(19)
(11)EP 3 300 089 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
06.05.2020 Bulletin 2020/19

(21)Application number: 16796334.7

(22)Date of filing:  10.05.2016
(51)Int. Cl.: 
H01F 1/153  (2006.01)
H01F 1/26  (2006.01)
B22F 3/00  (2006.01)
C22C 45/02  (2006.01)
H01F 17/06  (2006.01)
B22F 1/02  (2006.01)
H01F 41/02  (2006.01)
B22F 1/00  (2006.01)
C22C 38/00  (2006.01)
H01F 1/20  (2006.01)
H01F 3/08  (2006.01)
B22F 3/02  (2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/JP2016/063842
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/185940 (24.11.2016 Gazette  2016/47)

(54)

DUST CORE, METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAID DUST CORE, INDUCTOR PROVIDED WITH SAID DUST CORE, AND ELECTRONIC/ELECTRICAL DEVICE ON WHICH SAID INDUCTOR IS MOUNTED

STAUBKERN, VERFAHREN ZUR HERSTELLUNG DES STAUBKERNS, INDUKTOR MIT DEM STAUBKERN UND ELEKTRONISCHE/ELEKTRISCHE VORRICHTUNG MIT DARAUF ANGEBRACHTEM INDUKTOR

NOYAU À POUDRE DE FER, PROCÉDÉ DE PRODUCTION DUDIT NOYAU À POUDRE DE FER, BOBINE D'INDUCTION DOTÉE DUDIT NOYAU À POUDRE DE FER, ET DISPOSITIF ÉLECTRIQUE/ÉLECTRONIQUE SUR LEQUEL EST MONTÉE LADITE BOBINE D'INDUCTION


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 19.05.2015 JP 2015102104

(43)Date of publication of application:
28.03.2018 Bulletin 2018/13

(73)Proprietor: Alps Alpine Co., Ltd.
Tokyo 145-8501 (JP)

(72)Inventors:
  • TAKADATE, Kinshiro
    Tokyo 145-8501 (JP)
  • KOSHIBA, Hisato
    Tokyo 145-8501 (JP)
  • YAMASHITA, Shokan
    Tokyo 145-8501 (JP)

(74)Representative: Schmitt-Nilson Schraud Waibel Wohlfrom Patentanwälte Partnerschaft mbB 
Pelkovenstraße 143
80992 München
80992 München (DE)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 2 482 291
WO-A1-2014/054430
JP-A- 2001 196 216
JP-A- 2010 118 486
WO-A1-2009/128425
WO-A1-2015/008813
JP-A- 2006 237 153
US-A1- 2009 320 961
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    Technical Field



    [0001] The present invention relates to a dust core, a method for manufacturing the dust core, an inductor including the dust core, and an electronic/electric device on which the electronic/electric component is mounted. The term "inductor" as used herein refers to a passive element including a coil and a core member including a dust core and includes a concept of a reactor.

    Background Art



    [0002] Dust cores for use in inductors, such as reactors, transformers, and choke coils, used in boosting circuits for hybrid vehicles, generators, and transforming stations can be obtained by compacting a soft magnetic powder. An inductor including such a dust core is required to have both low core loss and excellent direct-current superposition characteristics.

    [0003] Patent Literature 1 discloses, as a means for solving the above problem (having both low core loss and excellent direct-current superposition characteristics), an inductor in which a coil is integrally embedded in a core formed by pressing a powder mixture of a magnetic powder and a binder, the magnetic powder used being a powder obtained by mixing a carbonyl iron powder with 5 weight percent to 20 weight percent of a Sendust powder.

    [0004] Patent Literature 2 discloses, as an inductor capable of further reducing the core loss, an inductor including a magnetic core (dust core) containing a solidified mixture of an insulating material and a powder mixture obtained by blending 90 mass percent to 98 mass percent of an amorphous soft magnetic powder with 2 mass percent to 10 mass percent of a crystalline soft magnetic powder. In the magnetic core (dust core), the amorphous soft magnetic powder is regarded as material for reducing the core loss of the inductor and the crystalline soft magnetic powder is regarded as material which increases the filling factor of the powder mixture to increase the magnetic permeability and which acts as a binder for bonding the amorphous soft magnetic powder together. JP 2001 196216 A discloses a dust core of amorphous and crystalline powders. Their size distributions overlap such that the ratio of D10 of the amorphous powder and D90 of the crystalline powder is approximately 2.

    Citation List


    Patent Literature



    [0005] 

    PTL 1: Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2006-13066

    PTL 2: Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2010-118486


    Summary of Invention


    Technical Problem



    [0006] In Patent Literature 1, powders of different types of crystalline magnetic materials are used as raw materials for a dust core for the purpose of enhancing direct-current superposition characteristics. In Patent Literature 2, a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and a powder of an amorphous magnetic material are used as raw materials for a dust core for the purpose of further reducing the core loss. However, in Patent Literature 2, no direct-current superposition characteristics have been evaluated.

    [0007] It is an object of the present invention to provide a dust core which contains a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and a powder of an amorphous magnetic material, which can enhance direct-current superposition characteristics of an inductor including the dust core, and which can reduce the core loss of the inductor. It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for manufacturing the dust core, an inductor including the dust core, and an electronic/electric device on which the inductor is mounted.

    Solution to Problem



    [0008] The inventors have performed investigations for the purpose of solving the above problem and, as a result, have obtained a novel finding that appropriately adjusting the particle size distribution of a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and the particle size distribution of a powder of an amorphous magnetic material increases the sum (the sum is herein also referred to as the "core alloy ratio") of the content (the term "content of powder" (unit: mass percent) is herein referred to as the content with respect to a dust core) of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the content of the amorphous magnetic material powder, thereby enabling the above problem to be solved.

    [0009] The present invention has been completed on the basis of the finding and is specified in claims 1 and 13.

    [0010] An aspect of the present invention provides a dust core containing a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and a powder of an amorphous magnetic material. The sum (core alloy ratio) of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the content of the amorphous magnetic material powder is 83 mass percent or more. The mass ratio (first mixing ratio) of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder to the sum (core alloy ratio) is 15 mass percent or less. The median diameter D50 of the amorphous magnetic material powder is greater than or equal to the median diameter D50 of the crystalline magnetic material powder. The ratio (first particle size ratio) of the 10% cumulative diameter D10a in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the amorphous magnetic material powder to the 90% cumulative diameter D90b in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the crystalline magnetic material powder ranges from 0.3 to 1.25.

    [0011] In the case where the particle size distribution of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the particle size distribution of the amorphous magnetic material powder satisfy the above relationship, when the first mixing ratio is 15 mass percent or less, it is likely to be stably achieved that the core alloy ratio is 83 mass percent or more. As a result, in an inductor including the dust core, direct-current superposition characteristics can be enhanced and the core loss can be reduced.

