(19)
(11)EP 3 109 760 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
27.11.2019 Bulletin 2019/48

(21)Application number: 16175785.1

(22)Date of filing:  22.06.2016
(51)Int. Cl.: 
G06F 11/00  (2006.01)

(54)

RANKING OF COMPUTER MODULES

RANGFOLGEN VON COMPUTERMODULEN

CLASSEMENT DE MODULES INFORMATIQUES


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 25.06.2015 US 201514750549

(43)Date of publication of application:
28.12.2016 Bulletin 2016/52

(73)Proprietor: BMC Software, Inc.
Houston, Texas 77042 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • PHADKE, Nilesh
    Houston, Texas 77042 (US)
  • PHADKE, Pallavi
    Houston, Texas 77042 (US)

(74)Representative: Zahn, Matthias et al
Peter Bittner und Partner
Herrenwiesenweg 2 69207 Sandhausen
Herrenwiesenweg 2 69207 Sandhausen (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
US-A1- 2006 080 738
US-A1- 2009 177 927
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    Technical Field



    [0001] This description relates to computer systems.

    Background



    [0002] Computer systems may utilize multiple software applications and/or services to facilitate operation of the computer systems themselves and/or to facilitate the operation of further systems. The further systems are controlled by the computer systems. In both cases, the computer systems and/or the further systems are technical systems. The further systems can also comprise computers and/or software applications.

    [0003] There are many examples for the facilitation of operation. The computer system can facilitate the operation of a business at a number of levels, such as to facilitate business information flow (for example regarding industrial machines, payroll, communication over the Internet), to facilitate the operation a factory or a plant (having computer-controlled industrial machines or equipment and the like).

    [0004] However, in the computer systems, the computers and the services may not all be equally important to ensure that the operations run smoothly. As used herein, "importance" stands for a relation between
    1. (i) the potential failure (of a computer and/or of a service) and
    2. (ii) the resulting (total or partial) interruption of the operation of the computer systems and/or of the further systems ("non-facilitation of operation").


    [0005] Also, some of the services may rely on multiple computer modules, and some of the computer modules may be required to implement multiple services. Some computer modules may be required to implement multiple services, and if those computer modules fail, multiple important services could also fail.

    [0006] US 2006/080738 A1 describes a computer system with a plurality of devices having computing capability, such as network routers, general purpose computers, mobile phones, printers etc., collectively called "assets". The assets are equipped with sensors that transmit parameter values - survey data - to a central server computer. The central server computer processes the parameters and detect situations where the assets are attacked from outside. In response, the central server identifies software to be deployed to the assets, called remediation. During remediation software deployment, the central computer forwards software to the assets so that the effects of the attacks are mitigated.

    Summary



    [0007] A computer system has multiple computers (or "computer module(s)", or "server(s)" etc.) that execute multiple applications (or "service(s)" etc.). Looking at the function, there are two-to-one relations (or "assignments"). Two computers may be required to run a single application. Or, from a different point of view, two applications may use the same computer. The overall computer system - the multiple computers and the multiple applications (or services) - facilitates the operation (e.g., of the business, the enterprise etc.) Two-to-one relations are examples of many-to-many relations (or assignments).

    [0008] Since computer modules do occasionally fail, back-up computer modules (or redundant computers modules) are provided, and the computer modules are monitored. Redundancies consume resources. In order to optimize the resource consumption, the services and are classified by data sets ("numerical values") that represent importance. The numerical values for the services translate into the numerical values for the computer modules ("scores"). Redundancies are provided according to the scores.

    [0009] The importance - the mentioned relation between the potential failure and the interruption of the operation - is given as a quantity and is represented by data sets. The importance can also be seen as a probability (or likelihood) that a service and/or a computer module prevents (or disturbs) the operation of the overall computer system (and/or any system connected to the computer system).

    [0010] A numerical value is a data set that represents the importance of a particular service or of a particular computer. The description herein refers to numerical values by numbers, but characters (like A, B, C ...) could also be used. There is a variety of numerical values that can be assigned to the importance. For example, if a failure does not affect the operation, the numerical value would be "0", if a failure would prevent the operation completely, the numerical value would be "1". Numerical values between "0" and "1" are also possible (intermediate numerical values).

    [0011] For convenience of explanation, the disclosure herein sometimes uses numerical values in a different range. This range (e.g., from "100" to "500") can be associated with the term "cost". Since a failure has to be responded to be repairing or replacing the computer and/service or by other counter-measures, this range is more indicative of the technical efforts to perform these counter-measures. The numerical values can be associated with technical parameters or measurement units that reflect the technical efforts to re-gain operation. Technical efforts to re-gaining operation are applicable for services (e.g., time to update software) and for computer modules (e.g. time to repair, electricity needed for the repair, and the like).

    [0012] Importance can be classified into two layers or levels. In a first layer, the above-mentioned facilitation of operation depends on the services. Therefore, a particular service has a particular service-to-operation importance. In other words, this is the importance of facilitating the operation (of the system). In a second layer, a particular service depends on one or more computer modules. Therefore, a particular computer module has a module-to-service(s) importance. According to the inter-layer dependency, the numerical values (that represents importance) are calculated in the direction from the first layer to the second layer.

    [0013] For convenience of explanation, the description distinguishes the numerical values (that represents importance) by different terms. In the first layer, the service-to-operation importance is sometimes called "operation relevance", so a particular service can have particular operation relevance. In the second layer, the module-to-service(s) importance is called "score". A particular "score" can be a calculated by combining the numerical value of importance for different services (that are supported by the particular computer module).

    [0014] As used herein, higher "operation relevance" and higher "scores" represent higher importance, and lower "operation relevance" and lower "scores" represent lower importance.

    [0015] Ranking (or providing priority lists) is used to compare the importance (i.e., the scores) between different particular computers. In the following examples, the rank is given as an integer number (e.g., positive integer from 1). The computer module with the highest score has rank "1"; the computer/service with the lowest score has the rank that corresponds to the number of computers/services that are compared with each other. The rank of a particular computer module can also be expressed by a numeral word ("one", "two", "three" and so on). The assignment of the rank integer is selected for convenience of explanation, but those of skill in the art can modify this approach. In other words, a particular computer module has a "score" if viewed alone, and a particular computer module has a "rank" if viewed as part of a plurality of computer modules.

    [0016] It may be advantageous that a failover resource is allocated to a higher ranking computer module (e.g. having a higher score) and not to a lower ranking computer module (having a lower score). Due to different failure likelihoods the consumption of resources can be minimized.

