(19)
(11)EP 3 064 373 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
10.04.2019 Bulletin 2019/15

(21)Application number: 14857635.8

(22)Date of filing:  01.07.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
B60C 9/22(2006.01)
B60C 9/28(2006.01)
B60C 15/00(2006.01)
B60C 9/20(2006.01)
B60C 11/02(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/JP2014/003510
(87)International publication number:
WO 2015/063974 (07.05.2015 Gazette  2015/18)

(54)

PNEUMATIC TIRE

LUFTREIFEN

PNEU


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 29.10.2013 JP 2013224539

(43)Date of publication of application:
07.09.2016 Bulletin 2016/36

(73)Proprietor: Bridgestone Corporation
Tokyo 104-8340 (JP)

(72)Inventors:
  • HATANAKA, Shintaro
    Kodaira-shi Tokyo 187-8531 (JP)
  • KUWAYAMA, Isao
    Kodaira-shi Tokyo 187-8531 (JP)

(74)Representative: Oxley, Robin John George 
Marks & Clerk LLP 90 Long Acre
London WC2E 9RA
London WC2E 9RA (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 2 463 119
WO-A1-2012/066725
JP-A- 2001 301 421
JP-A- 2009 012 547
JP-A- 2012 171 423
EP-A1- 2 982 518
WO-A1-2013/042256
JP-A- 2006 193 032
JP-A- 2012 020 673
US-A- 5 240 057
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION



    [0001] This application claims priority to and the benefit of Japanese Patent Application No. 2013-224539 filed October 29, 2013, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

    TECHNICAL FIELD



    [0002] This disclosure relates to a pneumatic tire.

    BACKGROUND



    [0003] One known way of reinforcing a pneumatic tire is to dispose, at the outer side in the tire radial direction of the crown portion of the carcass extending between bead portions, an inclined belt layer including cords extending at an inclination relative to the tire circumferential direction and a circumferential belt layer including cords extending along the tire circumferential direction.

    [0004] In other words, the tire is reinforced for example by using the inclined belt layer to ensure rigidity in the tire width direction and to yield cornering power, which is one important index of steering stability, and by using the circumferential belt layer to ensure rigidity in the tire circumferential direction and suppress radial growth of the tire when driving at high speed.

    [0005] In general, since a tire with larger cornering power has excellent steering stability, it is desirable to increase cornering power. Increasing the rigidity of the inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is an effective way of increasing cornering power. Specifically, steeply inclining the cords in the inclined belt layer relative to the tire circumferential direction is one possible approach. Attention is drawn to the disclosures of JP 2012-020673 A, WO 2012/066725 A1, JP 2009-012547 A, JP 2012-171423 A, JP 2001-301421 A, JP 2006-193032 A, EP 2982518 A1 and EP 2463119 A1.

    SUMMARY


    (Technical Problem)



    [0006] In a tire provided with an inclined belt layer including cords greatly inclined relative to the tire circumferential direction, a large cornering power is generated under the condition of driving with the tire at a relatively large slip angle. Conversely, under the condition of driving with a relatively small slip angle, the amount of increase in the cornering power is smaller than when the slip angle is large, and there is demand for improvement on this point.

    [0007] It would therefore be helpful to provide a pneumatic tire that reliably increases cornering power under various driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes.

    (Solution to Problem)



    [0008] In order to resolve the above-described problem, our pneumatic tire comprises a pair of bead portions; a tread portion; a carcass extending between the pair of bead portions; an inclined belt provided at an outer side of a crown portion of the carcass in a tire radial direction and formed by one or more inclined belt layers including cords that are inclined relative to a tire circumferential direction; and a circumferential belt provided at the outer side of the crown portion of the carcass in the tire radial direction and formed by one or more circumferential belt layers including cords that extend along the tire circumferential direction; wherein one or more circumferential main grooves extending along the tire circumferential direction are formed on a surface of the tread portion; as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt includes a high-angle inclined belt layer in which the cords are at an inclination angle of 35° or more to 90° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction; and in at least one tread half portion, an edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer in a tire width direction is positioned further outward in the tire width direction than a circumferential main groove disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction, and an interval in the tire width direction from a center of the circumferential main groove to the edge is 0.2W1 or more to 0.35W1 or less, where W1 is a width of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction; wherein as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt further includes a low-angle inclined belt layer in which the cords are at an inclination angle that is smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer and is 30° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction; and a width of the low-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is 0.6W1 or less. According to this structure, the cornering power can be increased under various driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes. The tread half portions are the pair of regions defined by the tire equator and the tread edges.

    [0009] The tire of this disclosure is used by being attached to an applicable rim. The "applicable rim" is an industrial standard effective in the region where the tire is manufactured and used and refers to a standard rim at an applicable size as described in the JATMA YEAR BOOK in Japan, the ETRTO STANDARDS MANUAL in Europe, the TRA YEAR BOOK in the United States of America, or the like (specifically the Measuring Rim in the ETRTO STANDARDS MANUAL and the Design Rim in the TRA YEAR BOOK).

    [0010] In this disclosure, the tire width direction and the like of the inclined belt layer and the circumferential belt layer is measured when the tire is mounted on the applicable rim, air pressure corresponding to the maximum load capability in the applicable size / ply rating described in JATMA or the like ("predetermined air pressure") is applied, and no load is applied.

    [0011] As used herein, the phrase "cords extending along the tire circumferential direction" includes not only the case of the cords being parallel to the tire circumferential direction, but also the case of the cords being slightly inclined relative to the tire circumferential direction (at an inclination angle of less than 5°) for example due to forming the belt layer by spirally winding strips of rubber-coated cords.

    [0012] In our pneumatic tire, as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt further includes a low-angle inclined belt layer in which the cords are at an inclination angle that is smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer and is 30° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction; and a width of the low-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is preferably 0.6W1 or less. According to this structure, the noise performance can be improved while increasing the cornering power.

