(19)
(11)EP 3 111 863 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
29.07.2020 Bulletin 2020/31

(21)Application number: 16185786.7

(22)Date of filing:  26.06.2014
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A61B 17/12(2006.01)
A61B 17/00(2006.01)
A61F 2/01(2006.01)

(54)

SPACE FILLING DEVICES

RAUMFÜLLENDE VORRICHTUNGEN

DISPOSITIFS DE REMPLISSAGE D'ESPACE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 26.06.2013 US 201361839843 P
21.11.2013 US 201361907288 P
25.06.2014 US 201414315237

(43)Date of publication of application:
04.01.2017 Bulletin 2017/01

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
14744997.9 / 3013255

(73)Proprietor: W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.
Newark, DE 19711 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • Ayres, Bridget B.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Korey, Nathan C.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Masters, Steven J.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • McDaniel, Thomas R.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Paris, Aaron L.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Schipper, Kenneth M.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Webster, Nicholas S.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Wolfe, Roark N.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)
  • Zeller, Peter J.
    Newark, DE 19711 (US)

(74)Representative: HGF 
1 City Walk
Leeds LS11 9DX
Leeds LS11 9DX (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-2013/040431
US-A1- 2007 162 048
US-A1- 2012 172 927
US-A1- 2007 066 993
US-A1- 2011 054 515
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD



    [0001] The present disclosure relates to implantable medical devices that may be used to occlude apertures, conduits, or structures within a patient.

    BACKGROUND



    [0002] Cardiac features such as atrial appendages can contribute to cardiac blood flow disturbance, which is associated with a number of cardiac-related pathologies. For example, complications caused by blood flow disturbance within the left atrial appendage (LAA) and associated with atrial fibrillation can contribute to embolic stroke. The LAA is a muscular pouch extending from the anterolateral wall of the left atrium of the heart and serves as a reservoir for the left atrium. During a normal cardiac cycle, the LAA contracts with the left atrium to pump blood from the LAA, which prevents blood from stagnating within the LAA. However, during cardiac cycles characterized by arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation), the LAA often fails to sufficiently contract, which can allow blood to stagnate within the LAA. Stagnant blood within the LAA is susceptible to coagulating and forming a thrombus, which can dislodge from the LAA and ultimately result in an embolic stroke. WO2013/040431 A1 discloses medical devices comprising a device frame comprising a plurality of elongate frame members, each of the elongate frame members including a first end and a second end; a first hub member that aggregates the first ends of the plurality of elongate members, and a second hub member that aggregates the second ends of the plurality of elongate members; wherein the device frame includes a face section, a laterally facing skirt section, and a distal sections, and wherein first portions of the elongate members define the face section and extend radially from the first hub member, second portions of the elongate members define the laterally facing skirt section and extend in a distal, axial, and helical direction along a first rotational direction from the face section and tired portions of the elongate members define the distal section.

    SUMMARY



    [0003] According to the present invention, a medical occlusive device includes a device frame that includes a plurality of elongate frame members, where each of the elongate frame members includes a first end and a second end. The medical occlusive device also includes a first hub member that aggregates the first ends of the plurality of elongate frame members, and a second hub member that aggregates the second ends of the plurality of elongate frame members. The device frame includes a face section, a laterally facing skirt section, and an inverted section, and first portions of the elongate frame members define the face section and extend radially from the first hub member, second portions of the elongate frame members define the laterally facing skirt section and extend in a distal, axial, and helical direction along a first rotational direction from the face section, and third portions of the elongate frame members define the inverted section and extend in a proximal direction from a distal portion of the laterally facing skirt section to the second hub member along a rotational direction opposite the first rotational direction. One of either the first or second hub members is disposed concentrically within the other of the first or second hub member. A covering component is attached to the face section and to the laterally facing skirt section.

    [0004] Various implementations may include one or more of the following. For each of the elongate frame members, an angle defined between an exit location from the first hub member and an entry location to the second hub member may be in the range of 140° to 360°, or in the range of 225° to 315°, or in the range of 255° to 285°, or 270°. The medical occlusive device may also include at least one anchor component attached to the device frame. Each of the elongate frame members may include one or more wires. The elongate frame members may include portions of a tube. The first rotational direction may be clockwise, or counter-clockwise. The face section of the device frame may be substantially flat, or may have a convex shape or a concave shape. The first hub member may be an eyelet and the second hub member may be an eyelet. The first hub member may be a ring member and the second hub member may be an eyelet. The first hub member may be a ring member and the second hub member may be a ring member. The second hub member may be disposed concentrically within the first hub member. The medical occlusive device also includes a covering component attached to the face section and to the laterally facing skirt section. The covering component may not be attached to the inverted section. The covering component may be configured to inhibit passage of blood through the covering component. The covering component may be configured to filter by allowing blood to pass through the covering component but not allowing emboli to pass through the covering component. A first portion of the inverted section may oppose at least a portion of the laterally facing skirt section, and a second portion of the inverted section may oppose at least a portion of the face section. The medical occlusive device may also include a covering component attached to the face section, the laterally facing skirt section, and the second portion of the inverted section, where the covering component may not be attached to the first portion of the inverted section.

    [0005] The details of one or more embodiments are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0006] 

    FIGS. 1A, 1B, and 1C are perspective views of an example medical occlusive device that can be used to occlude a hole, defect, aperture, appendage, vessel or conduit within a body of a patient.

    FIG. 2 is a front view of another example medical occlusive device and a perspective view of yet another example medical occlusive device.

    FIG. 3A is a perspective view of an example jig apparatus.

    FIG. 3B is a top view of an example jig apparatus, and shows a wind pattern that can be used to wind a device frame.

    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an example device frame.

    FIG. 5A is a perspective view of an example device frame that includes example anchors having a hook shape.

    FIG. 5B is a front view of an example medical occlusive device.

    FIG. 6 illustrates an example manufacturing operation that can provide the cupped feature of the device frames discussed herein.

    FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a distal portion of an example medical occlusive device that illustrates the cupped feature of the medical occlusive device.

    FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an example device frame elongated along a mandrel and with adhesive applied to portions of the device frame to which the covering component will attach.

    FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an example device frame.

    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a portion of an example device frame, and an example ring member.

    FIG. 11 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 12 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of another unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 13 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 14 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 15 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 16 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed device frame.

    FIG. 17 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed device frame.

    FIGS. 18A, 18B, and 18C are perspective views of an example medical occlusive device that includes a device frame having elongate frame members that are formed from a tube of material.

    FIG. 19 is a view of an example device frame in an elongated, pre-heat-set configuration, after it was laser-cut from a NiTi tube.

    FIGS. 20-25 are conceptual diagrams of portions of unclaimeddevice frames.

    FIG. 26A is a perspective view of an example anchor component that is included on embodiments of the medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    FIG. 26B is a perspective view showing the anchor component of FIG. 26A attached to the elongate frame members of an example medical occlusive device.

    FIG. 26C is a perspective view showing the anchor component of FIG. 26A mounted to an example medical occlusive device that includes a covering component.

    FIGS. 27A-27D are diagrams that exemplify nesting of hub members or eyelets within each other in accordance with embodiments provided herein.

    FIGS. 28A-28C depict techniques for configuring a medical occlusive device with nested eyelets in accordance with some embodiments provided herein.

    FIGS. 29A and 29B are perspective and side views of a winding jig that can be used to form medical occlusive devices with nested eyelets.

    FIGS. 30A and 30B depict example medical occlusive device embodiments with distal anchoring assemblies.

    FIGS. 31A and 31B depict unclaimed medical occlusive devices with distal anchoring assemblies.

    FIG. 32 is a perspective side view of an example medical occlusive device embodiment.

    FIGS. 33A-33D show various views of example medical occlusive device embodiments.

    FIG. 34A shows a perspective view of another unclaimed medical occlusive device.

    FIG. 34B depicts a distal anchoring member that can be used with the medical occlusive device of FIG. 34A.

    FIGS. 34C and 34D are additional views of the medical occlusive device of FIG. 34A.

    FIG. 35 is a side view of an example occlusive device frame embodiment.

    FIG. 36 is a perspective view of the example occlusive device frame of FIG. 35.

    FIG. 37 is a side view of an example anchor frame.

    FIG. 38 is a side view of another example anchor frame.

    FIG. 39 is a perspective view of the example anchor frame of FIG. 38.

    FIG. 40 is a side view of another example occlusive device frame embodiment.

    FIG. 41 is a perspective view of the example occlusive device frame of FIG. 40.

    FIG. 42 is a side view of another example occlusive device frame embodiment.

    FIG. 43 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 44 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 45 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 46 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 47 is a side view of an unclaimed occlusive device frame .

    FIG. 48 is a perspective view of the occlusive device frame of FIG. 47.

    FIG. 49 is a side view of an unclaimed occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 50 is an exploded view of the occlusive device frame of FIG. 49.

    FIG. 51 is a side view of an unclaimed occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 52 is an exploded view of the occlusive device frame of FIG. 51.

    FIG. 53 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 54 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another unclaimed occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 55 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 56 illustrates a material cutting pattern for an occlusive device frame in accordance with some embodiments.

    FIG. 57 illustrates another material cutting pattern for an occlusive device frame in accordance with some embodiments.

    FIG. 58 illustrates another material cutting pattern for an occlusive device frame in accordance with some embodiments.

    FIG. 59 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 60 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIG. 61 illustrates another material cutting pattern for an occlusive device frame in accordance with some embodiments.

    FIG. 62 illustrates another material cutting pattern for an occlusive device frame in accordance with some embodiments.

    FIG. 63A is a conceptual diagram of a portion of yet another example occlusive device frame.

    FIGS. 63B and 63C illustrate a hub member portion of the occlusive device frame of FIG. 63A.



    [0007] Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.

    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0008] This document describes devices, systems and methods that are useful, for example, for fully, partially, or occluding spaces, holes, defects, apertures, appendages, vessels or conduits within a body of a patient. An additional use, in some implementations, can include filtering.

    [0009] In general, any of the implantable medical occlusive devices described herein can be delivered to, and deployed at, an in vivo deployment site within a body of a patient using various minimally invasive transcatheter deployment techniques. For example, any of the implantable medical occlusive devices described herein may be releasably attached to a delivery catheter, and the medical occlusive device and delivery catheter may be loaded into a delivery sheath. The delivery sheath may be introduced to the vasculature of the patient and advanced through the vasculature, until a distal end of the delivery sheath is located at or near the target in vivo deployment site. The implantable medical occlusive device may be deployed at the deployment site, for example by pushing the medical occlusive device out the distal end of the delivery sheath using the delivery catheter and detaching the medical occlusive device from the delivery catheter. In some examples, the medical occlusive device can be deployed by retracting the delivery sheath while maintaining (or advancing) a position of the delivery catheter and the implantable medical occlusive device, and detaching the medical occlusive device from the delivery catheter. In some implementations, a first portion of the medical occlusive device is released from the delivery sheath while a second portion of the medical occlusive device remains constrained by the delivery sheath, a positioning of the first portion of the medical occlusive device is verified, and then the second portion of the medical occlusive device is released from the delivery sheath. The delivery catheter and delivery sheath can then be withdrawn or retracted from the body of the patient. In some examples, a retrieval element such as a tether, suture, or cable, is releasably attached to a portion of the medical occlusive device. The retrieval element can be used to retrieve or recapture the medical occlusive device after deployment, if desired.

    [0010] Any of the implantable medical occlusive devices discussed herein can be used to occlude a left atrial appendage (LAA) of a human heart. The implantable medical occlusive devices can be delivered in an endovascular manner through or over a catheter system to a delivery site, such as the LAA or other appropriate delivery site, and deployed at the site. The implantable medical occlusive devices can be deployed within the LAA and/or across the ostium of the LAA to isolate the LAA from the main chamber of the left atrium (left atrial chamber), for example. This may prevent thrombus formation within the LAA and/or thrombus exit from the LAA. In this manner, a risk of stroke may be reduced or minimized.

    [0011] Without limitation medical occlusive devices described here can be used to occlude spaces, holes, defects, apertures, vessels, conduits, or appendages within a body of a patient, including the heart, such as right or left atrial appendages, fistulas, aneurysms, and patent ductus arteriousus. The medical occlusive devices provide a device frame that is compliant enough to conform to a wide variety of opening geometries and sizes, and offer a high degree of conformability to conform to various structural geometries at the deployment site. Particularly, embodiments of the medical occlusive devices can provide a left atrial appendage occlusion device frame that provides firm, secure anchoring with significantly reduced clinical sequela from piercing or without traumatic piercing of the left atrial appendage tissue. While the medical occlusive devices discussed herein will generally be described as for use in occlusion applications, the medical occlusive devices can also be applicable for filtering applications. For example, the device frames described herein can be used for occlusion applications, filtering applications, and others. As an example, any of the device frames described herein can be fully or partially covered by a covering component configured to inhibit passage of blood through the covering component for occlusion applications. In some embodiments, any of the device frames described herein can be fully or partially covered by a covering component configured to filter by permitting blood to pass through the covering component but to inhibit emboli from passing through the covering component for filtering applications. As such, even though the face section of a device frame may be described herein as an occlusive face section, for example because the device frame may be used in an occlusion application, the face section may similarly be described as a filter face section for applications where the device frame is used to filter rather than occlude.

    [0012] In some implementations, the medical occlusive devices described herein can assume two or more configurations. For example, while the medical occlusive device is being delivered to the deployment site, the medical occlusive device may assume a collapsed or delivery configuration. Following deployment of the medical occlusive device, the medical occlusive device may assume an expanded or deployed configuration. While the medical occlusive device is being deployed, for example, the medical occlusive device may assume one or more partially expanded or partially deployed configurations.