    [0017] According to one general aspect, a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium may include instructions stored thereon for ranking multiple computer modules to reduce failure impacts. When executed by at least one processor, the instructions may be configured to cause a computing system implementing the multiple computer modules to at least associate the multiple computer modules with multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, at least one of the multiple services relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules, determine numerical values of the multiple services, and rank the multiple computer modules based on the determined numerical values of the multiple services with which the respective multiple computer modules are associated.

    [0018] According to another general aspect, a computing system may include at least one processor, and a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium comprising instructions stored thereon for ranking multiple computer modules to reduce failure impacts. When executed by the at least one processor, the instructions may be configured to cause the computing system to at least associate multiple computer modules with multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, at least one of the multiple services relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules, determine numerical values of the multiple services (i.e. operation relevance), and rank the multiple computer modules (i.e. scores) based on the determined numerical values (i.e. operation relevance) of the multiple services with which the respective multiple computer modules are associated.

    [0019] According to another general aspect, a computer-implemented method for ranking multiple computer modules to reduce failure impacts may include provisioning multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, in conjunction with the provisioning the multiple services, associating the multiple computer modules with multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, at least one of the multiple services relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules, determining numerical values of the multiple services, the numerical values of each of the multiple services being based on a determined importance of the respective service, determining scores of the multiple computer modules based on the determined numerical values of the multiple services that rely on the respective computer modules, ranking the multiple computer modules based on the determined scores of the multiple computer modules, re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a present time being included in a different part of a schedule for at least one of the multiple services than a previous time, re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services, selecting at least one of the multiple computer modules for failover support based on the rank of the at least one of the computer modules, and providing the failover support to the selected at least one computer module by associating a redundant computer module with a service associated with the selected at least one computer module.

    [0020] According to another general aspect, a computer system executes a method for ranking multiple computer modules to reduce failure impacts to a technical system that is being controlled by the multiple computer modules. In a provisioning step, the computer system provisions multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules. In conjunction with the provisioning the multiple services, the computer system associates the multiple computer modules with multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, with at least one of the multiple services relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules. The computer system determines numerical values of the multiple services, the numerical values of each of the multiple services are based on a determined importance of the respective service. The importance indicating indicates a relation between the potential failure of a particular computer module and the interruption of the operation of the technical system. The computer system determines scores of the multiple computer modules based on the determined values of the multiple services that rely on the respective computer modules. The computer system ranks the multiple computer modules based on the determined scores of the multiple computer modules. The computer system re-determines the values of the multiple services based on a present time being included in a different part of a schedule for at least one of the multiple services than a previous time. The computer system re-ranks the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined values of the multiple services. The computer system selects at least one of the multiple computer modules for failover support based on the rank of the at least one of the computer modules. The computer system provides the failover support to the selected at least one computer module by associating a redundant computer module with a service associated with the selected at least one computer module.

    [0021] The details of one or more implementations are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

    Brief Description of the Drawings



    [0022] 

    FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a computing system for ranking computer modules according to an example implementation in combination with a technical system;

    FIG. 2 is a flowchart of a computer-implemented method for ranking computer modules according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 3 is a diagram of a service model used in ranking computer modules according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 4A is a table showing operation relevance of a service at different times based on a schedule according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 4B is a table showing operation relevance of a machine reservation service at different times based on another schedule according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 4C is a table showing operation relevance of a payroll service according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 4D is a table showing operation relevance of a human resource (HR) service according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 5A is a table showing operation relevance of services at a specified time according to an example implementation;

    FIG. 5B is a table showing scores of computer modules related to the service model shown in FIG. 3 according to an example implementation; and

    FIG. 5C is a table showing the computer modules ranked according to the scores shown in FIG. 5B according to an example implementation.


    Detailed Description



    [0023] A computing system, such as a computer network including a datacenter, may include multiple computers that implement multiple computer modules to host, implement, and/or provide multiple services. The multiple computer modules, which may also be considered configuration items (CIs), may implement the multiple services. The computer modules may include virtual machines, hypervisors, web servers, software applications, and/or database servers. Some computer modules may implement a single service, some computer modules may implement multiple services, and some services may require multiple computer modules to implement the service.

    [0024] The computing system may rank the computer modules based on scores associated with the computer modules. The scores are based on the determined importance (represented by numerical values) of services associated with and/or supported by the computer modules, and the impacts of computer modules failing on the services associated with the failing computer modules. The scores may be based on importances of services that require the respective computer modules for implementation. Individual computer modules that implement multiple services may have scores based on a sum of the importances of the multiple services that the respective computer modules implement. If multiple computer modules implement a single service, but the service could still function without one or more of the computer modules, then the scores of each of the multiple computer modules that implement the single service may be based on a fraction of the importance of the single service that the multiple computer modules implement. Based on the rankings, the computer modules may be prioritized and/or ranked (such as from most important to least important), for correction (such as by administrators), have their frequencies of monitoring determined and/or changed, be selected for decommissioning, be selected for provisioning a new service, and/or be selected for failover support, as non-limiting examples. The failover support for a computer module may include allocating one or more redundant computer modules to the service supported by the computer module so that if the computer module fails, the one or more redundant computer modules can still support the service. The rankings may be used to minimize the impact of disruptions or failure by the computer modules in a computer network with shared resources, the computer network being managed by the computing system described herein.

    [0025] FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a computing system 100 for ranking computer modules according to an example implementation, in combination with a technical system 190. The computing system 100 may perform functions similar to those described above.

    [0026] FIG. 1 also illustrates technical system 190 to be controlled by services 300 and by computer modules 350. System 100 controls computer modules 350 and/or services 300. Control and reliance is illustrated by arrows. Services 300 control technical system 190 (that relies on the services), computer modules 350 implement services 300 (that rely on the modules). Services 300 and modules 350 are under control of computing system 100.

    [0027] For convenience of explanation, the blocks are illustrated separately, but computing system 100, computer-modules 350, services 300 and technical system 190 can be implemented as one system. By using references 300 and 350, FIG. 1 refers to more details in FIG. 3.

    [0028] The computing system 100 may include a service provisioner 102. The service provisioner 102 may provision services by launching the services. The provisioning of the services may include allocating and/or assigning computer modules for the services. The service provisioner 102 may, for example, determine computing resources needed to implement the service, what computing resources are available and in which computing modules the computing resources are available, assign and/or allocate computer modules to the service based on the determinations of needed and available computing resources, and launch and/or implement the service using the allocated and/or assigned computer module(s). The services may include various computing applications, such as document creation, modification, and/or sharing, scheduling, financial determinations, web hosting, customer portals, virtual machine reservation services, payroll services, and/or human resource (HR) services, services to control industrial machines or equipment as non-limiting examples. The service provisioner 102 may select computer modules with lowest ranks to minimize the impact of failure by a single computer module.

