(19)
(11)EP 3 246 425 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
04.12.2019 Bulletin 2019/49

(21)Application number: 15877740.9

(22)Date of filing:  28.08.2015
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
C22C 38/00(2006.01)
C21D 9/46(2006.01)
C22C 38/02(2006.01)
C22C 38/06(2006.01)
C22C 38/14(2006.01)
C22C 38/26(2006.01)
C22C 38/38(2006.01)
C22C 38/50(2006.01)
B21B 3/00(2006.01)
C22C 38/60(2006.01)
C22C 38/04(2006.01)
C22C 38/12(2006.01)
C22C 38/18(2006.01)
C22C 38/32(2006.01)
C22C 38/40(2006.01)
C22C 38/58(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/JP2015/004381
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/113781 (21.07.2016 Gazette  2016/29)

(54)

HIGH-STRENGTH STEEL SHEET AND PRODUCTION METHOD THEREFOR

HOCHFESTES STAHLBLECH UND HERSTELLUNGSVERFAHREN DAFÜR

TÔLE D'ACIER À HAUTE RÉSISTANCE ET PROCÉDÉ DE PRODUCTION S'Y RAPPORTANT


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 16.01.2015 JP 2015006312

(43)Date of publication of application:
22.11.2017 Bulletin 2017/47

(73)Proprietor: JFE Steel Corporation
Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)

(72)Inventors:
  • KARIYA, Nobusuke
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)
  • ONO, Yoshihiko
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)
  • FUNAKAWA, Yoshimasa
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)
  • MORI, Kazuma
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)
  • SUGIHARA, Reiko
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)
  • KAWAMURA, Kenji
    Tokyo 100-0011 (JP)

(74)Representative: Grünecker Patent- und Rechtsanwälte PartG mbB 
Leopoldstraße 4
80802 München
80802 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
JP-A- 2010 275 628
JP-A- 2012 082 499
US-A1- 2011 030 857
US-A1- 2013 295 402
US-A1- 2014 342 184
JP-A- 2011 063 877
JP-A- 2014 508 854
US-A1- 2012 216 925
US-A1- 2014 290 810
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    Technical Field



    [0001] The present invention relates to a high-strength steel sheet having a tensile strength of 1180 MPa or more and excellent bending workability and a method for manufacturing the steel sheet. The high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention can suitably be used as a material for, for example, automobile parts.

    Background Art



    [0002] Nowadays, attempts have been made to reduce exhaust gases such as CO2 from the viewpoint of global environment conservation. In the automobile industry, consideration is given to taking measures to reduce the amount of exhaust gases by increasing fuel efficiency through the weight reduction of an automobile body.

    [0003] Examples of a method for reducing the weight of an automobile body include a method in which the thickness of a steel sheet which is used for an automobile is decreased by increasing the strength of the steel sheet. It is known that there is a problem with this method in that bending workability decreases with an increase in the strength of a steel sheet. Therefore, there is a demand for a steel sheet having a high strength and good bending workability at the same time.

    [0004] There is a tendency for a variation in the mechanical properties of a product to increase with an increase in the strength level of a high-strength steel sheet, and there is an increase in variation in bending workability within a product in the case where a variation in mechanical properties is large. It is important that a variation in bending workability within a product does not become large, and, for example, there is a demand for stability of bending workability throughout a product from the viewpoint of increasing the yield of parts in the case where a part is manufactured by performing form molding which involves many portions to be subjected to bending work. Here, the term "a product" refers to a high-strength steel sheet. Therefore, the term "a variation in mechanical properties within a product" refers to a case where, when bending workability is determined at various positions, there is a variation in the determined result. In addition, a variation in properties in the width direction of a steel sheet, which is a product, is regarded as a problem.

    [0005]  In response to such a demand, for example, Patent Literature 1 discloses a high-proportion-limit steel sheet excellent in terms of bending workability and a method for manufacturing the steel sheet. Specifically, Patent Literature 1 discloses a method in which a proportion limit and bending workability are increased at the same time by performing cold rolling on a steel sheet having a specified chemical composition and by then annealing the cold-rolled steel sheet in a specified range of the temperature which is equal to or lower than the recrystallization temperature in order to allow the rearrangement of dislocations to occur while inhibiting the excessive recovery. In Patent Literature 1, bending workability is evaluated by performing a 90-degree V-bending test. However, since no consideration is given to the position to be evaluated in Patent Literature 1, it can be said that the stability of bending workability is not improved by the method in Patent Literature 1. Moreover, in the case of the method according to Patent Literature 1, since long-time annealing in a batch annealing furnace is indispensable after cold rolling has been performed, there is a problem of a decrease in productivity in comparison with continuous annealing.

    [0006] Patent Literature 2 discloses a steel sheet excellent in terms of bending workability and drilling resistance. Specifically, Patent Literature 2 discloses a method in which bending workability is increased, for example, by rapidly cooling a steel sheet after rolling has been performed or after rolling followed by reheating has been performed in order to form a microstructure including mainly martensite or a mixed microstructure including martensite and lower bainite and by controlling the value of Mn/C to be constant over the full range of the C content disclosed. In patent Literature 2, bending workability is evaluated by using a press bending method. However, since no consideration is given to the position to be evaluated in Patent Literature 2, it can be said that stable bending workability is not increased by the method in Patent Literature 2. Moreover, in Patent Literature 2, although specification regarding Brinell hardness is defined, specification regarding tensile strength is not disclosed.

    [0007] Patent Literature 3 discloses a high-strength steel sheet excellent in terms of bendability and a method for manufacturing the steel sheet. Specifically, Patent Literature 3 discloses a method in which a steel sheet having good close-contact bending capability in all of the rolling direction, the width direction, and the 45-degree direction is manufactured by heating steel having a specified chemical composition, by then performing rough rolling, by performing hot finish rolling which is started at a temperature of 1050°C or lower and finished in a temperature range from the Ar3 transformation temperature to (the Ar3 transformation temperature + 100°C), by then cooling the hot-rolled steel sheet at a cooling rate of 20°C/s or less, by then coiling the cooled steel sheet at a temperature of 600°C or higher, by then performing pickling, by then performing cold rolling with a rolling reduction of 50% to 70%, by then performing annealing for 30 seconds to 90 seconds in the temperature range in which an (α + γ)-dual phase is formed, and by then cooling the annealed steel sheet to a temperature of 550°C at a cooling rate of 5°C/s or more. In Patent Literature 3, bending workability is evaluated by performing close-contact bending. However, since no consideration is given to the position to be evaluated in Patent Literature 3, it can be said that stability of bending workability is not improved by the method in Patent Literature 3. In addition, in Patent Literature 3, tensile property is evaluated by performing a tensile test and the steel sheet has a strength of less than 1180 MPa. Accordingly, it cannot be said that the steel sheet has a sufficient strength for a high-strength steel sheet to be used for an automobile.
    Patent Literature 4 describes a high strength cold rolled steel sheet with excellent deep drawability and material uniformity, and its manufacturing method. Its field of application is automotive.
    The method disclosed consists of hot rolling FTR between 800-980°C, it cools down and is coiled between 500-700°C, pickled and cold rolled. Subsequently, it is heated at a rate of 0.5-3°C/s, and annealed between 800-900°C for 15-200s.
    The average cooling rate should be above 5°C/s down to 400-450°C. This means that cooling down in between 5-8°C/s results in a residence time of 15-24s in the 740-620°C interval. As per description of the application it is not necessary that the holding temperatures be constant, as long as the temperatures are within the specified ranges. Afterwards, the steel sheet cools down to 200°C at a rate between 0.2-10°C/s, which means that if the steel cools down at a rate between 0.25-1°C/s the residence time between 400-200°C ranges between 200-800s.

    Citation List


    Patent Literature



    [0008] 

    PTL 1: Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2010-138444

    PTL 2: Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2007-231395

    PTL 3: Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2001-335890

    PTL 4: US 2014/0290810 A1


    Summary of Invention


    Technical Problem



    [0009] The present invention has been completed in view of the situation described above, and an object of the present invention is to provide a high-strength steel sheet having a tensile strength of 1180 MPa or more and excellent bending workability stably within a product and a method for manufacturing the steel sheet.

    Solution to Problem



    [0010] The present inventors, in order to solve the problems described above, diligently conducted investigations from the viewpoint of the chemical composition and microstructure (metallographic structure) of a steel sheet, and, as a result, found that, in order to solve the problems described above, it is very important to control a chemical composition to be within an appropriate range and to appropriately control a metallographic structure.

    [0011] In order to form a metallographic structure for achieving good bending workability, it is necessary to form a multi-phase microstructure including a martensite phase and/or a bainite phase as a main phase and a ferrite phase. It is possible to form such a multi-phase microstructure by cooling a steel sheet to a specified temperature after annealing has been performed. Here, since there is a decrease in the B (boron) content in the surface layer of a steel sheet due to an atmosphere during annealing or cooling to form the multi-phase microstructure described above, there is an increase in the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer due to a decrease in hardenability in the surface layer. Since the concentration of C occurs in austenite due to an increase in the area ratio of a ferrite phase, there is a case where a hard martensite phase and/or a hard bainite phase are formed in the surface layer. In the case where the microstructure of the surface layer is a multi-phase microstructure including ferrite in combination with a hard martensite phase and/or a hard bainite phase, since the difference in hardness between ferrite and a martensite phase or a bainite phase is large, it is not possible to stably achieve high bending workability within a product. Here, the term "a surface layer" (also referred to as "the surface layer of a steel sheet" or "a surface layer in the thickness direction") refers to a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction.