    [0013] In our pneumatic tire, as the inclined belt layers, the inclined belt preferably includes only one layer of the high-angle inclined belt layer and one layer of the low-angle inclined belt layer. According to this structure, an increase in manufacturing costs and in tire weight can be suppressed while maintaining noise performance.

    [0014] In our pneumatic tire, X is preferably 700 or less when X = Ymn, where Y is Young's modulus of the cords in the one or more circumferential belt layers in GPa, m is the number of layers of the one or more circumferential belt layers, and n is the number of cords implanted per 50 mm. This structure contributes to the effect of increasing the cornering power under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes and can also reduce manufacturing costs.

    [0015] In our pneumatic tire, the circumferential belt preferably includes a wide circumferential belt layer and a narrow circumferential belt layer as the circumferential belt layers, and the narrow circumferential belt layer is disposed further outward in the tire radial direction than the wide circumferential belt layer. The wide circumferential belt layer optionally has a larger width in the tire width direction than that of the high-angle inclined belt layer, and the interval from the edge of the wide circumferential belt layer in the tire width direction to the edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction may be 5 mm or greater.

    [0016] In our pneumatic tire, the width W4 in the tire width direction of the central region may be 0.2W3 or more to 0.6W3 or less, where W3 is the width of the circumferential belt in the tire width direction.

    [0017] In our pneumatic tire, the inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer relative to the tire circumferential direction may be 10° or greater.

    [0018] In our pneumatic tire, the width W1 of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction may be greater than the ground contact width of the tread portion.

    (Advantageous Effect)



    [0019] According to this disclosure, a pneumatic tire with increased cornering power at a variety of slip angles can be provided.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0020] In the accompanying drawings:

    FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 1;

    FIG. 2 illustrates an example of the belt structure in the tire illustrated in FIG. 1;

    FIG. 3 illustrates another example of the belt structure in the tire illustrated in FIG. 1;

    FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 2;

    FIG. 5 illustrates the effects of the pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 2;

    FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 3;

    FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 4; and

    FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 5.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0021] The following describes embodiments of this disclosure with reference to the drawings.

    [0022] First, a pneumatic tire according to Embodiment 1, which is not part of the present invention, is described. FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional diagram in the tire width direction of a pneumatic tire according to this embodiment. The pneumatic tire 10 is used by being attached to an applicable rim R.

    [0023] As illustrated in FIG. 1, the pneumatic tire 10 includes a tread portion 11, sidewall portions 12 extending inward in the tire radial direction from the sides of the tread portion 11, and a bead portion 13 continuing from each sidewall portion 12 inward in the tire radial direction. One or more circumferential main grooves 14 extending along the tire equator CL are formed on the surface of the tread portion 11. While it suffices to provide the circumferential main grooves 14 on either one of the tread half portions bordered by the tire equator CL, one may be provided in each tread half portion for a total of two circumferential main grooves, or three or more may be provided.

    [0024] The pneumatic tire 10 also includes a carcass 15 extending between the pair of bead portions 13, an inclined belt 16, and a circumferential belt 17.

    [0025] The inclined belt 16 is disposed at the outer side of a crown portion of the carcass 15 in the tire radial direction. The inclined belt 16 is formed by one or more inclined belt layers including cords inclined relative to the tire circumferential direction. In this embodiment, as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt 16 includes a first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a. An inclination angle of the cords in the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a relative to the tire circumferential direction is 35° or more to 90° or less. The inclination angle is more preferably 50° or more.

    [0026] By setting the inclination angle of the cords to be 35° or more, the circumferential expansion of rubber increases when the surface of the tread portion 11 deforms, thereby sufficiently ensuring the ground contact length of the tire. As a result, the cornering power increases, yielding high turning performance. Furthermore, if the inclination angle is 50° or more, the cornering power can be further increased.

    [0027] Furthermore, in the inclined belt 16, the edge of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction is positioned further outward in the tire width direction than the circumferential main groove 14 disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction in the tread half portion bordered by the tire equator CL. Also, the interval W5 in the tire width direction from the edge of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction to the center of the circumferential main groove 14 is 0.2W1 or more to 0.35W1 or less, where W1 is the width of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction. By setting the interval W5 to satisfy this condition, a wide shoulder land portion 18 is formed on the surface of the tread portion 11. When the inclined belt 16 includes a plurality of high-angle inclined belt layers, then the edge, in the tire width direction, of the entire high-angle inclined belt in which all of the high-angle inclined belt layers are overlapped is positioned further outward in the tire width direction than the circumferential main groove 14 disposed furthest outward in the tread half portion bordered by the tire equator CL, and the interval W5 in the tire width direction from the edge to the center of the circumferential main groove 14 is 0.2W1 or more to 0.35W1 or less, where W1 is the width of the entire high-angle inclined belt in the tire width direction.

    [0028] By forming the above-described wide shoulder land portion 18 on the surface of the tread portion 11, the cornering power is increased, and a high turning performance is obtained, even under a driving condition with a relatively small slip angle. This effect is described below.

    [0029] Under a driving condition with a relatively small slip angle, the in-plane flexural rigidity of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction decreases due to the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a including cords with the above-mentioned inclination angle. For this reason, the shear force produced between the tread rubber and the inclined belt 16 decreases, and the effect of increasing the cornering power by including the above-mentioned inclination angle is reduced under a driving condition with a relatively small slip angle. Therefore, by forming the wide shoulder land portion 18 as described above, the rigidity of the shoulder land portion 18 in the tire width direction increases, and the in-plane flexure of the inclined belt 16 decreases. Accordingly, the shear force produced between the tread rubber and the inclined belt 16 increases, thereby increasing the cornering power.

