(19)
(11)EP 3 210 150 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
07.04.2021 Bulletin 2021/14

(21)Application number: 15864053.2

(22)Date of filing:  25.11.2015
(51)Int. Cl.: 
H04L 29/08  (2006.01)
G06F 21/53  (2013.01)
G06F 9/455  (2018.01)
H04L 29/06  (2006.01)
G06F 9/50  (2006.01)
G06F 9/54  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2015/062635
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/086111 (02.06.2016 Gazette  2016/22)

(54)

MULTI-TENANCY VIA CODE ENCAPSULATED IN SERVER REQUESTS

MANDANTENFÄHIGKEIT ÜBER IN SERVERANFRAGEN EINGEKAPSELTEN CODE

DISPOSITIF MULTI-LOCATAIRES PAR L'INTERMÉDIAIRE D'UN CODE ENCAPSULÉ DANS DES REQUÊTES DE SERVEUR


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 25.11.2014 US 201462084511 P
24.11.2015 US 201514951223

(43)Date of publication of application:
30.08.2017 Bulletin 2017/35

(73)Proprietor: Auth0 Inc.
Bellevue, Washington 98004 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • JANCZUK, Tomasz
    Bellevue, Washington 98004 (US)
  • WOLOSKI, Matias
    Bellevue, Washington 98004 (US)

(74)Representative: Swindell & Pearson Limited 
48 Friar Gate
Derby DE1 1GY
Derby DE1 1GY (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 3 201 767
US-A1- 2009 172 792
US-A1- 2013 117 804
US-B1- 8 499 023
WO-A2-2008/073618
US-A1- 2012 072 762
US-A1- 2013 340 028
  
  • Amazon: "AWS Lambda Developer Guide", , 13 November 2014 (2014-11-13), XP055478195, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:https://web.archive.org/web/2014121200 0213/https://docs.aws.amazon.com/lambda/la test/dg/lambda-dg.pdf [retrieved on 2018-05-24]
  • Jeff Barr: "AWS Lambda - Run Code in the Cloud", AWS News Blog, 13 November 2014 (2014-11-13), XP055478160, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/run-c ode-cloud/ [retrieved on 2018-05-24]
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

BACKGROUND



[0001] Computer application architectures have trended towards distributing different computing functions across multiple computers. Indeed, a majority of modern mobile and web applications are based on a distributed architecture. For example, in a client-server architecture, the split of application functionality between the front end and the backend helps reuse backend computing resources across several clients. It also creates a trust boundary between the client and the server, which enables servers to authorize access to protect data or functionality. In a typical client-server application, the client submits data for processing after authenticating itself to the backend, and the backend responds after processing of the client request using protected resources.

[0002] A typical cloud backend of an application (e.g., mobile or web) provides raw computing resources (e.g., CPU, memory, disk, network, etc.,) as well as the operating system and application framework capabilities that are different from that of the client. The backend encapsulates server code that implements part of the application logic as well as secrets this code requires to access protected data or functionality, such as database connection strings, application program interfaces (API), security keys, etc.

[0003] Managing an infrastructure that hosts backend code may involve sizing, provisioning, and scaling various servers, managing operating system updates, dealing with security issues, updating hardware as needed, and then monitoring all these elements for possible malfunctions. Thus, much effort is typically spent just on the logistics of managing the backend. This effort may be better spent in developing, optimizing and/or deploying computer applications.

[0004] Over the years, cloud computing has increased in popularity because it reduces Information Technology (IT) costs, and makes server computing capability available as a commodity/utility. Previously, the main approach to reduce costs was to lower the IT staff by outsourcing server computing functions to cloud computing vendors. However, presently there are several competing cloud computing vendors, so cost reductions are now primarily technical in nature.

[0005] One technical approach to reduce costs, is to increase application density. Specifically, hosting an application has resource costs such as memory and CPU. If there is a way to share those resource costs across applications, then those resource costs can be spread over those applications. Accordingly, multi-tenancy techniques have arisen to share virtual machine resources, thereby increasing application density.

[0006] The cost to provision and allocate a physical machine is greater than the cost to provision and allocate a virtual machine. In turn, the cost to provision and allocate a virtual machine is greater than the cost to provision and allocate a multi-tenant container. Finally, the cost to execute a process in a containers in turn is more expensive than the cost to execute a thread. Ideally, for a class of lightweight web applications, application density could be maximized but running each application on a per thread basis. However, while operating systems allow processes to manage resources, they do not provide adequate functionality to manage resources at the thread level. Specifically, information assets of different tenants should be isolated from each other, such as in a multi-tenant container, and resource use should be managed and metered to maintain quality of service and allow for billing by the cloud computing vendor.

[0007] While platform as a service (PaaS) solutions that allow customers to develop, run, and manage Web applications without the complexity of building and maintaining the infrastructure typically associated with developing and launching an app exist, they come with various concerns. For example, known PaaS platforms may not provide an attractive cost structure and may run on an asynchronous programming model, requiring polling for the results of the computation, which adversely affects latency. Further, known PaaS architectures may require the code not only to be uploaded but also persistently stored. The code then waits for events in order to complete its task. However, such approach includes security risks in that the code is managed elsewhere, making it vulnerable to copying or being hacked. It is with respect to these considerations and others that the present disclosure has been written.

[0008] 'AWS Lambda Developer Guide API Version 2014-11-13' (XP55478195) discloses a compute service that runs code in response to events such as image uploads, in app activity, website clicks, or outputs from connected devices. AWS Lambda extends other Amazon Web Service services with custom logic, or allows a user create their own backend that operates at AWS scale, performance, and security. AWS Lambda can execute a user's custom code, and events can be published from Amazon S3 to AWS Lambda. Once an execution of the custom code is complete, AWS Lambda can perform foolow up actions such as cleaning up resources.

[0009] EP 3201767 A1 discloses a service that manages a plurality of virtual machine instances for low latency execution of user codes. The plurality of virtual machine instances can be configured based on a predetermined set of configurations. One or more containers may be created within the virtual machine instances. In response to a request to execute user code, the service identifies a pre-configured virtual machine instance suitable for executing the user code. The service can allocate the identified virtual machine instance to the user, create a new container within an instance already allocated to the user, or re-use a container already created for execution of the user code. When the user code has not been activated for a time-out period, the service can invalidate allocation of the virtual machine instance and destroy the container. The time from receiving the request to beginning code execution is less than a predetermined duration, for example, 100 ms.