    [0012] In contrast, the present inventors found that, as described above, by specifying the chemical composition (in particular, the Sb content is important) and microstructure of a steel sheet, it is possible to obtain a steel sheet having good bending workability stably within a product despite having a tensile strength of 1180 MPa or more. That is, regarding a microstructure, satisfactory strength is achieved by specifying the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, and satisfactory bendability and ductility are achieved by appropriately controlling the area ratios of a ferrite phase and cementite. Moreover, it is made to be possible to achieve high bending workability stably within a product by appropriately controlling the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer.

    [0013] The present invention has been completed on the basis of the knowledge described above and is characterized by the features specified in the appended claims.

    [1] A high-strength steel sheet having
    a YR of 0.85 or less,
    a chemical composition containing, by mass%, C: 0.100% to 0.150%, Si: 0.30% to 0.70%, Mn: 2.20% to 2.80%, P: 0.025% or less, S: 0.0020% or less, Al: 0.020% to 0.060%, N: 0.0050% or less, Nb: 0.010% to 0.060%, Ti: 0.010% to 0.030%, B: 0.0005% to 0.0030%, Sb: 0.005% to 0.015%, Ca: 0.0015% or less, and optionally one or more of Cr: 0.30% or less, V: 0.10% or less, Mo: 0.20% or less, Cu: 0.10% or less, Ni: 0.10% or less, and REM: 0.0010% to 0.0050%, and the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities,
    a microstructure including, in terms of area ratio, 25% or less of a ferrite phase, 75% or more of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, and 5% or less of cementite,
    wherein, in a surface layer that is a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction, the area ratio of a ferrite phase is 5% to 20%,
    a tensile strength being 1180 MPa or more, which tensile strength being measured according JIS Z 2241 (2011),
    an excellent tensile strength-ductility balance represented by a product of tensile strength (TS) and ductility (El) measured according to JIS Z 2241 being 11500 MPa·% or more, and
    a bending workability in the width direction of the steel sheet being R/t = 3.0 or less, wherein R/t is the ratio of the limit bending radius to the thickness of the steel sheet, which bending workability is evaluated on the basis of a V-block method according to JIS Z.

    [2] A method for manufacturing a high-strength steel sheet, the method comprising:

    a hot rolling process in which finish rolling is performed on a steel material having the chemical composition according to item [1] at a temperature equal to or higher than the Ar3 transformation temperature and in which coiling is performed at a temperature of 600°C or lower;

    a pickling process in which pickling is performed on the hot-rolled steel sheet after the hot rolling process; and

    a continuous annealing process in which the steel sheet which has been pickled in the pickling process is heated to a temperature range of 570°C or higher at an average heating rate of 2°C/s or more, in which a holding time during which the steel sheet is held in a temperature range equal to or higher than the Ac3 transformation temperature is 60 seconds or more, in which the held steel sheet is then cooled to a temperature range of 620°C to 740°C at an average cooling rate of 0.1°C/s to 8°C/s, in which a holding time during which the cooled steel sheet is held in the temperature range is 10 seconds to 50 seconds, in which the held steel sheet is then cooled to a temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s, and in which a holding time during which the cooled steel sheet is held in a temperature range of 150°C or higher and 400°C or lower is 200 seconds to 800 seconds,

    wherein the Ar3 transformation temperature is defined by equation (1):

    and the Ac3 transformation temperature is defined by equation (2):

    where [M] denotes the content (mass%) of the chemical element M and t denotes the thickness (mm).

    [6] The method for manufacturing a high-strength steel sheet according to item [2], the method further comprising a cold rolling process in which cold rolling is performed on the pickled steel sheet after the pickling process and before the continuous annealing process.


    Advantageous Effects of Invention



    [0014] According to the present invention, it is possible to obtain a high-strength steel sheet having a tensile strength of 1180 MPa or more and excellent bending workability. The high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention is excellent in terms of bending workability stably within a product. Therefore, for example, in the case where the high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention is used for the structural members of an automobile, the steel sheet contributes to the weight reduction of an automobile body. Since there is an increase in the fuel efficiency of an automobile due to the weight reduction of an automobile body, and since there is an increase in the yield of parts, the utility value of the present invention is significantly large in the industry.

    Description of Embodiments



    [0015] Hereafter, the embodiments of the present invention will be specifically described. Here, the present invention is not limited to the embodiments below.

    <High-strength steel sheet>



    [0016] The chemical composition of the high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention has a chemical composition containing, by mass%, C: 0.100% to 0.150%, Si: 0.30% to 0.70%, Mn: 2.20% to 2.80%, P: 0.025% or less, S: 0.0020% or less, Al: 0.020% to 0.060%, N: 0.0050% or less, Nb: 0.010% to 0.060%, Ti: 0.010% to 0.030%, B: 0.0005% to 0.0030%, Sb: 0.005% to 0.015%, and Ca: 0.0015% or less.

    [0017] First, the above-mentioned chemical composition will be described. Here, in the present specification, "%" used when describing a chemical composition refers to "mass%".

    C: 0.100% to 0.150%



    [0018] C is a chemical element which is indispensable for achieving a desired strength. In order to produce such an effect, it is necessary that the C content be 0.100% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the C content is more than 0.150%, since there is a significant increase in strength, it is not possible to achieve a desired bending workability. Therefore, the C content is set to be in the range of 0.100% to 0.150%.

    Si: 0.30% to 0.70%



    [0019] Si is a chemical element which is effective for increasing the strength of steel without significantly decreasing the ductility of steel. In addition, Si is a chemical element which is important for controlling the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer. In order to produce the effects described above, it is necessary that the Si content be 0.30% or more. However, in the case where the Si content is more than 0.70%, since there is a significant increase in strength, it is not possible to achieve a desired bending workability. Therefore, the Si content is set to be 0.30% to 0.70%, or preferably 0.45% to 0.70%.

    Mn: 2.20% to 2.80%



    [0020] Mn is, like C, a chemical element which is indispensable for achieving a desired strength. In addition, Mn is a chemical element which is important for stabilizing an austenite phase in order to inhibit the formation of ferrite during cooling in a continuous annealing process. In order to produce the effects described above, it is necessary that the Mn content be 2.20% or more. However, in the case where the Mn content is more than 2.80%, since there is an excessive increase in the area ratio of a hard microstructure, there is a decrease in bending workability. Therefore, the Mn content is set to be 2.80% or less, preferably 2.40% to 2.80%, or more preferably 2.50% to 2.80%.

    P: 0.025% or less



    [0021] Since P is a chemical element which is effective for increasing the strength of steel, P may be added in accordance with the strength level of a steel sheet. In order to produce such an effect, it is preferable that the P content be 0.005% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the P content is more than 0.025%, there is a decrease in weldability. Therefore, the P content is set to be 0.025% or less. In addition, in the case where more excellent weldability is required, it is preferable that the P content be 0.020% or less.

    S: 0.0020% or less



    [0022] S forms non-metal inclusions such as MnS. A crack tends to occur at the interface between a non-metal inclusion and a metallographic structure in a bending test. Therefore, there is a decrease in bending workability in the case where S is contained. Therefore, since it is preferable that the S content be as small as possible, the S content is set to be 0.0020% or less in the present invention. In addition, in the case where more excellent bending workability is required, it is preferable that the S content be 0.0015% or less.

    Al: 0.020% to 0.060%



    [0023] Al is a chemical element which is added for the deoxidation of steel. In the present invention, it is necessary that the Al content be 0.020% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the Al content is more than 0.060%, there is a deterioration in surface quality. Therefore, the Al content is set to be in the range of 0.020% to 0.060%.

    N: 0.0050% or less



    [0024] In the case where N combines with B to form B nitrides, since there is a decrease in the amount of B, which increases hardenability during cooling in a continuous annealing process, there is an excessive increase in the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer, which results in a deterioration in bending workability. Therefore, in the present invention, it is preferable that the N content be as small as possible. Therefore, the N content is set to be 0.0050% or less, or preferably 0.0040% or less.

    Nb: 0.010% to 0.060%



    [0025] Nb is a chemical element which is effective for increasing the strength of steel and for refining microstructure of steel by forming carbonitrides in steel. In order to produce such effects, the Nb content is set to be 0.010% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the Nb content is more than 0.060%, since there is a significant increase in strength, it is not possible to achieve a desired bending workability. Therefore, the Nb content is set to be in the range of 0.010% to 0.060%, or preferably 0.020% to 0.050%.

    Ti: 0.010% to 0.030%



    [0026] Ti is, like Nb, a chemical element which is effective for increasing the strength of steel and for refining microstructure of steel by forming carbonitrides in steel. In addition, Ti inhibits the formation of B nitrides, which cause a decrease in hardenability. In order to produce such effects, the Ti content is set to be 0.010% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the Ti content is more than 0.030%, since there is a significant increase in strength, it is not possible to achieve a desired bending workability. Therefore, the Ti content is set to be in the range of 0.010% to 0.030%, or preferably 0.010% to 0.025%.