    [0012] The crystalline magnetic material may contain one or more materials selected from the group consisting of Fe-Si-Cr alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Fe-Co alloys, Fe-V alloys, Fe-Al alloys, Fe-Si alloys, Fe-Si-Al alloys, carbonyl iron, and pure iron.

    [0013] The crystalline magnetic material is preferably made of carbonyl iron.

    [0014] The amorphous magnetic material may contain one or more materials selected from the group consisting of Fe-Si-B alloys, Fe-P-C alloys, and Co-Fe-Si-B alloys.

    [0015] The amorphous magnetic material is preferably made of an Fe-P-C alloy.

    [0016] The crystalline magnetic material powder is preferably made of an insulated material. Within the above range, the increase in insulating resistance of the dust core and the reduction of the core loss Pcv in a high frequency band are stably achieved.

    [0017] The median diameter D50 of the crystalline magnetic material powder is preferably 10 µm or less. The above provision regarding the first particle size ratio is readily satisfied.

    [0018] The dust core may contain a binding component binding the crystalline magnetic material powder and the amorphous magnetic material powder to another material contained in the dust core. In this case, the binding component preferably contains a sub-component based on a resin material.

    [0019] Another aspect of the present invention provides a method for manufacturing the dust core. The method includes a molding step of obtaining a molded product by molding including press-molding a mixture containing the crystalline magnetic material powder, the amorphous magnetic material powder, and a binder component made of the resin material. The method allows the dust core to be efficiently manufactured.

    [0020] The molded product, which is obtained in the molding step, may be the dust core. Alternatively, the method may include a heat treatment step of obtaining the dust core by heat-treating the molded product, which is obtained in the molding step.

    [0021] Another aspect of the present invention provides an inductor including the dust core, a coil, and connection terminals each connected to an end portion of the coil. At least one portion of the dust core is placed so as to be located in an induced magnetic field generated by the current applied to the coil through the connection terminals. The inductor can achieve both excellent direct-current superposition characteristics and low core loss on the basis of excellent properties of the dust core.

    [0022] Another aspect of the present invention provides an electronic/electric device on which the inductor according to Claim 11 is mounted. The inductor is connected to a substrate through the connection terminals. Examples of the electronic/electric device include power-supply systems including a power supply switching circuit, a voltage step-up/down circuit, or a smoothing circuit and compact portable communication devices. The electronic/electric device according to the present invention includes the inductor and therefore readily copes with a large current.

    Advantageous Effects of Invention



    [0023] A dust core according to the present invention can enhance direct-current superposition characteristics of an inductor including the dust core and can reduce the core loss of the inductor because the particle size distribution of a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and the particle size distribution of a powder of an amorphous magnetic material are appropriately adjusted. The present invention provides a method for manufacturing the dust core, an inductor including the dust core, and an electronic/electric device on which the inductor is mounted.

    Brief Description of Drawings



    [0024] 

    [Fig. 1] Fig. 1 is a schematic perspective view showing the shape of a dust core according to an embodiment of the present invention.

    [Fig. 2] Fig. 2 is a schematic view showing a spray drier system used in an example of a method for producing a granular powder and the operation thereof.

    [Fig. 3] Fig. 3 is a schematic perspective view showing the shape of a toroidal coil that is a type of inductor including a dust core according to an embodiment of the present invention.

    [Fig. 4] Fig. 4 is a graph showing the relationship between µ5500 and the core alloy ratio based on each example of the present invention.

    [Fig. 5] Fig. 5 is a graph showing the relationship between the core loss Pcv and first mixing ratio based on each example of the present invention.

    [Fig. 6] Fig. 6 is a graph showing the influence of the first particle size ratio on the relationship between µ5500 and the first mixing ratio based on each example of the present invention.

    [Fig. 7] Fig. 7 is a graph showing the influence of the first particle size ratio on the relationship between the core loss Pcv and first mixing ratio based on each example of the present invention.

    [Fig. 8] Fig. 8 is a graph obtained by plotting a slope S1 and a slope S2 against the first particle size ratio on the horizontal axis, the slope S1 being determined by linearly approximating a plot of the first particle size ratio in the graph (the relationship between µ5500 and the first mixing ratio) shown in Fig. 6, the slope S2 being determined by linearly approximating a plot of the first particle size ratio in the graph (the relationship between the core loss Pcv and the first mixing ratio) shown in Fig. 7.

    [Fig. 9] Fig. 9 is a graph showing measurement results obtained in Examples 7, 10, 11, 20, and 25 to 27.

    [Fig. 10] Fig. 10 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 25.

    [Fig. 11] Fig. 11 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 10.

    [Fig. 12] Fig. 12 is a binary image which is in a stage prior to obtaining a binary image shown in Fig. 11 and in which cavity portions based on pores of magnetic powders remain.

    [Fig. 13] Fig. 13 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 26.

    [Fig. 14] Fig. 14 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 27.

    [Fig. 15] Fig. 15 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 7.

    [Fig. 16] Fig. 16 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 20.

    [Fig. 17] Fig. 17 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of a toroidal core according to Example 11.

    [Fig. 18] Fig. 18 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 10, according to Example 25.

    [Fig. 19] Fig. 19 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 11, according to Example 10.

    [Fig. 20] Fig. 20 is a Voronoi diagram, prior to removing peripheral polygons, in a stage prior to obtaining the Voronoi diagram shown in Fig. 19.

    [Fig. 21] Fig. 21 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 13, according to Example 26.

    [Fig. 22] Fig. 22 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 14, according to Example 27.

    [Fig. 23] Fig. 23 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 15, according to Example 7.

    [Fig. 24] Fig. 24 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 16, according to Example 20.

    [Fig. 25] Fig. 25 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 17 according to Example 11.

    [Fig. 26] Fig. 26 is a graph showing the relationship between the degree of dispersion of cavities (average) and the first particle size ratio.


    Description of Embodiments



    [0025] Embodiments of the present invention are described below in detail.

    1. Dust core



    [0026] Fig. 1 shows a dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention. The dust core 1 is ring-shaped in appearance and contains a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and a powder of an amorphous magnetic material. The dust core 1 according to this embodiment is one manufactured by a method including molding including press-molding a mixture containing these powders. In a non-limited example, the dust core 1 according to this embodiment contains a binding component binding the crystalline magnetic material powder and the amorphous magnetic material powder to other materials (the same type of materials or different types of materials in some cases) contained in the dust core 1.