    [0030] In particular, by setting the interval W5 from the edge of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a to the center of the circumferential main groove 17 to be 0.2W1 or more, the cornering power can be sufficiently increased and rigidity in the tire width direction can be obtained under a driving condition with a relatively small slip angle. Furthermore, setting the interval W5 to be 0.35W1 or less allows suppression of the reduction in cornering power due to the ground contact length of the tire shortening through the occurrence of buckling.

    [0031] In the inclined belt 16, the width of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction is preferably 60% or more of the width of the carcass 15 in the tire width direction in order to increase durability of the tire. Furthermore, setting the width of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction to be greater than the ground contact width of the tread portion 11 is preferable in order to further increase durability of the tire.

    [0032] As the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt 16 preferably includes a second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b, as in the embodiment in FIG. 1. The second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b is disposed further outward in the tire radial direction than the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a. The second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b may be disposed between the carcass 15 and the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a. In this embodiment, the inclination angle of the cords in the second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b relative to the tire circumferential direction is 35° or more to 90° or less.

    [0033] As illustrated in FIG. 2, the cords in the second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b intersect the cords in the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a so as to sandwich the tire equator CL therebetween. According to this structure, a shear force acts between the two high-angle inclined belt layers 16a and 16b when the vehicle corners, and the cornering power can be further improved.

    [0034] As illustrated in FIG. 3, the cords in the second high-angle inclined belt layer 16b may be inclined relative to the tire equator CL in the same direction as the cords in the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a. According to this structure, the shear force that acts between the two high-angle inclined belt layers 16a and 16b decreases, allowing a reduction in rolling resistance.

    [0035] The circumferential belt 17 is disposed at the outer side of the crown portion of the carcass 15 in the tire radial direction, preferably at the outer side of the inclined belt 16 in the tire radial direction. The circumferential belt 17 has cords extending along the tire circumferential direction and is formed by one or more circumferential belt layers. X is preferably 700 or less when X = Ymn, where Y (GPa) is Young's modulus of the cords in the one or more circumferential belt layers, m is the number of layers of the one or more circumferential belt layers, and n is the number of cords implanted per 50 mm.

    [0036] Setting X to be 700 or less can appropriately reduce the tensile strength of the circumferential belt layers and contribute to the effect of increasing cornering power under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes. Adopting a circumferential belt with a small tensile strength can also reduce manufacturing costs.

    [0037] The cords in the carcass 15, the inclined belt 16, and the circumferential belt 17 may, for example, be organic fiber cords made of aramid, polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate, or the like, or steel cords.

    [0038] Next, Embodiment 2, which is not part of the present invention, is described. In Embodiment 2, the structure of the circumferential belt differs from that of Embodiment 1. The following describes Embodiment 2, focusing on the differences from Embodiment 1. Portions having the same structure as in Embodiment 1 are labeled with the same reference signs.

    [0039] In a pneumatic tire 100 in Embodiment 2 (see FIG. 4), the structure of the tread portion 11, sidewall portions 12, bead portions 13, carcass 15, and inclined belt 16 and the positions at which the circumferential main grooves 14 are disposed are the same as in Embodiment 1.

    [0040] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 1, the cornering power increases and high turning performance is obtained under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes.

    [0041] In the pneumatic tire 100, a circumferential belt 170 includes a wide circumferential belt layer 170a and a narrow circumferential belt layer 170b as the circumferential belt layers. The narrow circumferential belt layer 170b is preferably disposed further outward in the tire radial direction than the wide circumferential belt layer 170a.

    [0042] A high-rigidity region is formed by overlap between two layers, i.e. the wide circumferential belt layer 170a and the narrow circumferential belt layer 170b, in a central region C, in the tire width direction, that includes the tire equator CL. Whereas two circumferential belt layers are provided in the central region C, one circumferential belt layer is provided in regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction. Therefore, the tire circumferential direction rigidity per unit width is higher in the central region C than in the regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction. A width W4 in the tire width direction of the central region C, where the high-rigidity region is formed, is 0.2W3 or more to 0.6W3 or less, where W3 is the width of the circumferential belt 170 in the tire width direction, i.e. the width of the wide circumferential belt layer 170a in the tire width direction in this example.

    [0043] By forming the high-rigidity region, the noise performance can be improved. This effect is described below.

    [0044] A tire in which the cords in the inclined belt layer have a large inclination angle relative to the tire circumferential direction, for example 35° or more as in this embodiment, has a shape (see the dash-double dot line in FIG. 5) such that the tread surface uniformly undergoes significant vibration in the high frequency range of 400 Hz to 2 kHz in the primary, secondary or ternary vibration modes in the cross-sectional direction, thereby causing a large noise emission. Therefore, forming the high-rigidity region to locally increase the circumferential rigidity of the central region C makes the central region of the tread portion 11 in the tire width direction less prone to expansion in the tire radial direction. As a result, the expansion of the tread surface in the tire radial direction is suppressed (see the dashed line in FIG. 5), and noise emission is reduced. In particular, setting the width W4 of the central region C in the tire width direction to be 0.2W3 or greater allows the required noise performance to be satisfied.

    [0045] Furthermore, setting the width W4 of the central region C in the tire width direction to be 0.6W3 or less allows suppression of the occurrence of a vibration mode in which the entire tread portion 11 vibrates due to the high-rigidity region being too wide, allows suppression of noise emission due to this vibration mode, and allows suppression of an increase in tire weight.

    [0046] Forming the high-rigidity region by setting the number of circumferential belt layers to two layers in the central region C and one layer in regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction also allows suppression of an increase in manufacturing costs and tire weight while maintaining noise performance.

    [0047] The wide circumferential belt layer 170a preferably has a smaller width in the tire width direction than the width of the high-angle inclined belt layer, i.e. the wider first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in this example. According to this structure, the wide circumferential belt layer 170a and the carcass 15 are prevented from being adjacent in the tire radial direction, and when the tread portion 11 contacts the ground, strain can be suppressed between the carcass 15, which acts to expand in the tire radial direction, and the wide circumferential belt layer 170a, which acts to suppress expansion in the tire circumferential direction. By suppressing strain between the carcass 15 and the wide circumferential belt layer 170a, deterioration of rolling resistance is suppressed.