    [0013] FIGS. 1A, 1B, and 1C are perspective views of an example medical occlusive device 100 that can be used to occlude a hole, defect, aperture, appendage, vessel or conduit within a body of a patient. The medical occlusive device 100 includes a device frame comprised of a plurality of elongate frame members 102, and includes a covering component 104 that covers at least a portion of the device frame. In this example, the covering component 104 covers a portion of the device frame and is attached to portions of the elongate frame members 102. As used herein, "frame" may refer to an entire device frame of a medical occlusive device, or may alternatively refer to a localized portion of a medical occlusive device that includes at least one elongate frame member. The medical occlusive device 100 is releasably attached, in FIG. 1A, to an example delivery catheter 106 at a first hub member 108. In some embodiments, the first hub member 108 and a second hub member 116 are connectable, and the delivery catheter 106 can be releasably attached to both the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116.

    [0014] In general, the elongate frame members 102 of medical occlusive device 100 are configured to define at least one occlusive face section 110 of the device frame, a laterally facing skirt section 112 of the device frame, where the laterally facing skirt section extends about a circumference of the device frame, and an inverted section 114 (see FIG. 1C) of the device frame. The elongate frame members 102 include a first portion that defines the at least one occlusive face section 110 of the device frame, a second portion that defines the laterally facing skirt section 112 of the device frame, and a third portion that defines the inverted section 114 of the device frame. The occlusive face section 110 may be a disc-shaped member, and in various implementations can have a circular shape, or can have an oval or elliptical shape. The laterally facing skirt section 112, as can be seen in FIG. 1B, defines a laterally facing surface of the medical occlusive device 100 that is configured to conform to a wall of a space to be occluded. For example, the laterally facing skirt section 112 (along with the covering component 104) may conform to an interior wall of the left atrial appendage, and may assist with occlusion of the appendage by preventing or substantially preventing passage of blood between the laterally facing skirt section 112 and the wall of the appendage. In some embodiments, one or more anchor features 122 are included. In some such embodiments, the anchor features 122 can protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 122 to enhance the migration resistance of the medical occlusive device 100. As will be described in more detail below, in some embodiments the inverted section 114 can include a first portion that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the laterally facing skirt section 112, and a second portion that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the occlusive face section 110.

    [0015] Each of the elongate frame members 102 includes a first end and a second end. The first hub member 108 aggregates the first ends of the elongate frame members 102, and a second hub member 116 (see FIG. 1C) aggregates the second ends of the elongate frame members 102. That is, each of the elongate frame members 102 extends from the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116, and first portions of the elongate frame members 102 define the occlusive face section 110, second portions of the elongate frame members 102 define the laterally facing skirt section 112, and third portions of the elongate frame members 102 define the inverted section 114. The medical occlusive device 100 includes ten elongate frame members.

    [0016] In general, the device frame includes a face section, a laterally facing skirt section, and an inverted section. First portions of the elongate frame members define the face section and extend radially from the first hub member. Second portions of the elongate frame members define the laterally facing skirt section and extend in a distal, axial, and helical direction along a first rotational direction (e.g., counter-clockwise) from the face section. Third portions of the elongate frame members define the inverted section and extend in a proximal direction from a distal portion of the laterally facing skirt section to the second hub member along a rotational direction opposite the first rotational direction (i.e., clockwise in this example).

    [0017] In general, at the time that the medical occlusive device is initially constructed, the elongate frame members 102 extend from the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116 in a common rotational direction. For example, each of the elongate frame members 102 can extend from the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116 in a clockwise direction. Alternatively, for example, each of the elongate frame members 102 can extend from the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116 in a counter-clockwise direction. As will be explained in additional detail below, the inverted section of the medical occlusive device gets inverted into an interior of the medical occlusive device, and it is this inversion that causes the portion of the elongate frame members that define the inverted section to follow a path having rotational direction opposite the rotational direction of the portion of the elongate frame members that define the laterally facing skirt section of the device frame.

    [0018] As can be best seen in FIG. 2, which is a front view of another example medical occlusive device 200 and a perspective view of yet another example medical occlusive device 202, for each of the elongate frame members, the first portion 204 of the elongate frame member extends radially from the first hub member 206. The first portions 204 may be referred to as "struts" of the occlusive face section. Medical occlusive devices 200 and 202 are very similar to the medical occlusive device 100 of FIGS. 1A-C, but include a different number of elongate frame members (in particular, twelve, rather than ten). This illustrates that the medical occlusive devices discussed herein can be constructed with any appropriate number of elongate frame members, such as two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, or more. Also, the medical occlusive devices 200 and 202 illustrate that the medical occlusive devices can be constructed to have differing diameters for the respective occlusive face sections, and to have differing diameters or widths for the corresponding laterally facing skirt sections.

    [0019] The medical occlusive devices 200, 202 of FIG. 2 each include an occlusive face section that has a circular shape. In general, the occlusive face section of the medical occlusive devices discussed herein may have a flat profile in some embodiments, and in other embodiments may have a convex profile or a concave profile. In some examples, the occlusive face section of the medical occlusive device is symmetric about a longitudinal axis of the medical occlusive device. In other examples, the occlusive face section is asymmetric or eccentric about the longitudinal axis of the medical occlusive device.

    [0020] Referring now to medical occlusive device 202 of FIG. 2, upon reaching a perimeter of the occlusive face section of the medical occlusive device, the elongate frame members begin to traverse a helical path and define the laterally facing skirt section. As can be best seen with reference to FIG. 1B, the elongate frame members include second portions 115 that define the laterally facing skirt section 112 of the medical occlusive device as they traverse helically in the same rotational direction, as discussed above.

    [0021] Generally, the view of FIG. 1A shows a proximal portion of the medical occlusive device 100, and the view of FIG. 1C shows a distal portion of the medical occlusive device 100. Generally, when the medical occlusive device 100 is deployed in a LAA, the occlusive face section 100 may be oriented to face the left atrial chamber, the laterally facing skirt section 112 may be generally oriented to face the wall of the LAA, and the inverted section 114 may be generally oriented to face within the LAA (i.e., to face the interior of the LAA). The inverted section 114 is referred to as being distal of the occlusive face section 110 because, after deployment, the position of the inverted section 114 is distal of the occlusive face section 110 with respect to the delivery system. By contrast, the occlusive face section 110 is referred to as being proximal of the inverted section 114 because its deployed position is proximal to the delivery system as compared to the inverted section 114. Typically, the distal portion of the medical occlusive device is deployed first, and the proximal portion of the medical occlusive device (e.g., including the occlusive face section 110) is deployed thereafter. With respect to a LAA, following deployment of the medical occlusive device, the inverted section 114 may be deeper within the interior of the LAA, while the occlusive face section 110 may be oriented to face the left atrial chamber of the heart.

    [0022] The medical occlusive devices discussed herein may generally be pulled into a delivery sheath to load the medical occlusive device, and may generally be pushed out of the delivery sheath to deploy the medical occlusive device. For example, a delivery catheter 106 may be releasably attached to a portion of the medical occlusive device (e.g., an attachment location near a proximal end of the medical occlusive device, the first hub member 108, the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116, and the like), and used to pull the medical occlusive device 100 into the delivery sheath. The delivery sheath may be introduced to the vasculature of the patient and advanced through the vasculature, as described above, until a distal end of the delivery sheath is located at or near the target in vivo deployment site. The medical occlusive device 100 may then be pushed out of the sheath with the delivery catheter, and the catheter may be detached from the medical occlusive device. In general, the medical occlusive devices discussed herein may be loaded into the sheath and deployed from the sheath without using a control catheter to engage a distal end portion of the medical occlusive device, for example.

    [0023] Elongate frame members 102 are wires in some implementations. For example, elongate frame members 102 can be spring wires, shape memory alloy wires, or super-elastic alloy wires for self-expanding type devices. Elongate frame members 102 can be made of nitinol (NiTi), L605 steel, stainless steel, or any other appropriate biocompatible material. In some embodiments, drawn wire tubes such as Nitinol tubes with a platinum, tantalum, iridium, palladium, or the like, fill can be used to enhance the elongate frame members 102 with additional radiographic visibility. In some embodiments, some or all of the elongate frame members 102 can be coated (e.g., sputter coated) with a radiopaque coating for enhanced radiographic visibility. For example, in some such embodiments portions or all of the elongate frame members 102 can be coated with a noble metal such as, but not limited to, tantalum, platinum, and the like. In some embodiments, bioresorbable or bioabsorbable materials may be used, for example a bioresorbable or bioabsorbable polymer. The super-elastic properties of NiTi make it a particularly good candidate material for the elongate frame members 102 (e.g., NiTi wires can be heat-set into a desired shape), according to some implementations. NiTi can be heat-set so that an elongate frame member 102 can self-expand into a desired shape when the elongate frame member 102 is placed in a less restrictive environment, such as when it is deployed from the delivery sheath to a body cavity. The elongate frame members 102 can provide structure and shape for the medical occlusive device 100. In general, the medical occlusive devices described herein include elongate frame members 102 that are shaped as desired to suit the purpose of the medical occlusive device. The elongate frame members 102 may generally be conformable, fatigue resistant, and elastic such that the elongate frame members 102 have a stored length. The elongate frame members 102 may have a spring nature that allows them to collapse and elongate to a pre-formed shape (e.g., the device frame of a medical occlusive device may have a pre-formed shape). The medical occlusive devices described herein may generally be heat set one or more times, as will be discussed further below.

    [0024] In some embodiments, the diameter or thickness of the elongate frame members 102 may be 0.020 cm (0.008") to 0.038 cm (0.015"), or 0.022 cm (0.009") to 0.076 cm (0.030"), but in some embodiments elongate frame members having smaller or larger diameters may be used. In some embodiments, each of the elongate frame members 102 has the same diameter. In some embodiments, one or more portions of the elongate frame members 102 may be diametrically tapered. The elongate frame members may have a round cross-sectional shape or may have a cross-sectional shape that is not round, such as a rectangle or other polygon. Examples of other cross-sectional shapes that the elongate frame members 102 may have include square, oval, rectangle, triangle, D-shape, trapezoid, or irregular cross-sectional shape formed by a braided or stranded construct. In some embodiments, a device frame may include flat elongate frame members 102. In some examples, the elongate frame members 102 may be formed using a centerless grinding technique, such that the diameter of the elongate frame members 102 varies along the length of the elongate frame members 102.

    [0025] In other embodiments, the elongate frame members 102 are formed from a tube of material that is cut to remove portions of the tube, leaving the elongate frame members 102. The tube can be made of nitinol (NiTi), L605 steel, stainless steel, or any other appropriate biocompatible material. In some embodiments, bioresorbable or bioabsorbable materials may be used, for example a bioresorbable or bioabsorbable polymer. The tube of material may be cut in variety of ways. For example, the tube may be cut by a laser. Alternatively, the tube may be cut by a blade, by a water jet, or electrochemically milled, to list just a few examples. The tube is cut according to a prescribed pattern to form elongate frame members 102, so that the elongate frame members extend from the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116. In these cut-tube embodiments, the first and second hub members 108, 116 may comprise cylindrical portions of the tube, for example. The first hub member 108, the second hub member 116, and elongate frame members 102 may all be considered portions of the tube, as they represent the remaining portions of the tube following the cutting process. Thereafter, the tube may be heat set one or more times, as will be discussed further below.

    [0026] In some embodiments, one or more elongate frame members 102 comprises two or more wires (e.g., a twisted pair, or a braided or stranded construct), over at least a portion of the elongate frame member's path. That is, an elongate frame member 102 may be considered a two-filar elongate frame member over a portion or all of its path.

    [0027] As described above, first hub member 108 and second hub member 116 aggregate, respectively, the first and second ends of elongate frame members 102. In cut-tube embodiments (i.e., embodiments where a tube of material is cut to define elongate frame members 102), first hub member 108 and second hub member 116 are typically cylindrical portions of the tube, from which the elongate frame members 102 extend. In embodiments that include wire-based elongate frame member 102, the hub members 108, 116 can be eyelets, crimp joints, or ring members, as will be further described below. In some examples, first hub member 108 and second hub member 116 are both eyelets. In some examples, first hub member 108 and second hub member 116 are both ring members. In some examples, first hub member 108 is an eyelet and second hub member 116 is a ring member. In some examples, first hub member 108 is a ring member and second hub member 116 is an eyelet. In some example, first hub member 108 is an eyelet or a ring member and second hub member 116 is a crimp joint.

    [0028] In some embodiments, the device frame of a medical occlusive device can be formed by cutting and expanding a tube or sheet of material (e.g., refer to FIGS. 18A, 18B, 18C and 19). For example, in some embodiments a device frame of a medical occlusive device can be formed by laser cutting a tube or sheet of NiTi material, expanding the NiTi material to the desired shape, and then heat-setting the material to the desired shape.

    [0029] In some embodiments, the device frames discussed herein can be constructed with a single hub member. For example, first portions of elongate frame members can define a face section of the medical occlusive device, second portions of elongate frame members can define a laterally facing skirt section of the medical occlusive device, and third portions of elongate frame members can define an inverted section of the medical occlusive device, where first and second ends of the elongate frame members are aggregated by a single hub member.

    [0030] Covering component 104 can be configured to inhibit the passage of blood and/or thrombus through the covering component 104, i.e., to occlude or modulate the flow of blood and/or thrombus through the covering component 104. Some embodiments provide a covering component 104 that is configured to induce rapid tissue ingrowth and immediately occludes the passage of blood through the covering component 104. The covering component 104 may be a porous, elastic member that can stretch and collapse to accommodate extension and collapse, respectively, of the elongate frame members 102. Pores of the covering component 104 may be sized to substantially, or in some examples completely, prevent passage of blood, other bodily fluids, thrombi, and emboli. In some implementations, the covering component 104 prevents or substantially prevents passage of blood, other bodily fluids, emboli, or other bodily materials through the covering component 104. The covering component 104 can have a microporous structure that provides a tissue ingrowth scaffold for durable occlusion and supplemental anchoring strength of the medical occlusive device 100. Some embodiments of the covering component 104 comprise a fluoropolymer, such as an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) polymer. In some examples, the covering component 104 can be a membranous covering. In some examples the covering component 104 can be a film.