    [0027] The sum (core alloy ratio) of the contents of the crystalline magnetic material powder and amorphous magnetic material powder in the dust core 1 is 83 mass percent or more. When the core alloy ratio is 83 mass percent or more, direct-current superposition characteristics of an inductor including the dust core 1 can be enhanced. Regarding this, in spite of dust cores that are substantially equal in initial magnetic permeability, as the core alloy ratio of the dust cores is higher, the magnetic permeability thereof tends to be more unlikely to reduce in such a state that a direct current is superimposed. When the core alloy ratio is 83 mass percent or more, the relative magnetic permeability is likely to be 40 or more even if the applied bias electric field is 5,500 A/m.

    (1) Powder of crystalline magnetic material



    [0028] The specific type of the crystalline magnetic material, which gives the crystalline magnetic material powder contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is not particularly limited and the crystalline magnetic material may be crystalline (a diffraction spectrum with clear peaks sufficient to identify the type of material is obtained by general X-ray diffraction measurement) and ferromagnetic. Examples of the crystalline magnetic material include Fe-Si-Cr alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Fe-Co alloys, Fe-V alloys, Fe-Al alloys, Fe-Si alloys, Fe-Si-Al alloys, carbonyl iron, and pure iron. The crystalline magnetic material may be composed of a single type of material or different types of materials. The crystalline magnetic material, which gives the crystalline magnetic material powder, is preferably one or more selected from the above materials. In particular, the crystalline magnetic material preferably contains carbonyl iron and is more preferably made of carbonyl iron. Carbonyl iron has high saturated magnetic flux density, is soft, and is likely to be plastically deformed; hence, the density of the dust core is readily increased during molding. Furthermore, the median diameter D50 is fine, 5 µm or less, and therefore the eddy-current loss can be suppressed.

    [0029] The shape of power of the crystalline magnetic material, which is contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is not limited. The shape of the powder may be spherical or non-spherical. When the shape thereof is non-spherical, the powder may have an anisotropic shape such as a flake shape, an oval shape, a droplet shape, or a needle shape or an amorphous shape with no specific anisotropy. Examples of an amorphous powder include a plurality of spherical powders directly bonded to each other and a plurality of spherical powders that are bonded to other powders so as to be partially embedded in the other powders. Such an amorphous powder is likely to be observed in carbonyl iron.

    [0030] The shape of the powder may be a shape obtained in the course of producing the powder or a shape obtained by secondarily processing the produced powder. Examples of the former shape include a spherical shape, an oval shape, a droplet shape, and a needle shape. An example of the latter shape is a flake shape.

    [0031] The particle diameter of the crystalline magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is set in relation to the particle diameter of the amorphous magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1, as described below.

    [0032] The content of the crystalline magnetic material powder in the dust core 1 is such an amount that the mass ratio (first mixing ratio) of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder to the sum (core alloy ratio) of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the content of the amorphous magnetic material powder is 15 mass percent or less. When the first mixing ratio is 15 mass percent or less, the excessive increase in core loss Pcv of the dust core 1 can be suppressed. As a basic tendency, as the first mixing ratio is higher, direct-current superposition characteristics of the inductor including the dust core 1 are further enhanced. However, when the first mixing ratio is more than 15 mass percent, the above tendency is not clear and the merit of using the crystalline magnetic material powder is unlikely to be obtained. From the viewpoint of stably achieving the improvement of direct-current superposition characteristics of the inductor including the dust core 1 and the suppression of the increase in core loss Pcv thereof, the first mixing ratio is preferably 12 mass percent or less.

    [0033] At least one portion of the crystalline magnetic material powder is preferably made of an insulated material and the crystalline magnetic material powder is more preferably made of the insulated material. In the case where the crystalline magnetic material powder is insulated, the insulating resistance of the dust core 1 tends to increase. Furthermore, not only in a high-frequency band but also in a low-frequency band, the core loss Pcv tends to decrease in some cases. The type of an insulating treatment applied to the crystalline magnetic material powder is not particularly limited. A phosphoric acid treatment, a phosphate treatment, and an oxidation treatment are exemplified.

    (2) Powder of amorphous magnetic material



    [0034] The specific type of the amorphous magnetic material, which gives the amorphous magnetic material powder contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is not particularly limited and the amorphous magnetic material may be amorphous (any diffraction spectrum with clear peaks sufficient to identify the type of material is not obtained by general X-ray diffraction measurement) and may be a ferromagnetic material, particularly a soft magnetic material. Examples of the amorphous magnetic material include Fe-Si-B alloys, Fe-P-C alloys, and Co-Fe-Si-B alloys. The amorphous magnetic material may be composed of a single type of material or different types of materials. A magnetic material making up the crystalline magnetic material powder is preferably one or more selected from the group consisting of the above materials. In particular, the amorphous magnetic material preferably contains an Fe-P-C alloy and is more preferably made of the Fe-P-C alloy.

    [0035] An example of the Fe-P-C alloy is an Fe-based amorphous alloy represented by the composition formula Fe100 atomic percent -a-b-c-x-y-z-tNiaSnbCrcPxCyBzSit, where 0 atomic percent ≤ a ≤ 10 atomic percent, 0 atomic percent ≤ b ≤ 3 atomic percent, 0 atomic percent ≤ c ≤ 6 atomic percent, 6.8 atomic percent ≤ x ≤ 13 atomic percent, 2.2 atomic percent ≤ y ≤ 13 atomic percent, 0 atomic percent ≤ z ≤ 9 atomic percent, and 0 atomic percent ≤ t ≤ 7 atomic percent. In the above composition formula, Ni, Sn, Cr, P, C, B, and Si are arbitrarily added elements.

    [0036] The additive amount a of Ni is preferably 0 atomic percent to 6 atomic percent and more preferably 0 atomic percent to 4 atomic percent. The additive amount b of Sn is preferably 0 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent and may range from 1 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent. The additive amount c of Cr is preferably 0 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent and more preferably 1 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent. The additive amount x of P is preferably 8.8 atomic percent or more in some cases. The additive amount y of C is preferably 4 atomic percent to 10 atomic percent and more preferably 5.8 atomic percent to 8.8 atomic percent in some cases. The additive amount z of B is preferably 0 atomic percent to 6 atomic percent and more preferably 0 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent. The additive amount t of Si is preferably 0 atomic percent to 6 atomic percent and more preferably 0 atomic percent to 2 atomic percent.

    [0037] The shape of power of the amorphous magnetic material, which is contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is not limited. The type of shape of the powder is the same as that of the crystalline magnetic material powder and therefore is not described. In relation to a production method, it is easy that the amorphous magnetic material is spherical or oval in some cases. In general, the amorphous magnetic material is harder than the crystalline magnetic material. Therefore, it is preferable that the crystalline magnetic material is non-spherical so as to be readily deformed during press-molding in some cases.

    [0038] The shape of the amorphous magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, may be a shape obtained in the course of producing the powder or a shape obtained by secondarily processing the produced powder. Examples of the former shape include a spherical shape, an oval shape, and a needle shape. An example of the latter shape is a flake shape.

