(19)
(11)EP 3 228 314 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
04.11.2020 Bulletin 2020/45

(21)Application number: 17166322.2

(22)Date of filing:  09.09.2011
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A61K 31/137(2006.01)
A61K 31/4422(2006.01)
A61P 31/04(2006.01)
A61K 31/4458(2006.01)
A61K 31/145(2006.01)

(54)

SULOCTIDIL FOR USE TO TREAT MICROBIAL INFECTIONS

SULOCTIDIL ZUR VERWENDUNG ZUR BEHANDLUNG VON MIKROBIELLEN INFEKTIONEN

LE SULOCTIDIL POUR UTILISATION DANS LE TRAITEMENT DES INFECTIONS MICROBIENNES


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 10.09.2010 GB 201015079

(43)Date of publication of application:
11.10.2017 Bulletin 2017/41

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
11758257.7 / 2613774

(73)Proprietor: Helperby Therapeutics Limited
London WC2A 3LH (GB)

(72)Inventors:
  • HU, Yanmin
    London, SW17 0RE (GB)
  • COATES, Anthony RM
    London, SW17 0RE (GB)

(74)Representative: D Young & Co LLP 
120 Holborn
London EC1N 2DY
London EC1N 2DY (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A2-2010/026602
US-A1- 2006 183 684
US-A- 5 698 549
  
  • ROBSON H G ET AL: "Experimental pneumoooccal and staphylococcal sepsis: effects of hydrocortisone and phenoxybenzamine upon mortality rates", JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGA, vol. 45, no. 9, 1 January 1966 (1966-01-01), pages 1421-1432, XP009155321, AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CLINICAL INVESTIGATION, US ISSN: 0021-9738, DOI: 10.1172/JCI105450
  • COHN R C ET AL: "VERAPAMIL-TOBRAMYCIN SYNERGY IN PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA BUT NOT PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN VITRO", CHEMOTHERAPY, S. KARGER AG, CH, vol. 41, no. 5, 1 September 1995 (1995-09-01), pages 330-333, XP000982639, ISSN: 0009-3157
  • IKECHUKWU OKOLI ET AL.: "Identification of antifungal compounds active against Candida albicans using an improved high-thoughput Ceanorhabditis elegans assay", PLOS ONE, vol. 4, no. 9, E7025, September 2009 (2009-09), pages 1-8, XP002773169,
  • DATABASE BIOSIS [Online] BIOSCIENCES INFORMATION SERVICE, PHILADELPHIA, PA, US; 1996, ABRAMOV Y ET AL: "Verapamil increases the bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of adriamycin on Escherichia coli", XP002773170, Database accession no. PREV199799420212
  • DATABASE BIOSIS [Online] BIOSCIENCES INFORMATION SERVICE, PHILADELPHIA, PA, US; December 1997 (1997-12), CEVIZ ADNAN ET AL: "Effects of nimodipine and ofloxacin on staphylococcal brain abscesses in rats", XP002773171, Database accession no. PREV199800122606
  • DATABASE MEDLINE [Online] US NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE (NLM), BETHESDA, MD, US; July 1975 (1975-07), HIRANO A ET AL: "[Proceedings: Effective use of phenoxybenzamine in a case of bacterial shock].", XP002773172, Database accession no. NLM1160064
  • DATABASE MEDLINE [Online] US NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE (NLM), BETHESDA, MD, US; 1988, BOSSON S ET AL: "Effects of a calcium antagonist (nifedipine) on cats in live E. coli bacteriemic shock.", XP002773173, Database accession no. NLM3227159
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description


[0001] This invention relates to the use of suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof for the treatment of bacterial infections. In particular, it relates to the treatment of bacterial infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci, and to the use of such compounds to kill multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent bacteria associated with such infections.

[0002] Before the introduction of antibiotics, patients suffering from acute microbial infections (e.g. tuberculosis or pneumonia) had a low chance of survival. For example, mortality from tuberculosis was around 50%. Although the introduction of antimicrobial agents in the 1940s and 1950s rapidly changed this picture, bacteria have responded by progressively gaining resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Now, every country in the world has antibioticresistant bacteria. Indeed, more than 70% of bacteria that give rise to hospital acquired infections in the USA resist at least one of the main antimicrobial agents that are typically used to fight infection (Nature Reviews, Drug Discovery 1, 895-910 (2002)).

[0003] One way of tackling the growing problem of resistant bacteria is the development of new classes of antimicrobial agents. However, until the introduction of linezolid in 2000, there had been no new class of antibiotic marketed for over 37 years. Moreover, even the development of new classes of antibiotic provides only a temporary solution, and indeed there are already reports of resistance of certain bacteria to linezolid (Lancet 357, 1179 (2001) and Lancet 358, 207-208 (2001)).

[0004] In order to develop more long-term solutions to the problem of bacterial resistance, it is clear that alternative approaches are required. One such alternative approach is to minimise, as much as is possible, the opportunities that bacteria are given for developing resistance to important antibiotics. Thus, strategies that can be adopted include limiting the use of antibiotics for the treatment of non-acute infections, as well as controlling which antibiotics are fed to animals in order to promote growth.

[0005] However, in order to tackle the problem more effectively, it is necessary to gain an understanding of the actual mechanisms by which bacteria generate resistance to antibiotic agents. To do this requires first a consideration of how current antibiotic agents work to kill bacteria.

[0006] Antimicrobial agents target essential components of bacterial metabolism. For example, the β-lactams (e.g. penicillins and cephalosporins) inhibit cell wall synthesis, whereas other agents inhibit a diverse range of targets, such as DNA gyrase (quinolones) and protein synthesis (e.g. macrolides, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and oxazolidinones). The range of organisms against which the antimicrobial agents are effective varies, depending upon which organisms are heavily reliant upon the metabolic step(s) that is/are inhibited. Further, the effect upon bacteria can vary from a mere inhibition of growth (i.e. a bacteriostatic effect, as seen with agents such as the tetracyclines) to full killing (i.e. a bactericidal effect, as seen, e.g. with penicillin).

[0007] Bacteria have been growing on Earth for more than 3 billion years and, in that time, have needed to respond to vast numbers of environmental stresses. It is therefore perhaps not surprising that bacteria have developed a seemingly inexhaustible variety of mechanisms by which they can respond to the metabolic stresses imposed upon them by antibiotic agents. Indeed, mechanisms by which the bacteria can generate resistance include strategies as diverse as inactivation of the drug, modification of the site of action, modification of the permeability of the cell wall, overproduction of the target enzyme and bypass of the inhibited steps. Nevertheless, the rate of resistance emerges to a particular agent has been observed to vary widely, depending upon factors such as the agent's mechanism of action, whether the agent's mode of killing is time- or concentration-dependent, the potency against the population of bacteria and the magnitude and duration of the available serum concentration.

[0008] It has been proposed (Science 264, 388-393 (1994)) that agents that target single enzymes (e.g. rifampicin) are the most prone to the development of resistance. Further, the longer that suboptimal levels of antimicrobial agent are in contact with the bacteria, the more likely the emergence of resistance.

[0009] Moreover, it is now known that many microbial infections include sub-populations of bacteria that are phenotypically resistant to antimicrobials (J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 4, 395-404 (1988); J. Med. Microbiol. 38, 197-202 (1993); J. Bacteriol. 182, 1794-1801 (2000); ibid. 182, 6358-6365 (2000); ibid. 183, 6746-6751 (2001); FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 202, 59-65 (2001); and Trends in Microbiology 13, 34-40 (2005)). There appear to be several types of such phenotypically resistant bacteria, including persisters, stationary-phase bacteria, as well as those in the depths of biofilms. However, each of these types is characterised by its low rate of growth compared to log-phase bacteria under the same conditions. Nutritional starvation and high cell densities are also common characteristics of such bacteria.

