(19)
(11)EP 3 213 135 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
25.11.2020 Bulletin 2020/48

(21)Application number: 15790375.8

(22)Date of filing:  20.10.2015
(51)Int. Cl.: 
G02B 6/44  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2015/056369
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/069323 (06.05.2016 Gazette  2016/18)

(54)

FIBER DROP CABLE ASSEMBLY FOR OUTDOOR AND INDOOR ROUTING

FASERVERBINDUNGSKABELANORDNUNG ZUR INNEN- UND AUSSENVERLEGUNG

ENSEMBLE CÂBLE DE DÉRIVATION À FIBRES OPTIQUES À DES FINS D'ACHEMINEMENT EXTÉRIEUR ET INTÉRIEUR


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 27.10.2014 US 201462069059 P
15.01.2015 US 201562103765 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
06.09.2017 Bulletin 2017/36

(60)Divisional application:
20200034.5

(73)Proprietor: Corning Research & Development Corporation
Corning, New York 14831 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • LARSON, Donald K.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • TREADWELL, Daniel J.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • THOMPSON, Zachary M.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • CLATANOFF, William J.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • CARLS, Joseph C.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • BORER, Victor J.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • KIPKE, Cary A.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)
  • COLE, Brian M.
    Saint Paul, Minnesota 55133-3427 (US)

(74)Representative: Epping - Hermann - Fischer 
Patentanwaltsgesellschaft mbH Schloßschmidstraße 5
80639 München
80639 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 1 555 680
US-A1- 2008 187 276
WO-A1-2014/066762
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    Field



    [0001] The present description relates to a drop cable assembly that can be routed from an outdoor terminal directly to an indoor wall outlet without disruption, telecommunications systems utilizing such assemblies, methods of routing such assemblies and methods of making such assemblies.

    Background



    [0002] The deployment of fiber to the home (FTTH) service is occurring at an increasingly rapid pace around the world, as service providers rush to offer greater bandwidth to customers.
    Installed cost is a significant concern for such service providers. Link loss is the insertion loss of the fiber span between an optical line terminal at a central office and the optical network unit at the subscriber dwelling. Additional connectors or splices are needed at the transition between cable types, and may be necessary when passing from outdoors (i.e. outside of a dwelling) to indoors (i.e. inside of a dwelling). Alternatively, a drop cable can be routed indoors within a conduit for a segment of the length, transitioned to a smaller cable with a splice or connection point, and then routed on the surface of the wall for the remaining segment. Each of these types of terminations adds to link loss, and further adds to the link budget, degrading performance and adding to electronics cost necessary for installation.

    [0003] Document WP 2014/066762 A1 discloses a system and a method for adhering cables and wires, such as fiber optic cable, to walls, trim and ceilings in either the interior or exterior of residential and business establishments. The method for installing a hot-melt adhesive coated fiber optic cable to a surface includes providing a length of fiber optic cable pre-coated with a hot-melt adhesive as well as providing a heating device, configured for heating the fiber optic cable pre- coated with hot melt adhesive with sufficient heat to cause the hot-melt adhesive to become softened and adhere to a surface. The method is completed by applying sufficient pressure to the adhesive softened fiber optic cable pre-coated with a hot-melt adhesive to adhere the fiber-optic cable to the surface.

    [0004] Document US 2008/187276 A1 discloses a flexible optical fiber tape which is formed from a substrate in the form of a strip adapted to maintain at least one optical fiber. The substrate may include an adhesive layer on at least one side for securing the tape to an external surface such as an interior floor, wall or ceiling. The tape may also have a flame-retardant characteristic.

    [0005] Document EP 1555680 A1 discloses a cable for data transmission which can be wired and constructed without damaging a surface of a wall, ceiling, floor or the like, without using any clamps. The cable includes a core wire having a medium that transmits data and a coating member having adhesiveness and coating at least part of the core wire. In this way, because of the adhesiveness of the coating member, it is easy to stick the cable onto a wall or the like.

    [0006] It is often necessary to drill large holes to pass a connector end of a pre-terminated drop cable through a dwelling wall. Additionally, appearance of the installed product inside of the dwelling is a key concern for homeowners and landlords. Poorly routed and stapled cables detract from a property's value. The size of the cable which is exposed to the tenant if surface mounted can detract from the decor of the room. Further, installing fiber to the home is a disruption to the homeowner's space. It is critical for an installer to be able to quickly complete an installation with minimal noise, drilling, dust or other intrusions.

    [0007] The presently described invention addresses all of the concerns discussed above, limiting link loss and budget, avoiding the necessity of large holes to route a drop cable into a dwelling, providing an aesthetically pleasing solution, and minimizing disruption to a homeowner during installation.

    Summary



    [0008] In one aspect, the present description relates to a fiber drop cable assembly according to appended claim 1. The fiber drop cable assembly includes an optical fiber, an adhesive layer that surrounds the optical fiber, and a removable jacket positioned around the adhesive layer and optical fiber. The adhesive that makes up the adhesive layer is suitable for adhering the optical fiber to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure. The fiber drop cable assembly further comprises a removable jacket positioned around the adhesive layer and optical fiber and a liner layer positioned over the adhesive layer and within the jacket. The liner layer remains intact after the removal of the jacket and wherein the liner layer may be subsequently separated from the adhesive layer to prepare the adhesive layer for adherence to a surface.

    [0009] In one embodiment, the assembly may further include a buffer coating positioned between the optical fiber and the adhesive layer.

    [0010] In another aspect, the present description relates to a telecommunications system. The telecommunications system includes a terminal that is positioned exterior to a dwelling, a fiber drop cable that is routed from the terminal, and an unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable. The fiber drop cable routed from the terminal is jacketed and weatherproofed and is routed to an entrance point of a dwelling through which the cable passes into the interior of the dwelling. The unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable is routed along an interior surface of the dwelling to a wall outlet. The unjacketed portion includes an adhesive layer that is pre-applied to the fiber drop cable and exposed upon removing the cable jacket. The adhesive layer allows the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable to be secured to the interior wall.