[0010] US2012/072762 discloses systems and methods for dynamically managing requests for computing capacity from a provider of computing resources. Illustratively, the computing resources may include program execution capabilities, data storage or management capabilities, network bandwidth, etc. The systems or methods automatically allocate computing resources for execution of one or more programs associated with the user. The systems and methods may enable the user to make changes to the allocated resources after execution of the one or more programs has started

SUMMARY



[0011] The invention is defined as the multitenant infrastructure server of claim 1 and the method of claim 14. Various embodiments are defined in the dependent claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0012] The drawing figures depict one or more implementations in accord with the present teachings, by way of example only, not by way of limitation. In the figures, like reference numerals refer to the same or similar elements.

FIG. 1 illustrates an example architecture for running a code of an arbitrary application in a secure multi-tenant environment.

FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of the data framework for executing code in multi-tenant containers.

FIG. 3 illustrates an example webtask virtual machine that may be used as the multi-tenant infrastructure server of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates a high level example call flow processes for executing a code in a multi-tenant infrastructure environment.

FIG. 5 illustrates a network or host computer that may be on a cloud.

FIG. 6 illustrates a computer with user interface elements.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0013] This disclosure generally relates to methods and systems of running a computer routine in a virtual environment. The computing environment discussed herein receives the computer routine in the form of computer code from a computer developer. A determination is made of which computing language or languages are being used in the routine. A container is created specifically for the routine, such that it is provisioned to support the languages in the routine and any other infrastructure utilized or invoked by the routine. Accordingly, the container will envelop the routine in a complete environment that includes the elements to run, such as code or a link thereto, system tools, system libraries, etc., thereby assuring that that the routine will run in its virtual destination environment. The virtual destination environment provides the raw resources required to execute the routine, including memory, processing power, networking, etc. Unlike known approaches, the routine is not uploaded for storage at rest, mapped to events, and stored at rest at the destination computing environment (i.e., virtual machine). Rather, the routine is routed to a virtual machine with the corresponding environment for execution without an expectation that the code will run again. Thus, the code is not stored at rest but destroyed upon completion of the execution of the code.

[0014] A request to execute the routine may be for an arbitrary application in that it is independent of the guest operating system of the virtual destination environment. Computer routine execution requests may be processed in a multi-tenancy infrastructure, thereby providing isolation and metering capabilities. Requests may be in an arbitrary programming language, provided that language bindings to the multi-tenancy infrastructure are available.

[0015] Advantageously, the need to install and run a computer routine (e.g., applications) on the user's own computer(s) is thereby rendered unnecessary, which simplifies maintenance, scalability, security, and support. Further, in one embodiment, the use of cloud computing helps avoid upfront infrastructure costs and allows businesses to have their code executed faster, with improved manageability and less maintenance. Since the code to be executed is isolated in its container and the container is destroyed upon completion of the execution, additional security is provided.

Example System Architecture



[0016] FIG. 1 illustrates an example architecture for running a routine of an arbitrary application in a secure multi-tenant environment. System 100 includes a client 102, a webtask server 107, a multi-tenant infrastructure server (MTIS) 140 that may include multiple containers, and an online file storage server 132. There is a network 130 that facilitates communication between the different components of system 100. The network 120 may be, without limitation, a local area network ("LAN"), a virtual private network ("VPN"), a cellular network, or the Internet. Accordingly, the client can communicate with the webtask server 107 via the network 130 to send a computer routine of an arbitrary application to be processed and to receive the corresponding results of the processing therefrom. In one embodiment, instead of sending the routine to the webtask server 107, a link is sent to a repository where the routine's code is stored, such as the online file storage server 132.

[0017] The webtask server 107 is configured to receive information from the client 102 and wrap the routine in a complete package that includes infrastructure to run in isolation in the MTIS 140. The webtask server 107 then sends the "package" to the MTIS 140. The webtask server 107 requests a container that has all the infrastructure to be used by the computer routine from the MTIS 140. The webtask server 107 then dispatches the computer routine together with metadata in the form of a package to the container specified by the MTIS 140. The container then runs the routine in the package according to the metadata. The container returns the results from running the routine back to the webtask server 107. The webtask server 107 then returns the results back to the client 102 (e.g., on their browser).

[0018] The MTIS 140 may operate on a cloud and include raw computing resources that are used to execute the computer routine received from the webtask server 107. This routine to be executed is non-persistent in that it is not stored in the MTIS 140. Instead, the routine is discarded upon completion of the execution of the computer routine.

Example Functional Blocks



[0019] Reference now is made to FIG. 2, which illustrates a block diagram of the data framework for executing code (e.g., a computer routine) in multi-tenant containers. System 100 illustrates a client 102 communicating with a server 104 via a network 130.

[0020] The server 140 may operate on a cloud and include raw computing resources 142, such as CPU, memory, disk, etc., as well as an operating system 144. Thus, server 140 provides raw computing resources 142 and an operating system, which can be viewed as a cloud commodity. Server 140 provides the backend for an application in the form of a computer routine to be run. What is notably missing from the server 140 is server code that implements part of the application logic as well as secrets this code requires to access protected data or functionality, such as database connection strings, API keys, etc. Both server code and the secrets are data that are serialized together into one bundle 108 and can now be found in the client 102. Further, in one embodiment, instead of storing all of the server code in the bundle 108 of the client 102, the code is externalized to a location that can be referenced with a uniform resource identifier (URL) 110, such as GitHub® or Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3). Thus, the code can be linked to an online file storage server 132.

[0021] The bundle 108, comprising the code (e.g., computer routine) for an arbitrary application (or a URL link thereto) 110, and the client secrets 112, is referred to herein as a webtask token 110, which defines backend application logic along with secrets for its execution. In one embodiment, it is cryptographically protected 114 from tampering and disclosure. It can be safely stored or passed through untrusted channels, like network 130.

[0022] It is the webtask server (e.g., 107 in FIG. 1) that decrypts the webtask token 110 and provides the already decrypted material to the server 140 (e.g., MTIS). For example, the decryption is performed by the webtask server 107 because webtask containers in the server 140 (e.g., MTIS) execute untrusted code and therefore are not given the cryptographic keys to decrypt webtask tokens 110.

