio link delay, SeNB radio link delay), the MeNB may recalculate the downlink split ratio in order to reduce an amount of time to deliver the packets to the UE.

    [0029] As an example, the number of packets in the retransmission buffer may be steadily increasing and the X2 connection between the MeNB and the SeNB is known to be delayed and lossy. Therefore, in order to optimize packet flow to the UE, the MeNB may change the 60/40 split ratio to 10/90. In other words, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may push one out of ten packets (i.e., 10%) to the UE via the SeNB and the remaining nine packets (i.e., 90%) may be pushed down through the MeNB link to the UE. Therefore, the MeNB may send fewer packets to the UE via the SeNB and more packets directly to the UE when the X2 connection between the MeNB and the SeNB is delayed.

    [0030] In one configuration, the PDCP layer in the UE may also include a retransmission buffer. The retransmission buffer may temporarily store packets to be communicated to the SeNB and/or MeNB. In the uplink, a discard counter associated with the retransmission buffer may be extended based on a traffic type associated with the packets. For example, the discard counter may be extended when the packets are related to delay-tolerant traffic (i.e., no time constraints). On the other hand, the discard counter may not be extended when the packets are related to delay-sensitive traffic, such as voice over internet protocol (VoIP) or video streaming. Therefore, premature flushing of the packets in the retransmission buffer of the UE due to capacity and latency constraints in the links (e.g., MeNB radio link, SeNB radio link) may be avoided when the discard counter is extended at the UE.

    [0031] In one example, the retransmission buffer in the PDCP layer of the UE may drop one or more packets. In the uplink, the retransmission buffer may drop the packets when overflow at the retransmission buffer is imminent. The dropping of the packets may indicate an overflow buffer status to the IP layer, which can result in the IP layer and application layer reducing a data rate to the retransmission buffer. In other words, the IP layer may send fewer packets to the retransmission buffer when the IP layer recognizes a potential overflow at the retransmission buffer. The PDCP layer in the UE may send a list of packets to the PDCP layer in the MeNB, wherein the list of packets includes dropped packets at the UE. Therefore, the MeNB may identify which packets are dropped at the UE and which packets are delayed at the UE.

    [0032] In addition, when the UL discard timer expires at the UE, some of the PDCP packets in the retransmission buffer may have been transmitted as PDCP PDUs to the RLC layer and to lower layers in the UE. As an example, when the UL discard timer expires, there are five PDCP packets in the retransmission buffer (e.g., A, B, C, D and E). The packets A and B may have been already sent to the RLC layer, but the ACKs have not yet been received. If the packets A and B are discarded, then the MeNB may be notified that packets A and B were discarded.

    [0033] In one configuration, the UE may send a buffer status and/or a request for a modified uplink (UL) split ratio to the PDCP layer in the MeNB in response to detecting the potential overflow at the retransmission buffer in the UE. As an example, in the uplink, the PDCP layer in the UE may send 50% of packets to the MeNB via the MeNB radio link and 50% of packets to the SeNB via the SeNB radio link. However, the SeNB radio link may be congested and, as a result, the packets to be communicated via the SeNB radio link can be stalled at the retransmission buffer. The PDCP layer in the MeNB may determine the modified UL split ratio and send the modified UL split ratio to the UE. The UE may send packets to the MeNB and the SeNB according to the modified UL split ratio. For example, the PDCP layer in the UE may send 80% of packets to the MeNB via the MeNB radio link and 20% of packets to the SeNB via the SeNB radio link according to the modified split ratio. In other words, the UE may send fewer packets to the SeNB due to the latency in the SeNB radio link. When the latency is substantially gone, the UE may again request the MeNB to modify the UL split ratio.

    [0034] FIG. 2 illustrates a legacy user plane packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer. In one example, the PDCP layer may be in a master evolved node B (MeNB). In the downlink, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive PDCP service data units (SDUs) from higher layers (e.g., the IP layer or application layer). The PDCP SDUs may be stored in a retransmission buffer at the PDCP layer in the MeNB. A numbering function may be applied to the PDCP SDUs. The PDCP layer may perform header compression using the RObust Header Compression (ROHC) protocol defined by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force), which can result in compressed PDCP SDUs. Ciphering may be applied to the compressed PDCP SDUs and a PDCP header can be added. In addition, the PDCP SDUs may be converted to PDCP packet data units (PDUs). The PDCP PDUs may be communicated in the downlink, for example, to the UE.