    [0011] In yet another aspect, the present description relates to a method of routing a fiber drop cable directly from a terminal that is external to a dwelling to a wall outlet that is internal to the dwelling. The method includes the steps of: a jacketed optical fiber drop cable to the terminal, routing the jacketed optical fiber drop cable along a portion of an exterior of the dwelling, routing the jacketed optical fiber drop cable through an entrance point into the dwelling, removing the jacket from the jacketed optical fiber drop cable, exposing an optical fiber and an adhesive layer, adhering the optical fiber layer to the interior wall of the dwelling utilizing the adhesive layer, and connecting the optical fiber to the wall outlet.

    [0012] In another aspect, the present description relates to a method of making a fiber optic cable assembly. The method includes the steps of: providing a jacketed cable with a hollowed interior, opening a re-sealable groove in the jacket to expose the hollow interior, inserting into the hollowed interior of the jacket an optical fiber, the optical fiber being surrounded by an adhesive layer that suitable for adhering the optical fiber to a wall or other permanent or semipermanent structure, and re-sealing the groove in the jacket to enclose the buffer coated optical fiber. In one aspect, the optical fiber inserted into the hollowed interior jacket may be a buffer coated optical fiber.

    [0013] In yet another aspect, the present description relates to a telecommunications system comprising an embodiment of the fiber drop cable assembly. The telecommunications system includes a terminal that is positioned exterior to a dwelling, the fiber drop cable assembly that is routed from the terminal, and an unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable. The fiber drop cable assembly routed from the terminal is jacketed and weatherproofed and is routed to an entrance point of a dwelling through which the cable passes into the interior of the dwelling. The unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable is routed along an interior surface of the dwelling to a wall outlet. The unjacketed portion is inserted into a track that is adhered to the interior wall of the dwelling and routed to the wall outlet. Additionally, the track includes features positioned along the length of the track that act to define a channel for securing and protecting the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable.

    Brief Description of the Drawings



    [0014] 

    Figures 1A-1C provide different views of a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description.

    Figure 2 provides a perspective view a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description.

    Figure 3 provides an exterior diagram of a telecommunications system according to the present description using fiber drop cable assemblies.

    Figure 4 provides an interior diagram of a telecommunications system according to the present description using fiber drop cable assemblies.

    Figure 5 provides a perspective view of a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description.

    Figures 6A-6B provide cross-sectional views of a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description.

    Figure 7 provides a cross-sectional view of a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description.

    Figure 8 illustrates an applicator tool for applying a fiber drop cable assembly to a surface.

    Figure 9 provides an exterior diagram of a telecommunications system according to the present description using fiber drop cable assemblies.

    Figure 10 provides an exterior diagram of a telecommunications system according to the present description using fiber drop cable assemblies.

    Figures 11A and 11B provide perspective views of a track for routing unjacketed drop cable with and without cable in the track.

    Figure 12 provides a perspective view of a track for routing unjacketed drop cable with a cover to secure and protect the cable in the track.

    Figures 13A-B are cross-sectional views of tracks for routing unjacketed drop cable that contain covers to secure and protect the cable.

    Figure 14 is a cross-sectional view of a jacketed fiber drop cable pre -populated with a track for routing indoors upon peeling of the jacket. The figures are not necessarily to scale. Like numbers used in the figures refer to like components. However, it will be understood that the use of a number to refer to a component in a given figure is not intended to limit the component in another figure labeled with the same number.


    Detailed Description



    [0015] In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which illustrate specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. The illustrated embodiments are not intended to be exhaustive of all embodiments according to the invention. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural or logical changes may be made. Embodiments of the invention are defined by the appended claims. In the following, parts of the description and drawings referring to embodiments which are not covered by the claims are not presented as embodiments of the invention, but as examples useful for understanding the invention. The following detailed description, therefore, is not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims.

    [0016] Unless otherwise indicated, all numbers expressing feature sizes, amounts, and physical properties used in the specification and claims are to be understood as being modified in all instances by the term "about." Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth in the foregoing specification and attached claims are approximations that can vary depending upon the desired properties sought to be obtained by those skilled in the art utilizing the teachings disclosed herein.

    [0017] As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms "a," "an," and "the" encompass embodiments having plural referents, unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. As used in this specification and the appended claims, the term "or" is generally employed in its sense including "and/or" unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.

    [0018] Moreover, the length unit micron is used in the application as a shorthand for the metric unit micrometer.

    [0019] Spatially related terms, including but not limited to, "proximate," "distal," "lower," "upper," "beneath," "below," "above," and "on top," if used herein, are utilized for ease of description to describe spatial relationships of an element(s) to another. Such spatially related terms encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the particular orientations depicted in the figures and described herein. For example, if an object depicted in the figures is turned over or flipped over, portions previously described as below or beneath other elements would then be above those other elements.

    [0020] As used herein, when an element, component or layer for example is described as forming a "coincident interface" with, or being "on," "connected to," "coupled with," "stacked on" or "in contact with" another element, component or layer, it can be directly on, directly connected to, directly coupled with, directly stacked on, in direct contact with, or intervening elements, components or layers may be on, connected, coupled or in contact with the particular element, component or layer, for example. When an element, component or layer for example is referred to as being "directly on," "directly connected to," "directly coupled with," or "directly in contact with" another element, there are no intervening elements, components or layers for example.

    [0021] The terms "buffered" optical fiber and "buffer coated" optical fiber may be used interchangeably throughout the description.

    [0022] Figures 1A-1C provide different views of a fiber drop cable assembly 100 according to the present description. Fiber drop cable assembly includes an optical fiber 110. Optical fiber 110 may be a conventional optical fiber having a conventional diameter of approximately 250 microns. The optical fiber is generally a standard optical fiber with a glass optically transmissive portion having a diameter of approximately 125 microns, and an acrylate coating surrounding the glass, the acrylate coating having a thickness of approximately 62.5 microns, such that the diameter of the entire "optical fiber" is 250 microns. Assembly 100 may further include a buffer coating 120 that surrounds the optical fiber 110. The diameter of the buffer coated optical fiber (labeled as element 125), which takes into account both the optical fiber and the buffer layer, may in some embodiments be between 250 (nominal) and 700 microns, or between 450 and 550 microns, or potentially between 490 and 510 microns, or between 550 microns and 650 microns, or potentially between 590 and 610 microns. In another embodiment, the diameter of the buffer coated optical fiber may be between 800 and 1000 microns, or between 850 microns and 950 microns, or potentially between 890 and 910 microns. However, although not shown in the figures, in some embodiments, there will be no buffer coating around the optical fiber.