[0023] Since webtask tokens 108 may include an URL link 110 to the server code rather than the code (e.g., computer routine) itself, the serialized size of the token is relatively small given today's bandwidth standards. Accordingly, webtask tokens 108 offer the flexibility of being able to be passed around as part of the payload in various protocols, including hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP). In the example of FIG. 1, the webtask token is stored in the client 102 application itself. Accordingly, by keeping backend secrets 112 included in the webtask token 108 at the client 102 end, the secrets remain safe from disclosure due to the encryption 114. Thus, the webtask token is resistant to tampering and spoofing.

[0024] When a request 124 originates from the client 102 and is sent to the server 140 over the network 130 to execute a computer routine for an arbitrary application, the request 124 may include the client specific data 106, as well as the webtask token 108, creating a webtask request. Accordingly, a webtask request is a request 124 from the client 102, which includes a webtask token 110 in addition to regular client request data 106.

[0025] In one embodiment, the server 140 receives the webtask request 124 (i.e., comprising the webtask token 108 and the client data 106), retrieves the computer routine from the online file storage 132, based on the URL 110 provided in the webtask token 108, and applies the appropriate computing resources 142 to execute the webtask request. Accordingly, server 140 provides a generic execution environment for executing any webtask request, instead of being focused on a particular application logic. A server, such as server 140 that provides a generic and uniform execution environment for webtasks, is sometimes referred to herein as an MTIS.

[0026] In one embodiment, in order to remain generic, the MTIS 140 provides a uniform execution environment for all webtasks. Thus, backend logic of various applications that run on the MTIS 140 have access to the same functionality provided by the operating system (OS) 144 and pre-installed software packages.

[0027] The uniformity of the MTIS 140 together with the lack of an application-specific state imposed by the webtask model has several advantages over traditional backends. For example, webtask runtime can easily be scaled 104 by various disparate applications. It therefore enables an application logic layer to leverage some of the same economies of scale that large data centers utilize at the hardware level. Accordingly, the MTIS 140 enables commoditization of application logic processing at a higher level of abstraction than known PaaS.

Example Multi-Tenant Model for Sandboxing Untrusted Computer Routines



[0028] In one embodiment, the MTIS 140 architecture is multi-tenant. Multitenancy refers to an architecture in which a single instance of a computer routine (e.g., software) runs on a server while serving multiple tenants. A tenant comprises a group of users who share a common access with specific privileges to the software. With such a multitenant architecture, a software application provides every tenant a share of the data, configuration, user management, tenant individual functionality, as well as non-functional properties. As noted before, the multitenancy architecture of the MTIS 140 discussed herein increases application density.

[0029] One consideration in the multi-tenant architecture of the MTIS 140 is how to prevent malicious (or a simply badly written) computer routine of one tenant from accessing data of another tenant. In this regard, the webtask request discussed herein may invoke a sandbox in the MTIS 140. A sandbox is a security mechanism for separating running programs. It provides a tightly controlled set of resources for guest programs to run in, such as a dedicated space on a memory. To that end, Docker® may be used to create a secure (CONTAINER) sandbox around the webtask request. For example, Docker separates applications from the infrastructure using container technology, similar to how virtual machines separate the operating system from bare metal. The webtask request may be implemented as a Docker container that provides a link to a computer routine and wraps the computer routine in a complete filesystem that essentially includes the components to run, such as the runtime, system tools, system libraries, etc., thereby assuring that it will run in its destination environment (i.e., the MTIS 140).

[0030] In one embodiment the custom computer routine that is executed using webtask requests 124 is in the context of an HTTP request. Execution time may be limited to the typical lifetime of an HTTP request. Put differently, webtask requests 124 have a duration sufficiently short to be satisfied by the HTTP request/response cycle or equivalent cycle.

[0031] For example, the webtask request 124 accepts an HTTP POST request from the client 102 including the server code (or link thereto) in the webtask request 124 body. In one embodiment, the webtask request 124 also specifies the webtask container name, which denotes the isolation boundary the computer routine will execute in at the MTIS 140. There may be a 1:1 map of customer to webtask container, which means the computer routine related to one subscriber is always isolated from the computer routine of another subscriber. The MTIS 140 executes the custom computer routine in an isolated environment, referred to sometimes herein as the webtask container, and sends back a response with the results. In one embodiment, the response is in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). Thus, the custom computer routine provided via the webtask request 124 executes in a uniform environment across all tenants.

[0032] A webtask request 124 includes the computer routine (or a link thereto) as well as contextual data required during its execution. For example, the client 102 submits a JavaScript function closure. The MTIS 140 invokes that function and provides a single callback parameter. When the custom computer routine in the webtask request has finished executing in the webtask container, it calls the callback and provides an indication of an error or a single result value. In one embodiment, that result value is then serialized as JSON and returned to the client 102 in the HTTP response.

[0033] In one embodiment, the MTIS 140 is based on Node.js, which allows a custom computer routine to utilize a fixed set of Node.js modules pre-provisioned in the webtask environment. The set of supported modules may be provided by the specific requirements of various extensibility scenarios. The uniformity of the computing environment across all tenants in the MTIS 140 allows the keeping of a pool of pre-warmed webtask containers ready to be assigned to tenants when a request 124 arrives. This reduces the cold startup latency.

[0034] The MTIS 140 is configured to reduce the amount of overhead in allocating resources to process the webtask request 124. Resource allocation overhead may come in the form of spawning virtual machines, spawning processes, spawning threads, and allocating memory. Accordingly, the MTIS 140 may use resource pooling.

[0035] In one embodiment, computer routine environments can be isolated using third party infrastructure compartments such as those provided by Docker (an open source). Docker merely abstracts away environment, but does not provide multi-tenancy. Virtual machines may also be pooled by the cloud infrastructure of the vendor and/or by a request by the MTIS 140.

[0036] The MTIS 140 can spawn a process pool, and in lieu of de-allocating processes, can return the process to the pool. However, to reduce cloud overhead, in practice, the number of processes allocated may be in the single digits, since requests are assumed to be single threaded. Process management can also be managed by the execution environment such as the Java Virtual Machine or Node.js® runtime.

[0037] The MTIS 140 may also use isolation and context primitives, such as v8::isolate and v8::context to ensure execution of the computer routine in an isolated manner. In one embodiment, the MTIS 140 may manage its own memory. Alternatively, the execution environment such as the Java Virtual Machine or Node.js® may manage its own memory. Note that the execution environment may have its own memory allocator and its own garbage collection.