    [0039] The particle diameter of the amorphous magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, is set in relation to the particle diameter of the crystalline magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1, as described above. In particular, the median diameter D50 (herein also referred to as the "first median diameter d1") of the amorphous magnetic material powder is greater than or equal to the median diameter D50 (herein also referred to as the "second median diameter d2") of the crystalline magnetic material powder. When the amorphous magnetic material powder and the crystalline magnetic material powder satisfy the above relation, the crystalline magnetic material powder, which is relatively soft, readily enters cavities formed by the amorphous magnetic material powder, which is relatively hard, and therefore the core alloy ratio is likely to be high. When the second median diameter d2 is excessively large, the core loss Pcv of the inductor including the dust core 1 is likely to be high in some cases. Therefore, the second median diameter d2 is preferably 10 µm or less in some cases.

    [0040] The ratio (first particle size ratio) of the 10% cumulative diameter D10a in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the amorphous magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1, to the 90% cumulative diameter D90b in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the crystalline magnetic material powder, which is contained in the dust core 1, ranges from 0.3 to 1.25. When the first particle size ratio is within this range, enhancing direct-current superposition characteristics of the inductor including the dust core 1 and suppressing the increase in core loss Pcv thereof can be both achieved. When the first particle size ratio is excessively low, the core loss Pcv of the inductor including the dust core 1 tends to increase significantly with the increase of the first mixing ratio. When the first particle size ratio is high, direct-current superposition characteristics of the inductor including the dust core 1 are likely to be improved with the increase of the first mixing ratio. However, when the first particle size ratio is excessively high, the core loss Pcv of the inductor including the dust core 1 tends to be high regardless of the first mixing ratio.

    (3) Binding component



    [0041] The dust core 1 may contain the binding component, which binds the crystalline magnetic material powder and the amorphous magnetic material powder to other materials contained in the dust core 1. The composition of the binding component is not limited and the binding component may be material contributing to fixing the amorphous magnetic material powder and the amorphous magnetic material powder (these powders are herein referred to as the "magnetic powders" in some cases), which are contained in the dust core 1 according to this embodiment. Examples of material making up the binding component include organic materials such as a resin material and the pyrolysis residue of the resin material (these are herein collectively referred to as the "resin material-based components") and inorganic materials. Examples of the resin material include acrylic resins, silicone resins, epoxy resins, phenol resins, urea resins, and melamine resins. An example of a binding component made of an inorganic material is a glass material such as waterglass. The binding component may be composed of a single type of material or different types of materials. The binding component may be a mixture of an organic material and an inorganic material.

    [0042] The binding component used is usually an insulating material. This enables insulating properties of the dust core 1 to be increased.

    2. Method for manufacturing dust core



    [0043] A method for manufacturing the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention is not particularly limited. Using a method below allows the dust core 1 to be more efficiently manufactured.

    [0044] The method for manufacturing the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention includes a molding step below and may further include a heat treatment step.

    (1) Molding step



    [0045] First, a mixture containing the magnetic powders and a component giving the binding component in the dust core 1 is prepared. The component (herein also referred to as the "binder component") giving the binding component is the binding component itself in some cases or a material different from the binding component in some cases. An example of the latter is the case where the binder component is the resin material and the binding component is the pyrolysis residue thereof.

    [0046] A molded product can be obtained by molding including press-molding the mixture. Pressing conditions are not limited and are determined on the basis of the composition of the binder component or the like. When the binder component is made of, for example, a thermosetting resin, the curing reaction of the resin is preferably allowed to proceed in a die by pressing and heating. In the case of compacting, although the pressing force is high, heating is not a necessary condition and pressing is performed in a short time.

    [0047] The case where the mixture is a granular powder and is compacted is described below in detail. The granular powder is excellent in handleability and can increase the workability of a compacting step which has a short molding time and which is excellent in production efficiency.

    (1-1) Granular powder



    [0048] The granular powder contains the magnetic powders and the binder component. The content of the binder component in the granular powder is not particularly limited. When the content thereof is excessively low, the binder component is unlikely to hold the magnetic powders. Furthermore, when the content of the binder component is excessively low, the binding component made of the pyrolysis residue of the binder component is unlikely to insulate the magnetic powders from each other in the dust core 1 obtained through the heat treatment step. However, when the content of the binder component is excessively high, the content of the binding component in the dust core 1 obtained through the heat treatment step is likely to be high. Increasing the content of the binding component in the dust core 1 is likely to reduce magnetic properties of the dust core 1. Therefore, the content of the binder component in the granular powder is preferably 0.5 mass percent to 5.0 mass percent with respect to the whole granular powder. From the viewpoint of stably reducing the possibility that the magnetic properties of the dust core 1 are reduced, the content of the binder component in the granular powder is preferably 1.0 mass percent to 3.5 mass percent with respect to the whole granular powder and more preferably 1.2 mass percent to 3.0 mass percent.

    [0049] The granular powder may contain a material other than the magnetic powders and the binder component. Examples of such a material include lubricants, silane coupling agents, and insulating fillers. When the granular powder contains a lubricant, the type thereof is not particularly limited. The lubricant may be organic or inorganic. Examples of an organic lubricant include metal soaps such as zinc stearate and aluminium stearate. It is conceivable that the organic lubricant evaporates in the heat treatment step and hardly remains in the dust core 1.

    [0050] A method for producing the granular powder is not particularly limited. The granular powder may be obtained in such a manner that components giving the granular powder are directly kneaded and an obtained kneaded product is crushed by a known process or in such a manner that slurry is prepared by adding a dispersion medium (for example, water) to the above components and is dried, followed by crushing. The particle size distribution of the granular powder may be controlled by sieving or classification after crushing.

    [0051] An example of a method for obtaining the granular powder from the above slurry is a method using a spray drier. As shown in Fig. 2, a rotor 201 is placed in a spray drier system 200 and slurry S is fed from an upper portion of the spray drier system 200 toward the rotor 201. The rotor 201 is rotating at a predetermined rotational speed to spray the slurry S in a chamber inside the spray drier system 200 in the form of small droplets by centrifugal force. Furthermore, hot air is introduced into the chamber inside the spray drier system 200, whereby a dispersion medium (water) contained in the slurry S in the form of small droplets is evaporated with the small droplets maintained. As a result, a granular powder P is formed from the slurry S. The granular powder P is collected from a lower portion of the spray drier system 200. The following parameters may be appropriately set: parameters such as the number of revolutions of the rotor 201, the temperature of the hot air introduced into the spray drier system 200, and the temperature of a lower portion of the chamber. Examples of the preset range of each of the parameters are as follows: the number of revolutions of the rotor 201 is 4,000 rpm to 6,000 rpm, the temperature of the hot air introduced into the spray drier system 200 is 130 °C to 170 °C, and the temperature of the lower portion of the chamber is 80 °C to 90 °C. The atmosphere and pressure in the chamber may be appropriately set. For example, the atmosphere in the chamber is an air atmosphere and the pressure therein is 2 mm H2O (about 0.02 kPa) in terms of the pressure difference from atmospheric pressure. The particle size distribution of the obtained granular powder P may be further controlled by sieving.