    [0023] Fiber drop cable assembly 100 further includes an adhesive layer 130 that may surround the buffer coating. The adhesive making up adhesive layer 130 is suitable for adhering the buffer coated optical fiber 125 to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure. In embodiments, where the optical fiber does not include a buffer coating around it, the adhesive layer 130 will directly surround the optical fiber 110. In one embodiment, the adhesive of adhesive layer 130 can be a pressure sensitive adhesive. In another embodiment, the adhesive layer 130 may contain a heat activated adhesive. The adhesive layer 130 may contain adhesives that are cured by moisture, radiation, or are simply air cured. Where a pressure sensitive adhesive is used, the pressure sensitive adhesive may be of a rubber, acrylic or silicone class adhesive. Appropriate rubber class pressure sensitive adhesives can include, e.g., natural rubber, synthetic polyisoprene, a styrene/butadiene random copolymer, polybutadiene, or SIS and SBS block copolymers. Appropriate silicone class pressure sensitive adhesives can include, e.g., traditional solvent silicone systems or silicone polyurea (SPU). Appropriate resin class pressure sensitive adhesives can include copolymers of acrylic monomers combining 1) a low Tg component, 2) a polar monomer, and optionally 3) a high TG component. One specific appropriate resin class pressure sensitive adhesive is 3M™ Low Surface Energy Acrylic Adhesive 300LSE from 3M Company (St. Paul, MN). Appropriate methods for coating the adhesive onto the buffered optical fiber may include solvent based coating methods, water based coating methods, polymerized web-coating, or hot melt extrusion.

    [0024] The assembly 100 also includes a removable jacket 140 that is positioned around the adhesive layer 130 and buffer coated optical fiber 125 (where a buffer coating is present). Figure 1C clearly illustrates jacket 140 in the process of being removed from the buffer coated optical fiber 125 (or fiber 110) and adhesive 130. The jacket may be capable of being removed by using a tool, or in another embodiment, may be peeled by hand. In some embodiments, the removable jacket 140 may be formed from a polymer material, such as polyethylene. Other materials may also be suitable materials for the primary jacket, such as polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), TPE, neoprene, polyurethane or fluoropolymers such as FEP and PFA. Jacket may, in one preferred embodiment, be both durable and weatherable. As such, one particularly appropriate material for jacket 140 may be UV stabilized polyethylene material. In some embodiments, the jacket 140 may also be abrasion resistant. The jacketed fiber is intended to be ruggedized for potential exposure to the elements, and is often times conspicuously colored black. These properties create negative visual impact if the jacketed cable is routed with the jacket on into a dwelling. Thus, the desirability of removing the jacket upon entry into the dwelling. In one embodiment, the jacket may be coated with a low friction fluorochemical coating, such as described in commonly owned and assigned International Publication No. WO 2015/081511, so that it can easily be pulled through the entry point into the dwelling.

    [0025] To aid in removing the jacket 140, the jacket may include at least one indentation 160 (or potentially multiple indentations) as illustrated in Figure 1B. The indentation(s) 160 are positioned proximate the buffer coated optical fiber 125 and run along the cable assembly's axis, allowing for the jacket to be removed more easily and consistently expose the fiber along its length upon removal (as illustrated in Figure 1C). Alternatively, the fiber drop cable assembly may include a pull string that is positioned within the jacket and runs parallel to the optical fiber. The pull string may be used to open the jacket when pulled by a user. Such a construction is illustrated in the embodiment described further below and illustrated in Figure 7.

    [0026] As further illustrated in Figures 1A and 1B, assembly 100 may also include two strength members 150 that are positioned within the removable jacket 140 on opposite sides of optical fiber 110. In some embodiments, the strength member 150 may be polymer rods. The polymer rods may be solely polymer, or may be glass reinforced polymer rods, carbon fiber reinforced polymer rods, or polyaramide (e.g., products sold under the trade designation KEVLAR) reinforced polymer rods.

    [0027] In another embodiment, illustrated in Figure 2, a fiber drop cable assembly 200 may resemble that of drop cable assembly 100, with one addition. Drop cable assembly 200 may additionally include a liner layer 160 that is positioned over the adhesive layer 130 and within the jacket 140. The liner 160 is capable of remaining intact after the jacket 140 has been removed. Liner 160 may subsequently (after removal of the jacket) be separated from the adhesive layer to prepare the adhesive layer for adherence to a surface, as further discussed below.

    [0028] In one appropriate use, as illustrated in Figure 3, the fiber drop cable assembly of the present description, entirely jacketed, is routed exterior to a dwelling 302. The drop cable assembly may be attached to the exterior wall of the dwelling using a number of conventional means, including stapling, cable clamps, or routing within conduits. Upon entry into the building through an entrance point 306, a peeled portion of the cable assembly 304 is adhered to a surface (e.g.) a wall of the interior of the dwelling 302. The peeled portion 304 may correspond to adhesive coated buffered fiber (elements 140 and 125), or simply adhesive coated optical fiber. As noted, the adhesive coated buffer coated fiber (or adhesive coated fiber) may be adhered to a wall, or other permanent or semi-permanent structure or surface. However, it may also be desirable to ensure that the portion of the adhesive coated fiber not in contact with the wall does not remain tacky after installation. As such an installer may use any number of means to render tack-free the non-adhered portions of the adhesive layer, such as i) placing a thin particulate layer on and covering the adhesive layer, ii) placing a thin film on and covering the adhesive layer, iii) applying a coating to and covering the adhesive layer, iv) including a volatile tackifying agent in the adhesive layer that evaporates and renders the adhesive tack-free, or, v) utilizing a curing reaction based on light, heat, moisture or air that causes the adhesive to slowly lose tack. Figure 3 shows an aerial deployment from pole to the house. This could also be a buried application where the fiber is fed underground when routing towards the dwelling. Figure 9 illustrates one such example, where a drop cable is routed underground from terminal 312 (in this embodiment, potentially a network interface device) to another distribution terminal 330. Alternatively, though not shown, the cable may be routed directly from the building entrance point 306 underground and routed directly to terminal 330.