    [0031] In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is configured such that the inhibition of fluid passage through the covering component 104 is immediate and does not rely on a thrombotic process. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 can be modified by one or more chemical or physical processes that enhance certain physical properties of the covering component 104. For example, a hydrophilic coating may be applied to the covering component 104 to improve the wettability and echo translucency of the covering component 104. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 may be modified with chemical moieties that promote one or more of endothelial cell attachment, endothelial cell migration, endothelial cell proliferation, and resistance to thrombosis. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 may be modified with covalently attached heparin or impregnated with one or more drug substances that are released in situ to promote wound healing or reduce tissue inflammation. In some embodiments, the drug may be a corticosteroid, a human growth factor, an anti-mitotic agent, an antithrombotic agent, or dexamethasone sodium phosphate.

    [0032] In some embodiments, the covering component 104 may be formed of a fluoropolymer (e.g., expanded PTFE (ePTFE) or PTFE). In some embodiments, the covering component 104 may be formed of a polyester, a silicone, a urethane, or another biocompatible polymer, or combinations thereof. In some embodiments, bioresorbable or bioabsorbable materials may be used, for example a bioresorbable or bioabsorbable polymer. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 can comprise Dacron. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 can comprise knits or fibers. The covering component 104 may be woven or non-woven in various embodiments. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 may be formed of a copolymer. In some examples, a first portion of the covering component 104 may be formed of a first material and a second portion of the covering component 104 may be formed of a second material. For example, the portion of the covering component 104 that covers the occlusive face section 110 may be formed of a first material, and a portion of the covering component 104 that covers the remainder of the medical occlusive device may be formed of a second material. In another example, a portion of the covering component 104 that covers the laterally facing skirt section 112 may be formed of a first material, and a portion of the covering component 104 that covers the remainder of the medical occlusive device may be formed of a second material.

    [0033] In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is attached, as by an adhesive, for example, to the first portions and second portions of the elongate frame members, but is not attached to the third portions of the elongate frame members. That is, the covering component is attached to the device frame at the occlusive face section 110 and the laterally facing skirt section 112 of the device frame, but is not attached to the device frame at the inverted section 114 of the device frame.

    [0034] In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is attached, as by an adhesive, for example, to the occlusive face section 110 and the laterally facing skirt section 112 of the device frame. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is attached to at least some portions of the elongate frame members using an adhesive. In some embodiments, FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) is used as an adhesive to attach the covering component 104 to elongate frame members. For example, an FEP coating can be applied to portions of the elongate frame members (e.g., refer to FIG. 8), and the FEP can act as a bonding agent to adhere the covering component 104 to the elongate frame members. In some embodiments, a radiopaque material can be combined with the adhesive. For example, in some embodiments a radiopaque powder (e.g., tungsten powder) can be mixed with the adhesive. When such a radiopaque material is used in conjunction with the adhesive for attaching the covering component 104 to the elongate frame members, the medical occlusive device 100 (and other medical occlusive devices described herein that include such radiopaque material) can be enhanced from a radiographic visualization standpoint (e.g., using fluoroscopy).

    [0035] In some embodiments, portions of the covering component 104 can be attached to the elongate frame members by banding the covering component 104 thereto. For example, in some embodiments portions of the covering component 104, such as but not limited to the ends of the covering component 104, are attached to the elongate frame members, or to the hub members, using banding. The banding can be a variety of materials, including but not limited to biocompatible film materials, suture materials, metallic materials, and the like, and combinations thereof. Such attachment materials and techniques can also be used for other embodiments of the medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0036] In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is attached to selected regions of the device frame and not attached to other regions of the device frame. This technique can facilitate enhanced conformability of the medical occlusive device 150 to the topography of a patient's anatomy at the implant site. Such techniques can also be used with other embodiments of the medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0037] In some embodiments, covering component 104 is pre-perforated to modulate fluid flow through the covering component 104, to create filtering properties, and/or to affect the propensity for tissue ingrowth to the covering component 104. In some embodiments, the covering component 104 is treated to make the covering component 104 stiffer or to add surface texture. For example, in some embodiments the covering component 104 is treated with FEP powder to provide a stiffened covering component 104 or roughened surface on the covering component 104. In some embodiments, selected portions of the covering component 104 are so treated, while other portions of the covering component 104 are not so treated. Other covering component 104 material treatment techniques can also be employed to provide beneficial mechanical properties and tissue response interactions. Such materials and techniques can also be used for other embodiments of the medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0038] Regarding the inverted section 114 of the device frame, the covering component 104 can be attached to the portion of the inverted section that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the occlusive face section 110, and the covering component 104 is not attached to the portion of the inverted section that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the laterally facing skirt section 112. See FIG. 1C, where the covering component 104 is loose about a portion 117 of the inverted section 114 that opposes at least a portion of the laterally facing skirt section 112, and is tighter against the portion 119 of the inverted section 114 that opposes at least of portion of the occlusive face section 110. In general, not attaching the covering component 104 to at least a portion of the inverted section 114 can provide a degree of freedom for the covering component, and allow it to move freely to avoid binding as the device frame expands and collapses, for example.

    [0039] In some embodiments, both the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 are covered by the covering component 104. In some embodiments, one or both of the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 are not covered by the covering component 104. With reference to FIGS. 1B and 1C, medical occlusive device 100 is shown carried on a mandrel 120 for ease of illustration, along with a catheter or sheath 124, into which the medical occlusive device 100 may be loaded. In actual use, mandrel 120 would be replaced by a delivery component, for example.

    [0040] In some embodiments, the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 are coupled together by a coupling element. The coupling element may be an adhesive, for example, such as fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). In other examples, the coupling element may be a weld or a mechanical coupling element, such as a joint, rivet (e.g., a barbell rivet), or various types of catch members. In some examples, the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 may be concentrically aligned along the longitudinal axis of the device frame. In some embodiments, the coupling element can eliminate relative motion between the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116. Eliminating the relative motion between the hub members can reduce or negate a straightening effect on the elongate frame members in some examples, which can be beneficial for loading or deploying the medical occlusive device, in some cases.

    [0041] By coupling the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 together, the struts of the occlusive face section 110 are placed back-to-back with struts of the portion 119 of the inverted section 114 that opposes at least a portion of the occlusive face section 110. This may balance rotational forces associated with the elongate frame members 102 of the medical occlusive device 100, which may be advantageous for deployment of the medical occlusive device 100. The rotational forces may be balanced, for example, because the inverted section 114 is inverted within the medical occlusive device, as will be discussed further below, so that the distal-facing portion of the medical occlusive device forms a cupped shape, as can be seen with reference to FIG. 1C.

    [0042] For medical occlusive devices having elongate frame members 102 comprised of wires, the elongate frame members may be wound, for example, using a winding jig or a modular tool and by guiding each elongate frame member 102 along a winding path defined by one or more pins, bars, blocks, channels, or feature-defining jig components to create the features of the medical occlusive device as desired. When using a jig apparatus, for example, the elongate frame members may follow a predetermined path as defined by the jig apparatus or determined by features of the jig apparatus. FIG. 3A is a perspective view of an example jig apparatus 220. Jig apparatus 220 can be used to wind an eight-wire medical occlusive device. For medical occlusive devices that include a different number of wires, jig apparatus's similar to jig 220 but with appropriate modifications, can be used.

    [0043] FIG. 3B is a top view of an example jig apparatus 222, and shows a wind pattern 224 that can be used to wind a medical occlusive device. Jig apparatus 222 is similar to jig 220, but includes additional features 227 (e.g., pins) that can be optionally used with one or more of the winding path to provide one or more anchors for the medical occlusive device. An elongate frame member 102 can initially be wound in a coiled fashion around a pin or mandrel (not shown) at the center 226 of the jig 222, to create a first eyelet (which may be first hub member 108 in some embodiments). The elongate frame member 102 can then be wound radially (see portion 228) and through a path in the jig 222. The elongate frame member 102 is wound in a rotational direction (clockwise in this example), as indicated by portion 230, and finally is wound radially back to the center 226 of the jig (see portion 232) and coiled around the pin or mandrel to create a second eyelet (which may be second hub member 116 in some embodiments). As can be seen in FIG. 3B, an angle defined between the elongate frame member's exit path from the first eyelet and entry path to the second eyelet is 270°. In some examples, the angle may be in a range of 255° to 285°. In some examples, the angle may be in a range of 225° to 315°. In some examples, the angle may be in a range of 140° to 360°. Each of the elongate frame members 102 can be similarly wound on the jig 22, and the above-described angle may be the same for each of the wires of the medical occlusive device. In general, a length of the medical occlusive device may be tuned based in part on the winding angle defined between the elongate frame member's exit path from the first eyelet and entry path to the second eyelet. For example, for medical occlusive devices having a longer skirt length, angles of 360° or longer can be used. For medical occlusive devices having a shorter skirt length, angles of 140°- 200° can be used.

    [0044] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an example device frame 250 carried by a mandrel 252 after the mandrel 252 and device frame has been removed from a winding jig. Device frame 250 includes an eyelet 254 as a second hub member 116 and a ring member 256 as a first hub member 108. Various types of ring members that can be used as either first or second hub members of the medical occlusive devices discussed herein will be described in more detail below.

    [0045] Device frame 250 generally includes six wires that form the device frame 250. Device frame 250 also includes six anchor features 258, which in this example are formed by six additional wires. As such, the device frame 250 of FIG. 4 includes a portion of the device frame that is two-filar, and a portion of the device frame that is single-filar. Although device frame 250 would be wound on a jig designed for device frames with six wires, the eight-wire example jig assembly 224 of FIG. 3B illustrates features 227, around which wires can be wound to provide anchor features similar to anchor features 258. For example, a pair of wires including a frame wire and an anchor wire may extend from first hub member 108 (e.g., a first eyelet). The frame wire may traverse the path shown in FIG. 3B, and the anchor wire may initially traverse the same path, but during portion 230 may instead be wound around a feature 227 and terminated.

    [0046] The anchor features can take various forms. FIG. 5A is a perspective view of an example device frame 260 that includes example anchor features 262 having a hook shape. FIG. 5B is a front view of an example medical occlusive device 266, and shows how the anchor features 268 can extend from the laterally facing skirt section for engaging tissue of a wall of the space to be occluded (e.g., the wall of an LAA).

    [0047] In some embodiments, device frames described herein can be created using a process that includes a single heat set operation, where the shape memory elongate frame members 102 are heated for a predetermined time and according to a predetermined heating profile while configured in a predetermined orientation to heat set the elongate frame members as desired. In some embodiments, device frames described herein can be created using a process that includes two heat set operations. For example, a first heat set operation can be provided to define portions of the occlusive face section 110 and inverted section 114 of the medical occlusive device, and a second heat set operation can be used to define the laterally facing skirt section 112 and portions of the inverted section 114. For example, the second heat set operation can be used to provide the cupped feature of the device frames described herein.

    [0048] Referring again to device frame 250 of FIG. 4, the device frame 250 can be heat set using a first heat set operation. Following a first heat set operation, FIG. 6 illustrates an example manufacturing operation that can provide the cupped feature of the device frames discussed herein. A device frame 280, carried by a mandrel 282 and initially in a flat orientation similar to the orientation of device frame 250 of FIG. 4, is pushed a predetermined distance into an interior space of manufacturing pipe or tube 284. For example, the mandrel 282, to which the first and second hub members 108, 116 of the device frame 280 are mounted, can be centered within the manufacturing pipe or tube 284 so that the (flat) device frame 280 is flush with an edge 286 of the manufacturing pipe or tube 284. The mandrel may then be pushed a predetermined distance into the tube 284, which may cause the first and second hub members 108, 116 to at least partially enter the interior space of the tube 284. The device frame 28 has a diameter that is larger than the diameter of the tube 284, and the laterally facing skirt section 112 is formed as the excess device frame length is pushed down by the tube 284 while the mandrel 282 is advanced into the tube 284. In some embodiments, the mandrel 282 is pushed into the tube 284 0.228 cm (0.090"). In some examples, the mandrel may be advanced into the tube 284 a distance in a range of 0.223 cm (0.088") to 0.233 cm (0.092"). In some examples, the mandrel may be advanced into the tube 284 a distance in a range of 0.215 cm (0.085") to 0.241 cm (0.095"). When the mandrel 282 has been appropriately advanced into the tube 284 to create the laterally facing skirt section 112, a second heat set operation can be performed on the device frame 280. Although the description above describes two separate heat set operations, in some implementations a single heat set operation can be performed.

    [0049] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a distal portion of an example medical occlusive device 288 that illustrates the cupped feature of the medical occlusive device.

    [0050] Following the second heat set operation, the device frame can be removed from the tube 284 and prepared for attachment of the covering component 104. The first and second hub members 108 and 116 can be separated on the mandrel to elongate the device frame. An adhesive (e.g., FEP) can be applied to portions of the elongate frame members. As described above, the covering component 104 is attached to the occlusive face section 110, the laterally facing skirt section 112, and the portion of the inverted section that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the occlusive face section. The covering component 104 is not attached to the portion of the inverted section that opposes the profile of at least a portion of the laterally facing skirt section. As such, the device frame can be prepared so that portions of the elongate frame members to which the covering component should attach are coated with adhesive, and portions or the device frame to which the covering component should not attach are not coated with adhesive. In some examples, the entire device frame can be initially coated with adhesive, and selected portions of the adhesive can be removed (as by vacuuming). In some examples, only those portions of the device frame to which the covering component should attach are coated with adhesive.

    [0051] FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an example device frame 290, elongated along a mandrel and with adhesive applied to portions of the device frame 290 to which the covering component will attach. In some examples, a hypotube can be used to separate the first and second hub members 108 and 116 to elongate the device frame on the mandrel. The covering component 104 may then be attached to portions of the device frame 290 via the adhesive. In some examples, a membranous film is wrapped onto the device frame to provide the covering component 104. In some examples, a membranous bag element is positioned onto the device frame to provide the covering component 104.

    [0052] Following application of the covering component, the first and second hub members 108 and 116 may be coupled together by a coupling element. The coupling element may be an adhesive, such as FEP, in some examples. In other examples, the coupling element may be a weld or a mechanical coupling element, such as a joint, rivet (e.g., a barbell rivet), or various types of catch members. The coupling element may align the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 along a longitudinal axis of the device frame. In some examples, the first hub member 108 and the second hub member 116 may be concentrically aligned along the longitudinal axis of the device frame.