    B: 0.0005% to 0.0030%



    [0027] B is a chemical element which is important for inhibiting the formation of ferrite during cooling in a continuous annealing process by increasing the hardenability of steel. In addition, B is a chemical element which is effective for controlling the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer. In order to produce such effects, the B content is set to be 0.0005% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the B content is more than 0.0030%, such effects become saturated, and there is an increase in rolling load in hot rolling and cold rolling. Therefore, the B content is set to be in the range of 0.0005% to 0.0030%, or preferably 0.0005% to 0.0025%.

    Sb: 0.005% to 0.015%



    [0028] Sb is the most important chemical element in the present invention. That is, Sb inhibits a decrease in the content of B which exists in the surface layer of steel as a result of being concentrated in the surface layer of steel in the annealing process of continuous annealing.

    [0029] Therefore, it is possible to control the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer to be within a desired range through the use of Sb. In order to produce such effects, the Sb content is set to be 0.005% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the Sb content is more than 0.015%, such effects become saturated, and there is a decrease in toughness due to the grain-boundary segregation of Sb. Therefore, the Sb content is set to be in the range of 0.005% to 0.015%, or preferably 0.008% to 0.012%.

    Ca: 0.0015% or less



    [0030] Ca forms oxides which are elongated in the rolling direction. A crack tends to occur at the interface between an oxide and a metallographic structure in a bending test. Therefore, containing Ca decreases bending workability. Therefore, since it is preferable that the Ca content be as small as possible, the Ca content is set to be 0.0015% or less in the present invention. In addition, in the case where more excellent bending workability is required, it is preferable that the Ca content be 0.0007% or less, or more preferably 0.0003% or less.

    [0031] The chemical composition according to the present invention may further contain one or more elements selected from Cr, V, Mo, Cu, and Ni as optional constituent chemical elements in addition to the constituent chemical elements described above.

    [0032] Cr and V, which are able to increase the hardenability of steel, may be added in order to increase strength. Since Mo is a chemical element which is effective for increasing the hardenability of steel, Mo may be added in order to increase strength. Since Cu and Ni are chemical elements which contribute to an increase in strength, Cu and Ni may be added in order to increase strength of steel. The upper limits of the contents of these chemical elements respectively correspond to the contents with which the effects of the respective chemical elements become saturated. Therefore, in order to produce the effects described above by adding these chemical elements, the contents of these chemical elements are set to be as follows: Cr is 0.30% or less, V is 0.10% or less, Mo is 0.20% or less, Cu is 0.10% or less, and Ni is 0.10% or less, or preferably Cr is 0.04% to 0.30%, V is 0.04% to 0.10%, Mo is 0.04% to 0.20%, Cu is 0.05% to 0.10%, and Ni is 0.05% to 0.10%.

    [0033] In addition, the chemical composition according to the present invention may further contain REM as an optional constituent chemical element. REM, which is able to spheroidize sulfides, is added in order to increase bending workability. The lower limit of the REM content corresponds to the minimum content with which a desired effect is produced, and the upper limit of the REM content corresponds to the content with which the effect described above becomes saturated. Therefore, in order to produce the effect described above by adding REM, the REM content is set to be 0.0010% to 0.0050%.

    [0034] The remainder which is different from the constituent chemical elements and the optional constituent chemical elements described above is Fe and inevitable impurities.

    [0035] Hereafter, the reasons for the limitations on the microstructure of the high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention will be described. The high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention has a microstructure including, in terms of area ratio, 25% or less of a ferrite phase, 75% or more of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, and 5% or less of cementite. In addition, in a surface layer, the area ratio of a ferrite phase is 5% to 20%. These limitations will be described hereafter.

    Area ratio of ferrite phase: 25% or less



    [0036] In order to achieve good bendability and strength, it is necessary that the area ratio of a ferrite phase be 25% or less, or preferably 15% or less.

    Area ratio of bainite phase and/or martensite phase: 75% or more



    [0037] In order to achieve sufficient strength, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase is set to be 75% or more, or preferably in the range of 85% or more. In addition, the meaning of the term "bainite phase" in the present invention includes both so-called upper bainite, in which plate-type cementite is precipitated along the interface of lath-structured ferrite, and so-called lower bainite, in which cementite is finely dispersed inside lath-structured ferrite. Here, it is possible to easily identify a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, in the case where a bainite phase and a martensite phase are both included, the total area ratio is set to be 75% or more, or preferably 85% or more.

    Area ratio of cementite: 5% or less



    [0038] In order to achieve good bending workability, it is necessary that the area ratio of cementite be 5% or less. In the case where the area ratio of cementite is more than 5%, there is a deterioration in bending workability. In addition, the term "cementite" in the present invention refers to cementite which separately exists at grain boundaries without being included in any metallographic structure.

    [0039] Here, besides a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite, a retained austenite phase may be included in the microstructure. In this case, it is preferable that the area ratio of a retained austenite phase be 5% or less. Here, since it is preferable that the area ratio of other phases than a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite be 5% or less, it is preferable that the total area ratio of a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite be 95% or more.

    [0040] It is possible to determine the area ratio of each of a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite by polishing the cross section in the thickness direction parallel to the rolling direction of a steel sheet, by then etching the polished cross section by using a 3%-nital solution, by then observing 10 fields of view at a position located at 1/4 of the thickness (position at 1/4 of the thickness from the surface in the cross section described above) by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a magnification of 2000 times, and by then analyzing the observed images by using image analysis software "Image-Pro Plus ver. 4.0" manufactured by Media Cybernetics, Inc. The area ratios of a ferrite phase and cementite were respectively defined as the area, which had been determined by identifying these metallographic structures by performing a visual test on microstructure photographs taken by using a SEM and by performing image analysis on the photographs, divided by the areas of the analyzed fields of view. Since the remaining metallographic structures according to the present invention which are different from a ferrite phase, a retained austenite phase, and cementite are a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase is defined as the area ratio of the metallographic structures which are different from a ferrite phase, a retained austenite, and cementite. The meaning of the term "bainite" in the present invention includes both so-called upper bainite, in which plate-type cementite is precipitated along the interface of lath-structured ferrite, and so-called lower bainite, in which cementite is finely dispersed inside lath-structured ferrite. The area ratio of a retained austenite phase was determined by grinding the surface of a steel sheet in the thickness direction, by further performing chemical polishing on the ground surface in order to remove 0.1 mm in the thickness direction so that the position located at 1/4 of the thickness of the steel sheet from the surface of the steel sheet was exposed, by then determining the integrated intensities of the (200) plane, (220) plane, and (311) plane of fcc iron and the (200) plane, (211) plane, and (220) plane of bcc iron by using the Kα ray of Mo with an X-ray diffractometer, and by then deriving the amount of retained austenite from the determined values. The area ratio of each of the metallographic structures, that is, a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite was defined as the average value of the area ratios of each of the metallographic structures which had been respectively determined in the 10 fields of view.

    Ferrite phase in surface layer that is region within 50 µm from surface in thickness direction



    [0041] In the present invention, in a surface layer that is a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction, the area ratio of a ferrite phase is 5% to 20%.

    [0042] The state of a ferrite phase in a surface layer is an important criterion for determining the quality of the high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention. Specifically, a ferrite phase in a surface layer has a role in dispersing strain which is applied to a steel sheet by performing bending work. In order to achieve good bending workability by effectively dispersing strain, it is necessary that the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer be 5% or more. On the other hand, in the case where the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer is more than 20%, since there is an increase in the hardness of a second phase (a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase) due to C being excessively concentrated in the second phase, there is an increase in the difference in hardness between ferrite and the second phase, which results in a deterioration in bending workability. Therefore, the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer is set to be 20% or less. It is preferable that the above-described area ratio of a ferrite phase be 5% to 15%.

    [0043] The remainder which is different from a ferrite phase is the above-described second phase (a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase), and the area ratio of the second phase is 80% to 95%.

    [0044] It is possible to determine the above-mentioned area ratio of a ferrite phase by polishing the cross section in the thickness direction parallel to the rolling direction of a steel sheet, by then etching the polished cross section by using a 3%-nital solution, by then observing 10 fields of view in a region which is within 50 µm from the surface of the steel sheet in the thickness direction thereof and which is in the polished surface after etching by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a magnification of 2000 times, and by then analyzing the observed images by image analysis processing using image analysis software "Image-Pro Plus ver. 4.0" manufactured by Media Cybernetics, Inc. That is, it is possible to derive the area ratio of a ferrite phase in each of the observation fields of view by distinguishing a ferrite phase on the digital image through image analysis and by performing image processing. The area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer was derived by calculating the average value of the area ratios of these 10 fields of view.