    [0029] Figure 10 offers another example of routing of the jacketed weather fiber drop cable assembly outside of the dwelling. In this particular embodiment, rather than being routed to the building entrance point 306 from a network interface-type device mounted on the exterior of the dwelling, the jacketed fiber drop cable assembly is routed directly to a terminal 334 that is positioned on a light pole. In such an embodiment, the system may include a strain relief device 332 positioned on the exterior of the dwelling.

    [0030] Figure 4 provides an interior view of the system also illustrated in Figure 3. These figures may be used together to understand discussion of the telecommunications system below. One telecommunications system according to the present description includes a terminal 312 that is positioned external to a dwelling 302. Terminal 312 may, e.g., be what is understood as a network interface device. A fiber drop cable 300, such as the fiber drop cable assemblies 100 and 200 discussed above, is routed from the terminal 312. The drop cable 300 is jacketed and weatherproofed and is routed to an entrance point 306 of the dwelling through which the fiber passes into the interior of the dwelling 314. At this point, an unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable 304 is routed along an interior surface 318 of the dwelling to a wall outlet 322. As used herein, the term "wall outlet" may be understood to include conventional wall outlets, wall mounted customer premises equipment devices (CPE devices) and other O/E devices. The unjacketed portion of the drop cable includes an adhesive layer (see, e.g., adhesive layer 140 in Figure 1) that is applied to the fiber drop cable and exposed upon removing the cable jacket (see Figure 1C), the adhesive layer allowing the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable to be secured to the interior wall 318. Of particular importance in the system described in Figures 3 and 4, is that the fiber drop cable, including both the portions external to the dwelling 302 and the unjacketed portions in the interior of dwelling 314, is continuous between the wall outlet 322 and terminal 312 without any need for termination or connection of the optical fiber at any point in between these two points (including at entrance 306).

    [0031] In a different aspect, the dwelling may be part of a multi-dwelling unit, such that exterior of dwelling 302 is in fact a hallway of a multi-dwelling unit (not shown). In such an embodiment, it is possible that the system will include a jacketed fiber drop cable that is routed within a raceway or a conduit from a terminal or building entrance point to a living unit. Upon entering the living unit the rugged jacket is removed to expose a buffered fiber which is surrounded by an adhesive layer with is utilized to adhere the fiber to the interior wall of the living unit and connecting the optical fiber to the wall outlet. Alternatively, in either aspect, the jacket of the cable may not be removed upon entry into the dwelling, but may be removed only after being routed a given distance within the dwelling. Such an article (or method of routing in accordance with the methods described below) may be appropriate where an entry point is in a place that is not generally visible to inhabitants at most times, e.g., in a closet. In such a system or method, the jacket may be removed when the cable enters a more highly visible region of the dwelling.

    [0032] Figures 3 and 4 can also be used to provide an illustration of a method of routing a fiber drop cable directly from a terminal that is external to a dwelling to a wall outlet that is internal to the dwelling. The method includes the step of connecting a jacketed optical fiber drop cable 300 to a terminal 312 and routing the jacketed optical fiber drop cable along a portion of an exterior of the dwelling 302. The method further includes the step of routing the jacketed optical fiber drop cable 300 through an entrance point 306 in the dwelling. Entrance point 306 can be of a diameter that is only slightly larger than the jacketed optical fiber drop cable. It is important to note that the current construction offers a major improvement over conventional systems that place a box at the entrance to the dwelling, and connect a separate indoor cable and outdoor cable within the box.

    [0033] Next, the jacket of the cable portion that is inside of the dwelling is removed from the cable (in a similar manner to that shown in Figure 1C), exposing an optical fiber that may be surrounded with a buffer layer, and an adhesive layer that surrounds the buffer layer (or surrounds the optical fiber where no buffer layer is present). In one embodiment, the jacket may be capable of being removed by hand. The optical fiber layer (unjacketed and potentially buffer coated) 304 is adhered to an interior surface 318 of the dwelling utilizing the adhesive layer. After routing along the interior wall, the optical fiber is connected to the wall outlet 322. In one embodiment, the steps described immediately above are performed sequentially. Alternatively, the distance along which the optical fiber must be routed may be measured and then removed to provide for the appropriate amount of unjacketed fiber first, and the drop cable is connected to the wall outlet before being routed outside to the terminal external to the dwelling.

    [0034] Although the adhesive layer is critical to adhere the optical fiber, it will be clear to one of skill in the art that it is undesirable for the surface area of the buffered or unbuffered optical fiber that is not adhered to the wall to retain its tackiness. Exposed tacky portions of the fiber can result in accumulation of dust, and may cause issues with any slack portions of the fiber that are wound, e.g., at the wall outlet. Accordingly, one further step of the method herein described is to cause the non-adhered adhesive to become tack-free. As described above, this "detackification" of the buffered optical fiber may be achieved through a number of means, including, i) a thin particulate layer being placed on and covering the adhesive layer, ii) a thin film being placed on and covering the adhesive layer, iii) a coating being applied to and covering the adhesive layer, iv) a volatile tackifying agent dissolved in the adhesive that evaporates and renders the adhesive tack-free, or v) a curing reaction based on light, heat, moisture or air that causes the adhesive to lose tack.