[0010] Although resistant to antimicrobial agents in their slow-growing state, phenotypically resistant bacteria differ from those that are genotypically resistant in that they regain their susceptibility to antimicrobials when they return to a fast-growing state (e.g. when nutrients become more readily available to them).

[0011] The presence of phenotypically resistant bacteria in an infection leads to the need for prolonged courses of antimicrobial agents, comprising multiple doses. This is because the resistant, slowly multiplying bacteria provide a pool of "latent" organisms that can convert to a fast-growing state when the conditions allow (thereby effectively re-initiating the infection). Multiple doses over time deal with this issue by gradually killing off the "latent" bacteria that convert to "active" form.

[0012] However, dealing with "latent" bacteria by administering prolonged courses of antimicrobials poses its own problems. That is, prolonged exposure of bacteria to suboptimal concentrations of antimicrobial agent can lead to the emergence of genotypically resistant bacteria, which can then multiply rapidly in the presence of even high concentrations of the antimicrobial.

[0013] Long courses of antimicrobials are more likely to encourage the emergence of genotypic resistance than shorter courses on the grounds that non-multiplying bacterial will tend to survive and, interestingly, probably have an enhanced ability to mutate to resistance (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 11736-11740 (1995); J. Bacteriol. 179, 6688-6691 (1997); and Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44, 1771-1777 (2000)).

[0014] In the light of the above, a new approach to combating the problem of bacterial resistance might be to select and develop antimicrobial agents on the basis of their ability to kill "latent" microorganisms. The production of such agents would allow, amongst other things, for the shortening of chemotherapy regimes in the treatment of microbial infections, thus reducing the frequency with which genotypical resistance arises in microorganisms.

[0015] International Patent Application, Publication Number WO2000028074 describes a method of screening compounds to determine their ability to kill clinically latent microorganisms. Using this method, the Applicant has observed that many conventional antimicrobial agents, such as augmentin, azithromycin, levofloxacin, linezolid and mupirocin, which otherwise exhibit excellent biological activity against log phase (i.e. multiplying) bacteria, exhibit little or no activity against clinically latent microorganisms. This observation has necessitated the development of novel antimicrobials which may be used to kill clinically latent microorganisms.

[0016] International Patent Application, Publication Numbers WO2007054693, WO2008117079 and WO2008142384 describe compounds which exhibit biological activity against clinically latent microorganisms. Examples of such compounds include 4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline, 4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline, N-[4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methylquinolin-6-yl]benzamide and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof.

[0017] US2006183684 A1 discloses compositions and methods for treating a disease or condition related to angiogenesis with a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor and one or more anti-hypertensive agent(s). The method is useful for preventing the development of hypertension and/or reducing hypertension in a subject treated with a VEGF inhibitor. WO2010026602 discloses calcium channel blockers for the treatment of drug sensitive and drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans and animals. US 5698549(A) discloses a method of treating hyperactive voiding associated with excessive nerve growth factor production and nerve growth in patients by administering a Ca++ channel blocker. The Ca++ channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem can be administered systemically to treat hyperactive voiding, such as is associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia and interstitial cystitis.

[0018] Robson H G et al., Journal of Clinical Investiga, American Society for Clinical Investigation, vol.45, no.9, 1 January 1966, pages 1421-1432, studies the experimental pneumococcal and staphyloccal sepsis effects of hydrocortisone and phenoxybenzamine upon mortality rates. Cohn R C et al., Chemotherapy, S.Karger AG, CH, vol.41, no.5, 1 September 1995, pages 330-333, discusses verapamil-tobramycin synergy. Ikechukwu Okoli et al., PLOS ONE, vol. 4, no. 9, September 2009 (2009-09), page e7025 identifies anti-fungal compounds active against Candida albicans using an improved high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans assay.

[0019] Abramov Y et al., Accession No. PREV199799420212 from the Biosciences Information Service database (1996), discloses how verapamil increases the bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of Adriamycin on Escherichia coli. Ceviz Adnan et al., Accession No. PREV199800122606 from the Biosciences Information Service database (1997), discloses the effects of nimodipine and ofloxacin on staphylococcal brain abscesses in rats.

[0020] Hirano A et al., Accession No. NLM1160064 from the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), Bethesda MD, US, July 1975, discloses the effective use of phenoxybenzamine in a case of bacterial shock. Bosson S et al., Accession No. NLM3227159 from the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), Bethesda MD, US, 1988, discloses the effects of a calcium antagonist (nifedipine) on cats in live E.coli bacteriemic shock.

[0021] The present invention is based upon the unexpected finding that certain classes of known biologically active compounds have been found to exhibit bactericidal activity against a variety of microorganisms.

[0022] Thus, in one embodiment the present invention provides suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection, wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci.

[0023] There is also provided a pharmaceutical composition comprising suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, and a pharmaceutically acceptable adjuvant, diluent or carrier, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection, wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci.

[0024] The aforementioned biologically active compounds are used to treat the bacterial infections. In particular they may be used to kill multiplying (log phase), non-multiplying (stationary phase) and/or clinically latent (persistent) bacteria associated with the infections. References herein to the treatment of a bacterial infection therefore include killing multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent bacteria associated with such infections. In a preferred embodiment, the aforementioned compounds are used to kill non-multiplying and/or clinically latent bacteria associated with an Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci infection, most preferably non-multiplying bacteria.

[0025] As used herein, "kill" means a loss of viability as assessed by a lack of metabolic activity.

[0026] As used herein, "clinically latent microorganism" means a microorganism that is metabolically active but has a growth rate that is below the threshold of infectious disease expression. The threshold of infectious disease expression refers to the growth rate threshold below which symptoms of infectious disease in a host are absent.

[0027] The metabolic activity of clinically latent microorganisms can be determined by several methods known to those skilled in the art; for example, by measuring mRNA levels in the microorganisms or by determining their rate of uridine uptake. In this respect, clinically latent microorganisms, when compared to microorganisms under logarithmic growth conditions (in vitro or in vivo), possess reduced but still significant levels of:
  1. (I) mRNA (e.g. from 0.0001 to 50%, such as from 1 to 30, 5 to 25 or 10 to 20%, of the level of mRNA); and/or
  2. (II) uridine (e.g. [3H]uridine) uptake (e.g. from 0.0005 to 50%, such as from 1 to 40, 15 to 35 or 20 to 30% of the level of [3H]uridine uptake).


[0028] Clinically latent microorganisms typically possess a number of identifiable characteristics. For example, they may be viable but non-culturable; i.e. they cannot typically be detected by standard culture techniques, but are detectable and quantifiable by techniques such as broth dilution counting, microscopy, or molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction. In addition, clinically latent microorganisms are phenotypically tolerant, and as such are sensitive (in log phase) to the biostatic effects of conventional antimicrobial agents (i.e. microorganisms for which the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of a conventional antimicrobial is substantially unchanged); but possess drastically decreased susceptibility to drug-induced killing (e.g. microorganisms for which, with any given conventional antimicrobial agent, the ratio of minimum microbiocidal concentration (e.g. minimum bactericidal concentration, MBC) to MIC is 10 or more).

[0029] As used herein, the term "microorganisms" means fungi and bacteria. References herein to "microbial", "antimicrobial" and "antimicrobially" shall be interpreted accordingly. For example, the term "microbial' means fungal or bacterial, and "microbial infection" means any fungal or bacterial infection.