    YR of steel according to present invention: 0.85 or less



    [0045] In the case where YR is excessively high, since strain is localized due to local plastic deformation, there may be a decrease in bendability. Therefore, it is desirable that YR be 0.85 or less. In addition, although there is no particular limitation on the lower limit of YR, it is preferable that the lower limit of YR be 0.72 or more in consideration of crashworthiness when used as an automobile member after having been subjected to press forming.

    <Method for manufacturing high-strength steel sheet>



    [0046] The method for manufacturing a high-strength steel sheet includes a hot rolling process, a pickling process, and a continuous annealing process. In addition, it is preferable that the manufacturing method according to the present invention include a cold rolling process between the pickling process and the continuous annealing process. Hereafter, each of the processes in the case where a cold rolling process is included will be described. In the following description, the term "temperature" refers to the surface temperature of, for example, a steel sheet. In addition, an average heating rate and an average cooling rate are calculated on the basis of a surface temperature. An average heating rate is expressed as ((heating end-point temperature - heating start temperature)/heating time). The temperature of a steel sheet after the pickling process, that is, the heating start temperature is equal to a room temperature. An average cooling rate is expressed as


    Hot rolling process



    [0047] The hot rolling process is a process in which a steel material having a chemical composition is subjected to finish rolling at a temperature equal to or higher than the Ar3 transformation temperature and in which the rolled steel sheet is coiled at a temperature of 600°C or lower. It is possible to manufacture the above-mentioned steel material by preparing molten steel having the chemical composition described above through the use of a refining method in which, for example, a converter is used and by casting the molten steel through the use of a casting method such as a continuous casting method.

    Finishing delivery temperature: equal to or higher than the Ar3 transformation temperature



    [0048] In the case where the finishing delivery temperature is lower than the Ar3 transformation temperature, a microstructure which is inhomogeneous in the thickness direction is formed due to, for example, an increase in the grain diameter of a ferrite phase in the surface layer of a steel sheet. In the case where such inhomogeneity occurs, it is not possible to control the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer to be 20% or less in the microstructure after the continuous annealing process. Therefore, the finishing delivery temperature is set to be equal to or higher than the Ar3 transformation temperature. Although there is no particular limitation on the upper limit of the finishing delivery temperature, since rolling at an excessively high temperature causes, for example, a scale flaw, it is preferable that the finishing delivery temperature be 1000°C or lower. Here, as the Ar3 transformation temperature, the value calculated by equation (1) below is used.

    Here, [M] denotes the content (mass%) of the chemical element M, and t denotes thickness (mm). In addition, correction terms may be added in accordance with some constituent chemical elements, and, for example, in the case where Cu, Cr, Ni, and Mo are contained, correction terms such as -20 × [Cu], -15 × [Cr], -55 × [Ni], and -80 × [Mo] may be respectively added to the right-hand side of equation (1).

    Coiling temperature: 600°C or lower



    [0049] In the case where the coiling temperature is higher than 600°C, since the metallographic structure of the steel sheet after the hot rolling process includes ferrite and pearlite, the microstructure of the steel sheet after the continuous annealing process or after the continuous annealing process following the cold rolling process includes, in terms of area ratio, more than 5% of cementite. In the case where the area ratio of cementite is more than 5%, there is a deterioration in bending workability. Therefore, the coiling temperature is set to be 600°C or lower. Here, it is preferable that the coiling temperature be 200°C or higher in order to prevent a deterioration in the shape of a hot-rolled steel sheet.

    Pickling process



    [0050] The pickling process is a process in which the hot-rolled steel sheet, which has been obtained in the hot rolling process, is subjected to pickling. The pickling process is performed in order to remove black scale which has been generated on the surface of a steel sheet. Here, there is no particular limitation on pickling conditions.

    Cold rolling process



    [0051] The cold rolling process is a process in which the pickled hot-rolled steel sheet is subjected to cold rolling. In the present invention, it is preferable that cold rolling process be performed after the pickling process and before the continuous annealing process. In the case where the rolling reduction of cold rolling is less than 40%, since the recrystallization of a ferrite phase is less likely to progress, a non-recrystallized ferrite phase is retained in a microstructure after the continuous annealing process, which may result in a decrease in bending workability. Therefore, it is preferable that the rolling reduction of cold rolling be 40% or more. In addition, in the case where the rolling reduction of cold rolling is excessively high, since there is an increase in load placed on rolling rolls, rolling troubles such as chattering and fracturing of a steel sheet may occur. Therefore, it is preferable that the rolling reduction of cold rolling be 70% or less.

    Continuous annealing process



    [0052] In the continuous annealing process, a cold-rolled steel sheet is heated to a temperature range of 570°C or higher at an average heating rate of 2°C/s or more, a holding time during which the cold-rolled steel sheet is held in a temperature range equal to or higher than the Ac3 transformation temperature is 60 seconds or more, the held cold-rolled steel sheet is cooled to a temperature range of 620°C to 740°C at an average cooling rate of 0.1°C/s to 8°C/s, a holding time during which the cooled cold-rolled steel sheet is held in the temperature range is 10 seconds to 50 seconds, the held cold-rolled steel sheet is cooled to a temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s, and a holding time during which the cooled cold-rolled steel sheet is held in the temperature range of 150°C or higher and 400°C or lower in this cooling operation is 200 seconds to 800 seconds.

    Heating to temperature range of 570°C or higher at average heating rate of 2°C/s or more



    [0053] In the case where the heating end-point temperature is lower than 570°C, since a heating rate in a temperature range in which the recrystallization of ferrite occurs is low, there is coarsening of the microstructure in the surface layer of a steel sheet after the continuous annealing process due to the progress of recrystallization, which may result in a deterioration in bending workability. In the case where the average heating rate is less than 2°C/s, since a furnace which is longer than usual is needed, there is an increase in energy consumption, which results in an increase in cost and a decrease in productivity. Here, it is preferable that the upper limit of the average heating rate be 10°C/s or less from the viewpoint of the control of the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer.

    Holding in temperature range equal to or higher than Ac3 transformation temperature for 60 seconds or more



    [0054] In order to practice this holding operation, which is performed after "heating to temperature range of 570°C or higher" has been performed, in the case where the heating end-point temperature of "heating to temperature range of 570°C or higher" is lower than the Ac3 transformation temperature, it is necessary that heating be additionally continued to a temperature equal to or higher than Ac3 transformation temperature thereafter. Even in the case where the heating end-point temperature of "heating to temperature range of 570°C or higher" is equal to or higher than Ac3 transformation temperature, heating may additionally be continued to a desired temperature so that the above-described holding operation may be performed. There is no particular limitation on the conditions used for such additional heating. What is important is the time (holding time) during which a cold-rolled steel sheet is retained in a temperature range equal to or higher than the Ac3 transformation temperature, and the holding time is not limited to the time during which the steel sheet is held at a constant temperature.

    [0055] In the case where the annealing temperature (holding temperature) is lower than the Ac3 transformation temperature or in the case where the annealing time (holding time) is less than 60 seconds, since cementite which has been formed in the hot rolling process is not sufficiently dissolved in the annealing process, an insufficient amount of austenite phase is formed so that an insufficient amount of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase is formed when cooling is performed in the annealing process , which results in insufficient strength. In addition, in the case where the annealing temperature is lower than the Ac3 transformation temperature or in the case where the annealing time is less than 60 seconds, since the area ratio of cementite becomes more than 5%, there is a decrease in bending workability. In addition, there is no particular limitation on the upper limit of the annealing temperature, in the case where the annealing temperature is higher than 900°C, there is an increase in cost due to an excessive energy consumption. Therefore, it is preferable that the upper limit of the annealing temperature be 900°C. Although there is no particular limitation on the upper limit of the annealing time, in the case where the holding time is more than 200 seconds, the effects become saturated, and there is an increase in cost. Therefore, it is preferable that the annealing time be 200 seconds or less. Here, as the Ac3 transformation temperature, the value calculated by equation (2) below is used.

    Here, [M] denotes the content (mass%) of the chemical element M.

    Cooling to temperature range of 620°C to 740°C at average cooling rate of 0.1°C/s to 8°C/s



    [0056] This cooling operation is a cooling operation in which cooling is performed from the above-described holding temperature (temperature in a temperature range equal to or higher than the Ac3 transformation temperature) to a temperature range of 620°C to 740°C at average cooling rate of 0.1°C/s to 8°C/s.

    [0057] In the case where the average cooling rate is less than 0.1°C/s, since an excessive amount of ferrite is precipitated in the surface layer of a steel sheet during cooling, the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer becomes more than 20%, which results in a deterioration in bending workability. On the other hand, in the case where the average cooling rate is more than 8°C/s, since the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer becomes less than 5%, there is a deterioration in bending workability. It is preferable that the average cooling rate be 0.5°C/s to 5°C/s. In the case where the cooling stop temperature is lower than 620°C, since an excessive amount of ferrite is precipitated in the surface layer of a steel sheet during cooling, the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer becomes more than 20%, and there is a deterioration in bending workability. On the other hand, in the case where the cooling stop temperature is higher than 740°C, since the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer becomes less than 5%, there is a deterioration in bending workability. It is preferable that the cooling stop temperature be within a temperature range of 640°C to 720°C.