    (1-2) Pressing conditions



    [0052] Pressing conditions for compacting are not particularly limited and may be appropriately determined in consideration of the composition of the granular powder, the shape of a molded product, or the like. When the pressing force used to compact the granular powder is excessively low, the mechanical strength of the molded product is low. Therefore, the following problems are likely to occur: problems such as the reduction in handleability of the molded product and the reduction in mechanical strength of the dust core 1 obtained from the molded product. Furthermore, magnetic properties and/or insulating properties of the dust core 1 are reduced in some cases. However, when the pressing force used to compact the granular powder is excessively high, it is difficult to prepare a molding die capable of withstanding the pressing force. From the viewpoint of stably reducing the possibility that a compression-pressing step adversely affects mechanical properties and/or magnetic properties of the dust core 1 and the viewpoint of facilitating industrial mass production, the pressing force used to compact the granular powder is preferably 0.3 GPA to 2 GPa, more preferably 0.5 GPA to 2 GPa, and particularly preferably 0.8 GPA to 2 GPa.

    [0053] In compacting, pressing may be performed together with heating or may be performed at room temperature.

    (2) Heat treatment step



    [0054] The molded product obtained in the molding step may be the dust core 1 according to this embodiment. The dust core 1 may be obtained in such a manner that the molded product is subjected to the heat treatment step as described below.

    [0055] In the heat treatment step, magnetic properties are adjusted in such a manner that the distance between the magnetic powders is modified by heating the molded product obtained in the molding step and are also adjusted by reducing the strain imparted to the magnetic powders in the molding step, whereby the dust core 1 is obtained.

    [0056] Since the heat treatment step is intended to adjust the magnetic properties of the dust core 1 as described above, heat treatment conditions such as heat treatment temperature are set such that the magnetic properties of the dust core 1 are optimum. An example of a method for setting the heat treatment conditions is as follows: the heating temperature of the molded product is varied and other conditions such as a heating rate and a holding time at a heating temperature are kept constant.

    [0057] Standards for evaluating the magnetic properties of the dust core 1 to set the heat treatment conditions are not particularly limited. The core loss Pcv of the dust core 1 can be cited as an example of an evaluation item. In this case, the heating temperature of the molded product may be set such that the core loss Pcv of the dust core 1 is minimized. Conditions for measuring the core loss Pcv thereof are appropriately set. For example, conditions including a frequency of 100 kHz and a maximum effective magnetic flux density Bm of 100 mT are cited.

    [0058] An atmosphere for heat treatment is not particularly limited. In an oxidizing atmosphere, the possibility that the pyrolysis of the binder component proceeds excessively or the possibility that the oxidation of the magnetic powders proceeds is high. Therefore, heat treatment is preferably performed in an inert atmosphere such as a nitrogen or argon atmosphere or a reducing atmosphere such as a hydrogen atmosphere.

    3. Electronic/electric component



    [0059] An electronic/electric component according to an embodiment of the present invention includes the dust core 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, a coil, and connection terminals each connected to an end portion of the coil. Herein, at least one portion of the dust core 1 is placed so as to be located in an induced magnetic field generated by the current applied to the coil through the connection terminals.

    [0060] An example of the electronic/electric component is a toroidal coil 10 shown in Fig. 3. The toroidal coil 10 includes the dust core (toroidal core) 1, which is ring-shaped, and a coil 2a formed by winding a coated conductive wire 2 around the dust core (toroidal core) 1. End portions 2d and 2e of the coil 2a can be defined in sections of the conductive wire that are located between the coil 2a, which is composed of the wound coated conductive wire 2, and end portions 2b and 2c of the coated conductive wire 2. As described above, in the electronic/electric component according to this embodiment, a member making up the coil and a member making up the connection terminals may be the same.

    EXAMPLES



    [0061] The present invention is further described below in detail with reference to examples and the like. The scope of the present invention is not limited to the examples or the like.

    (EXAMPLES 1 to 24)


    (1) Preparation of Fe-based amorphous alloy powders



    [0062] Raw materials were weighed so as to give the Composition Fe71.4 atomic percentNi6 atomic percentCr2 atomic percentP10.8 atomic percentC7.8 atomic percentB2 atomic percent, followed by preparing seven types of powders (amorphous powders) of an amorphous magnetic material that had different particle size distributions by a water atomization method. The particle size distribution of each obtained amorphous magnetic material powder was measured with "Microtrac Particle Size Distribution Analyzer MT 3300EX" manufactured by Nikkiso Co., Ltd. in terms of a volume distribution, followed by determining the 10% cumulative diameter D10 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution, the 50% cumulative diameter (first median diameter d1) D50 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution, and the 90% cumulative diameter D90 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution. Furthermore, a powder of insulated carbonyl iron was prepared as a crystalline magnetic material. Parameters relating to the particle size distribution of this powder were as described below.

    The 10% cumulative diameter D10 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 2.13 µm

    The 50% cumulative diameter (second median diameter d2) D50 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 4.3 µm

    The 90% cumulative diameter D90 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 7.55 µm



    [0063] The first particle size ratio was calculated from these values. The results are shown in Table 1.

    (2) Preparation of granular powders



    [0064] Each of the obtained amorphous magnetic material powders was mixed with the crystalline magnetic material powder such that a first mixing ratio shown in Table 1 was obtained, whereby a magnetic powder was obtained. With water serving as a dispersion medium, 98.4 parts by mass of the obtained magnetic powder and 1.4 parts by mass of an insulating binding material made of an acrylic resin were mixed, whereby slurry was obtained.

    [0065] The obtained slurry was dried, followed by grinding and sieving with a sieve with 300 µm openings, whereby a granular powder composed of powder passing through a 300 µm mesh was obtained.

    (3) Compacting



    [0066] The obtained granular powder was filled into a die and was press-molded with a surface pressure of 1.96 GPa, whereby a ring-shaped molded product having an outside diameter of 20 mm, an inside diameter of 12.7 mm, and a thickness of 7 mm was obtained.