    [0048] Alternatively, the wide circumferential belt layer 170a may have a larger width in the tire width direction than that of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a, and the interval from the edge of the wide circumferential belt layer 170a in the tire width direction to the edge of the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a in the tire width direction may be 5 mm or greater.

    [0049] By the wide circumferential belt layer 170a and the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a satisfying the above-described relationship, belt edge separation of the inclined belt is suppressed.

    [0050] Next, Embodiment 3, which is not part of the present invention, is described. In Embodiment 3, the structure of the circumferential belt differs from that of Embodiment 1. The following describes Embodiment 3, focusing on the differences from Embodiment 1. Portions having the same structure as in Embodiments 1 and 2 are labeled with the same reference signs.

    [0051] In a pneumatic tire 101 in Embodiment 3 (see FIG. 6), the structure of the tread portion 11, sidewall portions 12, bead portions 13, carcass 15, and inclined belt 16 and the positions at which the circumferential main grooves 14 are disposed are the same as in Embodiment 1.

    [0052] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 1, the cornering power increases and high turning performance is obtained reliably under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes.

    [0053] In the pneumatic tire 101, a circumferential belt 171 includes a first circumferential belt layer 171c and a second circumferential belt layer 171d that are split up in the tire width direction as the circumferential belt layers. A high-rigidity region is formed by the first circumferential belt layer 171c and the second circumferential belt layer 171d overlapping in the central region C. Whereas two circumferential belt layers are provided in the central region C, one circumferential belt layer is provided in regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction. Therefore, the tire circumferential direction rigidity per unit width is higher in the central region C than in the regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction. As in Embodiment 2, the width W4 in the tire width direction of the central region C is preferably 0.2W3 or more to 0.6W3 or less, where W3 is the width of the circumferential belt 171 in the tire width direction.

    [0054] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 2, by forming the high-rigidity region, the noise performance can be improved.

    [0055] Forming the high-rigidity region by setting the number of circumferential belt layers to two layers in the central region C and one layer in regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction also allows suppression of an increase in manufacturing costs and tire weight while maintaining noise performance.

    [0056] Next, Embodiment 4, which is not part of the present invention, is described. In Embodiment 4, the structure of the circumferential belt differs from that of Embodiment 1. The following describes Embodiment 4, focusing on the differences from Embodiment 1. Portions having the same structure as in Embodiments 1 to 3 are labeled with the same reference signs.

    [0057] In a pneumatic tire 102 in Embodiment 3 (see FIG. 7), the structure of the tread portion 11, sidewall portions 12, bead portions 13, carcass 15, and inclined belt 16 and the positions at which the circumferential main grooves 14 are disposed are the same as in Embodiment 1.

    [0058] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 1, the cornering power increases and high turning performance is obtained under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes.

    [0059] In the pneumatic tire 102, a circumferential belt 172 includes one circumferential belt layer as the one or more circumferential belt layers. In this circumferential belt layer, a high-rigidity region is formed by disposing, in the central region C, cords with a higher rigidity than the cords in the regions on the outer sides of the central region C in the tire width direction. By locally increasing at least one of Young's modulus of the cords and the number of cords implanted, the circumferential rigidity can be increased in the central region. Young's modulus can be adjusted by changing the material of the cords, the twist structure, or the like. According to this structure, the rigidity in the tire circumferential direction is greater in the central region C than in the regions further outward than the central region C in the tire width direction. As in Embodiment 2, the width W4 in the tire width direction of the central region C is preferably 0.2W3 or more to 0.6W3 or less, where W3 is the width of the circumferential belt 171 in the tire width direction.

    [0060] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 2, by forming the high-rigidity region, the noise performance can be improved.

    [0061] Next, Embodiment 5 is described. In Embodiment 5, the structure of the inclined belt differs from that of Embodiment 1. The following describes Embodiment 5, focusing on the differences from Embodiment 1. Portions having the same structure as in Embodiments 1 to 4 are labeled with the same reference signs.

    [0062] In a pneumatic tire 103 in Embodiment 5 (see FIG. 8), the structure of the tread portion 11, sidewall portions 12, bead portions 13, carcass 15, and circumferential belt 17 and the positions at which the circumferential main grooves 14 are disposed are the same as in Embodiment 1.

    [0063] In the pneumatic tire 103, as the inclined belt layers, the inclined belt 163 includes at least one high-angle inclined belt layer 163c and at least one low-angle inclined belt layer 163d. The inclined belt layers are preferably constituted by only one high-angle inclined belt layer and one low-angle inclined belt layer.

    [0064] Constituting the inclined belt layers with only one high-angle inclined belt layer and one low-angle inclined belt layer allows suppression of an increase in manufacturing costs and tire weight while maintaining noise performance.

    [0065] In this embodiment, the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d is provided further outward in the tire radial direction than the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c. Alternatively, the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d may be provided further inward in the tire radial direction than the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c.

    [0066] The inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c relative to the tire circumferential direction is 35° or more to 90° or less. The inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c relative to the tire circumferential direction is more preferably 50° or more. Like the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a of Embodiment 1, the edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c in the tire width direction is positioned further outward in the tire width direction than the circumferential main groove 14 disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction in the tread half portion bordered by the tire equator CL. Furthermore, like the first high-angle inclined belt layer 16a of Embodiment 1, the interval W5 in the tire width direction from the edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c in the tire width direction to the center of the circumferential main groove 14 disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction is 0.2W1 or more to 0.35W1 or less, where W1 is the width of the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c in the tire width direction.

    [0067] Accordingly, as in Embodiment 1, the cornering power increases and high turning performance is obtained under a variety of driving conditions in which the slip angle of the tire changes.