    [0029] The computing system 100 may include a service maintainer 104. The service maintainer 104 may maintain the services that have been launched and/or provisioned by the service provisioner 102. The service maintainer 104 may, for example, ensure that adequate computing resources continue to be provided to each of the services, and determine whether any of the services are interrupted, such as if a service drops or fails.

    [0030] The service maintainer 104 may also allocate failover resources, such as computer modules to computer modules based on their ranks, or by allocating failover resources to services with the highest importance. The service maintainer 104 may allocate failover resources to services and/or computer modules by assigning more and/or redundant computer modules to the services so that, in the event that one or more of the computer modules assigned to the service fails, the service will also still continue to function by relying on the remaining computer modules. The service maintainer 106 may assign the failover resources to the highest ranked computer modules.

    [0031] The service maintainer 104 may also determine that some of the services and/or computer modules should be decommissioned (e.g., switched off, deactivated). The service maintainer 104 may determine that some of the services should be decommissioned based on their numerical values, such as by decommissioning the service(s) and/or computer modules with the lowest operation importance and/or rank(s). The service maintainer 104 may determine that one or more of the services and/or computer modules should be decommissioned based on insufficient computing resources, such as insufficient computer modules, to support all of the services. Based on a determination that the available computing resources are insufficient to support all the services, the service maintainer 104 may decommission services and/or computer modules, starting with the services and/or computer modules with lowest numerical values (importance as operation relevance or score), thereby freeing the computer modules that supported and/or implemented the decommissioned services, until sufficient computing resources exist to support and/or implement all the services.

    [0032] The computing system 100 may include a schedule maintainer 106. The schedule maintainer 106 may maintain a schedule for each of the services, and/or determine what part of a schedule a particular time falls into. Some services may be active during some dates and/or times and inactive during other dates and/or times, or may have greater importance or criticality at some dates and/or times than other dates and/or times. The schedule maintainer 106 may maintain these dates and/or times of activity or inactivity, or criticality. The schedule maintainer 106 may also maintain importances of each of the services for each part of the schedule. The services may have different importances (operation relevance) at different parts of their respective schedules, reflecting their changing importances at different times, as shown and described below with respect to FIGs. 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D. Not all services may be equally important, and the importances and/or scores of the services may be based on an estimation of the likelihood that business operations (that rely on the services) become unavailable.

    [0033] The computing system 100 may include a service importance determiner 108. The service importance determiner 108 may determine the importances, which may be relative importances, of the services launched by the service provisioner 102 and/or maintained by the service maintainer 104. The service importance determiner 108 may, for example, assign numerical values to each of the services (i.e. operation relevance). As mentioned above, the operation relevance of each service may be based on the determined importance of each service. The importance (and hence the operation relevance) may change based on the date and/or time, such as based on active or critical times maintained by the schedule maintainer 106. The service importance determiner 108 may determine the importance based on input received by the computing system 100 from an administrator, or based on importance included in a file or template (importance is represented by data sets), as non-limiting examples.

    [0034] The computing system 100 may include a service and module associater 110. The service and module associater 110 may associate services with the computer modules needed to implement the services. The service and module associater 110 may, for example, associate services with the computer modules that the service provisioner 102 determined were needed to implement the services, and may associate the services with the computer modules in response to the service provisioner 102 provisioning the services. At least one of the services may rely on more than one of the multiple computer modules.

    [0035] The computing system 100 may include a module maintainer 112. The module maintainer 112 may maintain the computer modules (which may also be considered configuration items), such as by ensuring that they are continuing to run properly and have not been overloaded with requests from more services than the computer modules have resources to handle. The module maintainer 112 may also decommission, end, and/or turn off a computer module.

    [0036] The computing system 100 may include a module status determiner 114. The module status determiner 114 may determine the status of the computer modules maintained by the computing system 100. The module status determiner 114 may determine, for example, whether a computer module is functioning properly (i.e. according to pre-defined technical parameter), has resource requests that exceed the technical capacity of the computer module, a proportion (such as a percentage) of the resources of the computer module that are currently being used and/or whether the proportion of the resources of the computer module that are currently being used exceeds a threshold that indicates a risk of exceeding the resources of the computer module, and/or whether the computer module has failed or is not providing all of the needed resources to services depending on the computer module.

    [0037] The computing system 100 may include a module monitor 116. The module monitor 116 may monitor (such as in conjunction with the module status determiner 114), and/or determine a frequency of monitoring, the computer modules. The module monitor 116 may determine the frequency of monitoring the computer modules based, for example, on the importance and/or rank of the computer modules. The module monitor 116 may, for example, increase a frequency of monitoring a computer module based on the score/rank of the computer module, and/or decrease a frequency of monitoring a computer module based on the score/rank of the computer module. The module monitor 116 may determine to monitor more important and/or more highly scored/ranked computer modules more frequently and less important and/or lower ranked computer modules less frequently, and/or select computer modules for which to increase and/or decrease frequency of monitoring based on the rank of the computer modules, according to an example embodiment.

    [0038] The computing system 100 may include a module associater 117. The module associater 117 may associate the computer modules with the services. The module associater 117 may interface and/or communicate with the service and module associater 110 to determine the services with which each computer module is associated and/or supports.

    [0039] The computing system 100 may include a module score determiner 118. The module score determiner 118 may determine scores for each computer module. The module score determiner 118 may determine the scores for each computer module based on the importance(s) of the services that are associated with and/or dependent on the respective computer module. The module score determiner 118 may, for example, add (and/or determine a sum of) the numerical values (importance, operation relevance) of each of the services associated with the respective computer module. If a service is associated with more than one computer module, and the service could function without one of the computer modules, the module score determiner 118 may divide the numerical value (importance, operation relevance) of the service by the number of computer modules associated with the service (and/or multiply, for each of the computer modules associated with the service, the importance (score) by a fraction less than one, with the fractions for all of the computer modules associated with the service adding up to one) and add the quotient (and/or product) to the score of each computer module. If each of the computer modules is necessary for the service to function, the module score determiner 118 may add the numerical importance of the service to each of the computer modules associated with the service. The module score determiner 118 may either divide the numerical importance by the number of computer modules (or multiply the numerical importance by a fraction which may be the same or different for each of the computer modules), or add the numerical value (importance as score) to each of the computer modules, based on whether each of the computer modules is necessary for the performance of the service and/or whether a given computer module could be replaced with another computer module while the service is still provided and/or performed.