    [0035] The unjacketed optical fiber with adhesive layer may be adhered to the wall or other surface by appropriate means. In one embodiment, the adhesive layer may be adhered to the interior surface 318 of the dwelling using an applicator tool. The applicator tool may apply pressure to the optical fiber when being used, resulting in a deformation of the adhesive layer, and a greater surface area of adhesive on the interior surface. One example of such an applicator tool in the process of applying an unjacketed buffer optical fiber to the interior surface of a dwelling is illustrated in Figure 8 with applicator tool 803 applying optical fiber 800 to a surface. The applicator tool may also be used to implement some of the detackification techniques described above, such that exposed surface portions of the optical fiber are no longer tacky after contact with the applicator tool.

    [0036] Figure 5 provides yet another version of a fiber drop cable assembly according to the present description. In the illustrated embodiment, again the fiber drop cable assembly includes an optical fiber 510, with buffer coating 520 surrounding the optical fiber and an adhesive layer 530 that surround the buffer coating, the adhesive suitable for adhering the buffer coated optical fiber to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure. Additionally, the assembly of Figure 5 includes a removable jacket 540 positioned around the adhesive layer and buffer coated optical fiber. Figure 5 illustrates jacket 540 in the process of being removed from around these elements.

    [0037] Figure 5, and also Figures 6A and 6B which show the same construction from a cross-sectional view in both an open and closed jacket positions (respectively), illustrate this additional embodiment. The assembly offers other characteristics that may differ from assemblies described above.

    [0038] The present description also relates to a method of making a fiber drop cable assembly. The most common method of assembling a cable construction, including FRP-type cable, is to extrude the jacket portion of the cable around the optical fiber, and strength members (if any) in a continuous process. As an alternative, one may begin the process with a jacketed cable that does not yet contain optical fiber. The jacketed cable may contain strength members (e.g. strength member 550 in Figures 5 and 6A-6B). However, the central portion of the cable may be hollow. The hollowed jacket 540 may be capable of being opened (as illustrated in Figure 5 and 6A), and an optical fiber 510, potentially surrounded by a buffer layer 520, and adhesive layer 530 surrounding the optical fiber (and buffer layer where present) may be laid into the hollowed out center. After the adhesive coated optical fiber has been laid in the jacket 540, the jacket may be closed and re-sealed at groove area 570. The jacket may be sealed by appropriate method. In one embodiment, the groove area 570 may be heated such that the jacket seals by melting at groove area 570. In another embodiment, the adhesive layer 530 may act to sufficiently adhere the jacket 540 around the construction such that it remains closed at groove area 570. However, the adhesive layer will generally have a stronger adhesion to the optical fiber and will release freely from the jacket when the user applies an opening or peeling force to the jacket. The re-sealed cable construction will resemble that shown in Figure 6B. When and if a portion of the cable is intended for routing along an interior surface of a dwelling, it may once again be opened by removing the appropriate amount of jacket, and adhering the buffer coated optical fiber to the surface.

    [0039] Figure 7 illustrates yet another cross-sectional view of a potential fiber drop cable assembly 700 according to the present description. Here, as opposed to the other constructions shown, and as contemplated in the present description, the construction is a rounded cable with a generally round jacket 740. In previous embodiments, a generally rectangular jacket (also contemplated) is described, and any other number of jacket cross-sectional shapes may be appropriate. As with the other assemblies the construction may include an optical fiber 710, a buffer coating surrounding the optical fiber 720, an adhesive layer 730 surrounding the buffer coating, the adhesive suitable for adhering the buffer coated optical fiber to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure; and a removable jacket 740 positioned around the adhesive layer and buffer coated optical fiber. The construction may additionally include strength member 750 similar to those described in earlier embodiments. As with the construction shown in Figure 6, assembly 700 may include a groove area 770 that may or may not be resealable. Additionally, in this construction, the assembly 700 further includes a pull string 780. The pull string 780 is positioned within the jacket 740 and runs generally parallel to the optical fiber. A portion of the pull string may be exposed either manually or left exposed during manufacture, such that the jacket may be opened and removed by an installer by simply pulling the pull string.

    [0040] In yet another alternative embodiment, a fiber drop cable assembly may include multiple optical fibers, e.g., 4 optical fibers, 8 optical fibers, 12 optical fibers, or any other appropriate number of fibers. The optical fibers may be closely bundled and the bundle of optical fibers may be surrounded by a singular buffer coating or tubing. As with the other single fiber constructions, an adhesive layer may be applied that surrounds the buffer coating/tubing, the adhesive suitable for adhering the buffer coated optical fiber to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure. Additionally, a removable jacket may be positioned around the adhesive layer and buffer coated optical fiber. Such a construction may be suitable for bringing multiple fibers to a location, e.g., to run to a consolidation, terminal or outlet and drop service to multiple tenants or business customers.

    [0041] In yet another embodiment, the present description relates to a telecommunications system in which no adhesive layer is pre-applied to the portion of the assembly within the jacket. As with the system in Figures 3 and 4, the telecommunications system includes a terminal 312 that is exterior to a dwelling, and continuous fiber drop cable routed from the terminal 312, the fiber drop cable 300 being jacketed and weatherproofed and being routed to an entrance point 306 of a dwelling through which the fiber drop cable passes into the interior of the dwelling. Again, in the system, an unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable is routed along an interior surface of the dwelling to a wall outlet. However, in the current embodiment, the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable (e.g., the buffer coated optical fiber) is inserted into a track that is adhered to the interior wall of the dwelling and routed to the wall outlet 322. The track includes features positioned along the length of the track that act to define a channel for securing and protecting the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable. The track may be routed all the way from the entrance point to the dwelling to the wall outlet. Alternatively, the track may be routed only part of the distance to the wall outlet, e.g., where the entrance point to the dwelling is at a point that is generally not visible to inhabitants.

    [0042] Figures 11A and 11B offer perspective views of the track 1105 and features 1107 that are positioned along its length. As shown, in some embodiments, the features 1107 are positioned on opposing sides of the channel 1109. In some embodiments, the features may be intermittently spaced along the length of the track. In one embodiment, the features can be post-like features that may include a widened cap at the top of the features (much like mushrooms), such as those illustrated in Figures 11A and 11B, where the cap aids in securing and protecting the unjacketed fiber drop cable in the channel. The unjacketed drop cable 1101 (e.g. buffer coated optical fiber) may be inserted into the channel 1109 using an insertion tool that applies pressure onto the unjacketed portion of the drop cable in the direction of the channel in order to slide it past the any cap or top of the features and secure it in the channel. Such a tool may be similar to that illustrated in Figure 8.