    [0068] The inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d relative to the tire circumferential direction is smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c and is 30° or less. The cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d intersect the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c so as to sandwich the tire equator CL therebetween.

    [0069] By providing the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d, the noise performance can be improved. This effect is described below.

    [0070] As described above, a tire in which the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c have a large inclination angle relative to the tire circumferential direction has a shape (see the dash-double dot line in FIG. 5) such that the tread surface uniformly undergoes significant vibration in the high frequency range of 400 Hz to 2 kHz in the primary, secondary or ternary vibration modes in the cross-sectional direction, thereby causing a large noise emission. Therefore, setting the inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d relative to the tire circumferential direction to be smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c and to be 30° or less maintains the out-of-plane bending stiffness in the tire circumferential direction at a suitable degree near the tire equator CL. As a result, the expansion of the tread surface in the tire radial direction is suppressed (see the dashed line in FIG. 5), and noise emission is reduced.

    [0071] The inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d relative to the tire circumferential direction is preferably 10° or greater.

    [0072] Setting the inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d to be 10° or greater relative to the tire circumferential direction allows the out-of-plane bending stiffness in the tire circumferential direction to be ensured without impeding the effect, produced by the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c, of ensuring the ground contact length.

    [0073] The width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction is preferably 0.6W1 or less, where W1 is the width of the high-angle inclined belt layer 163c in the tire width direction.

    [0074] By setting the width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction to be 0.6W1 or less, the noise performance can be improved, the effect of improving the cornering power can be maintained, and the rolling resistance can be reduced. These effects are described below.

    [0075] If the width in the tire width direction becomes too large in a region where the out-of-plane bending stiffness in the tire circumferential direction is high, the tread portion 11 tends to vibrate uniformly, and the effect of reducing noise emission is diminished. Therefore, setting the width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction to be 0.6W1 or less suppresses induction of the mode in which the entire tread portion 11 vibrates, thereby improving the noise performance.

    [0076] Furthermore, when the vehicle corners, cornering power is obtained by the surface of the tread portion 11 being pushed strongly against the road surface. Therefore, when the load placed on the tire is insufficient with respect to the rigidity in the tire circumferential direction, the surface of the tread portion 11 is not sufficiently pressed against the road surface. As a result, the shoulder region of the tread portion 11 may be lifted up from the road surface, which reduces the effect of increasing cornering power. By setting the width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction to be 0.6W1 or less, the rigidity in the tire circumferential direction in the shoulder region of the tread portion 11 can be appropriately reduced, and the phenomenon whereby the tread portion 11 is lifted up can be suppressed. The effect of increasing cornering power is thus maintained.

    [0077] Furthermore, by setting the width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction to be 0.6W1 or less, the tire weight is reduced, and the rolling resistance of the pneumatic tire 103 can be lessened.

    [0078] The width W2 of the low-angle inclined belt layer 163d in the tire width direction is preferably 0.25W1 or greater.

    [0079] According to this structure, the belt rigidity is sufficiently guaranteed near the tire equator CL. Therefore, expansion of the tread portion 11 in the tire circumferential direction can be suppressed, noise emission can be reduced, and cornering power can be reliably increased.

    EXAMPLES



    [0080] Next, the cornering power, noise performance, and rolling resistance were evaluated for tires according to this disclosure and Comparative Example Tires, as described below. In the evaluation, Comparative Examples 1 to 4 and Examples 1 to 4 were compared.

    [0081] Comparative Examples 1 to 3 have a similar structure to that of the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 1 (see FIG. 1). Comparative Example 1 differs from the structure of the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 1, however, in that the inclination angle of the cords in the inclined belt layers relative to the tire circumferential direction is small, and the interval from the edge of the wide inclined belt layer (the first high-angle inclined belt layer in Embodiment 1) to the circumferential main groove is less than 0.2 times the width of the wide inclined belt layer in the tire width direction. Comparative Example 2 differs from the structure of the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 1 in that the interval from the edge of the wide inclined belt layer to the circumferential main groove is less than 0.2 times the width of the wide inclined belt layer in the tire width direction. Comparative Example 3 differs from the structure of the pneumatic tire in Embodiment 1 in that the interval from the edge of the wide inclined belt layer to the circumferential main groove is over 0.35 times the width of the wide inclined belt layer in the tire width direction.

    [0082] Example 1 corresponds to the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 1 (see FIG. 1). Example 2 corresponds to the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 2 (see FIG. 4). Example 3 corresponds to the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 3 (see FIG. 6). Example 4 corresponds to the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 5 (see FIG. 8). Example 5 has a similar structure to that of the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 5 (see FIG. 8). Example 5 differs from the structure of the pneumatic tire of Embodiment 5, however, in that the width of the narrow inclined belt layer (the low-angle inclined layer in Embodiment 5) in the tire width direction is over 0.6 times the width of the wide inclined belt layer (the high-angle inclined belt layer in Embodiment 5) in the tire width direction.