    [0040] The computing system 100 may include a module selector 120. The module selector may select computer modules for provisioning and/or supporting services. If new computer modules are not available, the module selector 120 may select a lower-ranked computer module (or lower-scored module) to provision the new service, so that a less important service dependent on the lower-ranked computer module may be decommissioned rather than a more important service dependent on a higher-ranked computer module. The module selector 120 may select computer modules to support the services based on the resource needs of the services and/or based on the resources available at each of the computer modules. The module selector 120 may also select for decommissioning, and/or decommission, a computer module based on a low rank of the computer module when at least one of the computer modules needs to be decommissioned, such as when the computing system 100 does not have sufficient computing resources to support all the computer modules. The module selector 120 may also, if the service maintainer 104 has selected service(s) for decommissioning, select the computer modules associated with the service(s) for decommissioning and/or disassociation with the service(s).

    [0041] The computing system 100 may include a ranker 122. The ranker 122 may rank the computer modules based on determined importances of the multiple services, and/or based on the scores of the computer modules that the module score determiner 118 determined. The ranker 122 may, for example, rank the computer modules in descending order with the computer modules that have the highest scores as the highest ranked (e.g., rank "1"), or rank the computer modules in ascending order with the computer modules that have the lowest scores as the highest ranked.

    [0042] The computer system 100 may include a computation trigger 124. The computation trigger 124 may prompt the module score determiner 118 to re-determine and/or re-compute the scores of the computer modules, and/or prompt the service importance determiner 108 to re-determine the importances of the services, and/or prompt the ranker 122 to re-rank the computer modules. The re-computation, re-determining, and/or re-ranking may update the numerical values (operation relevance, scores/ranks) in response to events and enable the computer system to minimize the impacts of failures by providing support to the most important computer modules and/or distributing resources in such a manner as to reduce the impact of any one computer module failing. The computation trigger 124 may prompt the module score determiner 118 to re-determine and/or re-compute the scores of the computer modules, and/or prompt the service importance determiner 108 to re-determine the importance of the events, and/or prompt the ranker 122 to re-score/re-rank the computer modules, in response to events such as the present time being within a different part of and/or within a different period of, a schedule for at least one of the services than a previous time, preconfigured and/or predetermined events occurring in a computer network monitored by the computing system 100, a preconfigured event associated with at least one of the computer modules exceeding a time threshold, a new computer module being added to the computer network that the computing system 100 is monitoring, or a computer module ceasing to function properly, as non-limiting examples.

    [0043] The computing system 100 may include at least one processor 128. The at least one processor 128 may include a processor, such as a microprocessor, capable of executing stored instructions to execute any of the functions, methods, or processes described herein.

    [0044] The computing system 100 may include at least one memory device 130. The at least one memory device 130 may store data and/or instructions. The data may include data and/or information used to perform, and/or generated as a result of, any of the functions, methods, or processes described herein. The instructions may include instructions for the at least one processor 128 to execute any of the functions, methods, or processes described herein.

    [0045] The computing system 100 may include at least one input/output device 132. The input/output device 132 may include one or more input devices which receive data from other computing systems and/or receive user input, and one or more output devices which send data to other computing systems and/or provide output to one or more users. The at least one processor 128, at least one memory 130, and at least one input/output device 132 may be included in a single computing device, or may be distributed among multiple computing devices in a distributed system.

    [0046] FIG. 2 is a flowchart of a computer-implemented method 200 for ranking computer modules to reduce failure impacts according to an example implementation. According to this example, the method 200 may include associating 202 the multiple computer modules with multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules, at least one of the multiple services relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules. The method 200 may also include determining 204 numerical values of the multiple services. The method 200 may also include ranking 206 the multiple computer modules based on the determined numerical values of the multiple services with which the respective multiple computer modules are associated. Method 200 also comprises to use the rank, that is to operate 210 the computer modules accordingly. This includes the feedback to the technical system (of the computer modules 300) and also the technical system 190.

    [0047] (Selectively) operating 210 the computer modules according to the ranking is a step that is illustrative for a number of activities that will be explained in the following, for example, monitoring modules and/or services with an intensity (or frequency) according to the rank, activating or de-activating (provisioning, decommissioning) of computer modules and/or services according to the operation relevance / rank; assigning (or in repetition re-assigning) modules to services (or vice versa), providing back-up (or other redundancy) for mission-critical modules and/or services and so on.

    [0048] According to an example implementation, the associating the multiple computer modules with the multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules is performed in conjunction with provisioning the multiple services (cf. service provisioner 102).

    [0049] According to an example implementation, the determined numerical value of each of the multiple services is based on a determined importance of the respective service.

    [0050] According to an example implementation, the ranking the multiple computer modules includes ranking each of the multiple computer modules based on the determined numerical values of the multiple services that rely on the respective computer modules.

    [0051] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include determining scores of the multiple computer modules based on the numerical values of the multiple services (operation relevance) with which the multiple computer modules are associated. In this example the ranking the multiple computer modules may include ranking the multiple computer modules based on the determined scores of the multiple computer modules.

    [0052] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a present time being part of a different part of a schedule for at least one of the multiple services than a previous time, and re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.

    [0053] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a preconfigured event occurring in a computer network managed by the computing system, and re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.

    [0054] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a preconfigured event associated with at least one of the computer modules exceeding a time threshold, and re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.

    [0055] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a new computer module being added to a computer network managed by the computing system, and re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.

    [0056] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on at least one of the multiple computer modules ceasing to function properly, and re-ranking the multiple computing modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.

    [0057] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include increasing a frequency of monitoring at least one of the multiple computer modules based on the rank of the at least one computer module. As monitoring requires the use of computer resources, having selective monitoring intensity can be advantageous. Computer modules (or services) having lower scores (i.e. lower operation relevance) are less frequently monitored than computer modules (or services) having higher scores (i.e., higher rank). In terms of importance, more important computer modules (or services) are monitored with more intensity than less important computer modules (or services).

    [0058] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include decreasing a frequency of monitoring at least one of the multiple computer modules based on the rank of the at least one computer module.

    [0059] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include selecting at least one computer module for which to decrease a frequency of monitoring based on the rank of the at least one computer module.

    [0060] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include decommissioning at least one of the computer modules based on the rank of the at least one of the computer modules. Decommissioning stands for de-activating a particular computer module, or removing the particular computer module from the computer system. As a consequence, the decommissioned (de-activated, removed) modules does not require resources such as energy, storage space (in case of physical computer) or the like. Decommissioning is the opposite as provisioning.

    [0061] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include determining that available computing resources are insufficient to support all of the multiple services. In this example the decommissioning is performed in response to the determining that available computing resources are insufficient to support all of the multiple services.

    [0062] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include selecting at least one of the computer modules for provisioning a new service based on the rank of the at least one of the computer modules.