    [0053] FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an example device frame 300, where the second hub member is arranged concentrically within (e.g., nested within) the first hub member. In this example, each of first hub member and second hub member are eyelets. In some examples, a first mandrel having a first diameter can be used in winding the first eyelet and a second mandrel having a second (smaller, in this example) can be used in winding the second eyelet. In other examples, the first hub member can be arranged concentrically within the second hub member.

    [0054] FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a portion of an example device frame 310, and an example ring member 312. Ring member 312 generally has a ring shape, and includes a plurality of holes longitudinally defined through a wall of the ring member 312. The ring member 312 may aggregate ends of the elongate frame members, which may pass through the holes of the ring member 312, or, in some embodiments, terminate within the ring member 312.

    [0055] FIGS.11-17 are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices. For example, in some of the figures the designs of the hub members and/or other device frame features are highlighted. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs. In these figures, no covering component or only partial covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 11-17 can be combined with a covering component. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0056] FIG. 11 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 400. Device frame 400 shows how the portion 117 of the inverted section opposes the laterally facing skirt section 112, and how the portion 119 of the inverted section opposes the occlusive face section 110. A union joint 402 couples the first hub member 108 to the second hub member 116, and aligns them along a longitudinal axis of the device frame. The joint 402 may hold the hub members 108 and 116 axially, while allowing rotational movement therebetween. The hub members 108 and 116 are eyelets in this example. A cap 118 of the joint may be rounded, for example.

    [0057] FIG. 12 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 420. The device frame includes a ring member 422 as the first hub member. The second hub member is an eyelet 423 in the depicted example. The ring member 422 and the eyelet 423 are not directly coupled to each other. However, the ring member 422 and the eyelet 423 may be directly coupled to each other. Ring member 422 may provide additional termination points for anchor attachment wires. As can be seen in FIG. 12, the elongate frame members generally enter ring member 422 along an axial direction, whereas the wires that enter an eyelet (see FIG. 11) may do so tangentially in a helically wound direction. In some examples, the ring member 422 may include a threaded feature (not shown) for attaching a delivery catheter, for example.

    [0058] FIG. 13 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 440. The device frame includes two ring members 422 and 424, corresponding to the first and second hub members, respectively. The elongate frame members may be terminated at the hub members in various ways. For example, the elongate frame members may be looped through the hub members. The elongate frame members may alternatively be welded, or attached with adhesive.

    [0059] FIG. 14 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 460. The device frame includes two ring members 422 and 424, corresponding to the first and second hub members, respectively coupled together by a joint 426. In some examples, the joint 426 may be configured to allow ring members 422 and 424 to spin relative to one another. In some examples, the joint 426 may be configured to not allow the ring members 422 and 424 to spin relative to one another.

    [0060] FIG. 15 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 480 of the type discussed herein. The device frame includes a pivot hub member 430 of the type described in the provisional application titled "Joint Assembly for Medical Devices," having inventors Coby C. Larsen, Steven J. Masters, and Thomas R. McDaniel, filed on 16 November 2012. Ends of the elongate frame members that terminate in the pivot hub member 430 have ball ends 432 that are received by the pivot hub member 430 with socket or slotted features, and allow the elongate frame members to pivot. The inner hub member comprises a ring member 424. The inner hub member may be another type of hub member such as, but not limited to, an eyelet, a tube portion, and the like.

    [0061] FIG. 16 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 500. An anchor assembly 502 is included, where the anchor assembly 502 uses separate elongate frame members from those used to form the occlusive device frame of the device frame 500. The elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame are terminated in an eyelet 504, which acts as the first hub member, while the anchor elongate frame members are terminated in a hub member or ring component 506, which may be attached to eyelet 504 by adhesive, welded joint, or other mechanical structures (e.g., dog-bone joint). The inner hub member comprises an eyelet 505. The inner hub member may be another type of hub member such as, but not limited to, a ring member, a tube portion, and the like. The anchor assembly 502 can use wires of different size, shape, or material than the wires of the occlusive device frame, in some implementations. The anchor assembly 502 can be formed using a cut-tube process as described elsewhere herein.

    [0062] FIG. 17 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 520 that is similar to the frame 500 of FIG. 16, but includes an additional anchors 510 located near the distal end of the device frame, which may allow for earlier anchoring during deployment of the device frame, for example. The anchors 510 may terminate at the same hub member or ring component 506, for example. The inner hub member comprises an eyelet 505. The inner hub member may be another type of hub member such as, but not limited to, a ring member, a tube portion, and the like. The anchors 510 can use wires of different size, shape, or material than the wires of the occlusive device frame, in some implementations. The anchors 510 can be formed using a cut-tube process as described elsewhere herein.

    [0063] FIGS. 18A, 18B, and 18C are perspective views of an example medical occlusive device 550 that includes a device frame having elongate frame members 552 that are formed by cutting (e.g., laser cutting) and expanding a tube of material. In this example, the medical occlusive device 550 includes six elongate frame members 552. In general, the device frame of medical occlusive device 550 has a shape similar to other occlusive device frames discussed herein. For example, a face section 554, laterally facing skirt section 556, and inverted section 558 of the device frame can be seen in the figures, despite the presence a covering component 560.

    [0064] FIG. 19 is a view of an example device frame 900 in an elongated, pre-heat-set configuration, just after it was laser-cut from a NiTi tube, for example. The device frame 900 includes cylindrical members near distal ends of the device frame, which may correspond to the hub members discussed herein. The device frame also includes elongate portions of the tube that can be heat set to a particular configuration so that the elongate portions form the features of the device frames discussed herein. The elongate portions generally terminate at the cylindrical members. The device frame 900 is intended to depict a general example of how a tube of material may be cut so that remaining portions of the tube may form a device frame for some medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0065] FIGS. 20-25 are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices. For example, in some of the figures the designs of the anchor frames and/or occlusive device frames are highlighted. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In these figures, no covering component or only partial covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 20-25 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0066] FIG. 20 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example device frame 700. A ring member 702 includes attachment holes that can allow pre-formed anchors 704 to be added separately after the main device frame is already assembled. Ball ends are shown on the elongate frame members and anchor elongate frame members, and can help secure the elongate frame members to the ring member 702. Adhesive or weld joints, or other mechanical securing components, can also be optionally used, for example. The inner hub member comprises an eyelet 505. The inner hub member may be another type of hub member such as, but not limited to, a ring member, a tube portion, and the like. The pre-formed anchors 704 can use wires of different size, shape, or material than the wires of the occlusive device frame, in some implementations. For example, the pre-formed anchors 704 can be formed of a bioabsorbable polymer while the occlusive device frame is formed of a metallic material.

    [0067] FIG. 21 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example device frame 720 of the type discussed herein. The device frame 720 includes an anchor assembly 722 with anchors 724, where the anchor assembly 722 is cut from a tube of material. For example, the anchor assembly 722 can be cut from a tube of Nitinol. One or more anchor arms of the assembly 722 include anchors 724 disposed at different longitudinal positions of the device frame 720 (see e.g., anchors 724a, 724b). This can facilitate staged anchoring during deployment, for example. Because anchors 724a and 724b are on the same arm of the assembly, additional anchors may be provided without adding to the profile of the device frame, for example.

    [0068] In some embodiments, the anchors 724 (and other anchors provided herein) are designed to be flexible and resilient such that the anchors 724 can be folded to a low-profile delivery configuration for containment within a delivery sheath, and can be translated within the delivery sheath without significant dragging resistance. When deployed from the delivery sheath, the anchors 724 revert to a curved configuration (e.g., as shown, or similar to as shown) that engages with the surrounding tissue at the deployment site. In some implementations, the anchors 724 pierce the surrounding tissue while the other parts of the device frame 720 act as a pledget to limit the penetration depth of the anchors 724. In that manner, the risk of pericardial effusion related to penetration of the anchors 724 can be mitigated. In some implementations, the anchors 724 engage the surrounding tissue without penetration. It should be understood that while the anchors 724 are depicted as having sharp points, in some embodiments the anchors 724 (and the other anchors described herein) can have other types of ends including, but not limited to, ball ends, barbs, atraumatic ends, hooks, bifurcated ends, and so on. In some embodiments, individual anchors of the anchors 724 can have differing types of ends.

    [0069] FIG. 22 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 740. The device frame 740 includes a distal expanding stent section 742, which can increase radial stiffness near the distal end of the device frame 740. The increased radial stiffness may improve anchoring in some embodiments (anchors not shown in FIG. 23, but stent section 742 could be combined with any of the device frames shown herein). Stent section 742 can be loosely attached to a distal portion of the device frame 740 with suture or film near the looped regions of the device frame. The stent section 742 can be formed from wires or cut tubing, for example.

    [0070] FIG. 23 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 760. Device frame 760 is similar to device frame 740 of FIG. 23, but includes a stent section 762 with anchor features 764 that extend from the stent section 762.

    [0071] FIG. 24 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 780. Device frame 780 includes in-frame anchors 782 at a distal end of the device frame 780. The anchors 782 include a loop and provide passive anchoring designed to avoid or minimize penetration of tissue. In other examples, the anchors 782 could include a sharp feature (e.g., at least one hook, barb, or tine) designed to penetrate tissue. As an alternative, any of the micro-coil anchor features described in the provisional application titled "Space Filling Devices," having inventors Coby C. Larsen, Brandon A. Lurie, Steven J. Masters, Thomas R. McDaniel, and Stanislaw L. Zukowski, filed on 15 March 2013, can be attached to any appropriate portion of elongate frame members on any of the device frames discussed herein.

    [0072] FIG. 25 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a device frame 800. Device rame 800 includes anchors 802 that extend distally from an anchor hub member 804, where the anchor hub member 804 is coupled to second hub member 806 by a coupling element 808 in this example. Coupling element 808 includes ball ends at respective ends of the element 808. The anchors 802 can articulate with some degree of independence from the rest of the device frame 800 by virtue of the use of the coupling element 808.

    [0073] FIG. 26A depicts an example anchor component 600 that is included on some embodiments of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. The example anchor component 600 is a wire (e.g., NiTi or stainless steel) that is bent to or formed in the approximate shape shown, including the compound bend angles of the ends 602, and the U-shaped arms 604. The free ends of the anchor component 600 can include sharp tips, atraumatic tips, barbs, ball-ends, or other types of tips, or combinations thereof.

    [0074] The first and second arms 604a and 604b can be connected to an elongate frame member of an occlusive device frame. For example, as illustrated in the example of FIG. 26B, the anchor component 600 can be connected to the elongate frame members 611 and 612 of an occlusive device frame 610. In this example implementation, the first arm 604a of the anchor component 600 is connected to a first elongate frame member 611 and the second arm 604b is connected to a second elongate frame member 612. As shown, the first arm 604a is connected to the first elongate frame member 611 at two or more positions along the length of the first arm 604a. This method of connecting the first arm 604a causes the first arm 604a to be held in contact with the first elongate frame member 611 along the full length of the first arm 604a. In some embodiments the second arm 604b is connected to the second elongate frame member 612 at a single location. Therefore, in some embodiments the second arm 604b can pivot in relation to the second elongate frame member 612. Such a pivotable connection between the second arm 604b and the second elongate frame member 612 can allow the anchor component 600 to reconfigure its position in relation to the device frame 610 of the medical occlusive device as the occlusive device frame 610 expands or contracts into different sizes or configurations. As the anchor component 600 reconfigures its position in relation to the device frame of the medical occlusive device 610, the ends 602 point in a radially outward direction so as to maintain an ability to anchor the medical occlusive device to surrounding tissue. In addition, the ends 602 point in a slightly proximal direction to reduce the likelihood of device frame 610 migration. This feature is illustrated in FIG. 26C, which shows anchor component 600 with ends exposed and in an orientation to provide anchoring while the occlusive device frame 610 is in a partially collapsed configuration.

    [0075] FIGS. 27A through 27D illustrate techniques for nesting hub members such that two or more hub members are located concentrically or coaxially in relation to each other. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members of the medical occlusive devices provided herein terminate at hub members. In some embodiments, a hub member is an eyelet (a coil comprised of one or more elongate frame members that are wound to have a spiral configuration). In some embodiments, a hub member is a ring member (e.g., refer to FIG. 10) where the elongate frame members terminate. In some embodiments, a hub member is a crimp joint, a collar surrounding an aggregation of elongate frame members. In some embodiments, the crimp joint may include adhesives, welds, compression fits, and the like, to restrain the elongate frame members within the collar. The eyelets and ring members may also include adhesives, welds, compression fits, and the like, to provide supplemental restraint of the elongate frame members. The nested hub configuration can provide a medical occlusive device that has advantages such as being collapsible to a low profile, as well as being resistant to fatigue. FIGS. 27A-27D are drawn to highlight particular medical occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In these figures, no covering component or only partial covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 27A-27D can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0076] FIG. 27A depicts a medical occlusive device 620 that has nested eyelets 622 and 624. That is, first eyelet 622 is located within the space defined by the second eyelet 624. FIG. 27B illustrates a medical occlusive device 630 that has an eyelet 632 nested within a ring member 634. FIG. 27C illustrates a medical occlusive device 640 that has a crimp joint 642 nested within a ring member 644. FIG. 27D illustrates a medical occlusive device 650 that has a ring member 652 nested within an eyelet 654. It should be understood that any combination of ring members, eyelets, and crimp joints are envisioned within the scope of this disclosure. In some embodiments that have eyelets, some or all of the elongate frame members that make up the eyelets may be conjoined in the eyelet area by welding (e.g., laser welding), or by another technique (e.g., using an adhesive, etc.). In some embodiments that have nested eyelets, such techniques can be used to conjoin some or all of the elongate frame members of the inner eyelet and/or the outer eyelet individually, while not conjoining the inner eyelet and outer eyelet together. In some embodiments that have nested eyelets, such techniques can be used to conjoin some or all of the elongate frame members of the inner eyelet and outer eyelet together. Any of the medical occlusive devices provided herein that include one or more eyelets can have some or all of the elongate frame members of the eyelet(s) conjoined in such a manner.