[0030] As used herein, the term "bacteria" (and derivatives thereof, such as "microbial infection") includes, but is not limited to, references to organisms (or infections due to organisms) of the following classes and specific types:

Staphylococci (e.g. Staph. aureus, Staph. epidermidis, Staph. saprophyticus, Staph. auricularis, Staph. capitis capitis, Staph. c. ureolyticus, Staph. caprae, Staph. cohnii cohnii, Staph. c. urealyticus, Staph. equorum, Staph. gallinarum, Staph. haemolyticus, Staph. hominis hominis, Staph. h. novobiosepticius, Staph. hyicus, Staph. intermedius, Staph. lugdunensis, Staph. pasteuri, Staph. saccharolyticus, Staph. schleiferi schleiferi, Staph. s. coagulans, Staph. sciuri, Staph. simulans, Staph. warneri and Staph. xylosus);
and

Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli, Enterobacter (e.g. Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter agglomerans and Enterobacter cloacae), Citrobacter (such as Citrob. freundii and Citrob. divernis), Hafnia (e.g. Hafnia alvei), Erwinia (e.g. Erwinia persicinus), Morganella morganii, Salmonella (Salmonella enterica and Salmonella typhi), Shigella (e.g. Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella boydii and Shigella sonnei), Klebsiella (e.g. Klebs. pneumoniae, Klebs. oxytoca, Klebs. ornitholytica, Klebs. planticola, Klebs. ozaenae, Klebs. terrigena, Klebs. granulomatis (Calymmatobacterium granulomatis) and Klebs. rhinoscleromatis), Proteus (e.g. Pr. mirabilis, Pr. rettgeri and Pr. vulgaris), Providencia (e.g. Providencia alcalifaciens, Providencia rettgeri and Providencia stuartii), Serratia (e.g. Serratia marcescens and Serratia liquifaciens), and Yersinia (e.g. Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis).



[0031] Preferably the bacteria to be treated are selected from the group consisting of: Staphylococci, such as Staph. aureus (either Methicillin-sensitive (i.e. MSSA) or Methicillin-resistant (i.e. MRSA)) and Staph. epidermidis; and
Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella (e.g. Klebs. pneumoniae and Klebs. oxytoca) and Proteus (e.g. Pr. mirabilis, Pr. rettgeri and Pr. vulgaris).

[0032] More preferably, the bacteria to be treated are selected from the group consisting of Staphylococcus aureus; either MSSA or MRSA, and Escherichia coli.

[0033] The biologically active compounds for use in the present invention are commercially available and/or may be prepared using conventional methods known in the art.

[0034] In one embodiment of the invention, there is provided the use of suloctidil, for the treatment of a bacterial infection, wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci; preferably for killing multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent microorganisms associated with the infection.

[0035] In an alternative embodiment of the invention, there is provided the use of suloctidil for the treatment of an infection caused by S. Aureus, including MSSA and/or MRSA; in particular for killing stationary phase S. Aureus.

[0036] In another embodiment of the invention, there is provided the use of suloctidil for the treatment of an infection caused by Escherichia coli; in particular, for killing log phase and/or stationary phase E. coli..

[0037] The above-mentioned biologically active compound has surprisingly been found to possess bactericidal activity and may therefore be used to treat a wide variety of conditions. Particular conditions which may be treated using such classes of compounds according to the present invention include abscesses, bacilliary dysentry, bacterial conjunctivitis, bacterial keratitis, bone and joint infections, burn wounds, cellulitis, cholangitis, cholecystitis, cutaneous diphtheria, cystitis, diseases of the upper respiratory tract, eczema, empymea, endocarditis, enteric fever, enteritis, epididymitis, epiglottitis, eye infections, furuncles, gastrointestinal infections (gastroenteritis), genital infections, gingivitis, infected burns, infections following dental operations, infections in the oral region, infections associated with prostheses, intraabdominal abscesses, liver abscesses, mastitis, mastoiditis, meningitis and infections of the nervous system, osteomyelitis, otitis (e.g. otitis externa and otitis media), orchitis, pancreatitis, paronychia, pelveoperitonitis, peritonitis, peritonitis with appendicitis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, postoperative wound infections, prostatitis, pyelonephritis, pyoderma (e.g. impetigo), salmonellosis, salpingitis, septic arthritis, septic infections, septicameia, sinusitis, skin infections (e.g. skin granulomas, impetigo, folliculitis and furunculosis), systemic infections, tonsillitis, toxic shock syndrome, typhoid, urethritis, wound infections, or intertrigo; or infections with MSSA, MRSA, Staph. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebs. pneumoniae, or Klebs. oxytoca.

[0038] It will be appreciated that references herein to "treatment" extend to prophylaxis as well as the treatment of established diseases or symptoms.

[0039] The above-mentioned known biologically active compound may be used alone or in combination for the treatment of bacterial infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci. It may also be used in combination with known antimicrobial compounds.

[0040] In one embodiment of the invention there is provided a combination comprising suloctidil, or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, and an antimicrobial compound, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection, wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci. Preferably said combination is used for killing multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent microorganisms associated with the bacterial infection.