    [0083] The results for the pneumatic tires in Comparative Examples 1 to 3 and Examples 1 to 5 are listed in Table 1.
    [Table 1]
     Comparative Example 1Comparative Example 2Comparative Example 3Example 1Example 2Example 3Example 4Example 5
    Tire size 165/60R19
    Ri m size 5.5J-19
    Internal pressure [kPa] 300
    Pr esumed LI 87
    Ground contact width [mm] 125
    Inclined belt  
      Wide inclined belt layer included included included included included included included included
        inclination angle*1 28° 60° 60° 60° 60° 60° 60° 60°
      width W1 [mm] 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135
      Narrow inclined belt layer included included included included included included included included
        inclination angle*1 28° 60° 60° 16° 60° 60° 16° 16°
      width W2 [mm] 130 130 130 85 130 130 65 85
      W2/W1 0.96 0.96 0.96 0.63 0.96 0.96 0.48 0.63
    Circumferential belt layer                
      Circumferential belt layer 1 included included included included included included included included
        Young's modulus [GPa] 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
      number of layers 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
      number of cords implanted [per 50 mm] 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50
      parameter X*2 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500
      width [mm] 128 128 128 128 128 79 128 128
      cord material nylon nylon nylon nylon nylon nylon nylon nylon
      Circumferential belt layer 2 - - - - included included - -
        Young's modulus [GPa] - - - - 19 10 - -
      number of layers - - - - 1 1 - -
      number of cords implanted [per 50 mm] - - - - 50 50 - -
      parameter X*2 - - - - 950 500 - -
      width [mm] - - - - 30 79 - -
      cord material - - - - hybrid cords nylon - -
      width W4 of high-rigidity region [mm] - - - - 30 30 - -
      total width W3 of circumferential belt [mm] 128
      W4/W3 - - - - 0.23 0.23 - -
    Position of circumferential main groove W5 [mm]*3 20 20 50 30 30 30 30 30
    W5/W1 0.15 0.15 0.37 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22
    Note the following in Table 1.
    *1 is the inclination angle of the cords relative to the tire circumferential direction.
    *2 is parameter X, which is the product of Young's modulus, the number of layers, and the number of cords implanted.
    *3 represents the position of the circumferential main groove disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction as the interval, in the tire width direction, from the edge of the wide inclined belt layer in the tire width direction to the center of the circumferential main groove in the tire width direction.

    <Test to Evaluate Cornering Power>



    [0084] The tires of Comparative Examples 1 to 3 and Examples 1 to 5 with the specifications listed in Table 1 were produced, assembled onto an applicable rim, mounted on a vehicle, and measured in a flat-belt cornering tester. At a belt speed of 100 km/h, the cornering force was measured when the slip angle (SA) between the rolling direction of the tire and the circumferential direction of the drum was 1° and 3°. The results are listed in Table 2.

    [0085] The results were converted into an index, with the cornering force of Comparative Example 1 being 100. A larger index indicates better cornering force at each slip angle, i.e. better cornering power at each slip angle.

    <Test to Evaluate Noise Performance>



    [0086] The tires of Comparative Examples 1 to 3 and Examples 1 to 5 with the specifications listed in Table 1 were produced, assembled onto an applicable rim, mounted on a vehicle, and placed on a running test drum, which was rotated at a speed of 100 km/h to measure the noise level with a traveling microphone method. The results are listed in Table 2.

    [0087] The results were evaluated as the difference in noise level, taking the noise level of Comparative Example 1 as a standard. A lower value indicates a better effect of noise reduction.

    <Test to Evaluate Rolling Resistance>



    [0088] The tires of Comparative Examples 1 to 3 and Examples 1 to 5 with the specifications listed in Table 1 were produced, assembled onto an applicable rim, mounted on a vehicle, and placed on a running test drum, which was rotated at a speed of 100 km/h to measure the rolling resistance and calculate the rolling resistance coefficient (RRC). The results are listed in Table 2.

    [0089] The results were converted into an index based on the inverse of the rolling resistance coefficient of Comparative Example 1. A higher value indicates better rolling resistance.
    [Table 2]
     Comparative Example 1Comparative Example 2Comparative Example 3Example 1Example 2Example 3Example 4Example 5
      Cornering force  
      SA= 1° 100 95 103 103 103 103 103 103
      SA = 3° 100 105 98 105 105 105 105 105
    Noise performance 0 dB +3 dB +3 dB +3 dB +1 dB +1 dB +1 dB +3 dB
    RRC   100 100 100 100 100 100 110 105

    <Test to Evaluate Cornering Power>



    [0090] As illustrated in the cornering force lines in Table 2, a comparison between Examples 1 to 5 and Comparative Examples 2 and 3 shows that the cornering force increased over Comparative Example 1 both when the slip angle was 1° and 3°. Accordingly, it is clear that if the inclination angle relative to the tire circumferential direction is 35° or more to less than 90°, and 0.2W1 ≤ W5 ≤ 0.35W1, then the cornering power increases for both slip angles of 1° and 3°.

    <Results of Noise Evaluation>



    [0091] As illustrated in the noise performance line in Table 2, a comparison between Example 1 and Examples 2 and 3 shows that the noise performance was better for Examples 2 and 3 than for Example 1. It was thus shown that the noise performance improves by using the circumferential belt to form the high-rigidity region. Furthermore, a comparison between Example 1 and Example 4 shows that the noise performance was better for Example 4 than for Example 1. It was thus shown that the noise performance improves by providing the low-angle inclined belt layer in which the cords are at an inclination angle that is smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer and is 30° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction.

    <Results of Rolling Resistance Evaluation>



    [0092] As illustrated in the RRC line in Table 2, a comparison between Example 5 and Example 4 shows that the rolling resistance performance was better for Example 4 than for Example 5. It was thus shown that the rolling resistance performance improves if W2 ≤ 0.6W1.

    REFERENCE SIGNS LIST



    [0093] 
    10, 100, 101, 102, 103
    Pneumatic tire
    11
    Tread portion
    12
    Sidewall portion
    13
    Bead portion
    14
    Circumferential main groove
    15
    Carcass
    16, 163
    Inclined belt
    16a
    First high-angle inclined belt layer
    16b
    Second high-angle inclined belt layer
    163c
    High-angle inclined belt layer
    163d
    Low-angle inclined belt layer
    17, 170, 171, 172
    Circumferential belt
    170a
    Wide circumferential belt layer
    170b
    Narrow circumferential belt layer
    171c
    First circumferential belt layer
    171d
    Second circumferential belt layer
    18
    Shoulder land portion
    C
    Central region
    CL
    Tire equator
    R
    Applicable rim