    [0077] FIGS. 28A through 28C depict a technique for forming a device frame of a medical occlusive device with nested eyelets. FIG. 28A shows an assembly of elongate frame members 660 that includes a first eyelet 662 and a second eyelet 664. The assembly of elongate frame members 660 can be the result of a process of winding elongate frame members using a jig and/or mandrel as described elsewhere herein. The assembly of elongate frame members 660 includes a first eyelet 662 and a second eyelet 664. While in some embodiments eyelets are included, in other embodiments other types of hubs can be included instead of, or in addition to, eyelets.

    [0078] FIG. 28B depicts an intermediate step of the technique for nesting hub members. To transition from the configuration of the assembly of elongate frame members 660 shown in FIG. 28A to the configuration of the assembly of elongate frame members 660 shown in FIG. 28B, the first and second eyelets 662 and 664 are rotated 180 degrees individually, and in opposite directions as indicated by arrows 663 and 665. In doing so, the elongate frame members 660 do not become twisted with each other.

    [0079] FIG. 28C depicts the final step of the technique for nesting hub members. That is, the inner eyelet 662 is placed substantially within the interior space defined by the second hub member 664. In some embodiments, the second hub member 664 can be placed substantially within the interior space defined by the first hub member 662.

    [0080] FIGS. 29A and 29B show tooling 670 that can be used to wind elongate frame members to make medical occlusive devices with nested eyelets. The winding pattern starts at the winding start disc 672 and winds an eyelet down the post 674. The elongate frame members are then wound, each following a similar but discretely different path (in this example 216 degrees). The elongate frame members are then wound, starting at the bottom of the post, upwards to form another eyelet around the initial eyelet.

    [0081] FIGS. 30A through 34D provide embodiments of medical occlusive devices that include distal anchoring members. Various types of distal anchoring members are described. FIGS. 30A-34D are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In some of these figures, some portions of the device frames and covering components are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible.

    [0082] FIG. 30A depicts a medical occlusive device 680 that includes an occlusive device frame 681 and a distal anchoring member 686. As with some other medical occlusive devices described herein, the occlusive device frame 681 includes an occlusive face section 682, a laterally facing skirt section 683, an inverted section 684, and a hub member 685 (which is a nested hub member assembly in embodiments.

    [0083] In some embodiments, the distal anchoring member 686 is constructed from material that is cut and then expanded. For example, in some embodiments the distal anchoring member 686 is made from a tube of material that is laser-cut and then expanded (and heat-set in some embodiments) to the configuration as shown. In some embodiments, NiTi is used as the material, but other materials such as stainless steel and polymers may also be used, instead of or in combination with NiTi. The design of the distal anchoring member 686 can facilitate the application of a radial force from the distal anchoring member 686 to the surrounding tissue that can assist with the anchoring performance of the medical occlusive device 680. In addition, the configuration of the distal anchoring member 686 includes portions made of curved elongate frame members. Such curved portions can provide axial and radial flexibility and springiness whereby the anchor frame is resistant to medical occlusive device migration within the anatomy of the patient. Further, in some embodiments the distal anchoring member 686 include multiple free ends 687 that can abut or penetrate tissue to provide anchorage of the medical occlusive device 680 in relation to the surrounding tissue.

    [0084] In some embodiments, the occlusive device frame 681 and distal anchoring member 686 may be coupled together by a coupling element 689. The coupling element may be an adhesive, such as FEP, or a weld, in some examples. In the depicted example, the coupling element 689 is a mechanical coupling element, such as a joint, rivet (e.g., a barbell rivet), or various types of catch members. In some examples, the hub member 685 of the occlusive device frame and the hub member 688 of the anchor frame are concentrically aligned along the longitudinal axis of the device frame.

    [0085] In some embodiments, the coupling element 689 may allow relative movement between the occlusive device frame 681 and distal anchoring member 686. For example, the occlusive device frame 681 and distal anchoring member 686 may be allowed to move axially in relation to each other, or to rotate in relation to each other.

    [0086] FIG. 30B shows another embodiment of a medical occlusive device 690 that includes a distal anchoring member 696. As with some other medical occlusive devices described herein, the occlusive device frame 691 includes an occlusive face section 692, a laterally facing skirt section 693, an inverted section 694, and a hub member 695 (which is a nested hub member assembly in embodiments).

    [0087] In some embodiments, the distal anchoring member 696 is made of multiple elongate frame members (e.g., 696a, 696b, and 696c) that terminate at one end at a ring hub member 698 and at the other end at ball ends 697. The ball ends 697 are adapted for atraumatically engaging body tissue and securing the medical occlusive device 690 in place, for example by friction, pressure, or entanglement. In some examples, the ball ends 697 may be formed on the end of the fixation anchor wire by laser welding. The ball ends 697 may provide anchoring and may reduce a potential for perforation or pericardial effusion, in some implementations. In general, the ball ends 697 or other passive anchor features discussed herein may cause less friction on an inside surface of a delivery sheath as compared to some active anchor elements with sharp edges, in some implementations, which may reduce particulation with respect to the delivery system in some cases. In some embodiments, a diameter of the ball ends 697 may be two times the diameter of the anchor frame wire. In some examples, the diameter of the ball end 697 may range from 1x (with just a round wire end) to 2x the diameter of the anchor frame wire, for example, the diameter may be 1.5x the diameter of the anchor frame wire, or 1.6x, 1.7x, 1.8x, or 1.9x the diameter of the anchor frame wire. The ball ends 697 may be created by applying a laser pulse to the end of the anchor frame wire, for example. For example, in some embodiments, spherical members or ball ends 697 may be formed directly on ends of the anchor frame wires using a precision laser weld technique (e.g., using an Nd:YAG laser).

    [0088] In some embodiments, the occlusive device frame 691 and distal anchoring member 696 may be coupled together by a coupling element 699. The coupling element may be an adhesive, such as FEP, or a weld, in some examples. In the depicted example, the coupling element 699 is a mechanical coupling element, such as a joint, rivet (e.g., a barbell rivet), or various types of catch members. In some embodiments, the coupling element 699 may allow relative movement between the occlusive device frame 691 and distal anchoring member 696. For example, the occlusive device frame 691 and distal anchoring member 696 may be allowed to move axially in relation to each other, or to rotate in relation to each other.

    [0089] FIG. 31A shows another embodiment of a medical occlusive device 810 that includes a distal anchoring member 816. As with other medical occlusive devices described herein, the occlusive device frame 811 includes an occlusive face section 812, a laterally facing skirt section 813, an inverted section 814, and a hub member 815 (which is a nested hub assembly in embodiments).

    [0090] In some embodiments, the distal anchoring member 816 is constructed from material that is cut and then expanded. For example, in some embodiments the distal anchoring member 816 is made from a tube of material that is laser-cut and then expanded (and heat-set in some embodiments) to the configuration as shown. In some embodiments, NiTi is used as the material, but other materials such as stainless steel and polymers may also be used.

    [0091] In some embodiments, the occlusive device frame 811 and distal anchoring member 816 may be coupled together by a coupling element 819. In contrast with medical occlusive device 680 and medical occlusive device 690, in medical occlusive device 810 the hub members 815 and 818 are not coupled. Rather, the perimeters of the occlusive device frame 811 and distal anchoring member 816 may be coupled together by multiple suture knots 819. In some embodiments, the hub members 815 and 818 can also be tethered together using a suture. The suture knots 819 lash and constrain the elongate frame members (e.g., 816a, 816b, 816c) to the elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame 811, or to the covering component of the occlusive device frame 811, or to both the elongate frame members and the covering component of the occlusive device frame 811.

    [0092] This technique of coupling occlusive device frame 811 and distal anchoring member 816 using multiple suture knots 819 may allow the medical occlusive device 810 to collapse to a very low profile for placement within a delivery sheath. In addition, in some embodiments the use of multiple suture knots 819 to couple the peripheries of the occlusive device frame 811 and distal anchoring member 816 may enhance the stability of the medical occlusive device 810 during loading into a delivery sheath, during deployment, and after deployment.

    [0093] FIG. 31B shows another embodiment of a medical occlusive device 820 that includes a distal anchoring member 826. As with other medical occlusive devices described herein, the occlusive device frame 821 includes an occlusive face section 822, a laterally facing skirt section 823, an inverted section 824, and a hub member 825 (which is a nested hub member assembly in embodiments).

    [0094] In some embodiments, the occlusive device frame 821 and distal anchoring member 826 may be coupled together by an overhand running stitch 829 that defines a spiral path around some or all of the periphery of the occlusive device frame 821 and distal anchoring member 826 at the intersection thereof. In contrast with medical occlusive device 680 and medical occlusive device 690, in medical occlusive device 820 the hub members 825 and 828 are not coupled. Rather, the perimeters of the occlusive device frame 821 and distal anchoring member 826 may be coupled together by an overhand running stitch 829. The hub members 825 and 828 are tethered together using a suture. The overhand running stitch 829 lashes and constrains the elongate frame members (e.g., 826a, 826b, 826c) to the elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame 821, or to the covering component of the occlusive device frame 821, or to both the elongate frame members and the covering component of the occlusive device frame 821.

    [0095] This technique of coupling occlusive device frame 821 and distal anchoring member 826 using an overhand running stitch 829 may allow the medical occlusive device 820 to collapse to a very low profile for placement within a delivery sheath. In addition, in some embodiments the use of an overhand running stitch 829 to couple the peripheries of the occlusive device frame 821 and distal anchoring member 826 may enhance the stability of the medical occlusive device 820 during loading into a delivery sheath, during deployment, and after deployment. Further, attachment of the distal anchoring member 826 to the occlusive device frame 821 can, in some embodiments, help center the medical occlusive device 820 within an anatomical space (e.g., a LAA).

    [0096] FIG. 32 shows a side perspective view of another medical occlusive device 830 that includes an occlusive device frame 831 and a distal anchoring member 836. In this view, only the end portions of the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 are visible. It should be understood that the distal anchoring member 836 can be analogous to any of the distal anchoring members 686, 696, 816, and 826 of FIGS. 30A, 30B, 31A, and 31B; can be analogous to the distal anchoring member 846 of FIGS. 33A-33C; and can have any other similar design.

    [0097] It can be seen that the elongate frame member 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 projects radially from the occlusive device frame 831. In particular, in some embodiments the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 project through the covering component 832 of the occlusive device frame 831. Further, in some embodiments the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 project from the occlusive device frame 831 through the interstitial spaces defined by the elongate frame members 834 of the occlusive device frame 831 (as shown in FIG. 32).

    [0098] A suturing technique for lashing and constraining the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 to the covering component 832 and elongate frame members 834 of the occlusive device frame 831 can be used for medical occlusive device 830. For example, in some embodiments, suture knots (refer to FIG. 31A) can be used to lash and constrain the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 to the elongate frame members 834 of the occlusive device frame 831. In some embodiments, an overhand running stitch technique (refer to FIG. 31B) can be used for lashing and constraining the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 to the covering component 832 and elongate frame members 834 of the occlusive device frame 831. In some embodiments, a combination of such techniques and other techniques (e.g., clips, adhesives, welds, etc.) can be used for lashing and constraining the elongate frame members 837 of the distal anchoring member 836 to the covering component 832 and elongate frame members 834 of the occlusive device frame 831.

    [0099] FIGS. 33A through 33D illustrate another medical occlusive device 840. The medical occlusive device 840 includes an occlusive device frame 841 and a distal anchoring member 846. The occlusive device frame 841 includes an occlusive face section 842, a laterally facing skirt section 843, a covering component 844, and an inverted section 845.

    [0100] The distal anchoring member 846 includes a device frame of multiple elongate frame members 847, and a substrate 848. The substrate 848 is at least partially bonded (e.g., using FEP), laminated, or otherwise attached to the elongate frame members 847. In some embodiments, the substrate can be a densified ePTFE material. In some embodiments, other types of sheet materials can be used, including but not limited to, PTFE, a polyester, DACRON, a silicone, a urethane, or another biocompatible polymer, or combinations thereof.

    [0101] In some embodiments, the distal anchoring member 846, including the device frame of multiple elongate frame members 847 and the substrate 848, can be attached to the occlusive device frame 841 near the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 843. For example, in some embodiments the device frame of multiple elongate frame members 847 and the substrate 848 of the distal anchoring member 846 is attached to the elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame 841 and/or the covering component 844 of the occlusive device frame 841 as described in reference to FIGS. 31A, 31B, and 32 (e.g., using suture knots, an overhand running stitch, and the like). In some embodiments, the substrate 848 provides additional surface with which to attach the distal anchoring member 846 to the occlusive device frame 841. For example, in FIG. 33B a suture element 849 is used to stitch the substrate 848 to the covering component 844. The suture element 849 can also be used to lash the elongate frame members 847 to the elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame 841 and to the covering component 844. In such a manner, the distal anchoring member 846 can, optionally, be securely attached to the occlusive device frame 841 near the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 843.

    [0102] FIGS. 34A, 34C, and 34D show another example medical occlusive device 850 that includes a distal anchoring member 856. FIG. 34B illustrates an example distal anchoring member 856 that can be a component part of the medical occlusive device 850.

    [0103] Referring to FIG. 34B, the distal anchoring member 856 can include a device frame with an anchoring portion 857, a proximal bulbous portion 858, and hub members 859a and 859b. The distal anchoring member 856 can be made of a material that is cut and expanded (such as shown in FIGS. 34A, 34C, and 34D) or of elongate frame members that are coupled together using hub members of various types (such as shown in FIG. 34B).

    [0104] Referring to FIGS. 34A, 34C, and 34D, the medical occlusive device 850 includes the distal anchoring member 856 and an occlusive device frame 851. The occlusive device frame 851 includes a hub member 851a, an occlusive face section 852, a laterally facing skirt section 853, a covering component 854, and an inverted section 855.