    [0035] In the uplink, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive PDCP PDUs from the UE (either directly from the UE or via the SeNB). The PDCP headers in the PDCP PDUs may be treated and a COUNT may be determined. A PDCP PDU counter (known as COUNT) may be used as input to the security algorithms. The COUNT value is incremented for each PDCP PDU during a radio resource control (RRC) connection. The COUNT has a length of 32 bits in order to allow an acceptable duration for the RRC connection. During the RRC connection, the COUNT value is maintained at the MeNB by counting each received PDCP PDU. Deciphering may be applied to the PDCP PDUs. The PDCP layer may perform header decompression and store the PDCP PDUs in a reordering buffer. In addition, the PDCP PDUs may be converted to PDCP SDUs. The PDCP SDUs may be communicated in the uplink from the PDCP layer to higher layers in the MeNB (e.g., IP layer or application layer). In other words, the PDCP SDUs may be arranged in a correct order before the PDCP PDUs are sent to the IP layer.

    [0036] FIG. 3A illustrates a novel user plane packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in a master evolved node B (MeNB). In the downlink, PDCP SDUs may be received at the retransmission buffer from higher layers in the MeNB. A numbering function may be applied to the PDCP SDUs. The PDCP layer may perform header compression using a ROHC protocol, which can result in compressed PDCP SDUs. Ciphering may be applied to the compressed PDCP SDUs. In addition, the PDCP SDUs may be converted to PDCP PDUs. A bearer split may occur after the ciphering is performed. In other words, the bearer split may refer to an ability to split a bearer over multiple eNBs in dual connectivity. The bearer split may be performed based on a split ratio. Based on the split ratio, a first portion of the PDCP PDUs may become M-PDCP PDUs and a second portion of the PDCP PDUs may become S-PDCP PDUs. A first PDCP header may be added to the M-PDCP PDUs and a second PDCP header may be added to the S-PDCP PDUs. The MeNB may communicate the M-PDCP PDUs to the UE via a MeNB radio link. In addition, the MeNB may communicate the S-PDCP PDUs to the SeNB via an X2 interface, wherein the SeNB may communicate the S-PDCP PDUs to the UE via a SeNB radio link.

    [0037] In the uplink, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may receive the M-PDCP PDUs from lower layers in the MeNB. In addition, the PDCP layer may receive the S-PDCP PDUs from lower layers in the MeNB. The PDCP layer in the MeNB may treat the PDCP headers of the M-PDCP PDUs. In addition, the PDCP layer in the MeNB may treat the PDCP headers of the S-PDCP PDUs. The PDCP layer may combine the bearers and determine a COUNT. In other words, the M-PDCP PDUs and the S-PDCP PDUs may be combined into PDCP PDUs. The PDCP PDUs may be converted to PDCP SDUs. Deciphering may be applied to the PDCP SDUs. The PDCP layer may perform ROHC decompression and store the PDCP SDUs in a reordering buffer, wherein the reordering buffer assembles the PDCP SDUs in a correct order. The PDCP SDUs may be communicated in the uplink from the PDCP layer to higher layers in the MeNB, such as the IP layer or application layer.

    [0038] FIG. 3B illustrates a novel user plane packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer in a user equipment (UE). In the downlink, PDCP SDUs may be received at the PDCP layer in the UE from higher layers and stored at the retransmission buffer. A numbering function may be applied to the PDCP SDUs. The PDCP layer may perform header compression using a ROHC protocol, which can result in compressed PDCP SDUs. Ciphering may be applied to the compressed PDCP SDUs. In addition, the PDCP SDUs may be converted to PDCP PDUs. A bearer split may occur after the ciphering is performed. The bearer split may be performed based on a split ratio, wherein the split ratio is determined by the MeNB. Based on the split ratio, a first portion of the PDCP PDUs may become M-PDCP PDUs and a second portion of the PDCP PDUs may become S-PDCP PDUs. The UE may communicate the M-PDCP PDUs to a master evolved node B (MeNB) via a MeNB radio link. In addition, the UE may communicate the S-PDCP PDUs to a secondary evolved node B (SeNB) via a SeNB radio link.

    [0039] In the uplink, the PDCP layer in the UE may receive the M-PDCP PDUs from lower layers in the UE. In addition, the PDCP layer in the UE may receive the S-PDCP PDUs from lower layers in the UE. The PDCP layer in the UE may combine the bearers and determine a COUNT. In other words, the M-PDCP PDUs and the S-PDCP PDUs may be combined into PDCP PDUs. The PDCP PDUs may be converted into PDCP SDUs. Deciphering may be applied to the PDCP SDUs. The PDCP layer may perform ROHC decompression and store the PDCP SDUs in a reordering buffer, wherein the reordering buffer assembles the PDCP SDUs in a correct order. In the uplink, the PDCP SDUs may be communicated from the PDCP layer to higher layers in the UE.