[0038] In one embodiment, security may be implemented by using isolation primitives. Specifically, an execution environment may execute the computer routine in a respective sandbox. Additional security and authentication might be performed by the MTIS 140. More typically, initial authentication may be to a public account to the cloud infrastructure. Thus, authentication need not be on a per requests basis, thereby improving performance.

[0039] In one embodiment, language bindings are managed by the execution environment (i.e., MTIS 140). Bindings may be native to the execution environment, or alternatively via an add-on, typically in the form of a dynamically linked library. Execution environments (with different languages) may also be discovered dynamically since sandboxes, which may be preconfigured with various execution environments, are able to enumerate those execution environments programmatically. Accordingly, the MTIS 140 can determine what is supported, and quickly respond with an error message rather than having to spawn/invoke a sandbox.

[0040] Pre-compilation may be an optimization implemented via the MTIS 140. For example, the computer routine embedded in a webtask request 124 may be byte-code rather than source code. Where stored procedures are invoked, a server side database may have precompiled stored procedure (note the stored procedure may be resident on the MTIS 140). In this way, a webtask request 124 can be made dependent solely on parameters of the computer routine sent.

[0041] In various embodiments, the multi-tenant system described herein provides various assurances for secure computer routine execution. First, there is data isolation where the computer routine of one tenant is prevented from accessing the computer routine or data of another tenant. For example, if one tenant runs a computer routine or data that accesses a custom database using a connection string or URL with an embedded password, the computer routine of another tenant running in the same system is prevented from discovering that password.

[0042] Second, a controlled resource consumption to mitigate authenticated Denial of Service (DOS) attacks is provided. To that end, in one embodiment, the sandbox of the webtask request 124 limits the amount of memory, CPU, and other system resources any one tenant can use.

[0043] Reference now is made to FIG. 3, which illustrates an example webtask virtual machine (VM) that may be used as the MTIS 140 of FIG. 1. To isolate the computer routine and data of one tenant from another, every tenant's computer routine is run in its own webtask container (e.g., Docker) in a sandbox 310. When an HTTP request arrives at a webtask VM, such as the MTIS 140, it is first processed by a proxy 306. The proxy 306 maintains a state representing the association between tenants and containers. In one embodiment, the proxy 306 looks at the etcd configuration to determine if a webtask container is already assigned for a particular tenant. If it is, the proxy 306 forwards the request to that webtask container 310. If it is not, the proxy assigns a new webtask container for that tenant from a pool of pre-warmed webtask containers available in the webtask cluster. The proxy then records that association in etcd (i.e., a daemon that runs across all computers in a cluster and provides a dynamic configuration registry, allowing various configuration data to be shared between the cluster members) for the sake of subsequent requests.

[0044] The pre-warmed pool of webtask containers is made possible by the uniform execution environment for all tenants. Being able to pick a pre-warmed container from a pool reduces cold startup latency compared to provisioning a container on the fly, even if one takes into account the already low startup latency of Docker containers.

[0045] In one embodiment, any single webtask container is just a simple HTTP server that allows multiple, concurrent requests to be processed on behalf of a single tenant. Requests executing within a specific webtask container are not isolated from each other. The lifetime of the webtask containers is managed by the controller daemon, which runs in a trusted Docker container and can therefore terminate any webtask container in a cluster following a pre-configured lifetime management policy.

[0046] In one embodiment, in addition to running every tenant's computer routine in its own Docker container 310, egress firewall rules are configured in a webtask cluster. These rules prevent an untrusted computer routine in one webtask container from communicating with other webtask containers or the webtask infrastructure. Setting up the firewall rules is possible because the HTTP server of the webtask container is running on a local network separated from the host's network by a bridge 308 (e.g., created by Docker). In one embodiment, the computer routine running in the webtask container can initiate outbound calls to the public internet. This enables outbound communication from the custom computer routine to external data sources and services, such as a customer's database or corporate edge services.

[0047] To limit memory and CPU consumption, a control groups (cgroups) mechanism (e.g., provided by Docker®) may be used. It should be noted that cgroups are mechanisms supported by Linux, while Docker® is a technology that builds on top of cgroups. In addition, every webtask container may create a transient Linux user and configures Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM) limits for that user on startup. These two mechanisms together help prevent a range of attacks on memory and CPU such as fork bombs.

Example Call Flow Process



[0048] With the foregoing overview of the multi-tenancy via code encapsulated in server requests system, it may be helpful now to consider a high-level discussion of example call flow processes. To that end, FIG. 4 illustrates a high level example call flow process for executing a code (e.g., computer routine) in a multi-tenant infrastructure environment, wherein the executed computer routine is non-persistent. The call flow process 400 is illustrated as a collection of steps in a logical call flow, which represents a sequence of operations that can be implemented in hardware, software, or a combination thereof. In the context of software, the steps represent computer-executable instructions that, when executed by one or more processors, perform the recited operations. Generally, computer-executable instructions may include routines, programs, objects, components, data structures, and the like that perform particular functions or implement particular abstract data types. The order in which the operations are described is not intended to be construed as a limitation, and any number of the described blocks can be combined in any order and/or in parallel to implement the process. For discussion purposes, the process 400 is described with reference to system 100 of FIG. 1. In the example call flow 400, there is a client 102, a webtask server 107, and a multi-tenant infrastructure server (MTIS) 140 in a cloud.

[0049] In step 408, a developer prepares a piece of code (e.g., a computer routine) to be executed on their computing device, represented in flow 400 as the client 102. In one embodiment, the computer routine is stored in an online file storage server 132.

[0050] In step 410, a connection is established with the webtask server 107 and a request is sent to a well-defined endpoint a, where the computer routine for an arbitrary application to be executed is a parameter of the request. The webtask request 124 includes a webtask token 108 as well as client data 106. In various embodiments, the webtask token 108 may comprise the computer routine (or a URL link to an online file storage that stores the computer routine 130) and client secrets 112 associated with the computer routine. In one embodiment, if the webtask server 107 cannot be reached by the client 102, then a failed connection error is returned to the client 102. To that end, the computer routine may have a handler to address this error.

[0051] In step 412, the webtask server 107 receives the webtask token together with the client data 106 and determines the type of computer routine used. Based on the computer routine, the webtask server 107 creates a webtask request 124 that includes the webtask token 108 and the client data. In various embodiments, the webtask token may invoke a multi-tenant container (e.g., such as Docker) that wraps the computer routine in a complete environment that includes the components to run in in isolation in the MTIS 140. This container is sometimes referred to herein as a webtask container.