    [0043] The surface of the track that is intended for adhesion to the wall, i.e., surface 1111, may be pre-laminated with some sort of adhesive layer 1113, e.g., a pressure sensitive adhesive layer. The adhesive may be a double sided adhesive for sticking to both the track and to the interior wall of a dwelling. The side of the adhesive intended for adhesion to the interior wall may initially be covered with a liner 1115 (shown, but optional), that may be stripped away by the installer at the time of application of the track to the wall. In one embodiment, the adhesive layer 1113 may be a stretch-release adhesive. Any appropriate type of adhesive for use in adhesive layer 1113 is contemplated.

    [0044] In some embodiments, the track and features will be made up of a flexible material that is either clear or translucent. The flexibility of the track and features enable the track to bend en route to the wall outlet, where, e.g, the track must turn a corner. Additionally, flexibility of the features allows for the unjacketed portion of the drop cable to be snapped into the channel. The clear or translucent nature of the track allows it to be aesthetically pleasing and difficult to notice for tenants or workers in the dwelling. Alternatively, the track and features may be made up of a flexible material that is color-matched to the color of the wall onto which it is being adhered. Similarly, in order to make the unjacketed portion of the drop cable less conspicuous, the buffer coating around the optical fiber routed in the track may be either clear or translucent or may be color-matched to the color of the wall onto which the track is adhered. Color-matching the track or buffered optical fiber may offer similar concealing, aesthetically pleasing properties to the system.

    [0045] In some embodiments, the system may further include a cover portion that is positioned over the channel. Such an embodiment may be better understood by reference to Figure 12. In this embodiment, a cover portion 1212 is positioned over the channel 1105, and potentially secured onto features 1107. The cover portion 1212 provide additional protection for the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable 1101. Alternatively, as shown in the cross-sectional views in Figures 13A and 13B, the cover portion 1212 may be shaped such that it mates with the shape of the features in the track. For example, the cover portion 1212 may contain its own features 1214 that are negatives of and/or mate with the track features 1107. Alternatively, as illustrated in Figure 13B, the cover portion 1212 may simply be a material that is coated over the entirety of the track construction, such as a caulking material. While in some embodiments, the unjacketed optical fiber drop cable may be removed from the jacket of the drop cable at the entrance point, and snapped into a track that is provided separately, it is also contemplated that the track may also be pre-populated within the jacket of the drop cable. Such a construction is illustrated in Figure 14. Here jacket 1140 surrounds a construction in which the unjacketed portion of cable 1101 is already populated in, or snapped into, track 1105, such that the entire construction can be adhered to an interior wall of a dwelling once jacket 1140 is peeled away. As with other proposed constructions, the cable construction may include, e.g., strength members 1150 within the drop cable.

    [0046] Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that a variety of alternate and/or equivalent implementations can be substituted for the specific embodiments shown and described without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the specific embodiments discussed herein. Therefore, it is intended that this disclosure be limited only by the claims and the equivalents thereof.


    Claims

    1. A fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700), comprising:

    an optical fiber (110);

    an adhesive layer (130) that surrounds the optical fiber (110), the adhesive layer (130) suitable for adhering the optical fiber (110) to a wall or other permanent or semi-permanent structure;

    a removable jacket (140) positioned around the adhesive layer (130) and optical fiber (110), characterized in

    a liner layer (160) positioned over the adhesive layer (130) and within the jacket (140), wherein the liner layer (160) remains intact after the removal of the jacket (140) and wherein the liner layer (160) may be subsequently separated from the adhesive layer (130) to prepare the adhesive layer (130) for adherence to a surface.


     
    2. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) of claim 1, wherein the adhesive layer (130) comprises one of a pressure sensitive adhesive, a heat activated adhesive, a moisture-curing adhesive, a radiation curing adhesive, and an air cured adhesive.
     
    3. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) of claim 1, wherein the adhesive coated fiber is adhered to a wall, or other permanent or semi-permanent structure and, wherein the assembly (100, 200, 700) further comprises a means to render tack-free the non-adhered portions of the adhesive layer (130) when the jacket (140) is removed, the means to render tack-free being chosen from:

    i. a thin particulate layer being placed on and covering the adhesive layer (130),

    ii. a thin film being placed on and covering the adhesive layer (130),

    iii. a coating being applied to and covering the adhesive layer (130),

    iv. a volatile tackifying agent dissolved in the adhesive layer (130) that evaporates and renders the adhesive layer (130) tack-free, or

    v. a curing reaction based on light, heat, moisture or air that causes the adhesive layer (130) to slowly lose tack.


     
    4. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) of claim 1, wherein a jacketed portion of the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) is routed exterior to a dwelling (302), and a peeled portion (304) of the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) is adhered to a surface of the interior of a dwelling (302).
     
    5. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the removable jacket (140) is formed from at least one polymer material selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, TPE, neoprene, polyurethane, and fluoropolymer.
     
    6. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, further comprising a buffer coating (120) positioned between the optical fiber (110) and the adhesive layer (130).
     
    7. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, further comprising two strength members (150) positioned within the removable jacket (140) on opposite sides of the optical fiber (110).
     
    8. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the removable jacket (140) is capable of being peeled by hand.
     
    9. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, further comprising a pull string (780) that is positioned within the jacket (140) and runs generally parallel to the optical fiber (110), wherein the jacket (140) may be opened by pulling the pull string (780).
     
    10. The fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the removable jacket (140) is formed from a UV stabilized polymer material.
     