    [0040] An embodiment of the invention provides functionality 400 of computer circuitry of a master evolved node B (MeNB) operable to mitigate traffic congestion, as shown in the flow chart in FIG. 4. The functionality may be implemented as a method or the functionality may be executed as instructions on a machine, where the instructions are included on at least one computer readable medium or one non-transitory machine readable storage medium. The computer circuitry is configured to identify service data unit (SDU) packets that are dropped in a retransmission buffer of a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer of the MeNB, as in block 410. The computer circuitry is configured to create a list of packet data unit (PDU) packets that are dropped at the PDCP layer of the MeNB, wherein the PDU packets that are dropped are associated with the SDU packets, as in block 420. The computer circuitry is configured to send the list of dropped PDU packets, from the PDCP layer of the MeNB to the PDCP layer of a user equipment (UE), to enable the UE to distinguish between delayed PDU packets and the dropped PDU packets, as in block 430.

    [0041] Dropping the PDU packets indicates an overflow buffer status to an internet protocol (IP) layer, wherein the IP layer reduces a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the MeNB in response to the overflow buffer status. In another example, the PDU packets are dropped in response to detecting a potential overflow at a retransmission buffer of the MeNB. In yet another example, the potential overflow is due to delay or capacity constraints on at least one of: an X2 link between the MeNB and a secondary evolved node B (SeNB), a radio link between the MeNB and the UE, or a radio link between the SeNB and the UE.

    [0042] In one example, computer circuitry can be further configured to recalculate a downlink (DL) split ratio when the potential overflow occurs at the retransmission buffer, the DL split ratio defining a first percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted to the UE via the SeNB and a second percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted directly to the UE. In addition, the computer circuitry can be further configured to: detect a potential overflow at a retransmission buffer of the MeNB, wherein SDU packets are stored in the retransmission buffer for retransmission in downlink to one of the UE or a secondary evolved node B (SeNB); detect a type of traffic associated with the SDU packets; and extend a discard counter at the retransmission buffer based in part on the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets in order to avoid premature flushing of the SDU packets at the retransmission buffer.

    [0043] In one example, the computer circuitry can be further configured to extend the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets is delay-tolerant traffic. In addition, the computer circuitry can be further configured to not extend the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets is delay-sensitive traffic. In one configuration, extending the discard counter at the retransmission buffer includes increasing a length of a packet data convergence protocol sequence number (PDCP SN) to include multiple least significant bits. In addition, the computer circuitry can be further configured to communicate with a secondary evolved node B (SeNB) via an X2 link in a dual connectivity architecture.

    [0044] Another example provides a method 500 for mitigating traffic congestion, as shown in the flow chart in FIG. 5. The method may be executed as instructions on a machine, where the instructions are included on at least one computer readable medium or one non-transitory machine readable storage medium. The method can include the operation of detecting a potential overflow at a retransmission buffer of a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer of a user equipment (UE), wherein packet data unit (PDU packets) are stored in the retransmission buffer for retransmission in downlink to one of a master evolved node B (MeNB) or a secondary evolved node B (SeNB), as in block 510. The method can include the operation of detecting a type of traffic associated with the PDU packets, as in block 520. The method can include the operation of extending a discard counter at the retransmission buffer based in part on the type of traffic associated with the PDU packets in order to avoid premature flushing of the PDU packets at the retransmission buffer, as in block 530.

    [0045] In one example, the method can include extending the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the PDU packets is delay-tolerant traffic. In addition, the method can include determining to not extend the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the PDU packets is delay-sensitive traffic.

    [0046] In one example, the method can include identifying service data unit (SDU) packets that are dropped in the retransmission buffer of the PDCP layer of the UE, wherein the SDU packets are dropped in response to detecting the potential overflow at the retransmission buffer; creating a list of packet data unit (PDU) packets that are dropped at the PDCP layer of the UE, wherein the PDU packets that are dropped are associated with the SDU packets; and sending the list of dropped PDU packets, from the PDCP layer of the UE to the PDCP layer of the MeNB to enable the MeNB to distinguish between delayed PDU packets and the dropped PDU packets. In one configuration, the PDU packets are dropped to indicate an overflow buffer status to an internet protocol (IP) layer to reduce a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the UE.

    [0047] In one example, the method can include dropping the PDU packets due to delay or capacity constraints of at least one of: an X2 link between the MeNB and the SeNB, a radio link between the MeNB and the UE, or a radio link between the SeNB and the UE. In addition, the method can include dropping the PDU packets to indicate a buffer status to an internet protocol (IP) layer, wherein the IP layer reduces a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the UE in response to the overflow buffer status. In one aspect, the method can include requesting a modified uplink (UL) split ratio from the MeNB when the potential overflow occurs at the retransmission buffer of the UE. In one configuration, the UE includes an antenna, a touch sensitive display screen, a speaker, a microphone, a graphics processor, an application processor, an internal memory, or a non-volatile memory port.