[0052] In one embodiment, the webtask server 107 is an HTTP server, the connection during the communication 410 between the client 102 and the webtask server 107 is an HTTP connection, and the webtask request 124 that includes the webtask token and the data 106, is an HTTP request. Alternatively, other protocols, or Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs) may be used, provided that only a single, generalized endpoint is exposed to the developer.

[0053] In step 414, the webtask server 107 sends the webtask request 124 to the MTIS 140. In this regard, the webtask server 107 requests a container that has all the infrastructure to be used by the computer routine from the MTIS 140. In one embodiment, the MTIS 140 may include language bindings for various supported languages. For example, the MTIS 140 may have JavaScript binding and C# bindings. Where an unsupported language arrives in a request, the MTIS 140 may provide an appropriate error message.

[0054] In step 416, the MTIS 140 extracts the computer routine to be executed and executes the computer routine in an isolated environment (i.e., webtask container) of the MTIS 140. The webtask container may be executed in a sandbox environment of the MTIS 140. The MTIS 140 also constructs a response in a format that is compatible with the protocols used by the webtask server 107. In various embodiments, the response may be in XML, JSON, and the like. Thus, the MTIS provides a generic and uniform execution environment for the received webtask request.

[0055] In one embodiment, the MTIS tracks the resources (e.g., CPU, memory, etc.) that have been consumed during execution of the computer routine in the webtask container of the MTIS 140 associated with the request identification (ID), for billing purposes (i.e., step 418). The MTIS 140 may use the webtask server 107 generated request ID and associate it with a Thread ID either from the JavaScript runtime, from the operating system, or one internally generated by the MTIS 140. In one embodiment, by associating the thread resources used with the request ID, metering on resources consumed per request basis are realized. Resource tracking need not be limited to CPU, memory (e.g., random access memory (RAM), hard-disk), but can include any meter-able resource such as network resources utilized during the execution of the computer routine.

[0056] In one embodiment, in step 420, the MTIS sends a response to the webtask server 107. The response may be a calculated result based on the computer routine executed in the MTIS 140. If the MTIS is not able to satisfy the request, or may not satisfy the request in time, the MTIS may return a response to the webtask server with an appropriate response (i.e., error message). Thus, the response from the MTIS may be a calculated result based on the executed computer routine or an appropriate error message.

[0057] In step 422, the response is forwarded from the webtask server 107 to the client 102. Alternatively or in addition, the response may be forwarded directly from the MTIS to the client 102.

[0058] Optionally, in step 424, a confirmation may be received by the MTIS 140 from the webtask server that the result has been received by the webtask server. In step 426 the MTIS 140 performs resource de-allocation, as appropriate. In ne embodiment, container that has been used is not returned to the pool; rather, it is discarded and replaced. The MTIS 140 destroys the webtask container, thereby assuring that the computer routine is not stored at rest.

Example Use Cases



[0059] With the foregoing explanation of the system and method of encapsulating computer routine in a server request, it may be helpful to provide a high level discussion of some example use cases. The concepts and system discussed herein can be applied to various use cases. For example, they may be applied to distributed applications, where an application may be architected into separate components, each designed to operate independently of others. Those separate components can send the computer routine to be executed via the MTIS 140 to different instances.

[0060] In on example, the system described herein can be used for offloading. To that end, an application may execute a routine either locally or remotely using the MTIS 140. In situations where the local computing resources are not available or are insufficient, the application may offload computing requests to the cloud via the MTIS 140.

[0061] In one example, the concepts discussed herein can be used for scripting WEB services. An application may provide a facility for end users to make scripts that avail themselves to different functionalities embodied in the computer routine. Some of the scripts, may execute on the cloud via the MTIS 140.

[0062] In one example, the system described herein can be used in asynchronous execution applications. In such a scenario, the computer routine executed on the MTIS 140 need not be executed synchronously. In this regard, the webtask server 107 may act as a dispatcher for long-lived/long-running processes.

[0063] In one example, the concepts discussed herein may be used for vertical applications/security. A Security API may be implemented to be executed in a multi-tenant infrastructure server application that maintains a sandbox. In one embodiment, the MTIS 140 may support encryption to secure the connection between a client and the multi-tenant infrastructure server application. Because the computer routine is not resident in the MTIS 140 and because all computer routines run in a secure sandbox, the MTIS 140 provides a secure execution environment for authentication functions as exposed via a security API. As to security, in one implementation, the MTIS 140 can be used to implement authentication, authorization, auditing, and/or metering functions at a proxy level in a multi-tier application.

Example computer platform



[0064] As discussed above, functions for establishing a connection to a webtask server, sending a request to execute a computer routine, sending and receiving messages, sending and receiving webtask tokens, creating webtask containers, executing a computer routine in an isolated environment, and other functions, can be implemented on computers connected for data communication via network 130, operating as the client server 102, webtask server 107, and MTIS 140, as shown in FIG. 5. Although special purpose devices may be used, such devices also may be implemented using one or more hardware platforms intended to represent a general class of data processing device commonly used to run "server" programming so as to implement functions such as the functions discussed herein, albeit with an appropriate network connection for data communication.

[0065] FIGS. 5 and 6 provide functional block diagram illustrations of general purpose computer hardware platforms that may also be applied for cloud computing. FIG. 5 illustrates a network or host computer platform, as may typically be used to implement a server, such as a webtask server 107 or MTIS 140. FIG. 6 depicts a device with user interface elements, as may be used to implement a personal computer or a client computing device such as client 102. It is believed that the general structure and general operation of such equipment as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 should be self-explanatory from the high-level illustrations.

[0066] A general purpose computer configured as a server, for example, includes a data communication interface for packet data communication over the network 130. The server computer also includes a central processing unit (CPU), in the form of one or more processors, for executing program instructions. The server platform typically includes an internal communication bus, program storage and data storage for various data files to be processed and/or communicated by the server, although the server often receives programming and data via network communications. The hardware elements, operating systems and programming languages of such servers are conventional in nature. Of course, the server functions may be implemented in a distributed fashion on a number of similar platforms, to distribute the processing load.

[0067] As discussed above, requests to the MTIS may be done from a client machine. A client machine may be any device with a processor, memory, and a network connection sufficient to connect to a cloud server, either directly or via the Internet, similar to that of FIG. 6. Typically there will be an operating system. Typical configurations are a central processing unit, RAM, and Wi-Fi or Ethernet connectivity. The memory will be computer-readable media and/or will have access to other computer-readable media, and will run a client application comprised of computer executable code resident in the memory and/or other computer-readable media.