[0041] Suitable antimicrobial compounds for use in combination in accordance with the present invention include one or more compounds selected from the following:
  1. (1) β-Lactams, including:
    1. (i) penicillins, such as
      1. (I) benzylpenicillin, procaine benzylpenicillin, phenoxy-methylpenicillin, methicillin, propicillin, epicillin, cyclacillin, hetacillin, 6-aminopenicillanic acid, penicillic acid, penicillanic acid sulphone (sulbactam), penicillin G, penicillin V, phenethicillin, phenoxymethylpenicillinic acid, azlocillin, carbenicillin, cloxacillin, D-(-)-penicillamine, dicloxacillin, nafcillin and oxacillin,
      2. (II) penicillinase-resistant penicillins (e.g. flucloxacillin),
      3. (III) broad-spectrum penicillins (e.g. ampicillin, amoxicillin, metampicillin and bacampicillin),
      4. (IV) antipseudomonal penicillins (e.g. carboxypenicillins such as ticarcillin or ureidopenicillins such as piperacillin),
      5. (V) mecillinams (e.g. pivmecillinam), or
      6. (VI) combinations of any two or more of the agents mentioned at (I) to (V) above, or combinations of any of the agents mentioned at (I) to (V) above with a β-lactamase inhibitor such as tazobactam or, particularly, clavulanic acid (which acid is optionally in metal salt form, e.g. in salt form with an alkali metal such as sodium or, particularly, potassium);
    2. (ii) cephalosporins, such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefalexin (cephalexin), cefcapene, cefcapene pivoxil, cefdinir, cefditoren, cefditoren pivoxil, cefixime, cefotaxime, cefpirome, cefpodoxime, cefpodoxime proxetil, cefprozil, cefradine, ceftazidime, cefteram, cefteram pivoxil, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, cefuroxime axetil, cephaloridine, cephacetrile, cephamandole, cephaloglycine, ceftobiprole, PPI-0903 (TAK-599), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid, 7-aminodes-acetoxycephalosporanic acid, cefamandole, cefazolin, cefmetazole, cefoperazone, cefsulodin, cephalosporin C zinc salt, cephalothin, cephapirin; and
    3. (iii) other β-lactams, such as monobactams (e.g. aztreonam), carbapenems (e.g. imipenem (optionally in combination with a renal enzyme inhibitor such as cilastatin), meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem (S-4661) and RO4908463 (CS-023)), penems (e.g. faropenem) and 1-oxa-β-lactams (e.g. moxalactam).
  2. (2) Tetracyclines, such as tetracycline, demeclocycline, doxycycline, lymecycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, meclocycline and methacycline, as well as glycylcyclines (e.g. tigecycline).
  3. (3) Aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin, neomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, amastatin, butirosin, butirosin A, daunorubicin, dibekacin, dihydrostreptomycin, G 418, hygromycin B, kanamycin B, kanamycin, kirromycin, paromomycin, ribostamycin, sisomicin, spectinomycin, streptozocin and thiostrepton.
  4. (4)
    1. (i) Macrolides, such as azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, amphotericins B (e.g. amphotericin B), bafilomycins (e.g. bafilomycin A1), brefeldins (e.g. brefeldin A), concanamycins (e.g. concanamycin A), filipin complex, josamycin, mepartricin, midecamycin, nonactin, nystatin, oleandomycin, oligomycins (e.g. oligomycin A, oligomycin B and oligomycin C), pimaricin, rifampicin, rifamycin, rosamicin, tylosin, virginiamycin and fosfomycin.
    2. (ii) Ketolides such as telithromycin and cethromycin (ABT-773).
    3. (iii) Lincosamines, such as lincomycin.
  5. (5) Clindamycin and clindamycin 2-phosphate.
  6. (6) Phenicols, such as chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol.
  7. (7) Steroids, such as fusidic acid (optionally in metal salt form, e.g. in salt form with an alkali metal such as sodium).
  8. (8) Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin, bleomycin, phleomycin, ristomycin, telavancin, dalbavancin and oritavancin.
  9. (9) Oxazolidinones, such as linezolid and AZD2563.
  10. (10) Streptogramins, such as quinupristin and dalfopristin, or a combination thereof.
  11. (11)
    1. (i) Peptides, such as polymyxins (e.g. polymyxin E (colistin) and polymyxin B), lysostaphin, duramycin, actinomycins (e.g. actinomycin C and actinomycin D), actinonin, 7-aminoactinomycin D, antimycin A, antipain, bacitracin, cyclosporin A, echinomycin, gramicidins (e.g. gramicidin A and gramicidin C), myxothiazol, nisin, paracelsin, valinomycin and viomycin.
    2. (ii) Lipopeptides, such as daptomycin.
    3. (iii) Lipoglycopeptides, such as ramoplanin.
  12. (12) Sulfonamides, such as sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfathiazole (which latter two agents are optionally in metal salt form, e.g. in salt form with an alkali metal such as sodium), succinylsulfathiazole, sulfadimethoxine, sulfaguanidine, sulfamethazine, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfanilamide and sulfasalazine.
  13. (13) Trimethoprim, optionally in combination with a sulfonamide, such as sulfamethoxazole (e.g. the combination co-trimoxazole).
  14. (14) Antituberculous drugs, such as isoniazid, rifampicin, rifabutin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, streptomycin, amikacin, capreomycin, kanamycin, quinolones (e.g. those at (q) below), para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine and ethionamide.
  15. (15) Antileprotic drugs, such as dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine.
  16. (16)
    1. (i) Nitroimidazoles, such as metronidazole and tinidazole.
    2. (ii) Nitrofurans, such as nitrofurantoin.
  17. (17) Quinolones, such as nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, garenoxacin, DX-619, WCK 771 (the arginine salt of S-(-)-nadifloxacin), 8-quinolinol, cinoxacin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, lomefloxacin, oxolinic acid and pipemidic acid.
  18. (18) Amino acid derivatives, such as azaserine, bestatin, D-cycloserine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and L-alanyl-L-1-aminoethyl-phosphonic acid.
  19. (19) Aureolic acids, such as chromomycin A3, mithramycin A and mitomycin C C.
  20. (20) Benzochinoides, such as herbimycin A.
  21. (21) Coumarin-glycosides, such as novobiocin.
  22. (22) Diphenyl ether derivatives, such as irgasan.
  23. (23) Epipolythiodixopiperazines, such as gliotoxin from Gliocladium fimbriatum.
  24. (24) Fatty acid derivatives, such as cerulenin.
  25. (25) Glucosamines, such as 1-deoxymannojirimycin, 1-deoxynojirimycin and N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin.
  26. (26) Indole derivatives, such as staurosporine.
  27. (27) Diaminopyrimidines, such as iclaprim (AR-100).
  28. (28) Macrolactams, such as ascomycin.
  29. (29) Taxoids, such as paclitaxel.
  30. (30) Statins, such as mevastatin.
  31. (31) Polyphenolic acids, such as (+)-usnic acid.
  32. (32) Polyethers, such as lasalocid A, lonomycin A, monensin, nigericin and salinomycin.
  33. (33) Picolinic acid derivatives, such as fusaric acid.
  34. (34) Peptidyl nucleosides, such as blasticidine S, nikkomycin, nourseothricin and puromycin.
  35. (35) Nucleosides, such as adenine 9-β-D-arabinofuranoside, 5-azacytidine, cordycepin, formycin A, tubercidin and tunicamycin.
  36. (36) Pleuromutilins, such as GSK-565154, GSK-275833 and tiamulin.
  37. (37) Peptide deformylase inhibitors, such as LBM415 (NVP PDF-713) and BB 83698.
  38. (38) Antibacterial agents for the skin, such as fucidin, benzamycin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, silver sulfadiazine, chlortetracycline, metronidazole, mupirocin, framycitin, gramicidin, neomycin sulfate, polymyxins (e.g. polymixin B) and gentamycin.
  39. (39) Miscellaneous agents, such as methenamine (hexamine), doxorubicin, piericidin A, stigmatellin, actidione, anisomycin, apramycin, coumermycin A1, L(+)-lactic acid, cytochalasins (e.g. cytochalasin B and cytochalasin D), emetine and ionomycin.
  40. (40) Antiseptic agents, such as chlorhexidine, phenol derivatives (e.g. thymol and triclosan), quarternary ammonium compounds (e.g. benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, benzethonium chloride, cetrimonium bromide, cetrimonium chloride and cetrimonium stearate), octenidine dihydrochloride, and terpenes (e.g. terpinen-4-ol).


[0042] Preferred antimicrobial compounds for use in combination in accordance with the present invention are those capable of killing clinically latent microorganisms. Methods for determining activity against clinically latent bacteria include a determination, under conditions known to those skilled in the art (such as those described in Nature Reviews, Drug Discovery 1, 895-910 (2002), of Minimum Stationary-cidal Concentration ("MSC") or Minimum Dormicidal Concentration ("MDC") for a test compound. A suitable compound screening method against clinically latent microorganisms is described in WO2000028074.

[0043] Examples of compounds capable of killing clinically latent microorganisms include those compounds disclosed in International Patent Application, Publication Numbers WO2007054693, WO2008117079 and WO2008142384. These applications describe suitable methods for the preparation of such compounds and doses for their administration.