    [0063] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include selecting at least one of the computer modules for failover support based on the rank of the at least one of the computer modules.

    [0064] According to an example implementation, the method 200 may further include providing the failover support to the selected at least one computer module by associating a redundant computer module with a service associated with the selected at least one computer module.

    [0065] FIG. 3 is a diagram of a service model 300 used in ranking computer modules according to an example implementation. The term "service model" stands for the plurality of services (i.e., multiple services) that facilitate the operation (of the enterprise, of the factory etc. as explained above). In this example, the service model 300 may include and/or implement a service 302, a machine reservation service 312, a human resources (HR) service 318, and a payroll service 324. While four services 302, 312, 318, 324 are implemented in the service model 300 shown in FIG. 3, more or fewer services may be implemented by other example service models.

    [0066] FIG. 3 also illustrates a plurality 350 of computer modules, such as web server 304, 306, 308, machine reservation application 314, machine database 316, HR application 320, payroll application 326 and server 322. The term "application" is used here for computer modules that execute software for a particular purpose, such as for reserving machines (as in 314), for handling HR data (as in 320) and so on.

    [0067] In the example shown in FIG. 3, the service 302 is assigned to a web application platform. In this example, four computer modules may implement and/or support the web application platform and/or service 302. The four computer modules include three web servers 304, 306, 308, and database 310. The three web servers 304, 306, 308 may share the load caused by Internet traffic to and from the web application platform, and when Internet traffic is low, the web application platform may not require all three web servers 304, 306, 308 at once. The web servers 304, 306, 308 may be part of a cluster, and each of the web servers 304, 306, 308 in the cluster may be assigned a relative weight within the cluster, which may be based on whether they are a primary web server or a backup web server. In an example, the module score determiner 118 may assign a primary web server 304 a weight of fifty percent (50%) of the importance of the service 302, the module score determiner 118 may assign a secondary web server 306 a weight of thirty percent (30%) of the importance of the service 302, and the module score determiner 118 may assign a third web server 308 a weight of twenty percent (20%) of the importance of the service 302. The service 302 may require the database 310 to implement the web application platform, causing the module score determiner 118 to assign the database 310 a score equal to the full importance of the service 302. In this example, the importance is 1 (or 100%). Failure of the database leads non-facilitation of operation of the web application platform. As explained above, the importance (of the computer modules) is represented by scores.

    [0068] The three web servers 304, 306, 308 and the database 310 may be dedicated solely to the service 302.

    [0069] The service model 300 may also include and/or implement the machine reservation service 312. The machine reservation service 312 may require two computer modules, a machine reservation application 314 and a machine database 316. Both the machine reservation application 314 and the machine database 316 may be required to implement the machine reservation service 312, and both the machine reservation application 314 and the machine database 316 may be dedicated solely to the machine reservation service 312, causing the module score determiner 118 to assign the machine reservation application 314 and the machine database 316 each a score equal to the importance of the machine reservation service 312.

    [0070] The service model 300 may also include and/or implement the HR service 318. The HR service 318 may require, as computer modules, an HR application 320 and a server 322. The HR application 320 may be dedicated solely to the HR service 318, causing the module score determiner 118 to assign the HR application a score equal to the importance of the HR service 318, but the server 322 may be shared between the HR service 318 and the payroll service 324, causing the module score determiner 118 to assign the server 322 a score based on a sum of the importances (operation relevance) of the HR service 318 and the payroll service 324.

    [0071] The service model 300 may also include and/or implement the payroll service 324. The payroll service 324 may require, as computer modules, a payroll application 326 and the server 322. The payroll application 326 may be dedicated solely to the payroll service 324, but the server 322 may be shared between the payroll service 324 and the HR service 318, causing the module score determiner 118 to assign the payroll application 326 a score equal to the full importance of the payroll service 324, and to add the importance of the payroll service 324 to the score of the server 322 based on the server's 322 support of the HR service 318.

    [0072] FIGs. 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D show the numerical values (operation relevance) 404, 408, 412, 416 associated with services 302, 312, 324, 318. As explained above, the scores 404, 408, 412, 416 may be interchanged with, and/or be considered equivalent or synonymous with the importance of services 302, 312, 324, and 318 respectively, as described herein.

    [0073] The operation of the computer system (and of the further system, and of the enterprise as a whole) can vary over time. This is applicable for the overall system and for particular computers and/or services.

    [0074] In a first example, the enterprise is a power plant. The arrival of a cargo train or cargo ship with coal makes the operation of transport equipment crucial. As a consequence, the computers and/or services that interact with the transport equipment gains importance over other computers and/or services (e.g. a payroll application). The power plant might produce electricity only during night hours when electricity from solar power plants is not available. As a consequence, the computers and/or services that interact with the generators gain importance over other computers and/or services (e.g. the transport equipment).

    [0075] In a second example, for convenience of explanation, the description uses the example of an enterprise with a time structure that differentiates weekdays from weekends, and that further differentiates weekdays into peak and non-peak hours.

    [0076] Both examples can easily be mapped to different situations and to different enterprises.

    [0077] FIG. 4A is a table showing numerical values (operation relevance) 404 of the service 302 at different times based on a schedule 402 according to an example implementation. The score 404 of the service 302 may change based on a time period within the schedule 402. In this example, during peak business hours (which may be between 9am/09:00 and 5pm/17:00) during the week (Monday through Friday), the service 302 has operation relevance 404 of "300". During non-peak business hours (which may be between 5pm/17:00 and 9am/09:00) during the week (Monday through Friday), the service 302 has operation relevance 404 of "200". During the weekends (Saturday and Sunday), the service 302 has operation relevance 404 of "100". These relevance values 404 reflect the relative importance of providing the service 302 at different times, with greatest importance during peak business hours, next non-peak business hours, and least importance on weekends.

    [0078] FIG. 4B is a table showing operation relevance 408 of the machine reservation service 312 at different times based on a schedule 406 according to an example implementation. In this example, weekends may be more important for the machine reservation service 312 than weekdays. Based on the greater importance during weekends than during the week, the score 408 of the machine reservation service 312 may change based on the time period within the schedule 406. The machine reservation service 312 may have a score 408 of "100" during weekdays (which may be Monday through Friday), and the machine reservation service 312 may have a score 408 of "500" during weekends (which may be Saturday and Sunday).

    [0079] FIG. 4C is a table showing operation relevance 412 of a payroll service 324 according to an example implementation. In this example, the operation relevance 412 does not vary based on the time period within the schedule 410, and/or is the same at all days (Monday through Sunday) and times, and is always "75".

    [0080] FIG. 4D is a table showing operation relevance 416 of the HR service 318 according to an example implementation. In this example, operation relevance score 416 does not vary based on the time period within the schedule 414 and/or is the same at all days (Monday through Sunday) and times, and is always "125".