    [0048] Another example provides functionality 600 of computer circuitry of a master evolved node B (MeNB) operable to mitigate traffic congestion, as shown in the flow chart in FIG. 6. The functionality may be implemented as a method or the functionality may be executed as instructions on a machine, where the instructions are included on at least one computer readable medium or one non-transitory machine readable storage medium. The computer circuitry can be configured to determine that a retransmission buffer at the MeNB is storing a number of packets that exceed a selected threshold level, as in block 610. The computer circuitry can be configured to adjust a downlink (DL) split ratio for the packets in the retransmission buffer, wherein the packets are to be sent to a secondary evolved node B (SeNB) or directly from the MeNB to a user equipment (UE), as in block 620. The computer circuitry can be further configured to split a bearer in the PDCP layer of the MeNB based on the adjusted DL split ratio to enable the UE and the SeNB to receive the packets in the retransmission buffer from the MeNB according to the adjusted DL split ratio.

    [0049] In one configuration, the retransmission buffer is at a packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer of the MeNB. In one example, the computer circuitry can be further configured to adjust the DL split ratio for the packets in the retransmission buffer in response to detecting delay or capacity constraints on an X2 link between the MeNB and the SeNB.

    [0050] FIG. 7 provides an example illustration of the wireless device, such as an user equipment (UE), a mobile station (MS), a mobile wireless device, a mobile communication device, a tablet, a handset, or other type of wireless device. The wireless device can include one or more antennas configured to communicate with a node, macro node, low power node (LPN), or, transmission station, such as a base station (BS), an evolved Node B (eNB), a baseband unit (BBU), a remote radio head (RRH), a remote radio equipment (RRE), a relay station (RS), a radio equipment (RE), or other type of wireless wide area network (WWAN) access point. The wireless device can be configured to communicate using at least one wireless communication standard including 3GPP LTE, WiMAX, High Speed Packet Access (HSPA), Bluetooth, and WiFi. The wireless device can communicate using separate antennas for each wireless communication standard or shared antennas for multiple wireless communication standards. The wireless device can communicate in a wireless local area network (WLAN), a wireless personal area network (WPAN), and/or a WWAN.

    [0051] FIG. 7 also provides an illustration of a microphone and one or more speakers that can be used for audio input and output from the wireless device. The display screen may be a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen, or other type of display screen such as an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display. The display screen can be configured as a touch screen. The touch screen may use capacitive, resistive, or another type of touch screen technology. An application processor and a graphics processor can be coupled to internal memory to provide processing and display capabilities. A non-volatile memory port can also be used to provide data input/output options to a user. The non-volatile memory port may also be used to expand the memory capabilities of the wireless device. A keyboard may be integrated with the wireless device or wirelessly connected to the wireless device to provide additional user input. A virtual keyboard may also be provided using the touch screen.

    [0052] Various techniques, or certain aspects or portions thereof, may take the form of program code (i.e., instructions) embodied in tangible media, such as floppy diskettes, CD-ROMs, hard drives, non-transitory computer readable storage medium, or any other machine-readable storage medium wherein, when the program code is loaded into and executed by a machine, such as a computer, the machine becomes an apparatus for practicing the various techniques. Circuitry can include hardware, firmware, program code, executable code, computer instructions, and/or software. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium can be a computer readable storage medium that does not include signal. In the case of program code execution on programmable computers, the computing device may include a processor, a storage medium readable by the processor (including volatile and non-volatile memory and/or storage elements), at least one input device, and at least one output device. The volatile and non-volatile memory and/or storage elements may be a RAM, EPROM, flash drive, optical drive, magnetic hard drive, solid state drive, or other medium for storing electronic data. The node and wireless device may also include a transceiver module, a counter module, a processing module, and/or a clock module or timer module. One or more programs that may implement or utilize the various techniques described herein may use an application programming interface (API), reusable controls, and the like. Such programs may be implemented in a high level procedural or object oriented programming language to communicate with a computer system. However, the program(s) may be implemented in assembly or machine language, if desired. In any case, the language may be a compiled or interpreted language, and combined with hardware implementations.

    [0053] It should be understood that many of the functional units described in this specification have been labeled as modules, in order to more particularly emphasize their implementation independence. For example, a module may be implemented as a hardware circuit comprising custom VLSI circuits or gate arrays, off-the-shelf semiconductors such as logic chips, transistors, or other discrete components. A module may also be implemented in programmable hardware devices such as field programmable gate arrays, programmable array logic, programmable logic devices or the like.