    [0105] The distal anchoring member 856 is coupled to the occlusive device frame 851 in one or more of the following ways. For example, the hub member 859a of the distal anchoring member 856 can be coupled to the hub member 851a of the occlusive device frame 851. Such coupling of the hub members 859a and 851a can be accomplished using the various techniques for coupling hub members that are described elsewhere herein (e.g., using coupling elements such as an adhesive (such as FEP), a weld, a mechanical coupling element (such as a joint, rivet (e.g., a barbell rivet)), or various types of catch members). Additionally, or as an alternative, the distal anchoring member 856 can be coupled to the occlusive device frame 851 using the suturing techniques described in reference to FIGS. 31A, 31B, and 32 (e.g., using suture knots, an overhand running stitch, and the like). A substrate may be included on the distal anchoring member 856 as described in reference to FIGS. 33A-33D. Additionally, or as an alternative, the distal anchoring member 856 can be coupled to the occlusive device frame 851 using an interference fit between the bulbous portion 858 and the interior of the occlusive device frame 851. That is, the outer diameter of the bulbous portion 858 can be larger than the interior of the occlusive device frame 851 thereby providing a coupling between the distal anchoring member 856 and the occlusive device frame 851.

    [0106] FIGS. 35 and 36 illustrate another example occlusive device frame 860 in a side view and proximal perspective view respectively. In the depicted embodiment, the occlusive device frame 860 comprises a plurality of elongate frame members 862 that are wound to form the occlusive device frame 860. The elongate frame members 862 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the elongate frame members 102 and/or any other exemplary elongate frame members described herein. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 862 can be formed from a cut-tube process as described above.

    [0107] In the depicted embodiment of occlusive device frame 860, the elongate frame members 862 of occlusive device frame 860 form an occlusive face section 870, a laterally facing skirt section 872, an inverted section 876, and hub members 868 that are nested eyelets 868. It should be understood that, in some embodiments of occlusive device frame 860, the occlusive face section 870, the laterally facing skirt section 872, the inverted section 876, and the hub members 868 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to all other medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0108] The occlusive device frame 860 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0109] While the depicted embodiment of occlusive device frame 860 includes the nested eyelets 868 as the hub members, in some embodiments of occlusive device frame 860 one or both of the hub members may be any of the other types of hub members described elsewhere herein (e.g., ring members, crimp joints, tube portions, and combinations thereof).

    [0110] FIG. 37 illustrates an example anchor frame 880 that can be included as part of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. In the depicted embodiment, the anchor frame 880 comprises a plurality of elongate frame members 882 that are wound to form the anchor frame 880. The elongate frame members 882 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the elongate frame members 102 and/or any other exemplary elongate frame members described herein. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 882 can be formed from a cut-tube process as described above.

    [0111] In the depicted embodiment of anchor frame 880, the elongate frame members 882 form anchor arms 884 and a hub member 886 that is an eyelet 886. It should be understood that, in some embodiments of the anchor frame 880, the anchor arms 884 and the hub member 886 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to all other anchor frames provided herein. For example, the free ends of the anchor arms 884 can be configured to have sharp tips, atraumatic tips, barbs, ball-ends, or other types of tips, or combinations thereof, as described above in reference to anchor component 600. In the depicted embodiment of anchor frame 880, the anchor arms 884 extend along a helical path. In some embodiments, the anchor arms 884 can extend along other paths such as, but not limited to, parallel to the central axis of the eyelet 886, a helical path that is reversed in direction from what is shown, helical paths at various different pitch angles, wavy paths, wound around the elongate frame members of the occlusive device frame, and the like, and combinations thereof.

    [0112] FIGS. 38 and 39 illustrate a side view and a proximal perspective view, respectively, of another example anchor frame 890 that can be included as part of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. In the depicted embodiment, the anchor frame 890 comprises a plurality of elongate frame members 892 that are formed from a cut-tube process as described above. The elongate frame members 892 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the elongate frame members 102 and/or any other exemplary elongate frame members described herein. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 892 can be wound to form the anchor frame 890, as described above.

    [0113] In the depicted embodiment of anchor frame 890, the elongate members 892 form one or more anchor arms 894 and a hub member 896 comprising a portion of a tube. Radial struts 893 extend radially outward from the hub member 896 and then transition into the anchor arms 894. It should be understood that, in some embodiments of the anchor frame 890, the anchor arms 894, the radial struts 893, and the hub member 896 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to all other anchor frames provided herein. For example, the free ends of the anchor arms 894 can be configured to have sharp tips, atraumatic tips, barbs, ball-ends, or other types of tips, or combinations thereof, as described above in reference to anchor component 600. In the depicted embodiment of anchor frame 890, the anchor arms 894 extend along a helical path. In some embodiments, the anchor arms 894 can extend along other paths such as, but not limited to, parallel to the central axis of the eyelet 896, a helical path that is reversed in direction from what is shown, helical paths at various different pitch angles, wavy paths, and the like, and combinations thereof.

    [0114] FIGS. 40 and 41 illustrate a side view and a proximal perspective view, respectively, of an example medical occlusive device 900. The medical occlusive device 900 includes the occlusive device frame 860 (as described above) coupled with the anchor frame 890 (as described above). In some embodiments, the medical occlusive device 900 includes the occlusive device frame 860 coupled with the anchor frame 880 (refer to FIG. 37), or another anchor frame provided herein. In some embodiments, the medical occlusive device 900 includes the anchor frame 890 (or anchor frame 880) coupled with another occlusive device frame provided herein.

    [0115] It should be understood that the medical occlusive device 900 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0116] In the depicted embodiment of medical occlusive device 900, the hub members 868 (i.e., the nested eyelets 868) of the occlusive device frame 860 are located within the hub member 896 of the anchor frame 890. In some embodiments, the hub members 868 and 896 are configured in other arrangements. For example, in some embodiments the hub member 896 is located within both of the hub members 868. Further, in some embodiments the hub member 896 is nested in between the inner and outer hub members of the hub members 868.

    [0117] In some embodiments, the anchor arms 894 are interwoven with the elongate frame members 862 of the occlusive device frame 860. The interweaving of the anchor arms 894 with the elongate frame members 862 can be configured in all possible arrangements as long as the free ends of the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 of the occlusive device frame 860.

    [0118] In the depicted embodiment of medical occlusive device 900, the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 in the area of the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of medical occlusive device 900, the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 in the area of the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of medical occlusive device 900, the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 in the mid-body area between the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872 and the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of medical occlusive device 900, the anchor arms 894 have dissimilar lengths and protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 at different areas along the laterally facing skirt section 872 (e.g., some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the distal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the distal end area).

    [0119] FIG. 42 is a side view of another example medical occlusive device 910. The medical occlusive device 910 includes the occlusive device frame 860 (as described above) coupled with an anchor frame 920. In some embodiments, the medical occlusive device 910 includes the occlusive device frame 860 coupled with the anchor frame provided herein. In some embodiments, the occlusive device 910 includes the anchor frame 920 coupled with another occlusive device frame provided herein.

    [0120] It should be understood that the medical occlusive device 910 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0121] The anchor frame 920 includes a hub member (not visible) and anchor arms 924. In some embodiments, the anchor frame 920 is formed using a cut-tube process as described elsewhere herein. In some embodiments, the anchor frame 920 is formed by winding multiple wires as described elsewhere herein.

    [0122] In the depicted embodiment of the medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 extend along the laterally facing skirt section 872 of the occlusive device frame 860 in a direction parallel to the axis of the nested eyelets 868. In some embodiments of the medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 extend along the laterally facing skirt section 872 in a helical pattern, or another pattern. In the depicted embodiment of the medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 are at least partially interwoven with the elongate frame element 924 of the occlusive device frame 860. In some embodiments of the medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 are more interwoven or less interwoven with the elongate frame members 924 of the occlusive device frame 860 in comparison to the depicted embodiment.

    [0123] In the depicted embodiment of the medical occlusive device 910, the hub member of the anchor frame 920 is located between the inner and outer hub members 868 (i.e., the hub member of the anchor frame 920 is sandwiched between the nested eyelets 868) of the occlusive device frame 860. In some embodiments, the hub member of the anchor frame 920 and the hub members 868 are configured in other arrangements. For example, in some embodiments the hub member of the anchor frame 920 is located within the inner hub member of the nested eyelets 868. Further, in some embodiments the nested eyelets 868 are located within the hub member of the anchor frame 920.

    [0124] In the depicted embodiment of medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 in the mid-body area between the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872 and the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of the medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 the area of the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 in the area of the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 872. In some embodiments of medical occlusive device 910, the anchor arms 924 have dissimilar lengths and protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 872 at different areas along the laterally facing skirt section 872 (e.g., some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the distal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the distal end area).

    [0125] FIGS. 43-46 schematically represent additional embodiments of medical occlusive devices 920, 930, 940, and 950, respectively. In some embodiments, the medical occlusive devices 920, 930, 940, and 950 include device frames with features as described above such as an occlusive face section, a laterally facing skirt section, and an inverted section. Additionally, in some embodiments the medical occlusive devices 920, 930, 940, and 950 include an anchor frame that is integrated with the occlusive device frame. In some such embodiments, the medical occlusive devices 920, 930, 940, and 950 are configured such that the hub member of the anchor frames are sandwiched in between the inner and outer hub members of the occlusive device frame. FIGS. 43-46 are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. For example, in some of the figures the designs of the hub members, anchor frames, and/or occlusive device frames are highlighted. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In these figures, no covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 43-46 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0126] It should be understood that the hub members of the anchor frames and/or the occlusive device frame may be any of the types of hub members described herein (e.g., eyelets, ring members, crimp joints, tube portions, etc.). In some embodiments, the hub members of the anchor frames and the hub members of the occlusive device frame are configured in other arrangements in relation to each other. For example, in some embodiments the hub member of the anchor frame is located within both of the hub members of the occlusive device frame. Further, in some embodiments the hub members of the occlusive device frame are located within the hub member of the anchor frame. That is, in some embodiments the hub member of the anchor frame is the outermost hub member of the arrangement.

    [0127] It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices 920, 930, 940, and 950 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0128] FIG. 43 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example occlusive device frame 922 that is coupled with an anchor frame 924. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the occlusive device frame 922 includes an occlusive face section 921, a laterally facing skirt section 923, and an inverted section 925. In the depicted embodiment, the occlusive device frame 922 has a wound wire construct, while the anchor frame 924 was formed using a cut-tube process. The inner hub member of the occlusive device frame 922 is a ring member 927 and the outer hub member of the occlusive device frame 922 is an eyelet 926. The hub member of the anchor frame 924 is a tube portion (not shown) that is sandwiched between the inner hub member 927 and outer hub member 926 of the occlusive device frame 922. The free ends of the anchor frame 924 protrude from the mid-body area of laterally facing skirt section 923 of the occlusive device frame 922 to provide additional migration resistance for medical occlusive device 920.

    [0129] FIG. 44 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example occlusive device frame 932 that is coupled with an anchor frame 934. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the occlusive device frame 932 includes an occlusive face section 931, a laterally facing skirt section 933, and an inverted section 935. In the depicted embodiment, the occlusive device frame 932 has a wound wire construct, while the anchor frame 934 was formed using a cut-tube process. The inner hub member of the occlusive device frame 932 is a ring member 937 and the outer hub member of the occlusive device frame 932 is an eyelet 936. The hub member of the anchor frame 934 is a tube portion (not shown) that is sandwiched between the inner hub member 937 and the outer hub member 936 of the occlusive device frame 932. The free ends of the anchor frame 934 protrude from both the distal area of the occlusive device frame 932 and the proximal area of the occlusive device frame 932 to provide additional migration resistance for medical occlusive device 930.

    [0130] FIG. 45 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example occlusive device frame 942 that is coupled with an anchor frame 944. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the occlusive device frame 942 includes an occlusive face section 941, a laterally facing skirt section 943, and an inverted section 945. In the depicted embodiment, the occlusive device frame 942 has a wound wire construct, while the anchor frame 944 was formed using a cut-tube process. The inner hub member of the occlusive device frame 942 is a ring member 947 and the outer hub member of the occlusive device frame 942 is an eyelet 946. The hub member of the anchor frame 944 is a tube portion (not shown) that is sandwiched between the inner hub member 947 and the outer hub member 946 of the occlusive device frame 942. The free ends of the anchor frame 944 protrude from the distal area of the occlusive device frame 942 to provide additional migration resistance for medical occlusive device 940.

    [0131] FIG. 46 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example occlusive device frame 952 that is coupled with an anchor frame 954. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the occlusive device frame 952 includes an occlusive face section 951, a laterally facing skirt section 953, and an inverted section 955. In the depicted embodiment, the occlusive device frame 952 has a wound wire construct, while the anchor frame 954 was formed using a cut-tube process. The inner hub member of the occlusive device frame 952 is a ring member 957 and the outer hub member of the occlusive device frame 952 is an eyelet 956. The hub member of the anchor frame 954 is a tube portion (not shown) that is sandwiched between the inner hub member 957 and the outer hub member 956 of the occlusive device frame 952. The free ends of the anchor frame 954 protrude from the proximal area of the occlusive device frame 952, to provide additional migration resistance for medical occlusive device 950.

    [0132] FIGS. 47 and 48 illustrate another occlusive device frame 960 in a side view and proximal perspective view respectively. The occlusive device frame 960 comprises a plurality of elongate frame members 962 that are formed from a cut-tube process to form the occlusive device frame 960. The elongate frame members 962 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the elongate frame members 102 and/or any other exemplary elongate frame members described herein. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 962 can be formed from a wound wire process as described above.

    [0133] In occlusive device frame 960, the elongate frame members 962 form an occlusive face section 970, a laterally facing skirt section 972, a convex section 976, and a hub member 968 that is a tube portion. It should be understood that, in some occlusive device frames 960, the occlusive face section 970, the laterally facing skirt section 972, the convex section 976, and the hub member 968 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to all other medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0134] The convex section 976 includes the free ends of the elongate frame members 962. Some or all of the free ends of the elongate frame members 962 may be conjoined together. The free ends of the elongate frame members 962 may not be conjoined together and may be allowed to move independently of each other. The convex section 976 may be a concaved or inverted section.