[0068] Similarly, a cloud server, such as the one depicted in FIG. 5, may be a device with a processor, memory, and a network connection sufficient to connect to a client machine either directly or via the Internet. As with a client machine, typically there will be an operating system. Typical configurations are a central processing unit, RAM, and Wi-Fi or Ethernet connectivity. The memory will be computer-readable media and/or will have access to other computer-readable media, and will run a client application comprised of computer executable code resident in the memory and/or other computer-readable media.

[0069] The cloud server will generally run a virtualization environment that may create virtual machines. In each virtual machine, there may be an operating system, or system level environment. Each virtual machine may spawn processes, each of which may spawn threads. An execution environment such as a Java Virtual Machine, or .NET runtime may execute in a virtual machine and manage processes and threads.

[0070] Computer-readable media, such as the RAM and ROM depicted in FIGS. 5 and 6 includes, at least, two types of computer-readable media, namely computer storage media and communications media. Computer storage media includes volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data. Computer storage media includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other non-transmission medium that can be used to store information for access by a computing device. In contrast, communication media may embody computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as a carrier wave, or other transmission mechanism. As defined herein, computer storage media does not include communication media.

[0071] The software functionalities involve programming, including executable code as well as associated stored data, e.g., files used for applications on the webtask server 107 and the MTIS 140 for sending a request to execute a computer routine, sending and receiving messages, sending and receiving webtask tokens, creating webtask containers, executing a computer routine in an isolated environment, and other functions. The software code is executable by the computing device. In operation, the code is stored within the computing device. At other times, however, the software may be stored at other locations and/or transported for loading into the appropriate computing device system. Execution of such code by a processor of the computing device enables the computing device to perform various functions, in essentially the manner performed in the implementations discussed and illustrated herein.

[0072] Hence, aspects of the methods of receiving and processing node data as outlined above may be embodied in programming. Program aspects of the technology may be thought of as "products" or "articles of manufacture" typically in the form of executable code and/or associated data that is carried on or embodied in a type of non-transitory machine readable medium.

Conclusion



[0073] It will be understood that the terms and expressions used herein have the ordinary meaning as is accorded to such terms and expressions with respect to their corresponding areas of inquiry and study except where specific meanings have otherwise been set forth herein. Relational terms such as first and second and the like may be used solely to distinguish one entity or action from another without necessarily requiring or implying any actual such relationship or order between such entities or actions. The terms "comprises," "comprising," or any other variation thereof, are intended to cover a non-exclusive inclusion, such that a process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises a list of elements does not include only those elements but may include other elements not expressly listed or inherent to such process, method, article, or apparatus. An element proceeded by "a" or "an" does not, without further constraints, preclude the existence of additional identical elements in the process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises the element.

[0074] The Abstract of the Disclosure is provided to allow the reader to quickly ascertain the nature of the technical disclosure. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope of the claims. In addition, in the foregoing Detailed Description, it can be seen that various features are grouped together in various embodiments for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed embodiments require more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims.


Claims

1. A multitenant infrastructure server, MTIS, (140) configured to provide an environment to execute a computer routine of an arbitrary application, the MTIS comprising:

a processor;

a network interface coupled to the processor configured to enable communications via a communication network;

a storage device for content and programming; and

a program stored in the storage device, wherein execution of the program configures the multitenant infrastructure server to perform acts comprising:

receiving a request (124) from a webtask server (107) to execute the computer routine in a webtask container, wherein the request includes client data (106) and client secrets (112), wherein the request further includes the computer routine to be executed or a uniform resource locator, URL, link to the computer routine;

executing the computer routine in the webtask container at the MTIS, wherein executing the computer routine includes assigning a pre-warmed container for a tenant from a pool of pre-warmed containers, wherein the pre-warmed containers are containers ready to be assigned before the request is received;

upon successful execution of the computer routine, returning a result set to the webtask server;

upon unsuccessful execution of the computer routine, returning an error computer routine to the webtask server;

determining resources consumed during the execution of the computer routine; and

destroying the webtask container to prevent persistent storage of the computer routine on the MTIS.


 
2. An MTIS according to claim 1, wherein the request does not include the computer routine but the uniform resource locator, URL, link to the computer routine.
 
3. An MTIS according to claim 2, wherein execution of the program further configures the MTIS to perform acts comprising: retrieving a computer routine from the URL provided.
 
4. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein determining the resources consumed includes:

obtaining a request identification, ID, associated with the webtask container; and

associating the request ID with a thread ID to meter the resources consumed on a per request basis.


 
5. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the client secrets and one of the computer routine to be executed or the URL to the computer routine are cryptographically protected from tampering and disclosure.
 
6. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the webtask container includes all dependencies of the computer routine to run in an isolated environment in the MTIS.
 
7. An MTIS according to claim 6, wherein the isolated environment is a sandbox in the MTIS.
 
8. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the resources consumed include processing power and memory used during the execution of the computer routine.
 
9. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the destroying the webtask container is in response to receiving a confirmation from the webtask server that the result set or the error computer routine has been received by the webtask container.
 
10. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the computer routine is independent of the operating system of the MTIS.
 
11. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the webtask server is an HTTP server and the request is an HTTP request.
 
12. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the result set is in JavaScript Object Notation, JSON.
 
13. An MTIS according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the MTIS provides data isolation for each tenant such that a computer routine of one tenant is prevented from accessing a computer routine or data of another tenant.
 
14. A method of executing a computer routine of an arbitrary application, the method comprising:
receiving a request (124) from a webtask server (107) to execute the computer routine in a webtask container of a multi-tenant infrastructure server, MTIS, (140), wherein the request includes client data (106) and client secrets (112), wherein the request further includes the computer routine to be executed or a uniform resource locator, URL, link to the computer routine;

executing the computer routine in the webtask container at the MTIS, wherein executing the computer routine includes assigning a pre-warmed container for a tenant from a pool of pre-warmed containers, wherein the pre-warmed containers are containers ready to be assigned before the request is received;

upon successful execution of the computer routine, returning a result set to the webtask server;

upon unsuccessful execution of the computer routine, returning an error notification to the webtask server;

determining resources consumed during the execution of the computer routine; and

destroying the webtask container to prevent persistent storage of the computer routine on the MTIS.