    [0054] Modules may also be implemented in software for execution by various types of processors. An identified module of executable code may, for instance, comprise one or more physical or logical blocks of computer instructions, which may, for instance, be organized as an object, procedure, or function. Nevertheless, the executables of an identified module need not be physically located together, but may comprise disparate instructions stored in different locations which, when joined logically together, comprise the module and achieve the stated purpose for the module.

    [0055] Indeed, a module of executable code may be a single instruction, or many instructions, and may even be distributed over several different code segments, among different programs, and across several memory devices. Similarly, operational data may be identified and illustrated herein within modules, and may be embodied in any suitable form and organized within any suitable type of data structure. The operational data may be collected as a single data set, or may be distributed over different locations including over different storage devices, and may exist, at least partially, merely as electronic signals on a system or network. The modules may be passive or active, including agents operable to perform desired functions.

    [0056] Reference throughout this specification to "an example" means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the example is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in an example" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment.

    [0057] As used herein, a plurality of items, structural elements, compositional elements, and/or materials may be presented in a common list for convenience. However, these lists should be construed as though each member of the list is individually identified as a separate and unique member. Thus, no individual member of such list should be construed as a de facto equivalent of any other member of the same list solely based on their presentation in a common group without indications to the contrary. In addition, various embodiments and example of the present invention may be referred to herein along with alternatives for the various components thereof.


    Claims

    1. A Computer circuitry for use in a master evolved node B, eNB, operable to mitigate traffic congestion, wherein the computer circuitry is configured to:

    identify (410) SDU packets that are dropped in a retransmission buffer of a PDCP layer of the master eNB;

    create (420) a list of PDU packets that are dropped at the PDCP layer of the master eNB, wherein the PDU packets that are dropped are associated with the SDU packets; and

    send (430) the list of dropped PDU packets, from the PDCP layer of the master eNB to the PDCP layer of a user equipment, to enable the user equipment to distinguish between delayed PDU packets and the dropped PDU packets;

    characterized in that

    dropping the PDU packets indicates an overflow buffer status to an IP layer, wherein the IP layer reduces a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the master eNB in response to the overflow buffer status.


     
    2. The computer circuitry of claim 1, wherein the PDU packets are dropped in response to detecting a potential overflow at a retransmission buffer of the master eNB.
     
    3. The computer circuitry of claim 2, wherein the potential overflow is due to delay or capacity constraints on at least one of an X2 link between the master eNB and a secondary eNB, a radio link between the master eNB and the user equipment, or a radio link between the secondary eNB and the user equipment.
     
    4. The computer circuitry of claim 2, further configured to recalculate a downlink split ratio when the potential overflow occurs at the retransmission buffer, the downlink split ratio defining a first percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted to the user equipment via the secondary eNB and a second percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted directly to the user equipment.
     
    5. The computer circuitry of one of claims 1 to 4, further configured to:

    detect (510) a potential overflow at a retransmission buffer of the master eNB, wherein SDU packets are stored in the retransmission buffer for retransmission in downlink to one of the user equipment or a secondary eNB;

    detect (520) a type of traffic associated with the SDU packets; and

    extend (530) a discard counter at the retransmission buffer based in part on the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets in order to avoid premature flushing of the SDU packets at the retransmission buffer.


     
    6. The computer circuitry of claim 5, further configured to extend the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets is delay-tolerant traffic.
     
    7. The computer circuitry of claim 5, further configured to not extend the discard counter at the retransmission buffer when the type of traffic associated with the SDU packets is delay-sensitive traffic.
     
    8. The computer circuitry of claim 5, wherein extending the discard counter at the retransmission buffer includes increasing a length of a PDCP sequence number to include multiple least significant bits.
     
    9. The computer circuitry of one of claims 1 to 8, further configured to communicate with a secondary eNB via an X2 link in a dual connectivity architecture.
     
    10. A method for mitigating traffic congestion in a master evolved node B, eNB, the method comprising:

    identifying SDU packets that are dropped in the retransmission buffer of the PDCP layer of the user equipment, wherein the SDU packets are dropped in response to detecting the potential overflow at the retransmission buffer;

    creating a list of PDU packets that are dropped at the PDCP layer of the user equipment, wherein the PDU packets that are dropped are associated with the SDU packets; and

    sending the list of dropped PDU packets, from the PDCP layer of the user equipment to the PDCP layer of the master eNB to enable the master eNB to distinguish between delayed PDU packets and the dropped PDU packets;

    characterized in that

    the PDU packets are dropped to indicate an overflow buffer status to an IP layer to cause a reduction of a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the user equipment.