    [0135] The occlusive device frame 960 can be combined with a covering component. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0136] While the depicted occlusive device frame 960 includes the tube portion 868 as the hub member, the hub member 868 may be any of the other types of hub members described elsewhere herein (e.g., a ring member, a crimp joints, an eyelet, etc.).

    [0137] FIGS. 49 and 50 illustrate a side view and a proximal exploded perspective view, respectively, of a medical occlusive device 980. The medical occlusive device 980 includes the occlusive device frame 960 (as described above) coupled with the anchor frame 890 (as described above in reference to FIGS. 38 and 39). The medical occlusive device 980 includes the occlusive device frame 960 coupled with the anchor frame 880 (refer to FIG. 37), or another anchor frame provided herein. The medical occlusive device 980 includes the anchor frame 890 (or anchor frame 880) coupled with another occlusive device frame provided herein.

    [0138] It should be understood that the medical occlusive device 980 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0139] The hub member 968 (i.e., the tube portion 868) of the occlusive device frame 960 is located within the hub member 896 of the anchor frame 890. The hub members 968 and 896 are configured in other arrangements. For example, The hub member 896 may be located within the hub member 968.

    [0140] The anchor arms 894 may be interwoven with the elongate frame members 962 of the occlusive device frame 960. The interweaving of the anchor arms 894 with the elongate frame members 962 can be configured in all possible arrangements as long as the free ends of the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 972 of the occlusive device frame 960.

    [0141] The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 972 in the area of the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 972. The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 972 in the area of the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 972. The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 972 in the mid-body area between the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 972 and the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 972. The anchor arms 894 have dissimilar lengths and protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 972 at different areas along the laterally facing skirt section 972 (e.g., some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the distal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the distal end area).

    [0142] FIG. 51 illustrates another occlusive device frame 990 in a side view. The depicted occlusive device frame 990 comprises a plurality of elongate frame members 992 that are wound to form the occlusive device frame 990. The elongate frame members 992 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the elongate frame members 102 and/or any other exemplary elongate frame members described herein. The elongate frame members 992 can be formed from a cut-tube process as described above.

    [0143] The elongate frame members 992 define an occlusive face section 995, a laterally facing skirt section 994, and a distal face section 996. It should be understood that, the occlusive face section 995, the laterally facing skirt section 994, and the distal face section 996 can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to all other medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0144] The distal face section 996 includes the free ends of the elongate frame members 992. Some or all of the free ends of the elongate frame members 992 may be conjoined together. The free ends of the elongate frame members 992 may not be conjoined together and may be allowed to move independently of each other. The distal section 996 may be a concaved, convexed, or inverted section.

    [0145] The occlusive device frame 990 can be combined with a covering component. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0146] While the occlusive device frame 990 includes a ring member 998 as the hub member 998, the hub member 998 may be any of the other types of hub members described elsewhere herein (e.g., an eyelet, a crimp joint, a tube portion, and combinations thereof).

    [0147] FIG. 52 illustrates a proximal exploded perspective view of a medical occlusive device 1000. The medical occlusive device 1000 includes the occlusive device frame 990 (as described above) coupled with the anchor frame 890 (as described above in reference to FIGS. 38 and 39). The medical occlusive device 1000 may include the occlusive device frame 990 coupled with the anchor frame 880 (refer to FIG. 37), or another anchor frame provided herein. The medical occlusive device 1000 may include the anchor frame 890 (or anchor frame 880) coupled with another occlusive device frame provided herein.

    [0148] It should be understood that the medical occlusive device 1000 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0149] In the depicted occlusive device 1000, the hub member 998 (i.e., the ring member 998) of the occlusive device frame 990 is located within the hub member 896 of the anchor frame 890. The hub members 998 and 896 may be configured in other arrangements. For example, the hub member 896 may be located within the hub member 998.

    [0150] The anchor arms 894 may be interwoven with the elongate frame members 992 of the occlusive device frame 990. The interweaving of the anchor arms 894 with the elongate frame members 992 can be configured in all possible arrangements as long as the free ends of the anchor arms 894 protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 994 of the occlusive device frame 990.

    [0151] The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 994 in the area of the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 994. The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 994 in the area of the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 994. The anchor arms 894 may protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 994 in the mid-body area between the proximal end of the laterally facing skirt section 994 and the distal end of the laterally facing skirt section 994. The anchor arms 894 may have dissimilar lengths and protrude from the laterally facing skirt section 994 at different areas along the laterally facing skirt section 994 (e.g., some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the distal end area while others protrude from the mid-body area, or some protrude from the proximal end area while others protrude from the distal end area).

    [0152] FIGS. 53-55 schematically represent an additional embodiments of medical occlusive device 1030, and further medical occlusive devices 1010 and 1020, respectively. The medical occlusive devices 1010, 1020, and 1030 are configured such that a first end of the elongate frame members terminate at an eyelet, and a second end of the elongate frame members terminate at a laser ball. The laser ball can be formed by melting the ends of the elongate frame members together using a laser. As such, in some embodiments the laser ball may not be as spherical as shown. It should be understood that the eyelet of the medical occlusive devices 1010, 1020, and 1030 may be any of the types of hub members described herein (e.g., a ring member, a crimp joint, a tube portion, etc.). FIGS. 53-55 are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. For example, in some of the figures the designs of the hub members and/or occlusive device frame features are highlighted. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In these figures, no covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 53-55 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0153] It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices 1010, 1020, and 1030 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein. Further, it should be understood that the medical occlusive devices 1010, 1020, and 1030 can be combined with the anchor frames provided herein (e.g., anchor frame 880, 890, 920, 924, 934, 942, 954, etc.).

    [0154] FIG. 53 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a medical occlusive device 1010 that has a wound wire construct of elongate frame members 1012. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1010 includes an occlusive face section 1011, a laterally facing skirt section 1013, and an inverted section 1015. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 1012 of the medical occlusive device 1010 are formed using a cut-tube process. In some such embodiments, the hub member 1014 is a tube portion. In the depicted medical occlusive device, the first ends of the elongate frame members 1012 are terminated at the hub member 1014, which is an eyelet 1014. The other ends of the elongate frame elements 1012 are terminated at a laser ball 1016 (i.e., the ends of the elongate frame elements 1012 are conjoined together). The ends of the elongate frame elements 1012 that are terminated at the laser ball 1016 are inverted. That is, the ends of the elongate frame elements 1012 that are terminated at the laser ball 1016 are directed away from the eyelet 1014.

    [0155] FIG. 54 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of a medical occlusive device 1020 that has a wound wire construct of elongate frame members 1022. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1020 includes an occlusive face section 1021, a laterally facing skirt section 1023, and an inverted section 1025. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 1022 of the medical occlusive device 1020 are formed using a cut-tube process. In some such embodiments, the hub member 1024 is a tube portion. In the depicted medical occlusive device, the first ends of the elongate frame members 1022 are terminated at the hub member 1024, which is an eyelet 1024. The other ends of the elongate frame members 1022 are terminated at a laser ball 1026. In the depicted embodiment of medical occlusive device 1020, the ends of the elongate frame members 1022 that are terminated at the laser ball 1026 are floating. That is, the laser ball 1026 is not in engagement with the eyelet 1014.

    [0156] FIG. 55 is a conceptual diagram of a portion of an example medical occlusive device 1030 that has a wound wire construct of elongate frame members 1032. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1030 includes an occlusive face section 1031, a laterally facing skirt section 1033, and an inverted section 1035. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 1032 of the medical occlusive device 1030 are formed using a cut-tube process. In some such embodiments, the hub member 1034 is a tube portion. In the depicted embodiment, the first ends of the elongate frame members 1032 are terminated at the hub member 1034, which is an eyelet 1034. The other ends of the elongate frame members 1032 are terminated at a laser ball 1036. In the depicted embodiment of medical occlusive device 1030, the ends of the elongate frame members 1032 that are terminated at the laser ball 1036 are nested within the eyelet 1034.

    [0157] FIGS. 56-58 illustrate example material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, and 1060, respectively, that can be used to form some embodiments of the occlusive device frames provided herein. Using material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, and 1060, occlusive device frames can be formed as unitary members. In some cases, the material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, and 1060 can be utilized for laser-cutting a tube of material (e.g., a tube of NiTi or other materials). In some such cases, the resulting occlusive device frames are a unitary and seamless construct. Or, in some cases a planar sheet of material can be cut as shown and the sheet can thereafter be formed into a tube. In some embodiments, chemical etching, machining, water jet cutting, or other techniques can be used to create the occlusive device frames in accordance with the material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, and 1060. In some embodiments, the example material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, and 1060 facilitate the formation of occlusive device frames that are cut from a material to form wire-like elongate frame members that can be wound to form the occlusive device frame. In some embodiments, anchor features are integrally formed with the elongate frame members. The anchor features can have a wide variety of configurations and can be located anywhere on the occlusive device frames.

    [0158] FIG. 56 illustrates a material cutting pattern 1040 that includes a plurality of elongate frame members 1042. The first ends of the elongate frame members 1042 terminate at a hub member 1044 and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1042 at free ends 1046. The hub member 1044 comprises, or can be formed into, a tube portion 1044. When formed into an occlusive device frame, the free ends 1046 are terminated into various types of hub members (e.g., a ring member, an eyelet, a crimp joint, a laser ball, etc.). In this embodiment, the free ends 1046 include tabs with holes to facilitate ease of attachment, handling, and manipulation (e.g., by inserting a wire through the hole, etc.).

    [0159] FIG. 57 illustrates a material cutting pattern 1050 that includes a plurality of elongate frame members 1052. The first ends of the elongate frame members 1052 terminate at a hub member 1054 and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1052 terminate at free ends 1056. The hub member 1054 comprises, or can be formed into, a tube portion 1044. When formed into an occlusive device frame, the free ends 1056 are terminated into various types of hub members (e.g., a ring member, an eyelet, a crimp joint, a laser ball, etc.). In this embodiment, the elongate frame members 1052 include various types of anchor features 1058 (e.g., barbs, hooks, atraumatic protrusions, angled protrusions, radial protrusions, bifurcated protrusions, spring members, etc., and combinations thereof). Such anchor features 1058 are integral with the elongate frame members 1052, and can be configured to protrude from the medical occlusive device into contact with tissue at an implant site to resist migration of the medical occlusive device. The anchor features 1058 may also be referred to as micro-hooks or in-frame anchor features. The anchor features 1058 can be located at any locations on the elongate frame members 1052 as desired. In result, when formed into an occlusive device frame, the anchor features can be located at any region of the occlusive device frame, and at multiple regions on the occlusive device frame as desired. It should be understood that such anchor features 1058 can be included on the elongate frame members that form any of the anchor frames, occlusive device frames, and medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0160] In some embodiments, the anchor features 1058 can serve to stabilize the medical occlusive devices in one or more directions (e.g., in the proximal and distal directions, laterally, rotationally, etc.) when the medical occlusive device has been implanted. The inclusion of the anchor features 1058 that are integrally formed with the elongate frame members 1052 provides various design advantages. For example, in some embodiments no additional anchor frame needs to be included in the medical occlusive device. However, in some embodiments an additional anchor frame can be included in medical occlusive devices that have anchor features 1058. Further, the anchor features 1058 can be formed to have a wide variety of different shapes. In some embodiments, the elongate frame members 1052 are configured with a width to thickness ratio that can help facilitate the desired orientation of the anchor features 1058 when the elongate frame members 1052 have been wound into the shape of the occlusive device frame. For example, in some embodiments, an elongate frame member 1052 having a thickness greater than the width of the elongate frame member 1052 helps the anchor features 1058 to be properly oriented when the elongate frame members 1052 have been wound into the shape of the occlusive device frame.

    [0161] FIG. 58 illustrates a material cutting pattern 1060 that includes a plurality of elongate frame members 1062. The first ends of the elongate frame members 1062 terminate at a hub member 1064 and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1062 terminate at free ends 1066. The hub member 1064 comprises, or can be formed into, a tube portion 1064. When formed into an occlusive device frame, the free ends 1066 are terminated into various types of hub members (e.g., a ring member, an eyelet, a crimp joint, a laser ball, etc.). In this embodiment, the elongate frame members 1062 include anchor features 1068. In this embodiment, the anchor features 1068 are protrusions. The anchor features 1068 are integral with the elongate frame members 1062, and can be configured to protrude from the medical occlusive device into contact with tissue at an implant site to resist migration of the medical occlusive device. It should be understood that such anchor features 1068 can be included on the elongate frame members that form any of the anchor frames, occlusive device frames, and medical occlusive devices provided herein.

    [0162] FIGS. 59 and 60 schematically represent additional embodiments of medical occlusive devices 1070 and 1090, respectively. In some embodiments, the medical occlusive devices 1070 and 1090 are formed using the material cutting patterns 1040, 1050, or 1060 as described above, or variants thereof. The medical occlusive devices 1070 and 1090 are configured such that the first ends of the elongate frame members terminate at an eyelet, and the second ends of the elongate frame members terminate at a tube portion. It should be understood that the eyelet of the medical occlusive devices 1070 and 1090 may be any of the types of hub members described herein (e.g., a ring member, a crimp joint, a tube portion, etc.). FIGS. 59 and 60 are drawn to highlight particular occlusive device frame features that can be incorporated into the designs of the medical occlusive devices provided herein. For example, in some of the figures the designs of the hub members and/or occlusive device frame features are highlighted. It should be understood that one or more of the features that are highlighted in these figures can be included in any of the medical occlusive devices described elsewhere herein, and that such features (and other features described herein) can be mixed and matched to create hybrid designs that are entirely within the scope of this disclosure. In these figures, no covering component is shown and some portions of the device frames are not shown so that the highlighted device frame features are more readily visible. It should be understood that the medical occlusive devices of FIGS. 59 and 60 can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0163] FIG. 59 illustrates medical occlusive device 1070 that includes elongate frame members 1072 that form the device frame and terminate at an eyelet 1074 and a tube portion 1076. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1070 includes an occlusive face section 1071, a laterally facing skirt section 1073, and an inverted section 1075. In the depicted embodiment, the tube portion 1076 is nested within the eyelet 1074. In some embodiments the eyelet 1074 may be nested within the tube portion 1076. The medical occlusive device 1070 also includes integral anchor features 1078 (e.g., refer to FIGS. 57 and 58). The anchor features 1078 can be various types of anchor features (e.g., barbs, hooks, atraumatic protrusions, angled protrusions, radial protrusions, bifurcated protrusions, spring members, etc., and combinations thereof). Such anchor features 1078 are integral with the elongate frame members 1072, and can be configured to protrude from the medical occlusive device into contact with tissue at an implant site to resist migration of the medical occlusive device. It should be understood that such anchor features 1078 can be included on the elongate frame members that form any of the anchor frames, occlusive device frames, and medical occlusion devices provided herein.