[0044] Preferred examples of antimicrobial agents for use in combination in accordance with the present invention include a compound selected from the group consisting of:

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-(3-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-(2-phenoxyethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

1-cyclopropyl-6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

{2-[4-(8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinolin-1-yl)-phenyoxy]ethyl}dimethyl amine;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-[4-(pyridin-3-yloxy)phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-benzyl-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline

1-(indan-2-yl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline

4-methyl-6-phenoxy-1-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-benzyl-4-methyl-6-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(indan-2-yl)-4-methyl-6-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinolin-6-ol;

1-(1-benzyl-piperidin-4-yl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(indan-1-yl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-ethoxy-4-methyl-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(2-methylphenyl)methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(4-iso-propylphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(1-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(3-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-methoxy-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-trifluoromethoxy-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-[4-(pyridin-3-yloxy)phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-benzyl-6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-8-trifluoromethoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(indan-1-yl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-[(6-phenoxy)pyridin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-[(6-methoxy)pyridin-3-yl]-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-1-(3-methylbutyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

1-cyclopropylmethyl-6,8-dimethoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-(morpholin-4-yl)-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4,6-dimethyl-1-(2-methylphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4,6-dimethyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-(piperidin-1-yl)-1-[4-(piperidin-1-yl)phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-(piperidin-1-yl)-1-(3-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-{4-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]phenyl}-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-[4-(4-fluorophenoxy)phenyl]-8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)-8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-cyclohexyl-8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-[4-(3-pyridyl)phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-[2-(3-pyridyl)ethyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(2-pyridylmethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(5-methylpyrazin-2-ylmethyl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-chloro-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-8-carboxylate;

4-methyl-8-(morpholin-1-yl)-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

ethyl [4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-8-yl]acetate;

1-[3-(4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinolin-1-yl)propyl]-pyrrolidin-2-one;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

ethyl3-(8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-1-yl)propionate;

ethyl4-(4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-1-yl)butanoate;

methyl 4-(4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-1-yl)butanoate;

ethyl (4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-1-yl)acetate;

4-methyl-1-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(1-benzylpyrrolidin-3-yl)-8-methoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

methyl 3-(4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline-1-yl)propionate;

1-((S)-indan-1-yl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

1-((R)-indan-1-yl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

1-(3-methoxypropyl)-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(tetrahydrofuran-2-ylmethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-4-methyl-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(2-phenylpropyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-cyano-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-hydroxy-4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

8-phenoxy-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methylpyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

8-methoxy-4-methyl-1-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3-fluorophenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenylamino-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline;

[4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-c]quinoline-8-oyl]-piperidine;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-iso-propylphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6-methoxy-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6-methoxy-1-(4-iso-propylphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

6,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

4-methyl-8-phenoxy-1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

1-(4-iso-propylphenyl)-6-phenoxy-4-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline; and

4,6-dimethyl-1-(4-methylphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline;

or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof.

[0045] Further preferred examples of antimicrobial agents for use in combination in accordance with the present invention include a compound selected from the group consisting of:

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6-hydroxy-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6-chloro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6-cyano-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6-benzyloxy-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(5,6-dichloro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(7-chloro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine hydrochloride;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6,8-dichloro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)amine;

[6-(4-fluorophenoxy)-2-methylquinolin-4-yl]-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)amine;

(2-methyl-6-phenylaminoquinolin-4-yl)-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)amine;

(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(benzoxazol-2-yl)-(2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinolin-4-yl)amine;

(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(6-chloro-2-methylquinazolin-4-yl)amine;

[2-methyl-6-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)quinolin-4-yl]-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)amine;

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-[2-methyl-6-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-quinolin-4-yl]amine; and

(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-(2-morpholin-4-yl-6-phenoxyquinolin-4-yl)amine;

or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof.

[0046] Still further preferred examples of antimicrobial agents for use in combination in accordance with the present invention include a compound selected from the group consisting of:

6-chloro-2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline;

6-benzyloxy-2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline;

2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-6-(pyridin-3-ylmethoxy)quinoline;

6-(4-methanesulfonylbenzyloxy)-2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline;

6-(4-methoxybenzyloxy)-2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline

2-methyl-6-phenethyloxy-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline;

2-methyl-6-(5-methylisoxazol-3-ylmethoxy)-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline;

4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline;

4-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline;

4-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline;

[1-(2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinolin-4-yl)-pyrrolidin-3-yl]phenylamine;

N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]benzamide;

N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-quinolin-6-yl]-2-phenylacetamide;

4-chloro-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]benzamide;

4-methoxy-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]benzamide;

2-methyl-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]benzamide;

pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

furan-2-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]nicotinamide;

3-methyl-3H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

5-methyl-1 H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-quinolin-6-yl]amide;

pyridazine-4-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-quinolin-6-yl]amide;

2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]acetamide;

2-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]acetamide;

3,5-dimethyl-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

2-(3-methyl-isoxazol-5-yl)-N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenyl-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-quinolin-6-yl]-acetamide;

N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]benzenesulfonamide;

benzyl-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amine;

(R- or S-)Benzyl-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amine;

(S- or R-)Benzyl-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amine;

(4-methoxybenzyl)-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amine;

4-{[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-ylamino]methyl}benzonitrile;

1-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]pyrrolidin-2-one;

N-[2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]-3-phenyl propionamide;

5-methyl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-quinolin-6-yl]amide;

pyridine-2-carboxylic acid [2-methyl-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolin-6-yl]amide;

N-[4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methylquinolin-6-yl]benzamide; and

2-methyl-6-phenoxy-4-(3-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl)quinoline; or

or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof.

[0047] Particularly preferred antimicrobial agents for use combination in accordance with the present invention are 4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline (Example 9, WO2007054693), 4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline (Example 8, WO2008142384), and N-[4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methylquinolin-6-yl]benzamide (Example 38, WO2008142384), and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof. In one embodiment of the invention the antimicrobial agent is 4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methyl-6-phenoxyquinoline,N-[4-(3-benzylpyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-methylquinolin-6-yl]benzamide or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof. A more preferred antimicrobial agent is 4-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-8-phenoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]-quinoline or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof such as the hydrochloride salt thereof.

[0048] When used in combination, compounds may be administered simultaneously, separately or sequentially. When administration is simultaneous, the compounds may be administered either in the same or a different pharmaceutical composition. Adjunctive therapy, i.e. where one agent is used as a primary treatment and the other agent is used to assist that primary treatment, is also an embodiment of the present invention.

[0049] As used herein the term "pharmaceutically acceptable derivative" means:
  1. (a) pharmaceutically acceptable salts with either acids or bases (e.g. acid addition salts); and/or
  2. (b) solvates (including hydrates).


[0050] Acid addition salts that may be mentioned include carboxylate salts (e.g. formate, acetate, trifluoroacetate, propionate, isobutyrate, heptanoate, decanoate, caprate, caprylate, stearate, acrylate, caproate, propiolate, ascorbate, citrate, glucuronate, glutamate, glycolate, α-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, tartrate, phenylacetate, mandelate, phenylpropionate, phenylbutyrate, benzoate, chlorobenzoate, methylbenzoate, hydroxybenzoate, methoxybenzoate, dinitrobenzoate, o-acetoxybenzoate, salicylate, nicotinate, isonicotinate, cinnamate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, suberate, sebacate, fumarate, malate, maleate, hydroxymaleate, hippurate, phthalate or terephthalate salts), halide salts (e.g. chloride, bromide or iodide salts), sulfonate salts (e.g. benzenesulfonate, methyl-, bromo- or chlorobenzenesulfonate, xylenesulfonate, methanesulfonate, ethanesulfonate, propanesulfonate, hydroxyethanesulfonate, 1- or 2- naphthalene-sulfonate or 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonate salts) or sulfate, pyrosulfate, bisulfate, sulfite, bisulfite, phosphate, monohydrogenphosphate, dihydrogenphosphate, metaphosphate, pyrophosphate or nitrate salts, and the like.

[0051] Compounds for use according to the invention may be administered as the raw material but the active ingredients are preferably provided in the form of pharmaceutical compositions.

[0052] The active ingredients may be used either as separate formulations or as a single combined formulation. When combined in the same formulation it will be appreciated that the two compounds must be stable and compatible with each other and the other components of the formulation.

[0053] Formulations of the invention include those suitable for oral, parenteral (including subcutaneous e.g. by injection or by depot tablet, intradermal, intrathecal, intramuscular e.g. by depot and intravenous), rectal and topical (including dermal, buccal and sublingual) or in a form suitable for administration by inhalation or insufflation administration. The most suitable route of administration may depend upon the condition and disorder of the patient.