 
15. A method according to claim 14, wherein the webtask container includes all dependencies of the computer routine to run in an isolated environment in the MTIS.
 
16. A method according to claim 14 or 15, wherein the destroying the webtask container is in response to receiving a confirmation from the webtask server that the result set or the error notification has been received by the webtask container.
 
17. A method according to any of claims 14 to 16, wherein the result set is in JavaScript Object Notation, JSON.
 
18. A method according to any of claims 14 to 17, further comprising providing data isolation for each tenant such that a computer routine of one tenant is prevented from accessing computer routine or data of another tenant.
 


Ansprüche

1. Mandantenfähiger Infrastrukturserver, MTIS, (140) konfiguriert, um eine Umgebung zum Ausführen einer Computerroutine einer beliebigen Anwendung bereitzustellen, das MTIS umfasst:

einen Prozessor;

eine Netzwerkschnittstelle, die mit dem Prozessor gekoppelt ist, der konfiguriert ist, um die Kommunikation über ein Kommunikationsnetzwerk zu ermöglichen;

eine Speichervorrichtung für Inhalt und Programmierung; und

ein in der Speichervorrichtung gespeichertes Programm, wobei eine Ausführung des Programms den mandantenfähigen Infrastrukturserver konfiguriert, um Schritte durchzuführen, die umfassen:

Empfangen einer Anfrage (124) von einem Webtask-Server (107), um die Computerroutine in einem Webtask-Container auszuführen, wobei die Anfrage Client-Daten (106) und Client-Geheimnisse (112) beinhaltet, wobei die Anfrage ferner die auszuführende Computerroutine oder eine einheitliche Ressourcenlokalisierung, URL, Verknüpfung mit der Computerroutine beinhaltet;

Ausführen der Computerroutine in dem Webtask-Container auf dem MTIS, wobei das Ausführen der Computerroutine das Zuweisen eines vorgewärmten Containers für einen Mandanten aus einem Pool vorgewärmter Container beinhaltet, wobei die vorgewärmten Container Container sind, die bereit sind, zugewiesen zu werden, bevor die Anfrage empfangen wird;

nach erfolgreicher Ausführung der Computerroutine Rückgabe einer Ergebnismenge an den Webtask-Server;

bei erfolgloser Ausführung der Computerroutine Rückgabe einer Fehlercomputerroutine an den Webtask-Server;

Bestimmen der während der Ausführung der Computerroutine verbrauchten Ressourcen; und

Zerstören des Webtask-Containers, um eine dauerhafte Speicherung der Computerroutine auf dem MTIS zu verhindern.


 
2. MTIS nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Anfrage nicht die Computerroutine beinhaltet, sondern die einheitliche Ressourcenlokalisierung, URL, Verknüpfung mit der Computerroutine.
 
3. MTIS nach Anspruch 2, wobei die Ausführung des Programms das MTIS ferner konfiguriert, um Schritte durchzuführen, die umfassen: Abrufen einer Computerroutine von der bereitgestellten URL.
 
4. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das Bestimmen der verbrauchten Ressourcen umfasst:

Erhalten einer Anfrage-Identifikation, ID, die mit dem Webtask-Container verknüpft ist; und

Verknüpfen der Anfrage-ID mit einer Thread-ID, um die verbrauchten Ressourcen auf einer pro-Anfrage-Basis zu messen.


 
5. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die Client-Geheimnisse und eine der auszuführenden Computerroutinen oder die URL zur Computerroutine kryptografisch vor Manipulationen und Offenlegung geschützt sind.
 
6. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei der Webtask-Container alle Abhängigkeiten der Computerroutine beinhaltet, die in einer isolierten Umgebung im MTIS laufen.
 
7. MTIS nach Anspruch 6, wobei die isolierte Umgebung eine Sandbox in dem MTIS ist.
 
8. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die verbrauchten Ressourcen Verarbeitungsleistung und Speicher beinhalten, die während der Ausführung der Computerroutine verwendet werden.
 
9. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das Zerstören des Webtask-Containers eine Reaktion auf den Empfang einer Bestätigung vom Webtask-Server ist, dass die Ergebnismenge oder die Fehlercomputerroutine vom Webtask-Container empfangen wurde.
 
10. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die Computerroutine unabhängig vom Betriebssystem des MTIS ist.
 
11. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei der Webtask-Server ein HTTP-Server und die Anfrage eine HTTP-Anfrage ist.
 
12. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei die Ergebnismenge in JavaScript-Object-Notation, JSON, ist.
 
13. MTIS nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das MTIS eine Datenisolation für jeden Mandanten bereitstellt, so dass eine Computerroutine eines Mandanten daran gehindert wird, auf eine Computerroutine oder Daten eines anderen Mandanten zuzugreifen.
 
14. Verfahren zum Ausführen einer Computerroutine einer beliebigen Anwendung, das Verfahren umfasst:

Empfangen einer Anfrage (124) von einem Webtask-Server (107), um die Computerroutine in einem Webtask-Container eines mandantenfähigen Infrastrukturservers, MTIS, (140) auszuführen, wobei die Anfrage Client-Daten (106) und Client-Geheimnisse (112) beinhaltet, wobei die Anfrage ferner die auszuführende Computerroutine oder eine einheitliche Ressourcenlokalisierung, URL, Verknüpfung mit der Computerroutine beinhaltet;

Ausführen der Computerroutine in dem Webtask-Container am MTIS, wobei das Ausführen der Computerroutine das Zuweisen eines vorgewärmten Containers für einen Mandanten aus einem Pool vorgewärmter Container beinhaltet, wobei die vorgewärmten Container Container sind, die bereit sind, zugewiesen zu werden, bevor die Anfrage empfangen wird;

nach erfolgreicher Ausführung der Computerroutine Rückgabe einer Ergebnismenge an den Webtask-Server;

bei erfolgloser Ausführung der Computerroutine Rückgabe einer Fehlerbenachrichtigung an den Webtask-Server;

Bestimmen der während der Ausführung der Computerroutine verbrauchten Ressourcen; und

Zerstören des Webtask-Containers, um eine dauerhafte Speicherung der Computerroutine auf dem MTIS zu verhindern.


 
15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei der Webtask-Container alle Abhängigkeiten der Computerroutine beinhaltet, die in einer isolierten Umgebung in dem MTIS laufen.
 
16. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14 oder 15, wobei das Zerstören des Webtask-Containers eine Reaktion auf den Empfang einer Bestätigung vom Webtask-Server ist, dass die Ergebnismenge oder die Fehlerbenachrichtigung vom Webtask-Container empfangen wurde.
 
17. Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 14 bis 16, wobei die Ergebnismenge in JavaScript-Objekt-Notation, JSON, ist.
 
18. Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 14 bis 17, ferner umfassend ein Bereitstellen einer Datenisolation für jeden Mandanten, so dass eine Computerroutine eines Mandanten daran gehindert wird, auf die Computerroutine oder Daten eines anderen Mandanten zuzugreifen.
 


Revendications

1. Serveur d'infrastructure à locataires multiples, MTIS, (140) configuré pour fournir un environnement pour exécuter un sous-programme informatique d'une application arbitraire, le MTIS comprenant :

un processeur ;

une interface réseau couplée au processeur configurée pour permettre des communications via un réseau de communication ;

un dispositif de stockage pour le contenu et la programmation ; et

un programme stocké dans le dispositif de stockage, dans lequel l'exécution du programme configure le serveur d'infrastructure à locataires multiples pour effectuer des actes comprenant les étapes consistant à :

recevoir une demande (124) d'un serveur de tâches Web (107) pour exécuter le sous-programme informatique dans un conteneur de tâches Web, dans lequel la demande comprend des données client (106) et des secrets client (112), dans lequel la demande comprend en outre le sous-programme informatique à exécuter ou un lien localisateur de ressources uniforme, URL, vers le sous-programme informatique ;

exécuter le sous-programme informatique dans le conteneur de tâche Web du MTIS, dans lequel

exécuter le sous-programme informatique comprend l'attribution d'un conteneur préchauffé pour un locataire à partir d'un pool de conteneurs préchauffés, dans lequel les conteneurs préchauffés sont des conteneurs prêts à être attribués avant la réception de la demande ;

lors de l'exécution réussie du sous-programme informatique, renvoyer un ensemble de résultats au serveur de tâches Web ;

lors de l'exécution infructueuse du sous-programme informatique, renvoyer un sous-programme informatique d'erreur au serveur de tâches Web ;

déterminer les ressources consommées pendant l'exécution du programme informatique ; et

détruire le conteneur de tâche Web pour empêcher le stockage permanent du sous-programme informatique sur le MTIS.


 
2. MTIS selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la requête n'inclut pas le sous-programme informatique mais le lien localisateur de ressource uniforme, URL, vers le sous-programme informatique.
 
3. MTIS selon la revendication 2, dans lequel l'exécution du programme configure en outre le MTIS pour effectuer des actes comprenant : la récupération d'un sous-programme informatique à partir de l'URL fournie.
 
4. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel la détermination des ressources consommées comprend les étapes consistant à :

obtenir une identification de demande, ID, associée au conteneur de tâche Web ; et

associer l'ID de demande à une ID de d'unité d'exécution pour mesurer les ressources consommées par demande.


 
5. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel les secrets du client et l'un des sous-programmes informatiques à exécuter ou l'URL vers le sous-programme informatique sont protégés par cryptographie contre la falsification et la divulgation.
 
6. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel le conteneur de tâches Web comprend toutes les dépendances du sous-programme informatique à exécuter dans un environnement isolé dans le MTIS.
 
7. MTIS selon la revendication 6, dans lequel l'environnement isolé est un bac à sable dans le MTIS.
 
8. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel les ressources consommées comprennent la puissance de traitement et la mémoire utilisées lors de l'exécution du sous-programme informatique.
 
9. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel la destruction du conteneur de tâches Web se fait en réponse à la réception d'une confirmation du serveur de tâches Web que l'ensemble de résultats ou le sous-programme informatique d'erreur a été reçu par le conteneur de tâches Web.
 
10. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel le sous-programme informatique est indépendant du système d'exploitation du MTIS.
 
11. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel le serveur de tâches Web est un serveur HTTP et la requête est une requête HTTP.
 
12. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel l'ensemble de résultats est en notation d'objet JavaScript, JSON.
 
13. MTIS selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel le MTIS fournit une isolation de données pour chaque locataire de telle sorte qu'un sous-programme informatique d'un locataire est empêché d'accéder à un sous-programme informatique ou aux données d'un autre locataire.
 
14. Procédé d'exécution d'un sous-programme informatique d'une application arbitraire, le procédé comprenant les étapes consistant à :

recevoir une demande (124) d'un serveur de tâches Web (107) pour exécuter le sous-programme informatique dans un conteneur de tâches Web d'un serveur d'infrastructure à locataires multiples, MTIS, (140), dans lequel la demande comprend des données client (106) et des secrets client (112), dans lequel la demande comprend en outre le sous-programme informatique à exécuter ou un lien localisateur de ressources uniforme, URL, vers le sous-programme informatique ;

exécuter le sous-programme informatique dans le conteneur de tâche Web du MTIS, dans lequel

exécuter le sous-programme informatique comprend l'attribution d'un conteneur préchauffé pour un locataire à partir d'un pool de conteneurs préchauffés, dans lequel les conteneurs préchauffés sont des conteneurs prêts à être attribués avant la réception de la demande ;

lors d'un exécution réussie du sous-programme informatique, renvoyer un ensemble de résultats au serveur de tâches Web ;

lors d'une exécution infructueuse du sous-programme informatique, renvoyer une notification d'erreur au serveur de tâches Web ;

déterminer les ressources consommées pendant l'exécution du programme informatique ; et

détruire le conteneur de tâche Web pour empêcher le stockage permanent du sous-programme informatique sur le MTIS.


 
15. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel le conteneur de tâche Web comprend toutes les dépendances du sous-programme informatique à exécuter dans un environnement isolé dans le MTIS.
 
16. Procédé selon la revendication 14 ou 15, dans lequel la destruction du conteneur de tâches Web se fait en réponse à la réception d'une confirmation du serveur de tâches Web que l'ensemble de résultats ou la notification d'erreur a été reçue par le conteneur de tâches Web.
 
17. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 14 à 16, dans lequel l'ensemble de résultats est en notation d'objet JavaScript, JSON.
 
18. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 14 à 17, comprenant en outre la fourniture d'isolement de données pour chaque locataire de sorte qu'un sous-programme informatique d'un locataire soit empêché d'accéder au sous-programme informatique ou aux données d'un autre locataire.
 




Drawing


















REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description