    Holding in temperature range of cooling stop temperature for 10 seconds to 50 seconds



    [0058] The holding in the above-described temperature range of the cooling stop temperature is one of the important requirements in the manufacturing method according to the present invention. In the case where the holding time is less than 10 seconds, since ferrite transformation in the surface layer of a steel sheet does not progress homogeneously across the width of the steel sheet, it is not possible to form a microstructure in which the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer of the steel sheet is 5% or more after continuous annealing has been performed, which results in a decrease in bending workability. In the case where the holding time is more than 50 seconds, since there is an excessive increase in the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer, there is an increase in the difference in hardness between a ferrite phase and a bainite phase or a martensite phase, which results in a decrease in bending workability. It is preferable that the holding time be 15 seconds to 40 seconds. Here, the term "a holding time" refers to a time (holding time) during which a cold-rolled steel sheet is retained in the temperature range of the cooling stop temperature, and the holding time is not limited to a time during which a cold-rolled steel sheet is held at a constant temperature.

    Cooling to temperature range of 400°C or lower at average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s



    [0059] This cooling operation is a cooling operation in which cooling is performed to a cooling stop temperature in the temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s after "holding in the temperature range of the cooling stop temperature for 10 seconds to 50 seconds" has been performed.

    [0060] This condition regarding the average cooling rate is one of the important requirements in the present invention. By performing rapid cooling to a temperature of 400°C at the highest at the specified average cooling rate, it is possible to control the area ratio of a ferrite phase and a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase. In the case where the average cooling rate is less than 5°C/s, since an excessive amount of ferrite phase is precipitated during cooling, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase becomes less than 75%, which results in a decrease in strength. In the case where the average cooling rate is more than 50°C/s, since the area ratio of a ferrite phase in the surface layer becomes less than 5%, there is a deterioration in bending workability. Also, in the case where the average cooling rate is more than 50°C/s, there is a deterioration in the shape of a steel sheet. Therefore, the average cooling rate of this cooling operation is set to be 50°C/s or less. It is preferable that cooling be performed to a cooling stop temperature in the temperature range of 330°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 10°C/s to 40°C/s.

    Holding in temperature range of 150°C or higher and 400°C or lower for 200 seconds to 800 seconds



    [0061] This holding operation is performed under the condition of a holding time of 200 seconds to 800 seconds after "cooling to a temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s". In addition, the above-described holding operation may be performed after cooling has been additionally performed following "cooling to a temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s".

    [0062] In the case where the holding time is less than 200 seconds, since bainite transformation does not progress in the case where a bainite phase exists in a second phase, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase in a steel sheet after continuous annealing has been performed does not become 75% or more, which makes it difficult to achieve satisfactory strength. In the case where the holding temperature is higher than 400°C, since the area ratio of cementite becomes more than 5%, there is a decrease in bending workability. In the case where the holding time is more than 800 seconds, since the tempering of a martensite phase excessively progresses, there is a decrease in strength. It is preferable that holding be performed in a temperature range of 150°C or higher and 330°C or lower for 300 seconds to 650 seconds. Here, the term "a holding time" refers to a time (holding time) during which a cold-rolled steel sheet is retained in the temperature range described above, and the holding time is not limited to a time during which a cold-rolled steel sheet is held at a constant temperature. Here, there is no particular limitation on a holding time in a temperature range of lower than 150°C, since the holding time has almost no influence on mechanical properties,.

    [0063] Based on the above description, it is possible to obtain the high-strength steel sheet having a tensile strength of 1180 MPa or more and excellent bending workability according to the present invention.

    [0064] Here, in the heating treatments and the cooling treatments in the manufacturing method according to the present invention, it is not necessary that the holding temperatures be constant as long as the temperatures are within the ranges described above, and there is no problem even in the case where the cooling rates or the heating rates vary during cooling or heating as long as the cooling rates and heating rates are within the specified ranges. In addition, performing skin pass rolling for the purpose of shape correction is within the scope of the present invention. It is preferable that skin pass rolling be performed with an elongation rate of 0.3% or less. In the present invention, although it is assumed that a steel material is manufactured through commonly used steel-making process, casting process, and hot rolling process, a case where a steel material is manufactured through a process in which, for example, all or part of a hot rolling process is omitted by using, for example, a thin-slab casting method is also within the scope of the present invention.

    [0065] Moreover, in the present invention, even in the case where the obtained high-strength steel sheet is subjected to various surface treatments such as a chemical conversion treatment, there is no decrease in the effects of the present invention.

    EXAMPLES



    [0066] Hereafter, the present invention will be specifically described on the basis of examples.

    [0067] Steel materials (slabs) having the chemical compositions given in Table 1 were used as starting materials. These steel materials were subjected to heating to the heating temperatures given in Table 2 (Table 2-1 and Table 2-2 are combined to form Table 2) and Table 3 (Table 3-1 and Table 3-2 are combined to form Table 3), then subjected to hot rolling under the conditions given in Table 2 and Table 3, subjected to pickling, subjected to cold rolling, and then subjected to continuous annealing. Some of the steel sheets (steel sheet No. 5) was not subjected to cold rolling.

    [0068] Microstructure observation and the evaluation of tensile properties and bending workability were performed on the cold-rolled steel sheets (No. 5 was a steel sheet) obtained as described above. The determination methods will be described below.

    (1) Microstructure observation



    [0069] It is possible to determine the area ratio of each of the microstructures, that is, a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite by polishing the cross section in the thickness direction parallel to the rolling direction of a steel sheet, by then etching the polished cross section by using a 3%-nital solution, by then observing 10 fields of view at a position located at 1/4 of the thickness by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a magnification of 2000 times, and by then analyzing the observed images by image analysis processing using image analysis software "Image-Pro Plus ver. 4.0" manufactured by Media Cybernetics, Inc. The area ratios of a ferrite phase and cementite were respectively defined as the area, which had been determined by identifying these metallographic structures by performing a visual test on microstructure photographs taken by using a SEM and by performing image analysis on the photographs, divided by the areas of the analyzed fields of view. Since the remaining metallographic structures according to the present invention which are different from a ferrite phase, a retained austenite phase, and cementite are a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase is defined as the area ratio of the metallographic structures which are different from a ferrite phase, a retained austenite phase, and cementite. The meaning of the term "bainite" in the present invention includes both so-called upper bainite, in which plate-type cementite is precipitated along the interface of lath-structured ferrite, and so-called lower bainite, in which cementite is finely dispersed inside lath-structured ferrite. The area ratio of a retained austenite phase was determined by grinding the surface of a steel sheet in the thickness direction, by further performing chemical polishing on the ground surface in order to remove 0.1 mm in the thickness direction so that the position located at 1/4 of the thickness from the surface was exposed, by then determining the integrated intensities of the (200) plane, (220) plane, and (311) plane of fcc iron and the (200) plane, (211) plane, and (220) plane of bcc iron by using the Kα ray of Mo with an X-ray diffractometer, and by then deriving the amount of retained austenite from the determined values. The area ratio of each of the metallographic structures, that is, a ferrite phase, a bainite phase, a martensite phase, and cementite was defined as the average value of the area ratios of each of the metallographic structures which had been respectively determined in the 10 fields of view.

    Area ratio of ferrite phase in surface layer



    [0070] The above-described microstructure was, after preparation of polishing the cross section in the thickness direction parallel to the rolling direction of a steel sheet and then etching the polished cross section by using a 3%-nital solution, observed in 10 fields of view in a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction of the steel sheet by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a magnification of 2000 times, and the area ratio of a ferrite phase was determined by analyzing the observed images by image analysis processing using image analysis software "Image-Pro Plus ver. 4.0" manufactured by Media Cybernetics, Inc. That is, the area ratio of a ferrite phase in each of the observation fields of view was determined by distinguishing a ferrite phase on the digital image through image analysis and by performing image processing. The area ratio of a ferrite phase in a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction was derived by calculating the average value of the area ratios of these 10 fields of view.

    (2) Tensile properties



    [0071] A tensile test (JIS Z 2241 (2011)) was performed on a JIS No. 5 tensile test piece which had been taken from the obtained steel sheets in a direction at a right angle to the rolling direction of the steel sheet. By performing the tensile test until breaking occurred, tensile strength and breaking elongation (ductility) were determined. In the present invention, strength is 1180 MPa or more. Further, in the present invention, in addition to excellent bending workability, it is possible to achieve excellent tensile strength-ductility balance represented by a product of tensile strength (TS) and ductility (El) of 11500 MPa·% or more, and such a case is judged as a case of good ductility. The product is preferably 12000 MPa·% or more.

    (3) Bending workability



    [0072] Bending workability was evaluated on the basis of a V-block method prescribed in JIS Z 2248. Here, a bending test was performed so that the direction of a bending ridge line was along the rolling direction. Evaluation samples were taken at five positions in the width direction of the steel sheet, that is, at 1/8 of the width (w), 1/4 of w, 1/2 of w, 3/4 of w, and 7/8 of w. In the bending test, whether or not a crack occurred on the outer side of the bending position was checked by performing a visual test, the minimum bending radius with which a crack did not occur was defined as a limit bending radius. In the present invention, the average value of the limit bending radii of the five positions was defined as the limit bending radius of a steel sheet. In Table 2 and Table 3, the ratio of the limit bending radius to the thickness (R/t) is given. In the present invention, a case where R/t was 3.0 or less was judged as good. Here, in the case where bending workability widely varies in the width direction of a steel sheet, since the limit bending radius is large at a specified position in the width direction, and since the ratio of the limit bending radius to the thickness (R/t) is also large at this position, it is possible to evaluate a variation in bending workability in the width direction of a steel sheet on the basis of the ratio of the limit bending radius to the thickness (R/t).