    [0081] FIG. 5A is a table showing operation relevance of the services 302, 312, 324, 318 at a specified time according to an example implementation. In this example, the time may be Monday at 3pm. This may place the service 302 in the peak business hours for a score of "300", place the machine reservation service 312 during a weekday for a score of "100", and the payroll service 324 and HR service would be assigned their only allowable scores of "75" and "125", respectively.

    [0082] FIG. 5B is a table showing scores of computer modules 350 included in the service model 300 shown in FIG. 3 according to an example implementation. As shown in FIG. 5B, the web server 304, which has a weight of fifty percent (50%) of the importance of the service 302 (which is "300" as described above), has a score of "300 0.5 = 150". The web server 306, which has a weight of thirty percent (30%) of the importance of the service 302, has a score of "300 0.3 = 90". The web server 308, which has a weight of twenty percent (20%) of the importance of the service 302, has a score of "300 0.2 = 60". The database 310, which is required to implement the service 302, has a score of "300", equal to the importance of the service 302.

    [0083] The machine reservation application 314 and the machine database 316 are both required to implement the machine reservation service 312, and therefore have scores of "100", equal to the importance of the machine reservation service 312.

    [0084] The server 322 is required to implement both the HR service 318 and the payroll service 324. Because the server 322 is required to implement both the HR service 318 and the payroll service 324, the server 322 has a score of "200", equal to the sum of the importance of the HR service 318 ("125") and the importance of the payroll service 324 ("75").

    [0085] The payroll application 326, which is required to implement the payroll service 324, has operation relevance of "75", equal to the importance of the payroll service 324.

    [0086] The HR application 320 (i.e. computer module), which is required to implement the HR service 318, has a score of "125", equal to the importance of the HR service 318.

    [0087] FIG. 5C is a table showing the computer modules ranked according to the scores shown in FIG. 5B according to an example implementation. As shown in FIG. 5C, the database 310, with the highest score of "300", has the highest rank of one (1); the server 322, with a score of "200", has the rank of two (2); the web server 304, with a score of "150", has a rank of three (3); the HR application 320, which has a score of "125", has a rank of four (4); the machine reservation application 314 and machine database 316, which have scores of "100", can either be tied with ranks of five (5) or have ranks of five (5) and six (6) as shown in FIG. 5C; the web server 306, which has a score of "90", has a rank of seven (7); the payroll application 326, which has a score of "75", has a rank of eight (8); and the web server 308, which has a score of "60", has the lowest rank, nine (9). The computing system 100 may recomputed the score and re-rank the computer modules when a service enters a different part of the service's respective schedule, when changes are introduced to the system such as computing devices such as servers are added or removed, or when a computer module goes down and/or fails. For example, if the web server 306, which is part of a cluster with the web servers 304, 306, went down, then the remaining web servers 304, 306 in the cluster would be assigned higher scores by redistributing the score from the web server 306 to the web servers 304, 306, which may result in the web servers 304, 306 having higher ranks.

    [0088] The ranks of the computer modules may be used to prioritize ticket requests, such as to request support personnel and/or information technology specialists to repair or patch any issues with the computer modules (the support personnel and/or information technology specialists may be requested to repair or patch more highly ranked computer modules first), to decommission computer modules with lower ranks in the event that insufficient resources exist to support all the computer modules, and/or for the module monitor 116 to change a frequency of monitoring the computer modules, such as the module monitor 116 monitoring computer modules with higher ranks more frequently and monitoring computer modules with lower ranks less frequently. The ranks of the computer modules may be used to prioritize the availability of spare parts (such as hard disk drives) and so on.

    [0089] In an example implementation, the computing system 100 may perform adaptive monitoring to dynamically rank the computer modules. The module monitor 116 may dynamically adjust a frequency of monitoring the computer modules. For example, when a service transitions from one part of a schedule to another, such as from peak business hours to non-peak business hours, or from a weekday to a weekend, the importance (i.e. its score) of the service may change. The module monitor 116 may change the frequency of monitoring the service in proportion to the change of score. In one example, if the earlier score was "Ca", the frequency (or period) of monitoring was "Fa", and the new score is "Cb", then the new frequency "Fb" of monitoring could be adjusted to Ca/CbFa. If Ca = 100, Fa = 1 minute (poll every minute), and Cb = 200, then Fb = 100/2001 = 0.5 minutes (poll every half minute or twice each minute).

    [0090] In another example, when the monitoring agent such as the module monitor 116 itself is under an excessive load, a throttling mechanism may lower the frequency of monitoring. The monitoring agent may be under load in situations such as when the monitoring agent goes down within a cluster or network congestion is such that it is desirable to limit the transfer of monitoring data (data generated and sent by the monitoring agent), the throttling mechanism may lower the frequency of monitoring to slow down the data collection and processing performed by the monitoring agent until the monitoring agent is no longer under the excessive load. The module monitor 116 could lower the frequency of monitoring all the computer modules, or only the lowest ranked computer module(s).

    [0091] In another example, priorities and/or rankings of services and/or computer modules may be updated in response to preconfigured events such as use of computing resources, such as processing resources, memory resources, and/or network or communication resources. For example, processor usage above a certain threshold such as 60% for a predetermined time such as two minutes may be considered a medium priority event, and processor usage above another threshold such as 80% for a predetermined time such as two minutes may be considered a critical priority event. The priority and/or ranking of computer modules may be changed, such as increasing the rankings of computer modules, in response to the computing resource usage associated with the computer modules exceeding predetermined thresholds for predetermined times. The increased ranks of the computer modules may prompt support personnel to address any issues regarding computer resource usage with respect to the computer modules.

    [0092] In another example, failover may be provided for some computer modules to ensure high availability. The computing system 100 may maintain a pool of failover resources (e.g., drives as mentioned above), which may include computing resources dedicated to failover events, to accommodate a small percentage of the computer modules. The computing system 100 may assign the failover resources to the computer modules with the highest ranks in response to the computer modules being re-ranked. The computing system 100 may also decommission a predetermined percentage of the lowest ranked computer modules, and/or provision some other predetermined percentage of the highest ranked computer modules, in response to the computer modules being re-ranked.

    [0093] In another example, when the service provisioner 102 provisions a new service, the service provisioner 102 may assign computer modules to the new service that have low or lowest scores. Assigning computer modules with lower scores and/or ranks to new services may prevent a single or multiple computer modules from becoming too critical or a single point of failure for multiple services.