    (4) Heat treatment



    [0067] The obtained compact was put in a furnace with a nitrogen flow atmosphere and was heat-treated in such a manner that the temperature in the furnace was increased from room temperature (23 °C) to a temperature of 370 °C at a heating rate of 10 °C/minute and the molded product was held at this temperature for 1 hour and was then cooled to room temperature in the furnace, whereby a toroidal core composed of a dust core was obtained.
    [Table 1]
    ExamplesParticle diameter of amorphous powder/µmFirst mixing ratio (mass percent)First particle size ratio
    D10D50D90
    1 2.8 5.0 9.1 0 0.37
    2 2.8 5.0 9.1 5 0.37
    3 2.8 5.0 9.1 10 0.37
    4 2.8 5.0 9.1 20 0.37
    5 3.6 8.1 17.3 0 0.48
    6 3.6 8.1 17.3 10 0.48
    7 3.6 8.1 17.3 20 0.48
    8 7.2 11.4 19.7 0 0.95
    9 7.2 11.4 19.7 5 0.95
    10 7.2 11.4 19.7 10 0.95
    11 7.2 11.4 19.7 20 0.95
    12 7.0 15.4 27.2 20 0.93
    13 9.5 24.3 49.4 0 1.25
    14 9.5 24.3 49.4 5 1.25
    15 9.5 24.3 49.4 10 1.25
    16 9.5 24.3 49.4 15 1.25
    17 9.5 24.3 49.4 20 1.25
    18 9.5 24.3 49.4 35 1.25
    19 9.5 24.3 49.4 50 1.25
    20 10.7 29.0 81.8 20 1.42
    21 19.6 48.0 120.0 0 2.59
    22 19.6 48.0 120.0 3 2.59
    23 19.6 48.0 120.0 5 2.59
    24 19.6 48.0 120.0 10 2.59

    (Test Example 1) Measurement of core loss Pcv



    [0068] A toroidal coil was obtained by winding a coated copper wire around the primary side and secondary side of the toroidal core, prepared in each of Examples 1 to 24, 40 times and 10 times, respectively. The toroidal coil was measured for core loss Pcv (unit: kW/m3) at a measurement frequency of 100 kHz using a BH analyzer ("SY-8218" manufactured by Iwatsu Electric Co., Ltd.) under such conditions that the maximum effective magnetic flux density Bm was 100 mT. The results are shown in Table 2.

    (Test Example 2) Measurement of magnetic permeability



    [0069] A toroidal coil was obtained by winding a coated copper wire around the toroidal core prepared in each example 34 times. The toroidal coil was measured for initial magnetic permeability µ0 at a condition of 100 kHz using an impedance analyzer and was also measured for relative magnetic permeability µ5500 ("42841A" manufactured by HP Inc.) in such a state that a direct current was superimposed and the direct current-applied magnetic field obtained thereby was 5,500 A/m. The results are shown in Table 2.

    (Test Example 3) Measurement of core density and core alloy ratio



    [0070] The toroidal core prepared in each example was measured for size and weight. The density of the toroidal core was calculated from these values. The results are shown in Table 2. Since the specific gravity of the amorphous magnetic material was 7.348 g/cm3 and the specific gravity of the crystalline magnetic material was 7.874 g/cm3, the alloy specific gravity of magnetic powders contained in the toroidal core was determined using these values and the first mixing ratio. The core density determined in advance was divided by the alloy specific gravity, whereby the core alloy ratio of the toroidal core was determined. The results are shown in Table 2.
    [Table 2]
    ExamplesCore density (g/cm3)Core alloy ratio (mass percent)µ0µ5500Core loss Pcv (kW/m3)Remarks
    1 5.96 81.1 60.3 34.9 165 Comparative example
    2 6.09 82.6 59.7 36.7 300 Comparative example
    3 6.20 84.3 59.5 38.1 419 Inventive example
    4 6.37 86.7 61.0 40.7 706 comparative example
    5 6.09 82.9 76.3 37.0 116 Comparative example
    6 6.26 84.7 72.0 39.7 314 Inventive example
    7 6.40 86.0 68.5 41.9 486 comparative example
    8 5.86 8 66.1 35.6 177 Comparative example
    9 6.09 82.6 72.0 38.5 230 Comparative example
    10 6.25 84.6 76.1 41.2 283 Inventive example
    11 6.42 86.2 72.6 43.3 425 comparative examples
    12 6.43 86.3 69.2 44.6 530
    13 6.05 82.3 86.3 37.6 310 Comparative example
    14 6.16 83.5 82.2 40.0 346 Inventive example
    15 6.28 84.9 79.7 43.5 409 Inventive example
    16 6.33 85.3 75.1 44.7 435 Inventive example
    17 6.41 86.1 75.3 46.1 522 comparative examples
    18 6.54 86.9 67.0 46.2 740
    19 6.61 86.9 61.5 46.4 1009
    20 6.40 85.9 80.7 46.2 513
    21 6.00 82.0 68.0 35.0 450
    22 6.13 83.0 72.0 40.0 486
    23 6.16 83.5 73.0 43.0 513
    24 6.28 84.9 77.0 48.0 570


    [0071] Fig. 4 is a graph showing the relationship between µ5500 and the core alloy ratio. As shown in Fig. 4, it was observed that a dust core having higher core alloy ratio had higher µ5500 and tended to have enhanced direct-current superposition characteristics.

    [0072] Fig. 5 is a graph showing the relationship between the core loss Pcv and the first mixing ratio. It was observed that the core loss Pcv tended to increase with the increase of the first mixing ratio, that is, the increase in content of the crystalline magnetic material powder.

    [0073] Fig. 6 is a graph showing the influence of the first particle size ratio on the relationship between µ5500 and the first mixing ratio. It was observed that as the first particle size ratio was higher, the increase of µ5500 due to the increase of the first mixing ratio tended to be more significant. As confirmed using the case where the first particle size ratio was 1.25 as an example, it was confirmed that when the first mixing ratio was 20 mass percent or more, µ5500 tended to be unlikely to be increased even though the first mixing ratio was increased. From this tendency and the relationship between the first mixing ratio and the core loss Pcv, it was confirmed that the first mixing ratio had to be capped to about 20 mass percent.

    [0074] Fig. 7 is a graph showing the influence of the first particle size ratio on the relationship between the core loss Pcv and the first mixing ratio. It was observed that as the first particle size ratio was lower, the increase of core loss Pcv due to the increase of the first mixing ratio tended to be more significant. It was confirmed that as the first particle size ratio was higher, the core loss Pcv tended to be higher.