    [0164] FIG. 60 illustrates medical occlusive device 1090 that includes elongate frame members 1092 that form the device frame and terminate at an eyelet 1094 and a tube portion 1096. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1090 includes an occlusive face section 1091, a laterally facing skirt section 1093, and an inverted section 1095. In the depicted embodiment, the tube portion 1096 is nested within the eyelet 1094. In some embodiments the eyelet 1094 may be nested within the tube portion 1096.

    [0165] FIGS. 61 and 62 illustrate material cutting patterns 1100 and 1110, respectively, that can be used to form some embodiments of the occlusive device frames provided herein. Using material cutting patterns 1100 and 1110, occlusive device frames can be formed as unitary members. In some cases, the material cutting patterns 1100 and 1110 can be utilized for laser-cutting a tube of material (e.g., a tube of NiTi or other materials). In some such cases, the resulting occlusive device frames are a unitary and seamless construct. Or, in some cases a planar sheet of material can be cut as shown and the sheet can thereafter be formed into a tube. In some embodiments, chemical etching, machining, water jet cutting, or other techniques can be used to create the occlusive device frames in accordance with the material cutting patterns 1100 and 1110.

    [0166] FIG. 61 illustrates a material cutting pattern 1100 that includes a plurality of elongate frame members 1102. The first ends of the elongate frame members 1102 terminate at a hub member 1104, and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1042 terminate at free ends (not shown). The hub member 1104 comprises, or can be formed into, a tube portion 1104. The tube portion 1104 is configured to allow the tube portion 1104 to be more compressible than a solid tube portion (e.g., tube portions 1044, 1054, and 1064 of FIGS. 56-58). Such compressibility of the tube portion 1104 can facilitate a reduced profile delivery configuration in some embodiments. When formed into an occlusive device frame, the free ends are terminated into various types of hub members (e.g., a ring member, an eyelet, a crimp joint, a laser ball, etc.). The material cutting pattern 1100 also includes anchor features 1106.

    [0167] FIG. 62 illustrates a material cutting pattern 1110 that includes a plurality of elongate frame members 1112. The first ends of the elongate frame members 1112 terminate at a hub member 1114, and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1142 terminate at free ends 1114. As will be described further in reference to FIGS. 63A-63C, the hub member 1114 comprises, or can be formed into, a tube portion 1114 that includes receptacles for the elongate frame members 1142. When formed into an occlusive device frame, the free ends 1116 are contained within the hub member 1114.

    [0168] FIGS. 63A-63C illustrate another example medical occlusive device 1120. FIG. 63A is a side view of the medical occlusive device 1120, and FIGS. 63B and 63C are partial views of the medical occlusive device1120 that show the terminations of the elongate frame members 1122. As with some medical occlusive device embodiments described elsewhere herein, the medical occlusive device 1120 includes an occlusive face section 1121, a laterally facing skirt section 1123, and an inverted section 1125. It should be understood that the medical occlusive device of FIGS. 63A-63C can be combined with a covering component in some embodiments. The covering component can share any or all of the features, characteristics, properties, etc. as described above in reference to the covering component 104 and/or any other exemplary covering components described herein.

    [0169] In some embodiments, the medical occlusive device 1120 is formed using the material cutting pattern 1110 as described above in reference to FIG. 62, or a variant thereof. The medical occlusive device 1120 is configured such that the first ends of the elongate frame members 1122 terminate at a tube portion 1124, and the second ends of the elongate frame members 1122 terminate at free ends 1126 that are located within the tube portion 1124. The tube portion 1124 includes receptacles 1127 (e.g., slots, holes, etc.) through which the elongate frame members 1122 may extend. The free ends 1126 include bulbous ends that are larger than the receptacles 1127 to provide resistance against removal of the free ends 1126 from within the tube portion 1124. In some embodiments, a retainer ring 1128 is installed onto the outer diameter of the tube portion 1124 to provide further retention of the free ends 1126 within the tube portion 1124.

    [0170] While the medical occlusive devices have been described with respect to an LAA, in some embodiments, the medical occlusive devices can be used to occlude or seal other apertures within a body of a patient, such as a right atrial appendage, a fistula, a patent ductus arteriousus, an atrial septal defect, a ventricular septal defect, a paravalvular leak, an arteriovenous malformation, or a body vessel.

    [0171] The examples discussed herein have focused on medical occlusive devices, but it is contemplated that the features described herein may also be used with other types of medical devices or accessories. Examples of implantable devices and accessories include, without limitation, occlusion and closure devices, filters (e.g. inferior vena cava filter or an embolic protection filter), catheter based grabbers or retrieval devices, temporary filtration devices, stents, stent-grafts, and vessel sizers. In some examples, the medical occlusive devices discussed herein can provide a vessel or appendage liner. For example, the medical occlusive device may be deployed into the appendage by initially placing the occlusive face section within the appendage so that the inverted section 114 (e.g., the cupped portion of the medical occlusive device) faces the left atrial chamber. For embodiments where the medical occlusive device is designed to filter, the covering component may be porous, where the pores are sized to generally permit blood to pass through the pores, but are sized to prevent emboli from passing through the pores of the covering component.

    [0172] In some embodiments, a medical occlusive or filtering device can include a first device frame that is similar to any of the device frames discussed above herein, and a sub-frame that is disposed within the first device frame. The medical occlusive or filtering device may not include a covering component in some implementations. The sub-frame may comprise elongate frame members that follow a rotational direction opposite the rotational direction followed by elongate frame members of the first device frame, in some examples. The sub-frame may be configured to clot or occlude in some examples. The sub-frame may be configured to filter in some examples.

    [0173] For additional examples of hub features that can be used with the medical occlusive devices discussed herein, see the provisional application titled "Joint Assembly for Medical Devices," having inventors Coby C. Larsen, Steven J. Masters, and Thomas R. McDaniel, filed on 16 November 2012, and see also the provisional application titled "Space Filling Devices," having inventors Coby C. Larsen, Brandon A. Lurie, Steven J. Masters, Thomas R. McDaniel, and Stanislaw L. Zukowski, filed on 15 March 2013. For additional examples of delivery system devices, systems, and techniques that can be used to deliver, deploy, reposition, and retrieve the medical occlusive devices discussed herein, see the provisional application titled "Implantable Medical Device Deployment System," having inventors Steven J. Masters and Thomas R. McDaniel, filed on 16 November 2012.


    Claims

    1. A medical occlusive device (100), comprising:

    a device frame comprising a plurality of elongate frame members (102), each of the elongate frame members (102) including a first end and a second end;

    a first hub member (108) that aggregates the first ends of the plurality of elongate frame members (102), and a second hub member (116) that aggregates the second ends of the plurality of elongate frame members (102),

    wherein one of either of the first (108) or second (116) hub members is disposed concentrically within the other of the first (108) or second (116) hub member;

    wherein the device frame includes a face section (110), a laterally facing skirt section (112), and an inverted section (114), and wherein first portions of the elongate frame members (102) define the face section (110) and extend radially from the first hub member (108), second portions of the elongate frame members (102) define the laterally facing skirt section (112) and extend in a distal, axial, and helical direction along a first rotational direction from the face section (110), and third portions of the elongate frame members (102) define the inverted section (114) and extend in a proximal direction from a distal portion of the laterally facing skirt section (112) to the second hub member (116) along a rotational direction opposite the first rotational direction; and

    a covering component (104) attached to the face section (110) and to the laterally facing skirt section (112).


     
    2. The medical occlusive device (100) of claim 1, wherein the first hub member (108) is an eyelet and the second hub member (116) is an eyelet.
     
    3. The medical occlusive device (100) of claim 1, wherein one of the first (108) or second (116) hub members is a ring member and the other of the first (108) or second (116) hub members is an eyelet.
     
    4. The medical occlusive device (100) of claim 1, wherein the first hub member (108) is a ring member and the second hub member (116) is a ring member.
     
    5. The medical occlusive device (100) of claim 1, wherein the first hub member (108) is a crimp joint and the second hub member (116) is an eyelet or a ring member, and wherein the first hub member (108) is disposed concentrically within the second hub member (116).
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Medizinische Okklusionsvorrichtung (100), umfassend:

    einen Vorrichtungsrahmen, der mehrere längliche Rahmenelemente (102) umfasst, wobei jedes der länglichen Rahmenelemente (102) ein erstes Ende und ein zweites Ende enthält;

    ein erstes Nabenelement (108), das die ersten Enden der mehreren länglichen Rahmenelemente (102) aggregiert, und ein zweites Nabenelement (116), das die zweiten Enden der mehreren länglichen Rahmenelementen (102) aggregiert;

    wobei eines entweder des ersten (108) oder des zweiten (116) Nabenelements konzentrisch in dem anderen des ersten (108) oder des zweiten (116) Nabenelements angeordnet ist;

    wobei der Vorrichtungsrahmen einen Stirnbereich (110), einen seitlich zugewandten Schürzenbereich (112) und einen umgekehrten Bereich (114) enthält und wobei erste Abschnitte der länglichen Rahmenelemente (102) den Stirnbereich (110) definieren und sich radial von dem ersten Nabenelement (108) erstrecken, zweite Abschnitte der länglichen Rahmenelemente (102) den seitlich zugewandten Schürzenbereich (112) definieren und sich in einer distalen, axialen und helikalen Richtung entlang einer ersten Drehrichtung von dem Stirnbereich (110) erstrecken und dritte Abschnitte der länglichen Rahmenelemente (102) den umgekehrten Bereich (114) definieren und sich in einer proximalen Richtung von einem distalen Abschnitt des seitlich zugewandten Schürzenbereichs (112) zu dem zweiten Nabenelement (116) entlang einer Drehrichtung entgegengesetzt zu der ersten Drehrichtung erstrecken; und

    eine Abdeckkomponente (104), die an dem Stirnbereich (110) und an dem seitlich zugewandten Schürzenbereich (112) angebracht ist.


     
    2. Medizinische Okklusionsvorrichtung (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei das erste Nabenelement (108) eine Öse und das zweite Nabenelement (116) eine Öse ist.
     
    3. Medizinische Okklusionsvorrichtung (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei eines des ersten (108) oder des zweiten (116) Nabenelements ein Ringelement und das andere des ersten (108) oder des zweiten (116) Nabenelements eine Öse ist.
     
    4. Medizinische Okklusionsvorrichtung (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei das erste Nabenelement (108) ein Ringelement und das zweite Nabenelement (116) ein Ringelement ist.
     
    5. Medizinische Okklusionsvorrichtung (100) nach Anspruch 1, wobei das erste Nabenelement (108) eine Crimpverbindung ist und das zweite Nabenelement (116) eine Öse oder ein Ringelement ist und wobei das erste Nabenelement (108) konzentrisch in dem zweiten Nabenelement (116) angeordnet ist.
     


    Revendications

    1. Dispositif médical occlusif (100), comprenant :

    un cadre de dispositif comprenant une pluralité d'éléments de cadre allongés (102), chacun des éléments de cadre allongés (102) comprenant une première extrémité et une seconde extrémité ;

    un premier élément de moyeu (108) qui agrège les premières extrémités de la pluralité d'éléments de cadre allongés (102), et un second élément de moyeu (116) qui agrège les secondes extrémités de la pluralité d'éléments de cadre allongés (102),

    l'un des premier (108) ou second (116) éléments de moyeu étant disposé concentriquement à l'intérieur de l'autre des premier (108) ou second (116) éléments de moyeu ;

    ledit cadre de dispositif comportant une section de face (110), une section de jupe faisant face latéralement (112) et une section inversée (114), et des premières parties des éléments de cadre allongés (102) définissant la section de face (110) et s'étendant radialement à partir du premier élément de moyeu (108), des deuxièmes parties des éléments de cadre allongés (102) définissant la section de jupe faisant face latéralement (112) et s'étendant dans une direction distale, axiale et hélicoïdale le long d'une première direction de rotation à partir de la section de face (110), et des troisièmes parties des éléments de cadre allongés (102) définissant la section inversée (114) et s'étendant dans une direction proximale à partir d'une partie distale de la section de jupe faisant face latéralement (112) jusqu'au second élément de moyeu (116) le long d'une direction de rotation opposée à la première direction de rotation ; et

    un composant de revêtement (104) fixé à la section de face (110) et à la section de jupe faisant face latéralement (112).


     
    2. Dispositif médical occlusif (100) selon la revendication 1, ledit premier élément de moyeu (108) étant un œillet et ledit second élément de moyeu (116) étant un œillet.
     
    3. Dispositif médical occlusif (100) selon la revendication 1, l'un des premier (108) ou second (116) éléments de moyeu étant un élément annulaire et l'autre des premier (108) ou second (116) éléments de moyeu étant un œillet.
     
    4. Dispositif médical d'occlusion (100) selon la revendication 1, ledit premier élément de moyeu (108) étant un élément annulaire et ledit second élément de moyeu (116) étant un élément annulaire.
     
    5. Dispositif médical occlusif (100) selon la revendication 1, ledit premier élément de moyeu (108) étant un joint de sertissage et ledit second élément de moyeu (116) étant un œillet ou un élément annulaire, et ledit premier élément de moyeu (108) étant disposé concentriquement à l'intérieur du second élément de moyeu (116).
     




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    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description




    Non-patent literature cited in the description