    [0094] Implementations of the various techniques described herein may be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, or in computer hardware, firmware, software, or in combinations of them. Implementations may implemented as a computer program product, i.e., a computer program tangibly embodied in an information carrier, e.g., in a machine readable storage device, for execution by, or to control the operation of, data processing apparatus, e.g., a programmable processor, a computer, or multiple computers. A computer program, such as the computer program(s) described above, can be written in any form of programming language, including compiled or interpreted languages, and can be deployed in any form, including as a stand alone program or as a module, component, subroutine, or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment. A computer program can be deployed to be executed on one computer or on multiple computers at one site or distributed across multiple sites and interconnected by a communication network.

    [0095] Method steps may be performed by one or more programmable processors executing a computer program to perform functions by operating on input data and generating output. Method steps also may be performed by, and an apparatus may be implemented as, special purpose logic circuitry, e.g., an FPGA (field programmable gate array) or an ASIC (application specific integrated circuit).

    [0096] Processors suitable for the execution of a computer program include, by way of example, both general and special purpose microprocessors, and any one or more processors of any kind of digital computer. Generally, a processor will receive instructions and data from a read only memory or a random access memory or both. Elements of a computer may include at least one processor for executing instructions and one or more memory devices for storing instructions and data. Generally, a computer also may include, or be operatively coupled to receive data from or transfer data to, or both, one or more mass storage devices for storing data, e.g., magnetic, magneto optical disks, or optical disks. Information carriers suitable for embodying computer program instructions and data include all forms of non volatile memory, including by way of example semiconductor memory devices, e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices; magnetic disks, e.g., internal hard disks or removable disks; magneto optical disks; and CD ROM and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory may be supplemented by, or incorporated in special purpose logic circuitry.

    [0097] To provide for interaction with a user, implementations may be implemented on a computer having a display device, e.g., a cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor, for displaying information to the user and a keyboard and a pointing device, e.g., a mouse or a trackball, by which the user can provide input to the computer. Other kinds of devices can be used to provide for interaction with a user as well; for example, feedback provided to the user can be any form of sensory feedback, e.g., visual feedback, auditory feedback, or tactile feedback; and input from the user can be received in any form, including acoustic, speech, or tactile input.

    [0098] Implementations may be implemented in a computing system that includes a back end component, e.g., as a data server, or that includes a middleware component, e.g., an application server, or that includes a front end component, e.g., a client computer having a graphical user interface or a Web browser through which a user can interact with an implementation, or any combination of such back end, middleware, or front end components. Components may be interconnected by any form or medium of digital data communication, e.g., a communication network. Examples of communication networks include a local area network (LAN) and a wide area network (WAN), e.g., the Internet.


    Claims

    1. A computer-implemented method (200) for ranking multiple computer modules (350) to reduce failure impacts of failing computer modules, the method (200) comprising:

    associating (202) the multiple computer modules (350) with multiple services (300, 302, 312, 318, 324) that rely on the multiple computer modules (350), at least one of the multiple services (302, 312) relying on more than one of the multiple computer modules (350), wherein said services and computer modules are arranged to control a technical system (190);

    determining (204) numerical values (404, 408, 412, 416) of the multiple services (302, 312, 318, 324) that represent criticality of the respective services at different time periods of the service schedule;

    ranking (206) the multiple computer modules based on the numerical values of the multiple services which rely on the respective computer modules,

    wherein said ranking is dynamically determined as the service criticality changes due to service transitions from one time period to another time period of its schedule;

    operating (210) the computer modules (350) according to the result of the ranking (206) by dynamically adjusting the monitoring frequency of computer modules according to the result of the ranking.


     
    2. The computer-implemented method (200) according to claim 1, wherein associating (202) the multiple computer modules with the multiple services that rely on the multiple computer modules is performed in conjunction with provisioning the multiple services.
     
    3. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, wherein ranking (206) the multiple computer modules includes ranking each of the multiple computer modules based on the determined values of the multiple services that rely on the respective computer modules.
     
    4. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising:

    re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a present time being part of a different part of a schedule for at least one of the multiple services than a previous time; and

    re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined values of the multiple services.


     
    5. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising:

    re-determining the values of the multiple services based on a preconfigured event occurring in a computer network managed by the computing system; and

    re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined values of the multiple services.


     
    6. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising:

    re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a preconfigured event associated with at least one of the computer modules exceeding a time threshold; and

    re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined values of the multiple services.


     
    7. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising:

    re-determining the numerical values of the multiple services based on a new computer module being added to a computer network managed by the computing system; and

    re-ranking the multiple computer modules based on the re-determined numerical values of the multiple services.


     
    8. The computer-implemented method (200) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising:

    re-determining the values of the multiple services based on at least one of the multiple computer modules ceasing to function properly; and

    re-ranking the multiple computing modules based on the re-determined values of the multiple services.


     
    9. A non-transitory computer-readable storage medium (130) comprising instructions stored thereon for ranking multiple computer modules (350) to reduce failure impacts to a technical system (190) that is being controlled by multiple services (300), wherein the instructions, when executed by at least one processor (128), are configured to cause a computing system (100) controlling the computer modules (350) to perform a method according to any of claims 1-8.
     
    10. A computing system (100) that controls the operation of a plurality of computer modules (350) that implement a plurality of services (350) that control a technical system (190), the computer system (100) executing a method (200) according to any of claims 1-8.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) zum Einordnen mehrerer Computermodule (350) in einen Rang, um Ausfallauswirkungen ausfallender Computermodule zu reduzieren, wobei das Verfahren (200) umfasst:

    Zuordnen (202) der mehreren Computermodule (350) zu mehreren Diensten (300, 302, 312, 318, 324), die sich auf die mehreren Computermodule (350) stützen, wobei sich mindestens einer der mehreren Dienste (302, 312) auf mehr als eines der mehreren Computermodule (350) stützt und wobei die Dienste und Computermodule dazu angeordnet sind, ein technisches System (190) zu steuern;

    Bestimmen (204) von numerischen Werten (404, 408, 412, 416) der mehreren Dienste (302, 312, 318, 324), die die Kritikalität der jeweiligen Dienste zu verschiedenen Zeiträumen des Dienstplans darstellen;

    Einordnen (206) der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der numerischen Werte der mehreren Dienste, die sich auf die jeweiligen Computermodule stützen, wobei das Einordnen in einen Rang dynamisch bestimmt wird, wenn sich die Dienstkritikalität aufgrund von Dienstübergängen von einem Zeitraum zu einem anderen Zeitraum ihres Zeitplans ändert;

    Betreiben (210) der Computermodule (350) gemäß dem Ergebnis des Einordnens (206) in einen Rang durch dynamisches Anpassen der Überwachungsfrequenz von Computermodulen gemäß dem Ergebnis des Einordnens in einen Rang.