    [0075] In order to confirm the tendencies observed in Figs. 6 and 7, a slope S1 was determined by linearly approximating a plot of the first particle size ratio in the graph (the relationship between µ5500 and the first mixing ratio) shown in Fig. 6 and a slope S2 was determined by linearly approximating a plot of the first particle size ratio in the graph (the relationship between the core loss Pcv and the first mixing ratio) shown in Fig. 7. The results are shown in Table 3 and Fig. 8. Fig. 8 is a graph obtained by plotting the slopes S1 and S2 against the first particle size ratio on the horizontal axis.
    [Table 3]
    First particle size ratioSlope
    S1S2
    0.37 0.28 26.98
    0.48 0.32 18.49
    0.95 0.38 14.11
    1.25 0.44 12.48
    2.59 1.28 12.03


    [0076] As shown in Table 3 and Fig. 8, as the first particle size ratio is higher, the slope S1 is larger. This shows that µ5500 strongly depends on the first mixing ratio. This is possibly because when the first particle size ratio is high, the particle diameter of the amorphous magnetic material powder is relatively large, the surface area of the crystalline magnetic material powder is therefore small, and the amorphous magnetic material powder can be coated with a small amount of the crystalline magnetic material powder.

    [0077] On the other hand, as the first particle size ratio is lower, the slope S2 is larger. This shows that the core loss Pcv strongly depends on the first mixing ratio. When the slope S2 is 0.95 or more, the change of the slope S2 is small. Thus, it is clear that when the first particle size ratio is 0.95 or more, the core loss Pcv can be stably reduced. This is possibly because when the first particle size ratio is low, the particle diameter of the amorphous magnetic material powder is relatively small, cavities between the amorphous magnetic material powder are therefore small, and the amorphous magnetic material powder is strongly deformed so as to enter the cavities.

    (EXAMPLES 25 to 27)



    [0078] Raw materials were weighed so as to give the Composition Fe71.4 atomic percentNi6 atomic percentCr2 atomic percenfP10.8 atomic percentC7.8 atomic percentB2 atomic percent, followed by preparing three types of powders (amorphous powders) of an amorphous magnetic material that had different particle size distributions by a water atomization method. The particle size distribution of each of the obtained amorphous magnetic material powders was measured with "Microtrac Particle Size Distribution Analyzer MT 3300EX" manufactured by Nikkiso Co., Ltd. in terms of a volume distribution, followed by determining the 10% cumulative diameter D10 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution and the 50% cumulative diameter (first median diameter d1) D50 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution. These results are shown in Table 4. Furthermore, a powder of insulated carbonyl iron was prepared as a crystalline magnetic material. Parameters relating to the particle size distribution of this powder were as described below.

    The 10% cumulative diameter D10 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 2.13 µm

    The 50% cumulative diameter (second median diameter d2) D50 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 4.3 µm

    The 90% cumulative diameter D90 in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution: 7.55 µm



    [0079] The first particle size ratio was calculated from these values. The results are shown in Table 4. From the viewpoint of readily ascertaining tendencies, results obtained in some of the above-mentioned examples are also shown in Table 4.

    [Table 4]



    [0080] 



    [0081] Each of the amorphous magnetic material powders was mixed with the crystalline magnetic material powder such that a first mixing ratio shown in Table 4 was obtained, whereby a magnetic powder was obtained. A toroidal core composed of a dust core was obtained by the same procedure as that used in Examples 1 to 24.

    [0082] The initial magnetic permeability µ0 and the relative magnetic permeability µ5500 were measured by the same test as that performed in Test Example 2. The core alloy ratio was measured by the same test as that performed in Test Example 3. Measurement results and the rate of change are shown in Table 4. Fig. 9 is a graph showing measurement results obtained in Examples 25 to 27 together with measurement results obtained in Examples 7, 10, 11, and 20. In Fig. 9, open circles (

    ) represent results obtained in the case where the first mixing ratio is 10 mass percent (Examples 10 to 25 and 27) and solid circles (

    ) represent results obtained in the case where the first mixing ratio is 20 mass percent (Examples 7, 11, and 20). As shown in Fig. 9, it was confirmed that µ5500 tended to increase with the increase of the increase of the first particle size ratio regardless of whether the first mixing ratio was 10 mass percent or 20 mass percent.

    (Test Example 4) Measurement of degree of dispersion of cavities



    [0083] The toroidal core according to each of Examples 25 to 28 was cut, followed by observing a cross section thereof. Arbitrary three locations in the cross section were set to observation portions. In a field of view per location of about 120 µm × about 90 µm, an observation image was obtained using a secondary electron microscope.

    [0084] Fig. 10 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 25. Fig. 11 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 10. Fig. 12 is a binary image which is in a stage prior to obtaining a binary image shown in Fig. 11 and in which cavity portions based on pores of the magnetic powders remain. Fig. 13 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 26. Fig. 14 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 27. Fig. 15 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 7. Fig. 16 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 20. Fig. 17 is an image showing results obtained by binarizing one of three cross-sectional observation images of the toroidal core according to Example 11.

    [0085] Each observation image was automatically binarized as described below. First, the minimum in a histogram of a target image that was a measurement object was set to a threshold. The average luminance of pixels with a luminance less than or equal to the threshold and the average luminance of pixels with a luminance greater than the threshold were determined, followed by setting the intermediate between these average luminances to a new threshold. The average luminance of pixels with a luminance less than or equal to the new threshold and the average luminance of pixels with a luminance greater than the new threshold were determined, followed by setting the intermediate between these average luminances to a new threshold. In this way, a new threshold was repeatedly determined. When a new threshold was less than the immediately preceding threshold, this new threshold was set to a final threshold, whereby binarization was performed. Furthermore, after a median filter was used to remove noise, ultimate eroded points were determined with respect to a region corresponding to a cavity portion, whereby the cavity portion was divided. In this way, cavity portions in the observation image were identified.

    [0086] Herein, among a group of regions (the luminance gray-scale value in an image is 0) identified as cavity portions, those derived from pores formed in a magnetic powder as was clear from an initial observation image were judged to be no cavity portions and were processed into portions of the magnetic powder (in particular, the luminance gray-scale value (0) in the case of a cavity portion was replaced with the luminance gray-scale value (1) in the case of the magnetic powder) (refer to Figs. 11 and 12). In this way, the following image was obtained from each observation image: a binary image composed of a plurality of cavity portions (luminance gray-scale value: 0) independent of each other and a background (having a luminance gray-scale value of 0 and including the magnetic powder) (refer to Figs. 10, 11, and 13 to 17).

    [0087] Fig. 18 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 10, according to Example 25. Fig. 19 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 11, according to Example 10. Fig. 20 is a Voronoi diagram, prior to removing peripheral polygons, in a stage prior to obtaining the Voronoi diagram shown in Fig. 19. Fig. 21 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 13, according to Example 26. Fig. 22 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 14, according to Example 27. Fig. 23 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 15, according to Example 7. Fig. 24 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 16, according to Example 20. Fig. 25 is a Voronoi diagram prepared on the basis of a binary image, shown in Fig. 17 according to Example 11.