     
    11. The method claim 10, further comprising dropping the PDU packets due to delay or capacity constraints of at least one of an X2 link between the master eNB and the secondary eNB, a radio link between the master eNB and the user equipment, or a radio link between the secondary eNB and the user equipment.
     
    12. The method of claim 10 or 11, further comprising dropping the PDU packets to indicate a buffer status to an IP layer, wherein the IP layer reduces a packet rate to the PDCP layer at the user equipment in response to the overflow buffer status.
     
    13. The method of one of claim 10 to 12, further comprising requesting a modified uplink split ratio from the master eNB when the potential overflow occurs at the retransmission buffer of the user equipment, the downlink split ratio defining a first percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted to the user equipment via the secondary eNB and a second percentage of PDU packets to be transmitted directly to the user equipment.
     
    14. A machine-readable storage medium storing instructions that, when performed by a processing unit of a master evolved node B, eNB, cause the master eNB to perform the method of one of claims 10 t 13.
     
    15. An evolved node B, eNB, comprising computer circuity according to one of claims 1 to 9.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Computerschaltungen zur Verwendung in einem entwickelten Master-B-Knoten, eNB, funktionsfähig zum Abschwächen von Verkehrsüberlastung, wobei die Computerschaltungen konfiguriert sind zum:

    Identifizieren (410) von SDU-Paketen, die in einem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher einer PDCP-Schicht des Master-eNB abgelegt werden;

    Erzeugen (420) einer Liste von PDU-Paketen, die auf der PDCP-Schicht des Master-eNB abgelegt werden, wobei die PDU-Pakete, die abgelegt werden, mit den SDU-Paketen assoziiert sind; und

    Senden (430) der Liste der abgelegten PDU-Pakete von der PDCP-Schicht des Master-eNB an die PDCP-Schicht einer Benutzerausrüstung, um die Benutzerausrüstung in die Lage zu versetzen, zwischen verzögerten PDU-Paketen und den abgelegten PDU-Paketen zu unterschieden;

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass

    Ablegen der PDU-Pakete einen Überlauf-Zwischenspeicherstatus an eine IP-Schicht angibt, wobei die IP-Schicht eine Paketrate zu der PDCP-Schicht an dem Master-eNB als Reaktion auf den Überlauf-Zwischenspeicherstatus reduziert.


     
    2. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 1, wobei die PDU-Pakete als Reaktion auf Detektieren eines potenziellen Überlaufs an einem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher des Master-eNB abgelegt werden.
     
    3. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 2, wobei der potenzielle Überlauf auf Verzögerung oder Kapazitätsbeschränkungen an mindestens einer einer X2-Verknüpfung zwischen dem Master-eNB und einem sekundären eNB, einer Funkverknüpfung zwischen dem Master-eNB und der Benutzerausrüstung oder einer Funkverknüpfung zwischen dem sekundären eNB und der Benutzerausrüstung zurückzuführen ist.
     
    4. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 2, ferner konfiguriert zum Neuberechnen eines Downlink-Aufteilungsverhältnisses, wenn der potenzielle Überlauf an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher vorkommt, wobei das Downlink-Aufteilungsverhältnis einen ersten Prozentanteil von PDU-Paketen, die über den sekundären eNB an die Benutzerausrüstung zu übertragen sind, und einen zweiten Prozentanteil von PDU-Paketen, die direkt an die Benutzerausrüstung zu übertragen sind, definiert.
     
    5. Computerschaltungen nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 4, ferner konfiguriert zum:

    Detektieren (510) eines potenziellen Überlaufs an einem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher des Master-eNB, wobei SDU-Pakete in dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher für Neuübertragung im Downlink an eines der Benutzerausrüstung oder eines sekundären eNB gespeichert werden;

    Detektieren (520) eines mit den SDU-Paketen assoziierten Verkehrstyps; und

    Erweitern (530) eines Verwerfungszählers an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher basierend teilweise auf dem mit den SDU-Paketen assoziierten Verkehrstyp, um vorzeitiges Auslagern der SDU-Pakete an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher zu vermeiden.


     
    6. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 5, ferner konfiguriert zum Erweitern des Verwerfungszählers an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher, wenn der mit den SDU-Paketen assoziierte Verkehrstyp verzögerungstoleranter Verkehr ist.
     
    7. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 5, ferner konfiguriert, den Verwerfungszähler an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher nicht zu erweitern, wenn der mit den SDU-Paketen assoziierte Verkehrstyp verzögerungsempfindlicher Verkehr ist.
     
    8. Computerschaltungen nach Anspruch 5, wobei Erweitern des Verwerfungszählers an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher enthält, eine Länge einer PDCP-Sequenznummer zu vergrößern, um mehrere niederwertigste Bits aufzunehmen.
     