     
    2. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Zuordnen (202) der mehreren Computermodule zu den mehreren Diensten, die sich auf die mehreren Computermodule stützen, in Verbindung mit einem Bereitstellen der mehreren Dienste durchgeführt wird.
     
    3. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das Einordnen (206) der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang das Einordnen jedes der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der bestimmten Werte der mehreren Dienste, die sich auf die jeweiligen Computermodule stützen, enthält.
     
    4. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend:

    Neubestimmen der numerischen Werte der mehreren Dienste auf Basis einer gegenwärtigen Zeit, die für mindestens einen der mehreren Dienste Teil eines unterschiedlichen Teils eines Zeitplans als eine vorherigen Zeit ist; und

    Neueinordnen der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der neu bestimmten Werten der mehreren Dienste.


     
    5. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend:

    Neubestimmen der Werte der mehreren Dienste auf Basis eines vorkonfigurierten Ereignisses, das in einem von dem Rechensystem verwalteten Computernetzwerk auftritt; und

    Neueinordnen der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der neu bestimmten Werte der mehreren Dienste.


     
    6. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend:

    Neubestimmen der numerischen Werte der mehreren Dienste auf Basis eines vorkonfigurierten Ereignisses, das mindestens einem der Computermodule zugeordnet ist, das einen Zeitschwellenwert überschreitet; und

    Neueinordnen der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der neu bestimmten Werte der mehreren Dienste.


     
    7. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend:

    Neubestimmen der numerischen Werte der mehreren Dienste auf Basis eines neuen Computermoduls, das einem von dem Rechensystem verwalteten Computernetzwerk hinzugefügt wird; und

    Neueinordnen der mehreren Computermodule in einen Rang auf Basis der neu bestimmten numerischen Werte der mehreren Dienste.


     
    8. Computerimplementiertes Verfahren (200) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, ferner umfassend:

    Neubestimmen der Werte der mehreren Dienste auf Basis mindestens eines der mehreren Computermodule, die nicht mehr richtig funktionieren; und

    Neueinordnen der mehreren Rechenmodule in einen Rang auf Basis der neu bestimmten Werte der mehreren Dienste.


     
    9. Nichtflüchtiges computerlesbares Speichermedium (130), umfassend darauf gespeicherte Anweisungen zum Einordnen mehrerer Computermodule (350) in einen Rang, um Ausfallauswirkungen auf ein technisches System (190) zu verringern, das von mehreren Diensten (300) gesteuert wird, wobei die Anweisungen, wenn sie von mindestens einem Prozessor (128) ausgeführt werden, so konfiguriert sind, dass sie ein Rechensystem (100), das die Computermodule (350) steuert, dazu veranlassen, ein Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 1-8 durchzuführen.
     
    10. Rechensystem (100), das den Betrieb mehrerer Computermodule (350) steuert, die mehrere Dienste (350) implementieren, die ein technisches System (190) steuern, wobei das Computersystem (100) ein Verfahren (200) nach einem der Ansprüche 1-8 ausführt.
     


    Revendications

    1. Procédé mis en œuvre par ordinateur (200) pour classer de multiples modules informatiques (350) afin de réduire les effets de défaillance de modules informatiques défaillants, le procédé (200) consistant à :

    associer (202) les multiples modules informatiques (350) à de multiples services (300, 302, 312, 318, 324) qui s'appuient sur les multiples modules informatiques (350), au moins l'un des multiples services (302, 312) s'appuyant sur plus d'un des multiples modules informatiques (350), lesdits services et modules informatiques étant agencés pour commander un système technique (190) ;

    déterminer (204) des valeurs numériques (404, 408, 412, 416) des multiples services (302, 312, 318, 324) qui représentent la criticité des services respectifs à différentes périodes de la planification de service ;

    classer (206) les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs numériques des multiples services qui s'appuient sur les modules informatiques respectifs, ledit classement étant déterminé dynamiquement à mesure que la criticité du service change en raison de transitions de service d'une période de temps à une autre période de temps de sa planification ;

    actionner (210) les modules informatiques (350) selon le résultat du classement (206) en ajustant dynamiquement la fréquence de surveillance de modules informatiques selon le résultat du classement.


     
    2. Procédé mise en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'association (202) des multiples modules informatiques aux multiples services qui s'appuient sur les multiples modules informatiques est exécutée conjointement avec la fourniture des multiples services.
     
    3. Procédé mis en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel le classement (206) des multiples modules informatiques comprend le classement de chacun des multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs déterminées des multiples services qui s'appuient sur les modules informatiques respectifs.
     
    4. Procédé mis en œuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, consistant en outre à :

    redéterminer les valeurs numériques des multiples services en fonction d'une heure actuelle faisant partie d'une partie différente d'une planification pour au moins un des services multiples par rapport à une heure précédente ; et

    reclasser les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs redéterminées des multiples services.


     
    5. Procédé mis en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, consistant en outre à :

    redéterminer les valeurs des multiples services en fonction d'un événement préconfiguré se produisant dans un réseau informatique géré par le système informatique ; et

    reclasser les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs redéterminées des multiples services.


     
    6. Procédé mis en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, consistant en outre à :

    redéterminer les valeurs numériques des multiples services en fonction d'un événement préconfiguré associé à au moins l'un des modules informatiques dépassant un seuil temporel ; et

    reclasser les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs redéterminées des multiples services.


     
    7. Procédé mis en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, consistant en outre à :

    redéterminer les valeurs numériques des multiples services en fonction d'un nouveau module informatique ajouté à un réseau informatique géré par le système informatique ; et

    reclasser les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs numériques redéterminées des multiples services.


     
    8. Procédé mis en oeuvre par ordinateur (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, consistant en outre à :

    redéterminer les valeurs des multiples services en fonction d'au moins un des multiples modules informatiques cessant de fonctionner correctement ; et

    reclasser les multiples modules informatiques en fonction des valeurs redéterminées des multiples services.


     
    9. Support de stockage lisible par un ordinateur non transitoire (130) comprenant des instructions stockées sur celui-ci pour classer de multiples modules informatiques (350) afin de réduire les effets de défaillance sur un système technique (190) qui est commandé par de multiples services (300), dans lequel les instructions, lorsqu'elles sont exécutées par au moins un processeur (128), sont configurées pour amener un système informatique (100) commandant les modules informatiques (350) à exécuter un procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 8.
     
    10. Système informatique (100) qui commande l'actionnement d'une pluralité de modules informatiques (350) mettant en oeuvre une pluralité de services (350) qui commandent un système technique (190), le système informatique (100) exécutant un procédé (200) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 8.
     




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    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description