    11. A telecommunications system, comprising:

    a terminal (312), exterior to a dwelling (302);

    a fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) according to one of the claims 1 to 10 which is configured as a continuous fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) routed from the terminal (312), the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) being jacketed and weatherproofed, and being routed to an entrance point (306) of a dwelling (302) through which the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) passes into the interior of the dwelling (302);

    an unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700) routed along an interior surface (318) of the dwelling (302) to a wall outlet (322), the unjacketed portion being inserted into a track (1105) that is adhered to the interior wall (318) of the dwelling (302) and routed to the wall outlet (322), the track (1105) comprising features (1107) positioned along the length of the track (1105) that act to define a channel (1109) for securing and protecting the unjacketed portion of the fiber drop cable assembly (100, 200, 700).


     
    12. The telecommunications system of claim 11, wherein the features (1107) are intermittently spaced and positioned on opposing sides of the channel (1109).
     
    13. The telecommunications system of claim 12, wherein the features (1107) comprise post-like features.
     
    14. The telecommunications system of claim 13, wherein the post-like features comprise a widened cap at the top of the features (1107) that aids in securing and protecting the unjacketed fiber drop cable (1101) in the channel (1109).
     
    15. The telecommunications system of claim 11, wherein the track (1105) and features (1107) comprise a flexible clear or translucent material.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700), umfassend:

    eine optische Faser (110);

    eine adhäsive Schicht (130), welche die optische Faser (110) umgibt, wobei die adhäsive Schicht (130) dazu geeignet ist, die optische Faser (110) an einer Wand oder einer anderen permanenten oder halbpermanenten Struktur anzukleben;

    einen entfernbaren Mantel (140), der um die adhäsive Schicht (130) und die optische Faser (110) herum angeordnet ist, dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass

    eine Einlageschicht (160) über der adhäsiven Schicht (130) und innerhalb des Mantels (140) angeordnet ist, wobei die Einlageschicht (160) nach dem Entfernen des Mantels (140) intakt bleibt, und wobei sich die Einlageschicht (160) anschließend von der adhäsiven Schicht (130) abtrennen lässt, um die adhäsive Schicht (130) zum Ankleben an einer Fläche vorzubereiten.


     
    2. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach Anspruch 1, wobei die adhäsive Schicht (130) ein druckempfindliches Adhäsionsmittel, ein wärmeaktiviertes Adhäsionsmittel, ein feuchtigkeitshärtendes Adhäsionsmittel, ein strahlungshärtendes Adhäsionsmittel und/oder ein luftgehärtetes Adhäsionsmittel umfasst.
     
    3. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach Anspruch 1, wobei die adhäsive beschichtete Faser an einer Wand oder einer anderen permanenten oder halbpermanenten Struktur angeklebt wird, und wobei die Anordnung (100, 200, 700) darüber hinaus ein Mittel umfasst, um die nicht angeklebten Abschnitte der adhäsiven Schicht (130) von Klebrigkeit frei zu machen, wenn der Mantel (140) entfernt ist, wobei das Mittel, um von Klebrigkeit frei zu machen, ausgewählt sind aus:

    i. einer dünnen partikelförmigen Schicht, die auf der adhäsiven Schicht (130) angebracht wird und diese bedeckt,

    ii. einer Dünnschicht, die auf der adhäsiven Schicht (130) angebracht wird und diese bedeckt,

    iii. einer Beschichtung, die auf die adhäsive Schicht (130) aufgetragen wird und diese bedeckt,

    iv. einen in der adhäsiven Schicht (130) aufgelösten flüchtigen Klebrigmacher, der verdunstet und die adhäsive Schicht (130) von Klebrigkeit frei macht, oder

    v. eine Aushärtungsreaktion auf Grundlage von Licht, Wärme, Feuchtigkeit oder Luft, die bewirkt, dass die adhäsive Schicht (130) langsam an Klebrigkeit verliert.


     
    4. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach Anspruch 1, wobei ein ummantelter Abschnitt der Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) außerhalb eines Wohnhauses (302) verlegt wird, und ein abgemantelter Abschnitt (304) der Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) an einer Fläche des Inneren eines Wohnhauses (302) angeklebt wird.
     
    5. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei der entfernbare Mantel (140) aus mindestens einem Polymermaterial gebildet ist, das aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Polyethylen, Polypropylen, Polyvinylchlorid, TPE, Neopren, Polyurethan und Fluorpolymer besteht.
     
    6. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, darüber hinaus eine Pufferbeschichtung (120) umfassend, die zwischen der optischen Faser (110) und der adhäsiven Schicht (130) angeordnet ist.
     
    7. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, darüber hinaus zwei Festigkeitsteile (150) umfassend, die in dem entfernbaren Mantel (140) auf entgegengesetzten Seiten der optischen Faser (110) angeordnet sind.
     
    8. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei der entfernbare Mantel (140) von Hand abgezogen werden kann.
     
    9. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, darüber hinaus eine Zugschnur (780) umfassend, die in dem Mantel (140) angeordnet ist und allgemein parallel zur optischen Faser (110) verläuft, wobei sich der Mantel (140) durch Ziehen an der Zugschnur (780) öffnen lässt.
     
    10. Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei der entfernbare Mantel (140) aus einem UV-stabilisierten Polymermaterial gebildet ist.
     
    11. Telekommunikationssystem, umfassend:

    einen Anschluss (312) außerhalb eines Wohnhauses (302);

    eine Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 10, die als eine ausgehend vom Anschluss (312) durchgehende Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) ausgelegt ist, wobei die Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) ummantelt und wetterfest gemacht ist und zu einem Eintrittspunkt (306) eines Wohnhauses (302) verlegt ist, durch den die Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) in das Innere des Wohnhauses (302) eintritt;

    wobei ein nicht ummantelter Abschnitt der Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) wird entlang einer Innenfläche (318) des Wohnhauses (302) zu einem Wandauslass (322) verlegt, wobei der nicht ummantelte Abschnitt in eine Bahn (1105) eingeführt wird, die an der Innenwand (318) des Wohnhauses (302) anhaftet und zum Wandauslass (322) verlegt wird, wobei die Bahn (1105) entlang der Länge der Bahn (1105) angeordnete Merkmale (1107) umfasst, die so wirken, dass sie einen Kanal (1109) zum Befestigen und Schützen des nicht ummantelten Abschnitts der Faserverbindungskabelanordnung (100, 200, 700) definieren.