    9. Computerschaltungen nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 8, ferner konfiguriert zum Kommunizieren mit einem sekundären eNB über eine X2-Verknüpfung in einer Architektur doppelter Konnektivität.
     
    10. Verfahren zum Abschwächen von Verkehrsüberlastung in einem entwickelten Master-B-Knoten, eNB, das Verfahren umfassend:

    Identifizieren von SDU-Paketen, die in einem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher der PDCP-Schicht der Benutzerausrüstung abgelegt werden, wobei die SDU-Pakete als Reaktion auf Detektieren des potenziellen Überlaufs an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher abgelegt werden;

    Erzeugen einer Liste von PDU-Paketen, die auf der PDCP-Schicht der Benutzerausrüstung abgelegt werden, wobei die PDU-Pakete, die abgelegt werden, mit den SDU-Paketen assoziiert sind; und

    Senden der Liste der abgelegten PDU-Pakete von der PDCP-Schicht der Benutzerausrüstung an die PDCP-Schicht des Master-eNB, um den Master-eNB in die Lage zu versetzen, zwischen verzögerten PDU-Paketen und den abgelegten PDU-Paketen zu unterschieden;

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass

    die PDU-Pakete abgelegt werden, um einen Überlauf-Zwischenspeicherstatus an eine IP-Schicht anzugeben, um eine Reduktion einer Paketrate an die PDCP-Schicht an der Benutzerausrüstung zu bewirken.


     
    11. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, ferner umfassend Ablegen der PDU-Pakete aufgrund von Verzögerung oder Kapazitätsbeschränkungen mindestens einer einer X2-Verknüpfung zwischen dem Master-eNB und dem sekundären eNB, einer Funkverknüpfung zwischen dem Master-eNB und der Benutzerausrüstung oder einer Funkverknüpfung zwischen dem sekundären eNB und der Benutzerausrüstung.
     
    12. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10 oder 11, ferner umfassend Ablegen der PDU-Pakete, um einen Zwischenspeicherstatus an eine IP-Schicht anzugeben, wobei die IP-Schicht eine Paketrate zu der PDCP-Schicht an der Benutzerausrüstung als Reaktion auf den Überlauf-Zwischenspeicherstatus reduziert.
     
    13. Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 10 bis 12, ferner umfassend Anfordern eines modifizierten Uplink-Aufteilungsverhältnisses von dem Master-eNB, wenn der potenzielle Überlauf an dem Neuübertragung-Zwischenspeicher der Benutzerausrüstung vorkommt, wobei das Downlink-Aufteilungsverhältnis einen ersten Prozentanteil von PDU-Paketen, die über den sekundären eNB an die Benutzerausrüstung zu übertragen sind, und einen zweiten Prozentanteil von PDU-Paketen, die direkt an die Benutzerausrüstung zu übertragen sind, definiert.
     
    14. Maschinenlesbares Speichermedium, das Anweisungen speichert, die, wenn sie durch eine Verarbeitungseinheit eines entwickelten Master-B-Knotens, eNB, durchgeführt werden, bewirken, dass der Master-eNB das Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 10 bis 13 durchführt.
     
    15. Entwickelter B-Knoten, eNB, umfassend Computerschaltungen nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 9.
     


    Revendications

    1. Circuits informatiques destinés à être utilisés dans un nœud B évolué, eNB, maître, exploitable pour atténuer une congestion de trafic, les circuits informatiques étant configurés pour :

    identifier (410) des paquets SDU qui sont abandonnés dans un tampon de retransmission d'une couche PDCP de l'ENB maître ;

    créer (420) une liste de paquets PDU qui sont abandonnés au niveau de la couche PDCP de l'eNB maître, dans lesquels les paquets PDU qui sont abandonnés sont associés aux paquets SDU ; et

    envoyer (430) la liste de paquets PDU abandonnés, de la couche PDCP de l'eNB maître à la couche PDCP d'un équipement utilisateur, pour permettre à l'équipement utilisateur de différencier les paquets PDU retardés des paquets PDU abandonnés ;

    caractérisés en ce que

    l'abandon des paquets PDU indique un état de tampon de débordement à une couche IP, la couche IP réduisant un débit de paquets vers la couche PDCP au niveau de l'eNB maître en réponse à l'état de tampon de débordement.


     
    2. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les paquets PDU sont abandonnés en réponse à la détection d'un débordement potentiel au niveau d'un tampon de retransmission de l'eNB maître.
     
    3. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 2, dans lequel le débordement potentiel est dû à des contraintes de retard ou de capacité sur au moins une d'une liaison X2 entre l'eNB maître et un eNB secondaire, d'une liaison radio entre l'eNB maître et l'équipement utilisateur, ou d'une liaison radio entre l'eNB secondaire et l'équipement utilisateur.
     