    [0073] The results obtained as described above are given along with the conditions in Table 2 and Table 3.

    [Table 2-1]
    Steel Sheet No.Steel CodeHot Rolling ConditionContinuous Annealing ConditionNote
    Heating Temperature (°C)Finish Rolling Temperature (°C)Coiling Temperature (°C)Thickness (mm)Average Heating Rate to Temperature Range of 570°C or Higher (°C/s)Heating Temperature (°C)Soaking Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range Equal to or Higher than Ac3 (s)Average Cooling Rate to Temperature Range of 620°C to 740°C (°C/s)Cooling Stop Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range of 620°C to 740°C (s)Average Cooling Rate to Temperature Range of 400°C or Lower (°C/s)Cooling Stop Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range of 150°C or Higher and Lower than 400°C (s)
    1 A 1240 880 560 1.4 4 620 860 140 1.8 660 18 37 280 430 Example
    2 B 1240 880 560 1.4 4 630 860 110 3.4 680 37 18 310 510 Example
    3 C 1240 880 560 1.4 4 620 850 120 1.5 680 22 22 260 470 Example
    4 D 1240 880 560 1.4 5 620 850 120 1.1 660 35 36 280 530 Example
    5 E 1240 880 560 2.0 5 610 850 120 3.6 680 30 19 240 490 Example
    6 F 1240 880 560 1.4 5 620 840 100 4.3 700 38 24 310 440 Example
    7 G 1240 880 560 1.4 13 630 850 140 5.8 630 21 45 360 560 Example
    8 H 1240 880 560 1.4 11 600 840 130 2.6 640 45 29 210 780 Example
    9 I 1240 880 560 1.4 2 580 860 80 6.4 710 13 13 250 320 Example
    10 J 1240 880 560 1.4 7 640 850 130 2.9 680 24 30 290 480 Example
    11 K 1240 880 560 1.4 5 600 850 90 7.2 650 15 18 370 650 Example
    12 L 1240 880 560 1.4 6 610 860 150 5.7 670 36 21 220 490 Example
    13 M 1240 880 560 1.4 11 600 850 170 2.0 690 18 9 270 530 Example
    14 N 1240 880 560 1.4 4 630 860 120 1.2 670 26 24 270 490 Example
    15 a 1240 880 560 1.4 8 640 850 130 6.4 690 19 31 300 460 Comparative Example
    16 b 1240 880 560 1.4 12 590 860 180 5.3 630 46 7 360 720 Comparative Example
    17 c 1240 880 560 1.4 14 620 850 110 1.9 610 21 14 290 300 Comparative Example
    18 d 1240 880 560 1.4 9 600 860 60 7.7 730 12 43 210 260 Comparative Example
    19 e 1240 880 560 1.4 4 650 850 140 2.6 670 27 29 330 510 Comparative Example
    20 f 1240 880 560 1.4 3 610 850 100 1.3 660 48 36 280 460 Comparative Example
    21 g 1240 880 560 1.4 2 600 850 120 0.8 640 32 24 240 440 Comparative Example
    22 h 1240 880 560 1.4 4 580 850 130 1.4 650 35 37 220 570 Comparative Example
    23 i 1240 880 560 1.4 5 630 850 150 3.5 710 17 25 250 490 Comparative Example
    24 j 1240 880 560 1.4 5 600 850 140 4.8 680 24 39 310 530 Comparative Example
    Underlined portion: out of the range according to the present invention
    [Table 2-2]
    Steel Sheet No.Steel CodeMicrostructurePropertyNote
    Area Ratio of Ferrite (%)Area Ratio of Bainite and/or Martensite (%)Area Ratio of Cementite (%)Area Ratio of Ferrite within 50 µm From Surface in Thickness Direction (%)OtherYield Strength (MPa)Tensile Strength (MPa)YRDuctility (%)EI × TSR/t
    1 A 12 85 3 15 - 976 1283 0.76 11.2 14370 2.2 Example
    2 B 15 81 4 13 - 889 1205 0.74 12.2 14701 1.9 Example
    3 C 9 89 2 12 - 911 1247 0.73 9.8 12221 1.6 Example
    4 D 6 90 4 11 - 1089 1342 0.81 9.6 12883 1.4 Example
    5 E 13 84 3 14 - 889 1226 0.73 9.8 12015 1.4 Example
    6 F 10 88 2 12 - 951 1261 0.75 10.3 12988 1.5 Example
    7 G 8 87 5 15 - 986 1244 0.79 9.9 12316 1.5 Example
    8 H 12 85 3 11 - 903 1260 0.72 10.4 13104 2.0 Example
    9 I 24 75 1 19 - 1054 1338 0.79 10.5 14049 1.7 Example
    10 J 6 88 2 11 Retained Austenite 972 1196 0.81 10.1 12080 1.4 Example
    11 K 11 88 1 14 - 1018 1269 0.80 11.6 14720 1.6 Example
    12 L 10 86 4 13 - 964 1253 0.77 9.6 12029 1.9 Example
    13 M 13 84 3 18 - 1075 1315 0.82 9.2 12098 1.6 Example
    14 N 8 90 2 12 - 1026 1264 0.81 9.5 12008 2.0 Example
    15 a 9 86 5 19 - 1105 1307 0.85 9.1 11894 3.4 Comparative Example
    16 b 1 91 6 3 Retained Austenite 1303 1439 0.91 5.7 8202 3.6 Comparative Example
    17 c 7 89 4 31 - 831 1186 0.70 9.3 11030 3.6 Comparative Example
    18 d 53 35 12 19 - 512 914 0.56 12.8 11699 1.6 Comparative Example
    19 e 16 81 3 28 - 968 1228 0.79 9.4 11543 4.0 Comparative Example
    20 f 12 84 4 32 - 952 1243 0.77 9.0 11187 3.9 Comparative Example
    21 g 17 80 3 33 - 984 1342 0.73 8.6 11541 3.7 Comparative Example
    22 h 22 76 2 27 - 882 1251 0.71 9.2 11509 3.7 Comparative Example
    23 i 13 82 5 35 - 879 1239 0.71 9.5 11771 3.6 Comparative Example
    24 j 11 86 3 33 - 968 1276 0.76 9.3 11867 3.8 Comparative Example
    Underlined portion: out of the range according to the present invention
    [Table 3-1]
    Steel Sheet No.Steel CodeHot Rolling ConditionContinuous Annealing ConditionNote
    Heating Temperature (°C)Finish Rolling Temperature (°C)Coiling Temperature (°C)Thickness (mm)Average Heating Rate to Temperature Range of 570°C or Higher (°C/s)Heating Temperature (°C)Soaking Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range Equal to or Higher than Ac3 (s)Average Cooling Rate to Temperature Range of 620°C to 740°C (°C/s)Cooling Stop Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range of 620°C to 740°C (s)Average Cooling Rate to Temperature Range of 400°C or Lower (°C/s)Cooling Stop Temperature (°C)Holding Time in Temperature Range of 150°C or Higher and 400°C or Lower (s)
    25 C 1240 640 520 1.4 4 650 860 130 0.9 680 38 25 260 410 Comparative Example
    26 C 1220 870 710 1.4 17 630 850 90 4.8 660 19 37 220 280 Comparative Example
    27 C 1220 870 530 1.4 5 500 870 120 3.6 650 21 33 320 540 Comparative Example
    28 C 1200 880 590 1.4 7 620 870 110 1.9 670 28 26 330 490 Example
    29 C 1210 860 510 1.4 4 640 860 100 2.5 680 24 29 240 520 Example
    30 C 1240 860 550 1.4 4 620 710 120 4.7 700 36 24 310 430 Comparative Example
    31 C 1220 850 560 1.4 6 610 860 140 2.2 670 21 38 250 510 Example
    32 C 1250 870 570 1.4 4 640 880 110 1.4 660 26 33 260 490 Example
    33 C 1210 850 550 1.4 5 630 870 120 3.0 680 29 24 280 460 Example
    34 C 1250 880 570 1.4 6 610 880 35 2.5 650 22 36 340 520 Comparative Example
    35 C 1200 890 540 1.4 4 640 860 100 1.7 660 30 22 270 480 Example
    36 C 1220 870 530 1.4 5 610 840 120 14.3 690 41 31 330 390 Comparative Example
    37 C 1210 850 520 1.4 4 650 850 130 5.6 800 32 35 270 450 Comparative Example
    38 J 1240 860 570 1.4 7 640 830 150 7.4 670 130 18 250 310 Comparative Example
    39 J 1220 850 560 1.4 4 620 860 140 3.1 730 19 80 230 420 Comparative Example
    40 J 1240 860 530 1.4 6 610 880 110 5.7 660 33 24 570 470 Comparative Example
    41 J 1230 860 560 1.4 4 630 850 130 2.4 680 19 27 280 520 Example
    42 J 1240 880 540 1.4 4 640 830 120 3.1 660 25 25 300 500 Example
    43 J 1250 850 520 1.4 6 610 830 90 1.6 670 23 31 250 680 Example
    44 J 1210 860 550 1.4 5 650 820 130 3.8 710 29 19 280 160 Comparative Example
    45 J 1220 850 580 1.4 7 620 850 80 2.3 640 26 22 320 500 Example
    46 J 1200 850 510 1.4 5 610 840 130 6.9 650 4 24 240 350 Comparative Example
    47 J 1210 850 580 1.4 4 640 850 110 4.2 570 27 16 380 440 Comparative Example
    48 N 1250 890 540 1.4 6 630 860 130 1.5 680 23 29 310 620 Example
    49 N 1220 860 530 1.4 4 620 830 120 2.6 720 29 3 290 460 Comparative Example
    50 f 1240 870 510 1.4 5 600 870 100 22.7 630 16 42 210 370 Comparative Example
    51 f 1200 840 520 1.4 7 620 850 110 1.1 790 18 34 300 480 Comparative Example
    52 C 1220 870 570 1.4 4 620 860 120 4.5 700 15 25 300 450 Example
    53 C 1220 870 570 1.4 4 620 860 120 4.5 700 15 25 250 450 Example
    Underlined portion: out of the range according to the present invention
    [Table 3-2]
    Steel Sheet No.Steel CodeMicrostructurePropertyNote
    Area Ratio of Ferrite (%)Area Ratio of Bainite and/or Martensite (%)Area Ratio of Cementite (%)Area Ratio of Ferrite within 50 µm From Surface in Thickness Direction (%)OtherYield Strength (MPa)Tensile Strength (MPa)YRDuctility (%)EI × TSR/t
    25 C 12 85 3 27 - 854 1219 0.70 9.3 11337 3.5 Comparative Example
    26 C 16 76 8 12 - 789 1202 0.66 9.6 11539 3.6 Comparative Example
    27 C 13 83 4 2 - 924 1236 0.75 8.8 10877 3.8 Comparative Example
    28 C 11 87 2 10 - 1012 1267 0.80 11.5 14571 1.4 Example
    29 C 9 88 3 11 - 921 1253 0.74 11.1 13908 1.5 Example
    30 C 34 50 16 29 - 612 932 0.66 12.7 11836 3.3 Comparative Example
    31 C 10 89 1 10 - 995 1306 0.76 10.2 13321 1.5 Example
    32 C 7 91 2 7 - 1026 1341 0.77 9.1 12203 1.6 Example
    33 C 9 88 3 9 - 1011 1328 0.76 9.9 13147 1.5 Example
    34 C 18 69 13 17 - 866 1019 0.85 10.9 11107 3.5 Comparative Example
    35 C 11 87 2 8 - 972 1295 0.75 10.4 13468 1.4 Example
    36 C 19 77 4 3 - 1045 1242 0.84 8.5 10557 3.9 Comparative Example
    37 C 17 78 5 3 - 987 1261 0.78 8.7 10971 3.8 Comparative Example
    38 J 16 80 4 26 - 796 1193 0.67 9.5 11334 3.9 Comparative Example
    39 J 2 91 7 2 - 1087 1437 0.76 7.8 11209 3.6 Comparative Example
    40 J 32 51 17 18 - 795 1290 0.62 8.6 11094 3.4 Comparative Example
    41 J 14 83 3 10 - 889 1224 0.73 10.7 13097 1.5 Example
    42 J 22 75 1 9 Retained Austenite 901 1202 0.75 12.9 15506 1.4 Example
    43 J 17 80 3 12 - 877 1198 0.73 12.3 14735 1.6 Example
    44 J 11 73 16 16 - 899 1035 0.87 10.8 11178 3.5 Comparative Example
    45 J 8 90 2 11 - 924 1188 0.78 12.5 14850 1.9 Example
    46 J 14 82 4 3 - 894 1203 0.74 9.2 11068 3.9 Comparative Example
    47 J 22 75 3 35 - 835 1237 0.68 9.4 11628 3.8 Comparative Example
    48 N 12 86 2 14 - 945 1240 0.76 9.7 12028 1.4 Example
    49 N 33 34 33 38 - 661 1051 0.63 11.3 11876 3.3 Comparative Example
    50 f 18 77 5 3 - 1002 1274 0.79 8.5 10829 3.8 Comparative Example
    51 f 17 79 4 4 - 914 1256 0.73 8.9 11178 3.7 Comparative Example
    52 C 0 99 1 6 - 1005 1352 0.74 8.9 12033 2.4 Example
    53 C 0 99 1 6 - 978 1284 0.76 9.1 11684 2.2 Example
    Underlined portion: out of the range according to the present invention