    Claims

    1. A pneumatic tire (10, 100, 101, 102, 103) comprising:

    a pair of bead portions (13);

    a tread portion (11);

    a carcass (15) extending between the pair of bead portions (13);

    an inclined belt (16, 163) provided at an outer side of a crown portion of the carcass in a tire radial direction and formed by one or more inclined belt layers including cords that are inclined relative to a tire circumferential direction; and

    a circumferential belt (17, 170, 171, 172) provided at the outer side of the crown portion of the carcass in the tire radial direction and formed by one or more circumferential belt layers including cords that extend along the tire circumferential direction; wherein

    one or more circumferential main grooves (14) extending along the tire circumferential direction are formed on a surface of the tread portion;

    as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt includes a high-angle inclined belt layer (16a, 163c) in which the cords are at an inclination angle of 35° or more to 90° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction; and

    in at least one tread half portion, an edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer in a tire width direction is positioned further outward in the tire width direction than a circumferential main groove disposed furthest outward in the tire width direction, and an interval W5 in the tire width direction from the edge to a center of the circumferential main groove is 0.2W1 or more to 0.35W1 or less, where W1 is a width of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction;

    characterised in that as the one or more inclined belt layers, the inclined belt further includes a low-angle inclined belt layer (163d) in which the cords are at an inclination angle that is smaller than the inclination angle of the cords in the high-angle inclined belt layer and is 30° or less relative to the tire circumferential direction; and

    a width of the low-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is 0.6W1 or less.


     
    2. The pneumatic tire of claim 1, wherein as the inclined belt layers, the inclined belt includes only one layer of the high-angle inclined belt layer and one layer of the low-angle inclined belt layer.
     
    3. The pneumatic tire of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein X is 700 or less when X = Ymn, where Y is Young's modulus of the cords in the one or more circumferential belt layers in GPa, m is the number of layers of the one or more circumferential belt layers, and n is the number of cords implanted per 50 mm.
     
    4. The pneumatic tire of any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the circumferential belt includes a wide circumferential belt layer (170a) and a narrow circumferential belt layer (170b) as the circumferential belt layers, and the narrow circumferential belt layer is disposed further outward in the tire radial direction than the wide circumferential belt layer.
     
    5. The pneumatic tire of claim 4, wherein the wide circumferential belt layer has a larger width in the tire width direction than that of the high-angle inclined belt layer, and the interval from the edge of the wide circumferential belt layer in the tire width direction to the edge of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is 5 mm or greater.
     
    6. The pneumatic tire of claim 1, wherein the width W4 in the tire width direction of the central region is 0.2W3 or more to 0.6W3 or less, where W3 is the width of the circumferential belt in the tire width direction.
     
    7. The pneumatic tire of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the inclination angle of the cords in the low-angle inclined belt layer relative to the tire circumferential direction is 10° or greater.
     
    8. The pneumatic tire of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the width W1 of the high-angle inclined belt layer in the tire width direction is greater than the ground contact width of the tread portion.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Luftreifen (10, 100, 101, 102, 103), der Folgendes umfasst:

    ein Paar von Wulstabschnitten (13),

    einen Laufflächenabschnitt (11),

    eine Karkasse (15), die sich zwischen dem Paar von Wulstabschnitten (13) erstreckt,

    einen geneigten Gürtel (16, 163), der an einer in einer Reifenradialrichtung äußeren Seite eines Scheitelabschnitts der Karkasse bereitgestellt und durch eine oder mehrere geneigte Gürtellagen gebildet wird, die Kords einschließen, die im Verhältnis zu einer Reifenumfangsrichtung geneigt sind, und

    einen umlaufenden Gürtel (17, 170, 171, 172), der an der in der Reifenradialrichtung äußeren Seite des Scheitelabschnitts der Karkasse bereitgestellt und durch eine oder mehrere umlaufende Gürtellagen gebildet wird, die Kords einschließen, die sich entlang der Reifenumfangsrichtung erstrecken, wobei

    eine oder mehrere umlaufende Hauptrillen (14), die sich entlang der Reifenumfangsrichtung erstrecken, auf einer Oberfläche des Laufflächenabschnitts geformt sind,

    als die eine oder die mehreren geneigten Gürtellagen der geneigte Gürtel eine in hohem Winkel geneigte Gürtellage (16a, 163c) einschließt, in der die Kords in einem Neigungswinkel von 35° oder mehr bis 90° oder weniger im Verhältnis zu der Reifenumfangsrichtung geneigt sind, und

    in wenigstens einem Laufflächen-Halbabschnitt eine Kante der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage in einer Reifenbreitenrichtung in der Reifenbreitenrichtung weiter nach außen angeordnet ist als eine umlaufende Hauptrille, die in der Reifenbreitenrichtung am weitesten nach außen angeordnet ist, und ein Abstand W5 in der Reifenbreitenrichtung von der Kante zu einer Mitte der umlaufenden Hauptrille 0,2W1 oder mehr bis 0,35W1 oder weniger beträgt, wobei W1 eine Breite der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage in der Reifenbreitenrichtung ist,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass als die eine oder die mehreren geneigten Gürtellagen der geneigte Gürtel ferner eine in niedrigem Winkel geneigte Gürtellage (163d) einschließt, in der sich die Kords in einem Neigungswinkel befinden, der kleiner ist als der Neigungswinkel der Kords in der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage und 30° oder weniger im Verhältnis zu der Reifenumfangsrichtung beträgt, und

    eine Breite der in niedrigem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage in der Reifenbreitenrichtung 0,6W1 oder weniger beträgt.


     
    2. Luftreifen nach Anspruch 1, wobei als die geneigten Gürtellagen der geneigte Gürtel nur eine Lage der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage und eine Lage der in niedrigem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage einschließt.
     
    3. Luftreifen nach Anspruch 1 oder Anspruch 2, wobei X 700 oder weniger beträgt, wenn X = Ymn, wobei Y der Elastizitätsmodul der Kords in der einen oder den mehreren umlaufenden Gürtellagen in GPa ist, m die Anzahl von Lage der einen oder der mehreren umlaufenden Gürtellagen ist und n die Anzahl von Kords, die je 50 mm eingesetzt sind, ist.
     