[0054] Preferably, the compositions of the invention are formulated for oral or topical administration.

[0055] The formulations may conveniently be presented in unit dosage form and may be prepared by any of the methods well known in the art of pharmacy e.g. as described in "Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy", Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 21st Edition, (2005). Suitable methods include the step of bringing into association to active ingredients with a carrier which constitutes one or more excipients. In general, formulations are prepared by uniformly and intimately bringing into association the active ingredients with liquid carriers or finely divided solid carriers or both and then, if necessary, shaping the product into the desired formulation. It will be appreciated that when the two active ingredients are administered independently, each may be administered by a different means.

[0056] When formulated with excipients, the active ingredients may be present in a concentration from 0.1 to 99.5% (such as from 0.5 to 95%) by weight of the total mixture; conveniently from 30 to 95% for tablets and capsules and 0.01 to 50% (such as from 3 to 50%) for liquid preparations.

[0057] Formulations suitable for oral administration may be presented as discrete units such as capsules, cachets or tablets (e.g. chewable tablets in particular for paediatric administration), each containing a predetermined amount of active ingredient; as powder or granules; as a solution or suspension in an aqueous liquid or non-aqueous liquid; or as an oil-in-water liquid emulsion or water-in-oil liquid emulsion. The active ingredients may also be presented a bolus, electuary or paste.

[0058] A tablet may be made by compression or moulding, optionally with one or more excipients. Compressed tablets may be prepared by compressing in a suitable machine the active ingredient in a free-flowing form such as a powder or granules, optionally mixed with other conventional excipients such as binding agents (e.g. syrup, acacia, gelatin, sorbitol, tragacanth, mucilage of starch, polyvinylpyrrolidone and/or hydroxymethyl cellulose), fillers (e.g. lactose, sugar, microcrystalline cellulose, maize-starch, calcium phosphate and/or sorbitol), lubricants (e.g. magnesium stearate, stearic acid, talc, polyethylene glycol and/or silica), disintegrants (e.g. potato starch, croscarmellose sodium and/or sodium starch glycolate) and wetting agents (e.g. sodium lauryl sulphate). Moulded tablets may be made by moulding in a suitable machine a mixture of the powdered active ingredient with an inert liquid diluent. The tablets may be optionally coated or scored and may be formulated so as to provide controlled release (e.g. delayed, sustained, or pulsed release, or a combination of immediate release and controlled release) of the active ingredients.

[0059] Alternatively, the active ingredients may be incorporated into oral liquid preparations such as aqueous or oily suspensions, solutions, emulsions, syrups or elixirs. Formulations containing the active ingredients may also be presented as a dry product for constitution with water or another suitable vehicle before use. Such liquid preparations may contain conventional additives such as suspending agents (e.g. sorbitol syrup, methyl cellulose, glucose/sugar syrup, gelatin, hydroxymethyl cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, aluminium stearate gel and/or hydrogenated edible fats), emulsifying agents (e.g. lecithin, sorbitan mono-oleate and/or acacia), non-aqueous vehicles (e.g. edible oils, such as almond oil, fractionated coconut oil, oily esters, propylene glycol and/or ethyl alcohol), and preservatives (e.g. methyl or propyl p-hydroxybenzoates and/or sorbic acid).

[0060] Topical compositions, which are useful for treating disorders of the skin or of membranes accessible by digitation (such as membrane of the mouth, vagina, cervix, anus and rectum), include creams, ointments, lotions, sprays, gels and sterile aqueous solutions or suspensions. As such, topical compositions include those in which the active ingredients are dissolved or dispersed in a dermatological vehicle known in the art (e.g. aqueous or non-aqueous gels, ointments, water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions). Constituents of such vehicles may comprise water, aqueous buffer solutions, non-aqueous solvents (such as ethanol, isopropanol, benzyl alcohol, 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol, propylene glycol, propylene glycol monolaurate, glycofurol or glycerol), oils (e.g. a mineral oil such as a liquid paraffin, natural or synthetic triglycerides such as Miglyol™, or silicone oils such as dimethicone). Depending, inter alia, upon the nature of the formulation as well as its intended use and site of application, the dermatological vehicle employed may contain one or more components selected from the following list: a solubilising agent or solvent (e.g. a β-cyclodextrin, such as hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, or an alcohol or polyol such as ethanol, propylene glycol or glycerol); a thickening agent (e.g. hydroxymethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose or carbomer); a gelling agent (e.g. a polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene copolymer); a preservative (e.g. benzyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, chlorbutol, a benzoate, potassium sorbate or EDTA or salt thereof); and pH buffering agent(s) (e.g. a mixture of dihydrogen phosphate and hydrogen phosphate salts, or a mixture of citric acid and a hydrogen phosphate salt). Topical formulations may also be formulated as a transdermal patch.

[0061] Methods of producing topical pharmaceutical compositions such as creams, ointments, lotions, sprays and sterile aqueous solutions or suspensions are well known in the art. Suitable methods of preparing topical pharmaceutical compositions are described, e.g. in WO9510999, US 6974585, WO2006048747, as well as in documents cited in any of these references.

[0062] Topical pharmaceutical compositions according to the present invention may be used to treat a variety of skin or membrane disorders, such as infections of the skin or membranes (e.g. infections of nasal membranes, axilla, groin, perineum, rectum, dermatitic skin, skin ulcers, and sites of insertion of medical equipment such as i.v. needles, catheters and tracheostomy or feeding tubes) with any of the bacteria described above, (e.g. any of the Staphylococci organisms mentioned hereinbefore, such as S. aureus (e.g. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA))).

[0063] Particular bacterial conditions that may be treated by topical pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention also include the skin- and membrane-related conditions disclosed hereinbefore, as well as: ecthyma; ecthyma gangrenosum; impetigo; paronychia; cellulitis; folliculitis (including hot tub folliculitis); furunculosis; carbunculosis; staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome; surgical scarlet fever; pyoderma; external canal ear infections; necrotizing fasciitis; lymphadenitis; as well as infected eczma, burns, abrasions and skin wounds.

[0064] Compositions for use according to the invention may be presented in a pack or dispenser device which may contain one or more unit dosage forms containing the active ingredients. The pack may, e.g. comprise metal or plastic foil, such as a blister pack. Where the compositions are intended for administration as two separate compositions these may be presented in the form of a twin pack.

[0065] Pharmaceutical compositions may also be prescribed to the patient in "patient packs" containing the whole course of treatment in a single package, usually a blister pack. Patient packs have an advantage over traditional prescriptions, where a pharmacist divides a patients' supply of a pharmaceutical from a bulk supply, in that the patient always has access to the package insert contained in the patient pack, normally missing in traditional prescriptions. The inclusion of the package insert has been shown to improve patient compliance with the physician's instructions.

[0066] The administration of the combination of the invention by means of a single patient pack, or patients packs of each composition, including a package insert directing the patient to the correct use of the invention is a desirable feature of this invention.

[0067] The amount of active ingredients required for use in treatment will vary with the nature of the condition being treated and the age and condition of the patient, and will ultimately be at the discretion of the attendant physician or veterinarian. In general however, doses employed for adult human treatment will typically be in the range of 0.02 to 5000 mg per day, preferably 1 to 1500 mg per day. The desired dose may conveniently be presented in a single dose or as divided doses administered at appropriate intervals, e.g. as two, three, four or more sub-doses per day.