    [0074] As Table 2 and Table 3 indicate, it is clarified that bending workability was good in the case of the examples of the present invention which had microstructures including, in terms of area ratio, 25% or less of a ferrite phase, 75% or more of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, and 5% or less of cementite, in which the area ratio of a ferrite phase is 5% to 20% in a surface layer.

    [0075] On the other hand, in the case of the comparative examples, one or both of strength and bending workability were poor. In particular, it is clarified that, in the case of the comparative examples where the chemical compositions were not appropriate, strength or bending workability was not improved even though the area ratio of a ferrite phase, the area ratio of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, the area ratio of cementite, and the area ratio of a ferrite phase in a surface layer were appropriate.

    Industrial Applicability



    [0076] Since the high-strength steel sheet according to the present invention is excellent in terms of bending workability, the steel sheet can be used as a steel sheet for the weight reduction and strengthening of an automobile body.


    Claims

    1. A high-strength steel sheet having
    a YR of 0.85 or less,
    a chemical composition containing, by mass%, C: 0.100% to 0.150%, Si: 0.30% to 0.70%, Mn: 2.20% to 2.80%, P: 0.025% or less, S: 0.0020% or less, A1: 0.020% to 0.060%, N: 0.0050% or less, Nb: 0.010% to 0.060%, Ti: 0.010% to 0.030%, B: 0.0005% to 0.0030%, Sb: 0.005% to 0.015%, Ca: 0.0015% or less, and optionally one or more of Cr: 0.30% or less, V: 0.10% or less, Mo: 0.20% or less, Cu: 0.10% or less, Ni: 0.10% or less, and REM: 0.0010% to 0.0050%, and the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities,
    a microstructure including, in terms of area ratio, 25% or less of a ferrite phase, 75% or more of a bainite phase and/or a martensite phase, and 5% or less of cementite,
    wherein, in a surface layer that is a region within 50 µm from the surface in the thickness direction, the area ratio of a ferrite phase is 5% to 20%,
    a tensile strength being 1180 MPa or more, which tensile strength being measured according JIS Z 2241 (2011),
    an excellent tensile strength-ductility balance represented by a product of tensile strength (TS) and ductility (El) measured according to JIS Z 2241 being 11500 MPa % or more, and a bending workability in the width direction of the steel sheet being R/t = 3.0 or less, wherein R/t is the ratio of the limit bending radius to the thickness of the steel sheet, which bending workability is evaluated on the basis of a V-block method according to JIS Z 2248.
     
    2. A method for manufacturing a high-strength steel sheet, the method comprising:

    a hot rolling process in which finish rolling is performed on a steel material having the chemical composition according to Claim 1 at a temperature equal to or higher than the Ar3 transformation temperature and in which coiling is performed at a temperature of 600°C or lower;

    a pickling process in which pickling is performed on the hot-rolled steel sheet after the hot rolling process; and

    a continuous annealing process in which the steel sheet which has been pickled in the pickling process is heated to a temperature range of 570°C or higher at an average heating rate of 2°C/s or more, in which a holding time during which the steel sheet is held in a temperature range equal to or higher than the Ac3 transformation temperature is 60 seconds or more, in which the held steel sheet is then cooled to a temperature range of 620°C to 740°C at an average cooling rate of 0.1°C/s to 8°C/s, in which a holding time during which the cooled steel sheet is held in the temperature range is 10 seconds to 50 seconds, in which the held steel sheet is then cooled to a temperature range of 400°C or lower at an average cooling rate of 5°C/s to 50°C/s, and in which a holding time during which the cooled steel sheet is held in a temperature range of 150°C or higher and 400°C or lower is 200 seconds to 800 seconds,

    wherein the Ar3 transformation temperature is defined by equation (1):

    and the Ac3 transformation temperature is defined by equation (2) :

    where [M] denotes the content (mass%) of the chemical element M and t denotes the thickness (mm).