     
    12. Telekommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 11, wobei die Merkmale (1107) intermittierend beabstandet und auf entgegengesetzten Seiten des Kanals (1109) angeordnet sind.
     
    13. Telekommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 12, wobei die Merkmale (1107) ständerartige Merkmale umfassen.
     
    14. Telekommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 13, wobei die ständerartigen Merkmale eine verbreiterte Kappe an der Oberseite der Merkmale (1107) umfassen, die beim Befestigen und Schützen des nicht ummantelten Faserverbindungskabels (1101) in dem Kanal (1109) hilft.
     
    15. Telekommunikationssystem nach Anspruch 11, wobei die Bahn (1105) und die Merkmale (1107) ein flexibles klares oder durchscheinendes Material umfassen.
     


    Revendications

    1. Ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700), comprenant :

    une fibre optique (110) ;

    une couche adhésive (130) qui entoure la fibre optique (110), la couche adhésive (130) étant apte à faire adhérer la fibre optique (110) à une paroi ou autre structure permanente ou semi-permanente ;

    une gaine (140) amovible positionnée autour de la couche adhésive (130) et de la fibre optique (110), caractérisé par

    une couche de garnissage (160) positionnée par-dessus la couche adhésive (130) et à l'intérieur de la gaine (140), sachant que la couche de garnissage (160) reste intacte après l'enlèvement de la gaine (140) et sachant que la couche de garnissage (160) peut être subséquemment séparée de la couche adhésive (130) pour préparer la couche adhésive (130) à adhérer à une surface.


     
    2. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de la revendication 1, sachant que la couche adhésive (130) comprend l'un d'un adhésif sensible à la pression, d'un adhésif activé à chaud, d'un adhésif à durcissement à l'humidité, d'un adhésif à durcissement par rayonnement, et d'un adhésif à durcissement à l'air.
     
    3. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de la revendication 1, sachant que la fibre revêtue d'adhésif est attachée par adhérence à un mur, ou à une autre structure permanente ou semi-permanente et, et sachant que l'ensemble (100, 200, 700) comprend en outre un moyen de sécher hors poisse les parties non attachées de la couche adhésive (130) lorsque la gaine (140) est enlevée, le moyen de séchage hors poisse étant choisi parmi :

    i. une mince couche de particules placée sur et recouvrant la couche adhésive (130),

    ii. un mince film placé sur et recouvrant la couche adhésive (130),

    iii. un revêtement appliqué à et recouvrant la couche adhésive (130),

    iv. un agent de séchage hors poisse volatile dissous dans la couche adhésive (130) qui s'évapore et sèche hors poisse la couche adhésive (130), ou

    v. une réaction de durcissement basée sur de la lumière, de la chaleur, de l'humidité ou de l'air qui fait en sorte que la couche adhésive (130) perde lentement sa pégosité.


     
    4. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de la revendication 1, sachant qu'une partie gainée de l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) est acheminée extérieurement à un logement (302), et une partie détachée (304) de l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) est attachée par adhérence à une surface de l'intérieur d'un logement (302).
     
    5. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de l'une des revendications précédentes, sachant que la gaine (140) amovible est composée d'au moins un matériau polymère sélectionné dans le groupe constitué par le polyéthylène, le polypropylène, le chlorure de polyvinyle, le TPE, le néoprène, le polyuréthane, et le fluoropolymère.
     
    6. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de l'une des revendications précédentes, comprenant en outre un revêtement tampon (120) positionné entre la fibre optique (110) et la couche adhésive (130).
     
    7. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de l'une des revendications précédentes, comprenant en outre deux éléments de renfort (150) positionnés à l'intérieur de la gaine (140) amovible de côtés opposés de la fibre optique (110) .
     
    8. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de l'une des revendications précédentes, sachant que la gaine (140) amovible est apte à être détachée à la main.
     
    9. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) de l'une des revendications précédentes, comprenant en outre un cordon à traction (780) qui est positionné à l'intérieur de la gaine (140) et est sensiblement parallèle à la fibre optique (110), sachant que la gaine (140) peut être ouverte en tirant sur le cordon à traction (780).
     
    10. L'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) selon l'une des revendications précédentes, sachant que la gaine (140) amovible est composée d'un matériau polymère stabilisé aux UV.
     
    11. Système de télécommunication, comprenant :

    une borne (312), extérieure à un logement (302) ;

    un ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) selon l'une des revendications 1 à 10, qui est configuré comme ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) continu acheminé depuis la borne (312), l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) étant gainé et est fait d'être résistant aux intemperies, et étant acheminé vers un point d'entrée (306) d'un logement (302) par lequel l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) passe pour entrer dans le logement (302) ;

    une partie non gainée de l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700) acheminée le long d'une surface intérieure (318) du logement (302) vers une sortie murale (322), la partie non gainée étant insérée dans une piste (1105) qui est attachée par adhérence à la paroi intérieure (318) du logement (302) et acheminée vers la sortie de paroi (322), la piste (1105) comprenant des éléments caractéristiques (1107) positionnés le long de la piste (1105) qui agissent pour définir un canal (1109) destiné à fixer et protéger la partie non gainée de l'ensemble câble de dérivation à fibre (100, 200, 700).


     
    12. Le système de télécommunication de la revendication 11, sachant que les éléments caractéristiques (1107) sont espacés par intermittence et positionnés de côtés opposés du canal (1109).
     
    13. Le système de télécommunication de la revendication 12, sachant que les éléments caractéristiques (1107) comprennent des éléments caractéristiques de type poteaux.
     
    14. Le système de télécommunication de la revendication 13, sachant que les éléments caractéristiques de type poteaux comprennent un capuchon élargi en haut des éléments caractéristiques (1107), lequel aide à fixer et protéger le câble de dérivation à fibre (1101) non gainé dans le canal (1109).
     
    15. Le système de télécommunication de la revendication 11, sachant que la piste (1105) et les éléments caractéristiques (1107) comprennent un matériau transparent ou translucide flexible.
     




    Drawing

































    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description