Biological Tests



[0068] Test procedures that may be employed to determine the biological (e.g. bactericidal or antimicrobial) activity of the active ingredients include those known to persons skilled in the art for determining:
  1. (a) bactericidal activity against clinically latent bacteria; and
  2. (b) antimicrobial activity against log phase bacteria.


[0069] In relation to (a) above, methods for determining activity against clinically latent bacteria include a determination, under conditions known to those skilled in the art (such as those described in Nature Reviews, Drug Discovery 1, 895-910 (2002)), of Minimum Stationary-cidal Concentration ("MSC") or Minimum Dormicidal Concentration ("MDC") for a test compound.

[0070] By way of example, WO2000028074 describes a suitable method of screening compounds to determine their ability to kill clinically latent microorganisms. A typical method may include the following steps:
  1. (1) growing a bacterial culture to stationary phase;
  2. (2) treating the stationary phase culture with one or more antimicrobial agents at a concentration and or time sufficient to kill growing bacteria, thereby selecting a phenotypically resistant sub-population;
  3. (3) incubating a sample of the phenotypically resistant subpopulation with one or more test compounds or agents; and
  4. (4) assessing any antimicrobial effects against the phenotypically resistant subpopulation.


[0071] According to this method, the phenotypically resistant sub-population may be seen as representative of clinically latent bacteria which remain metabolically active in vivo and which can result in relapse or onset of disease.

[0072] In relation to (b) above, methods for determining activity against log phase bacteria include a determination, under standard conditions (i.e. conditions known to those skilled in the art, such as those described in WO 2005014585), of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration ("MIC") or Minimum Bactericidal Concentration ("MBC") for a test compound. Specific examples of such methods are described below.

Methods


Bacterial strains



[0073] Staphylococcus aureus (Oxford strain); Gram positive; Reference strain.

[0074] Escherichia coli K12; Gram negative; Reference strain.

[0075] Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 6751; Gram negative; Reference strain.

Growth of bacteria



[0076] Bacteria were grown in 10 ml of nutrient broth (No. 2 (Oxoid)) overnight at 37°C, with continuous shaking at 120 rpm. The overnight cultures were diluted (1000 X) in 100 ml of growth medium and then incubated without shaking for 10 days. Viability of the bacteria was estimated by colony forming unit (CFU) counts at 2 hour intervals at the first 24 hours and at 12-24 hours afterwards. From serial 10-fold dilutions of the experimental cultures, 100 µl samples were added to triplicate plates of nutrient agar plates (Oxoid) and blood agar plates (Oxoid). Colony forming units (CFU) were counted after incubation of the plates at 37°C for 24 hours.

Log phase cultures



[0077] The above-described overnight cultures were diluted (1000 X) with iso-sensitest broth. The cultures were then incubated at 37°C with shaking for 1-2 hours to reach log CFU 6, which served as log phase cultures.

Stationary phase cultures



[0078] Cultures incubated for more than 24 hours are in the stationary phase. For drug screening, 5-6 day old stationary phase cultures were used.

Measurements of bactericidal activity against log phase cultures



[0079] The bactericidal activity of the drugs against log phase cultures were determined by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drugs, which is defined as the lowest concentration which inhibits visible growth. Different concentrations of each test compound were incubated with the log-phase cultures in 96 well plates for 24 hours. Bactericidal activity was then examined by taking a spectrophotometer reading (using a plate reader) at 405 nm.

Measurements of bactericidal activity against stationary phase cultures



[0080] Different concentrations of each test compound were incubated with stationary phase cultures (5-6 day cultures) in 96 well plates for 24 or 48 hours. Bactericidal activity was then determined by taking CFU counts of the resulting cultures, as described above.

Measurements of bactericidal activity against persistent (clinically latent) bacteria



[0081] An antibiotic (gentamicin) was added to 5-6 day stationary-phase cultures to the final concentration of 50 to 100 µg/ml for 24 hours. After 24 hours of antibiotic treatment, the cells are washed 3 times with phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and then resuspended in PBS. The surviving bacterial cells are used as persisters. Viability is estimated by CFU counts. The persisters were then used in measurements of bactericidal activity for test compounds.

[0082] Different concentrations of each test compound were incubated with the (persister) cell suspension in 96 well plates for various periods of time (24 and 48 hours). Bactericidal activity was then determined by taking CFU counts of the resulting cultures, as described above.

Examples


Example 1: Bactericidal activities of compounds against stationary phase S. aureus



[0083] The results obtained are summarised in Table 1 below.
Table 1
CompoundLog Kill µg/ml
2512.56.25
Pyrvinium pamoate 6.03 6.03 6.03
Pararosaniline pamoate 6.15 6.15 6.15
Bithionate sodium 6.15 6.15 0.01
Phenylmercuric acetate 6.03 6.03 6.03
Tioconazole 6.15 6.15 0.00
Mefloquine 6.03 6.03 -0.01
Mitomycin C 6.15 6.15 6.15
Toremifene citrate 6.15 6.15 6.15
Sanguinarine sulfate 6.15 6.15 6.15
Carboplatin 6.03 6.03 0.92
Cisplatin 6.03 6.03 6.03
Hydroquinone 6.15 6.15 6.15
Thioridazine hydrochloride 6.03 6.03 6.03
Trifluoperazine hydrochloride 6.03 2.22 0.00
Triflupromazine hydrochloride 6.15 6.15 6.15
Chlorprothixene hydrochloride 6.15 6.15 1.83
Perhexiline maleate 6.15 6.15 6.15
Suloctidil 6.03 6.03 6.03
Nisoldipine 6.15 6.15 0.00

Conclusions



[0084] All compounds exhibited significant bactericidal activities against stationary phase S. aureus. There were 6 log of bacteria incubated with the compounds. Complete kill was observed at 25, 2.5 µg/ml, and in some cases at 6.25 ug/ml.

Example 2: Bactericidal activities of compounds against log phase and stationary phase E. coli



[0085] The results obtained are summarised in Tables 2 and 3 below.
Table 2
CompoundLog kill µg/ml
  25.00 12.50 6.25
Quinacrine hydrochloride 6.14 2.14 1.27
Pararosaniline pamoate 6.14 6.14 1.90
Phenylmercuric acetate 6.14 6.14 6.14
Acrisorcin 6.14 6.14 6.14
Mefloquine 6.14 6.14 2.48
Mitomycin C 6.14 6.14 2.27
Mitoxanthrone hydrochloride 6.14 6.14 6.14
Bleomycin 6.14 6.14 2.22
Doxorubicin 6.14 6.14 6.14
Sanquinarine sulfate 6.14 2.40 -0.10
Carboplatin 6.14 6.14 6.14
Cisplatin 6.14 6.14 6.14
Hydroquinone 6.14 6.14 6.14
Thioridazine hydrochloride 6.14 6.14 6.14
Trifluoperazine hydrochloride 6.14 6.14 -0.12
Triflupromazine hydrochloride 6.14 6.14 2.10
Table 3
CompoundE. coli MIC µg/ml
Quinacrine hydrochloride -
Pararosaniline pamoate 10
Bithionate sodium 5
Phenylmercuric acetate 0.15
Acrisorcin -
Mefloquine 10
Mitomycin C 0.3
Mitoxanthrone hydrochloride -
Bleomycin 0.15
Doxorubicin -
Sanquinarine sulfate -
Carboplatin -
Cisplatin -
Hydroquinone -
Thioridazine hydrochloride 10
Trifluoperazine hydrochloride 20
Triflupromazine hydrochloride 10
Chlorprothixene hydrochloride 20
Perhexiline maleate 10
Suloctidil 10
Nisoldipine -
Vitamin B12 -
Key: - signifies MIC higher than 50 µg/ml

Conclusions



[0086] All compounds exhibited significant bactericidal activities against stationary phase E. coli. There were 6 log of bacteria incubated with the compounds. Complete kill was observed at 25, 12.5 µg/ml, and and in some cases 6.25 ug/ml.