     
    3. The method for manufacturing a high-strength steel sheet according to Claim 2, the method further comprising a cold rolling process in which cold rolling is performed on the pickled steel sheet after the pickling process and before the continuous annealing process.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Hochfestes Stahlblech, das Folgendes aufweist:

    ein Streckgrenzenverhältnis von 0,85 oder weniger,

    eine chemischen Zusammensetzung, die nach Ma% aus Folgendem besteht: C: 0,100 % bis 0,150 %, Si: 0,30 % bis 0,70 %, Mn: 2,20 % bis 2,80 %, P: 0,025 % oder weniger, S: 0,0020 % oder weniger, Al: 0,020 % bis 0,060 %, N: 0,0050 % oder weniger, Nb: 0,010 % bis 0,060 %, Ti: 0,010 % bis 0,030 %, B: 0,0005 % bis 0,0030 %, Sb: 0,005 % bis 0,015 %, Ca: 0,0015 % oder weniger, und optional aus einem oder mehreren aus: Cr: 0,30 % oder weniger, V: 0,10 % oder weniger, Mo: 0,20 % oder weniger, Cu: 0,10 % oder weniger, Ni: 0,10 % oder weniger; und REM: 0,0010 % bis 0,0050 %, wobei der Rest Fe und unvermeidbare Verunreinigungen sind,

    ein Mikrogefüge, das hinsichtlich eines Flächenverhältnisses 25 % oder weniger einer Ferritphase, 75 % oder mehr einer Bainitphase und/oder einer Martensitphase und 5 % oder weniger an Zementit beinhaltet,

    wobei in einer Oberflächenschicht, bei der es sich um eine Region innerhalb von 50 µm von der Oberfläche in der Dickenrichtung handelt, das Flächenverhältnis einer Ferritphase 5 % bis 20 % beträgt,

    wobei eine Zugfestigkeit 1180 MPa oder mehr beträgt, wobei die Zugfestigkeit gemäß JIS Z 2241 (2011) gemessen wird,

    ein hervorragendes Zugfestigkeits-Verformbarkeits-Gleichgewicht, repräsentiert durch ein Produkt aus einer Zugfestigkeit (TS) und einer Verformbarkeit (El), gemessen gemäß JIS Z 2241, das 11500 MPa % oder mehr beträgt, und eine Biegeumformbarkeit in der Breitenrichtung des Stahlblechs, die R/t = 3,0 oder weniger beträgt, wobei R/t das Verhältnis des Grenzbiegeradius zu der Dicke des Stahlblechs ist, wobei die Biegeumformbarkeit auf Basis eines V-Blockverfahrens gemäß JIS Z 2248 evaluiert wird.


     
    2. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines hochfesten Stahlblechs, wobei das Verfahren umfasst:

    einen Warmwalzprozess, in dem das Fertigwalzen an einem Stahlmaterial mit der chemischen Zusammensetzung nach Anspruch 1 bei einer Temperatur gleich oder höher als die Ar3-Transformationstemperatur durchgeführt wird und in dem das Aufwickeln bei einer Temperatur von 600 °C oder niedriger durchgeführt wird;

    einen Beizprozess, in dem das Beizen an dem warmgewalzten Stahlblech nach dem Warmwalzprozess durchgeführt wird; und

    einen Durchlaufglühprozess, in dem das Stahlblech, das in dem Beizprozess gebeizt wurde, auf einen Temperaturbereich von 570 °C oder höher bei einer durchschnittlichen Erwärmungsgeschwindigkeit von 2 °C/Sek oder mehr erwärmt wird, wobei eine Haltezeit, während der das Stahlblech in einem Temperaturbereich von gleich oder höher als die Ac3-Transformationstemperatur gehalten wird, 60 Sekunden oder mehr beträgt, wobei das gehaltene Stahlblech anschließend auf einen Temperaturbereich von 620 °C bis 740 °C bei einer durchschnittlichen Abkühlungsgeschwindigkeit von 0,1 °C/Sek bis 8 °C/Sek abgekühlt wird, wobei die Haltezeit, während der das abgekühlte Stahlblech in dem Temperaturbereich gehalten wird, 10 Sekunden bis 50 Sekunden beträgt, wobei das gehaltene Stahlblech anschließend auf einen Temperaturbereich von 400 °C oder niedriger bei einer durchschnittlichen Abkühlungsgeschwindigkeit von 5 °C/Sek bis 50 °C/Sek abgekühlt wird, und wobei eine Haltezeit, während der das abgekühlte Stahlblech in einen Temperaturbereich von 150 °C oder höher und 400 °C oder niedriger gehalten wird, 200 Sekunden bis 800 Sekunden beträgt,

    wobei die Ar3-Transformationstemperatur durch die Gleichung (1) definiert ist:

    wobei die Ac3-Transformationstemperatur durch die Gleichung (2) definiert ist:

    wobei [M] den Gehalt (Ma%) des chemischen Elements M kennzeichnet und t die Dicke (mm) kennzeichnet.


     
    3. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines hochfesten Stahlblechs nach Anspruch 2, wobei das Verfahren des Weiteren einen Kaltwalzprozess umfasst, in dem Kaltwalzen an dem gewalzten Stahlblech nach dem Beizprozess und vor dem Durchlaufglühprozess durchgeführt wird.
     


    Revendications

    1. Tôle d'acier à haute résistance ayant
    un rapport d'élasticité YR inférieur ou égal à 0,85,
    une composition chimique contenant, en % massique, C : de 0,100 % à 0,150 %, Si : de 0,30 % à 0,70 %, Mn : de 2,20 % à 2,80 %, P : 0,025 % ou moins, S : 0,0020 % ou moins, Al : de 0,020 % à 0,060 %, N : 0,0050 % ou moins, Nb : de 0,010 % à 0,060 %, Ti : de 0,010 % à 0,030 %, B : de 0,0005 % à 0,0030 %, Sb : de 0,005 % à 0,015 %, Ca : 0,0015 % ou moins, et éventuellement un ou plusieurs éléments parmi Cr : 0,30% ou moins, V : 0,10 % ou moins, Mo : 0,20 % ou moins, Cu : 0,10 % ou moins, Ni : 0,10 % ou moins et terres rares : de 0,0010 % à 0,0050 %, le reste étant du fer (Fe) et des impuretés inévitables,
    une microstructure incluant, en termes de fraction surfacique, 25 % ou moins d'une phase ferrite, 75 % ou plus d'une phase bainite et/ou d'une phase martensite et 5 % ou moins de cémentite,
    où, dans une couche de surface qui est une région jusqu'à 50 µm depuis la surface dans le sens de l'épaisseur, la fraction surfacique d'une phase ferrite va de 5 % à 20 %,
    une résistance à la traction étant supérieure ou égale à 1180 MPa, ladite résistance à la traction étant mesurée selon le document JIS Z 2241 (2011),
    un excellent équilibre entre résistance à la traction et ductilité se traduisant par un produit de la résistance à la traction (TS) et de la ductilité (El) mesurée selon le document JIS Z 2241 qui est supérieur ou égal à 11 500 MPa·%, et une aptitude au travail par pliage dans le sens largeur de la tôle d'acier étant R/t = 3,0 ou moins, où R/t est le rapport du rayon de courbure limite à l'épaisseur de la tôle d'acier, ladite aptitude au travail par pliage étant évaluée sur la base d'une méthode avec bloc en V selon le document JIS Z 2248.
     
    2. Procédé de fabrication d'une tôle d'acier à haute résistance, le procédé comprenant :

    une opération de laminage à chaud dans laquelle un laminage de finissage est effectué sur un matériau d'acier ayant la composition chimique selon la revendication 1 à une température supérieure ou égale à la température de transformation Ar3 et dans laquelle un enroulement est effectué à une température inférieure ou égale à 600 °C ;

    une opération de décapage dans laquelle un décapage est effectué sur la tôle d'acier laminée à chaud après l'opération de laminage à chaud ; et

    une opération de recuit continu dans laquelle la tôle d'acier qui a été décapée lors de l'opération de décapage est chauffée jusqu'à une plage de température de 570 °C ou plus à une vitesse de chauffage moyenne de 2 °C/s ou plus, dans laquelle un temps de maintien pendant lequel la tôle d'acier est maintenue dans une plage de température supérieure ou égale à la température de transformation Ac3 est de 60 secondes ou plus, dans laquelle la tôle d'acier maintenue est ensuite refroidie jusqu'à une plage de température de 620 °C à 740 °C à une vitesse de refroidissement moyenne de 0,1 °C/s à 8 °C/s, dans laquelle un temps de maintien pendant lequel la tôle d'acier refroidie est maintenue dans la plage de température va de 10 secondes à 50 secondes, dans lequel la tôle d'acier est ensuite refroidie jusqu'à une plage de température de 400 °C ou moins à une vitesse de refroidissement moyenne de 5 °C/s à 50 °C/s, et dans laquelle un temps de maintien pendant lequel la tôle d'acier refroidie est maintenue dans une plage de température de 150 °C ou plus et 400 °C ou moins va de 200 secondes à 800 secondes,

    la température de transformation Ar3 étant définie par l'équation (1) :

    et la température de transformation Ac3 étant définie par l'équation (2) :

    où [M] représente la teneur (% massique) de l'élément chimique M et t représente l'épaisseur (mm).


     
    3. Procédé de fabrication d'une tôle d'acier à haute résistance selon la revendication 2, le procédé comprenant en outre une opération de laminage à froid dans laquelle un laminage à froid est effectué sur la tôle d'acier décapé après l'opération de décapage et avant l'opération de recuit continu.
     






    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description