    4. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 2, configurés en outre pour recalculer un rapport de division de liaison descendante quand le débordement potentiel se produit au niveau du tampon de retransmission, le rapport de division de liaison descendante définissant un premier pourcentage de paquets PDU à transmettre à l'équipement utilisateur par l'intermédiaire de l'eNB secondaire et un second pourcentage de paquets PDU à transmettre directement à l'équipement utilisateur.
     
    5. Circuits informatiques selon l'une des revendications 1 à 4, configurés en outre pour :

    détecter (510) un débordement potentiel au niveau d'un tampon de retransmission de l'eNB maître, dans lesquels des paquets SDU sont mémorisés dans le tampon de retransmission en vue de leur retransmission dans la liaison descendante vers un de l'équipement utilisateur ou d'un eNB secondaire ;

    détecter (520) un type de trafic associé aux paquets SDU ; et

    étendre (530) un compteur de rejets au niveau du tampon de retransmission en fonction en partie du type de trafic associé aux paquets SDU afin d'éviter une purge prématurée des paquets SDU au niveau du tampon de retransmission.


     
    6. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 5, configurés en outre pour étendre le compteur de rejets au niveau du tampon de retransmission quand le type de trafic associé aux paquets SDU est un trafic tolérant un retard.
     
    7. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 5, configurés en outre pour ne pas étendre le compteur de rejets au niveau du tampon de retransmission quand le type de trafic associé au paquet SDU est un trafic sensible au retard.
     
    8. Circuits informatiques selon la revendication 5, dans lesquels l'extension du compteur de rejets au niveau du tampon de retransmission comporte une augmentation d'une longueur d'un numéro de séquence PDCP pour inclure de multiples bits de poids faible.
     
    9. Circuit informatique selon l'une des revendications 1 à 8, configurés en outre pour communiquer avec un eNB secondaire par l'intermédiaire d'une liaison X2 dans une architecture de double connectivité.
     
    10. Procédé d'atténuation d'une congestion de trafic dans un nœud B évolué, eNB, maître, le procédé comprenant :

    l'identification de paquets SDU qui sont abandonnés dans un tampon de retransmission de la couche PDCP de l'équipement utilisateur, les paquets SDU étant abandonnés en réponse à la détection du débordement potentiel au niveau du tampon de retransmission ;

    la création d'une liste de paquets PDU qui sont abandonnés au niveau de la couche PDCP de l'équipement utilisateur, dans lesquels les paquets PDU qui sont abandonnés sont associés aux paquets SDU ; et

    l'envoi de la liste de paquets PDU abandonnés, de la couche PDCP de l'équipement utilisateur à la couche PDCP de l'eNB maître, pour permettre à l'eNB maître de différencier les paquets PDU retardés des paquets PDU abandonnés ;

    caractérisé en ce que

    les paquets PDU sont abandonnés pour indiquer un état de tampon de débordement à une couche IP afin d'entraîner une réduction d'un débit de paquets vers la couche PDCP au niveau de l'équipement utilisateur.


     
    11. Procédé selon la revendication 10, comprenant en outre l'abandon des paquets PD en raison de contraintes de retard ou de capacité d'au moins une d'une liaison X2 entre l'eNB maître et un eNB secondaire, d'une liaison radio entre l'eNB maître et l'équipement utilisateur, ou d'une liaison radio entre l'eNB secondaire et l'équipement utilisateur.
     
    12. Procédé selon la revendication 10 ou 11, comprenant en outre un abandon des paquets pour indiquer un état de tampon à une couche IP, la couche IP réduisant un débit de paquets vers la couche PDCP au niveau de l'équipement utilisateur en réponse à l'état de tampon de débordement.
     
    13. Procédé selon l'une des revendications 10 à 12, comprenant en outre la demande d'un rapport de division de liaison montante modifié par l'eNB maître à l'occurrence du débordement potentiel au niveau du tampon de retransmission de l'équipement utilisateur, le rapport de division de liaison descendante définissant un premier pourcentage de paquets PDU à transmettre à l'équipement utilisateur par l'intermédiaire de l'eNB secondaire et un second pourcentage de paquets PDU à transmettre directement à l'équipement utilisateur.
     
    14. Support de mémorisation lisible par machine mémorisant des instructions qui, à leur exécution par une unité de traitement d'un nœud B évolué, eNB, maître, amènent l'eNB maître, à mettre en œuvre le procédé selon l'une des revendications 10 à 13.
     
    15. Nœud B évolué, eNB, comprenant des circuits informatiques selon l'une des revendications 1 à 9.
     




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    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Non-patent literature cited in the description