    4. Luftreifen nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 3, wobei der umlaufende Gürtel eine breite umlaufende Gürtellage (170a) und eine schmale umlaufende Gürtellage (170b) als die umlaufenden Gürtellagen einschließt und die schmale umlaufende Gürtellage in der Reifenradialrichtung weiter nach außen angeordnet ist als die breite umlaufende Gürtellage.
     
    5. Luftreifen nach Anspruch 4, wobei die breite umlaufende Gürtellage eine Breite in der Reifenbreitenrichtung aufweist, die größer ist als diejenige der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage, und der Abstand von der Kante der breiten umlaufenden Gürtellage in der Reifenbreitenrichtung zu der Kante der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage in der Reifenbreitenrichtung 5 mm oder mehr beträgt.
     
    6. Luftreifen nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Breite W4 des mittleren Bereichs in der Reifenbreitenrichtung 0,2W3 oder mehr bis 0,6W3 oder weniger beträgt, wobei W3 die Breite des umlaufenden Gürtels in der Reifenbreitenrichtung ist.
     
    7. Luftreifen nach Anspruch 1 oder Anspruch 2, wobei der Neigungswinkel der Kords in der in niedrigem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage im Verhältnis zu der Reifenumfangsrichtung 10° oder mehr beträgt.
     
    8. Luftreifen nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die Breite W1 der in hohem Winkel geneigten Gürtellage in der Reifenbreitenrichtung größer ist als eine Bodenberührungsbreite des Laufflächenabschnitts.
     


    Revendications

    1. Bandage pneumatique (10, 100, 101, 102, 103), comprenant :

    une paire de parties de talon (13) ;

    une partie de bande de roulement (11) ;

    une carcasse (15) s'étendant entre la paire de parties de talon (13) ;

    une ceinture inclinée (16, 163) agencée au niveau d'un côté externe d'une partie de sommet de la carcasse, dans une direction radiale du bandage pneumatique, et formée par une ou plusieurs couches de ceinture inclinées incluant des câblés inclinés par rapport à une direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique ; et

    une ceinture circonférentielle (17, 170, 171, 172) agencée au niveau du côté externe de la partie de sommet de la carcasse, dans la direction radiale du bandage pneumatique, et formée par une ou plusieurs couches de ceinture circonférentielles incluant des câblés s'étendant le long de la direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique ; dans lequel

    une ou plusieurs rainures circonférentielles principales (14) s'étendant le long de la direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique sont formées sur une surface de la partie de bande de roulement ;

    comme l'une ou les plusieurs couches de ceinture inclinées, la ceinture inclinée inclut une couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle (16a, 163c), dans laquelle les câblés forment un angle d'inclinaison compris entre 35° ou plus et 90° ou moins par rapport à la direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique ; et

    dans au moins une demie-partie de la bande de roulement, un bord de la couche de centre inclinée à un grand angle, dans une direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, est positionné davantage vers l'extérieur, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, qu'une rainure circonférentielle principale disposée le plus vers l'extérieur, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, un intervalle W5, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, entre le bord et un centre de la rainure circonférentielle principale étant compris entre 0,2W1 ou plus et 0,35W1 ou moins, W1 représentant une largeur de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique ;

    caractérisé en ce que comme l'une ou les plusieurs couches de ceinture inclinées, la ceinture inclinée inclut en outre une couche de ceinture inclinée à un angle réduit (163d) dans laquelle les câblés forment un angle d'inclinaison inférieur à l'angle d'inclinaison des câblés dans la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle et correspondant à 30° ou moins par rapport à la direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique ; et

    une largeur de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un angle réduit, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, correspond à 0,6W1 ou moins.


     
    2. Bandage pneumatique selon la revendication 1, dans lequel, comme les couches de ceinture inclinées, la ceinture inclinée inclut qu'une couche de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle et une couche de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un angle réduit.
     
    3. Bandage pneumatique selon les revendications 1 ou 2, dans lequel X correspond à 700 ou moins lorsque X = Ymn, Y représentant le module de Young des câblés dans l'une ou les plusieurs couches de ceinture inclinées en GPa, m représentant le nombre de couches de l'une ou des plusieurs couches de ceinture circonférentielles, et n représentant le nombre de câblés implantés par 50 mm.
     
    4. Bandage pneumatique selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 3, dans lequel la ceinture circonférentielle inclut une couche de ceinture circonférentielle large (170a) et une couche de ceinture circonférentielle étroite (170b) comme les couches de ceinture circonférentielles, la couche de ceinture circonférentielle étroite étant disposée davantage vers l'extérieur, dans la direction radiale du bandage pneumatique, que la couche de ceinture circonférentielle large.
     
    5. Bandage pneumatique selon la revendication 4, dans lequel la couche de ceinture circonférentielle large a une largeur supérieure, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, à celle de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle, l'intervalle entre le bord de la couche de ceinture circonférentielle large, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, et le bord de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, correspondant à 5 mm ou plus.
     
    6. Bandage pneumatique selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la largeur W4, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, de la région centrale est comprise entre 0,2W3 ou plus et 0,6W3 ou moins, W3 représentant la largeur de la ceinture circonférentielle, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique.
     
    7. Bandage pneumatique selon les revendications 1 ou 2, dans lequel l'angle d'inclinaison des câblés dans la couche de ceinture inclinée à un angle réduit par rapport à la direction circonférentielle du bandage pneumatique, correspond à 10° ou plus.
     
    8. Bandage pneumatique selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel la largeur W1 de la couche de ceinture inclinée à un grand angle, dans la direction de la largeur du bandage pneumatique, est supérieure à la largeur de contact au sol de la partie de bande de roulement.
     




    Drawing





























    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description