[0087] Certain compounds were also were active against log phase E. coli showing MIC between 0.15 to 20 µg/ml.

Example 3: Bactericidal activity of suloctidil and mefloquine against stationary phase P. aeruginosa (outside scope of invention)



[0088] The results obtained are summarised in Figure 1.

Conclusions



[0089] Mefloquine was active against stationary phase P. aeruginosa. At 80 µg/ml, mefloquine removed more than 107 of the orgamism. There was about 1.5 log reduction of the bacterium at 40 µg/ml. Suloctidil displayed no observable activity against stationary phase

[0090] P. aeruginosa.

Example 4: Bactericidal activities of compounds against persistent E. coli



[0091] The results obtained are summarised in Table 4 below.
Table 4
CompoundsLog Kill µg/ml
2512.56.25
Bithionate sodium 6.21 0.03 0.01
Bleomycin 6.21 6.21 1.55
Carboplatin 6.21 2.55 1.55
Chlorprothixene hydrochloride 6.21 0.03 0.02
Cisplatin 6.21 6.21 6.21
Vitamin B12 6.21 6.21 0.03
Mefloquine 6.21 0.03 0.02
Mitomycin C 6.21 6.21 6.21
Mitoxanthrone hydrochloride 6.21 6.21 6.21
Pararosaniline pamoate 6.21 0.01 -0.01
Perhexiline maleate 6.21 0.04 -0.01
Phenylmercuric acetate 6.21 6.21 6.21
Sanguinarine sulfate 6.21 1.47 0.04
Suloctidil 6.21 0.02 0.02
Thioridazine hydrochloride 6.21 0.03 0.04
Triflupromazine hydrochloride 6.21 2.34 0.03

Conclusions



[0092] All compounds exhibited significant bactericidal activities against persistent E. coli selected by treatment with getamicin. There were 6 log of bacteria incubated with the compounds. Complete kill was observed at 25 µg/ml and in some cases at 12.5 and 6.25 µg/ml.

Example 5: In vitro activity of of phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride (HT00800157) with polymyxin E against log phase E. coli by checkerboard analysis (outside scope of invention)



[0093] The results obtained are summarised in Table 5 below.


Conclusions



[0094] 
  1. 1. MIC for phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride alone was >64 µg/ml.
  2. 2. In combination with polymyxin E at 0.06 µg/ml, MIC for phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride was 64 µg/ml.
  3. 3. In combination with polymyxin E at 0.25 µg/ml, the MIC for phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride was reduced to 1 µg/ml.



Claims

1. Suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection, wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci.
 
2. Suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof for use according to claim 1 wherein the use is for killing multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent microorganisms associated with the bacterial infection.
 
3. Suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof for use according to claims 1 or 2 wherein the infection is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli.
 
4. Suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof for use according to claim 3 wherein the infection is caused by Staphylococcus aureus.
 
5. A pharmaceutical composition comprising suloctidil, or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, and a pharmaceutically acceptable adjuvant, diluent or carrier, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci.
 
6. A pharmaceutical composition for use according to claim 5, wherein the infection is caused by Staphylococcus aureus.
 
7. A pharmaceutical composition for use according to claim 5, wherein the infection is caused by Escherichia coli.
 
8. A combination comprising suloctidil or a pharmaceutically acceptable derivative thereof, and an antimicrobial compound, for use in the treatment of a bacterial infection wherein the infection is caused by Enterobacteriaceae or Staphylococci.
 
9. A combination for use according to claim 8 wherein the use is for killing multiplying, non-multiplying and/or clinically latent microorganisms associated with the bacterial infection.
 
10. A combination for use according to claim 8, wherein the infection is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli.
 


Ansprüche

1. Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon zur Verwendung bei der Behandlung einer Bakterieninfektion, wobei die Infektion durch Enterobakterien oder Staphylokokken verursacht wird.
 
2. Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Verwendung zum Abtöten von sich vermehrenden, sich nichtvermehrenden und/oder klinisch latenten mit der Bakterieninfektion assoziierten Mikroorganismen ist.
 
3. Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, wobei die Infektion durch Staphylococcus aureus oder Escherichia coli verursacht wird.
 
4. Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 3, wobei die Infektion durch Staphylococcus aureus verursacht wird.
 
5. Pharmazeutische Zusammensetzung, umfassend Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon und ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Adjuvans, ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Verdünnungsmittel oder einen pharmazeutisch unbedenklichen Träger, zur Verwendung bei der Behandlung einer Bakterieninfektion, wobei die Infektion durch Enterobakterien oder Staphylokokken verursacht wird.
 
6. Pharmazeutische Zusammensetzung zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 5, wobei die Infektion durch Staphylococcus aureus verursacht wird.
 
7. Pharmazeutische Zusammensetzung zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 5, wobei die Infektion durch Escherichia coli verursacht wird.
 
8. Kombination, umfassend Suloctidil oder ein pharmazeutisch unbedenkliches Derivat davon und eine antimikrobielle Verbindung, zur Verwendung bei der Behandlung einer Bakterieninfektion, wobei die Infektion durch Enterobakterien oder Staphylokokken verursacht wird.
 
9. Kombination zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 8, wobei die Verwendung zum Abtöten von sich vermehrenden, sich nichtvermehrenden und/oder klinisch latenten mit der Bakterieninfektion assoziierten Mikroorganismen ist.
 
10. Kombination zur Verwendung nach Anspruch 8, wobei die Infektion durch Staphylococcus aureus oder Escherichia coli verursacht wird.
 


Revendications

1. Suloctidil ou dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant, pour une utilisation dans le traitement d'une infection bactérienne, l'infection étant causée par des Enterobacteriaceae ou des Staphylococci.
 
2. Suloctidil ou dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant pour une utilisation selon la revendication 1, l'utilisation étant pour la destruction de micro-organismes se multipliant, ne se multipliant pas et/ou cliniquement latents associés à l'infection bactérienne.
 
3. Suloctidil ou dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant pour une utilisation selon la revendication 1 ou 2, l'infection étant causée par Staphylococcus aureus ou par Escherichia coli.
 
4. Suloctidil ou dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant pour une utilisation selon la revendication 3, l'infection étant causée par Staphylococcus aureus.
 
5. Composition pharmaceutique comprenant du suloctidil, ou un dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant, et un adjuvant, un diluant ou un support pharmaceutiquement acceptable, pour une utilisation dans le traitement d'une infection bactérienne, l'infection étant causée par des Enterobacteriaceae ou des Staphylococci.
 
6. Composition pharmaceutique pour une utilisation selon la revendication 5, l'infection étant causée par Staphylococcus aureus.
 
7. Composition pharmaceutique pour une utilisation selon la revendication 5, l'infection étant causée par Escherichia coli.
 
8. Combinaison comprenant du suloctidil ou un dérivé pharmaceutiquement acceptable correspondant, et un composé antimicrobien, pour une utilisation dans le traitement d'une infection bactérienne, l'infection étant causée par des Enterobacteriaceae ou des Staphylococci.
 
9. Combinaison pour une utilisation selon la revendication 8, l'utilisation étant pour la destruction de micro-organismes se multipliant, ne se multipliant pas et/ou cliniquement latents associés à l'infection bactérienne.
 
10. Combinaison pour une utilisation selon la revendication 8, l'infection étant causée par Staphylococcus aureus ou par Escherichia coli.
 




Drawing








Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description




Non-patent literature cited in the description