    [0088] A Voronoi diagram was obtained using an obtained binary image. The Voronoi diagram is a diagram obtained by connecting the bisectors between the closest cavity portions. Using the areas of a plurality of polygons shown in the Voronoi diagram enables the dispersion analysis of cavity portions. Herein, in the Voronoi diagram obtained from the binary image, polygons arranged to be in contact with the periphery (a side making up an end portion of the diagram) may possibly contain no appropriate information between the closest cavity portions. Therefore, in advance of performing the dispersion analysis of cavity portions using the Voronoi diagram, among polygons making up the Voronoi diagram, polygons (peripheral polygons) in contact with the periphery were removed (refer to Figs. 19 and 20), followed by performing the dispersion analysis of the cavity portions using the Voronoi diagram from which the peripheral polygons were removed.

    [0089] The degree of dispersion of cavities determined from the Voronoi diagram according to each example and the average thereof are shown in Table 5 together with the first particle size ratio obtained in the example. The term "degree of dispersion of cavities" refers to the value that is obtained in such a manner that the average area and area standard deviation of a plurality of polygons shown in a Voronoi diagram are determined and the area standard deviation is divided by the average area. The average area and area standard deviation of polygons determined from a Voronoi diagram are shown in Table 5.
    [Table 5]
    ExamplesFirst mixing ratioFirst particle size ratioAverage area of Voronoi diagram (µm2)Area standard deviation of Voronoi diagram (µm2)Degree of dispersion of cavitiesAverage degree of dispersion of cavities
    25 10 0.26 3.63 2.43 0.67 0.69
    3.52 2.48 0.70
    3.73 2.60 0.70
    10 10 0.95 8.50 8.67 1.02 1.01
    8.76 9.18 1.05
    10.13 9.77 0.96
    26 10 0.84 10.86 9.86 0.91 0.96
    9.62 9.88 1.03
    11.67 11.14 0.95
    27 10 2.38 26.34 41.12 1.56 1.84
    15.57 37.80 2.43
    25.15 38.14 1.52
    7 20 0.48 9.24 9.81 1.06 1.08
    7.33 7.65 1.04
    7.92 8.88 1.12
    20 20 1.42 7.38 11.41 1.55 1.42
    7.28 10.17 1.40
    5.26 6.86 1.31
    11 20 0.95 6.25 6.39 1.02 0.99
    6.45 6.29 0.97
    6.60 6.39 0.97


    [0090] Fig. 26 is a graph, prepared on the basis of Table 5, showing the relationship between the degree of dispersion of cavities (average) and the first particle size ratio. In Fig. 26, open circles (

    ) represent results obtained in the case where the first mixing ratio is 10 mass percent (Examples 10 to 25 and 27) and solid circles (

    ) represent results obtained in the case where the first mixing ratio is 20 mass percent (Examples 7, 11, and 20). As shown in Fig. 26, the degree of dispersion of cavities (average) and the first particle size ratio exhibited excellent linearity and the squared correlation coefficient thereof was 0.9015. Thus, it is possible that a cross section of a dust core is observed, a Voronoi diagram is prepared by the above-mentioned procedure, and the first particle size ratio of the dust core is estimated on the basis of the degree of dispersion of cavities determined from the Voronoi diagram.

    Industrial Applicability



    [0091] An electronic/electric component including a dust core according to the present invention can be preferably used as an inductor, such as a reactor, a transformer, or a choke coil, used in boosting circuits for hybrid vehicles, generators, and transforming stations.

    Reference Signs List



    [0092] 
    1
    Dust core (toroidal core)
    10
    Toroidal coil
    2
    Coated conductive wire
    2a
    Coil
    2b, 2c
    End portions of coated conductive wire 2
    2d, 2e
    End portions of coil 2a
    200
    Spray drier system
    201
    Rotor
    S
    Slurry
    P
    Granular powder



    Claims

    1. A dust core (1) containing a powder of a crystalline magnetic material and a powder of an amorphous magnetic material,
    wherein the sum of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the content of the amorphous magnetic material powder is 83 mass percent or more,
    the mass ratio of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder to the sum of the content of the crystalline magnetic material powder and the content of the amorphous magnetic material powder is 15 mass percent or less,
    the median diameter D50 of the amorphous magnetic material powder is greater than or equal to the median diameter D50 of the crystalline magnetic material powder, characterised in that the ratio of the 10% cumulative diameter D10a in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the amorphous magnetic material powder to the 90% cumulative diameter D90b in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the crystalline magnetic material powder ranges from 0.3 to 1.25.
     
    2. The dust core (1) according to Claim 1, wherein the 10% cumulative diameter D10a in the volume-based cumulative particle size distribution of the amorphous magnetic material powder is 9.5 µm or less.
     
    3. The dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 2, wherein the crystalline magnetic material contains one or more materials selected from the group consisting of Fe-Si-Cr alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Fe-Co alloys, Fe-V alloys, Fe-AI alloys, Fe-Si alloys, Fe-Si-AI alloys, carbonyl iron, and pure iron.
     
    4. The dust core (1) according to Claim 3, wherein the crystalline magnetic material is made of carbonyl iron.
     
    5. The dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 4, wherein the amorphous magnetic material contains one or more materials selected from the group consisting of Fe-Si-B alloys, Fe-P-C alloys, and Co-Fe-Si-B alloys.
     
    6. The dust (1) core according to Claim 5 wherein the amorphous magnetic material is made of an Fe-P-C alloy.
     
    7. The dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 6, wherein the crystalline magnetic material powder is made of an insulated material.
     
    8. The dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 7, wherein the median diameter D50 of the crystalline magnetic material powder is 10 µm or less.
     
    9. The dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 8, containing a binding component binding the crystalline magnetic material powder and the amorphous magnetic material powder to another material contained in the dust core.
     
    10. The dust core (1) according to Claim 9, wherein the binding component contains a sub-component based on a resin material.
     
    11. An inductor (10) comprising the dust core (1) according to any one of Claims 1 to 10, a coil (2a), and connection terminals (2b, 2c) each connected to an end portion (2d, 2e) of the coil (2a), wherein at least one portion of the dust core (1) is placed so as to be located in an induced magnetic field generated by the current applied to the coil (2a) through the connection terminals (2b, 2c).
     
    12. An electronic/electric device on which the inductor (10) according to Claim 11 is mounted, wherein the inductor is connected to a substrate through the connection terminals (2b, 2c).
     
    13. A method for manufacturing the dust core (1) according to Claim 10, comprising a molding step of obtaining a molded product by molding including press-molding a mixture containing the crystalline magnetic material powder, the amorphous magnetic material powder, and a binder component made of the resin material.
     
    14. The method according to Claim 13, wherein the molded product, which is obtained in the molding step, is the dust core (1).
     
    15. The method according to Claim 13, comprising a heat treatment step of obtaining the dust core (1) by heat-treating the molded product, which is obtained in the molding step.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Staubkern (1), der ein Pulver aus einem kristallinen magnetischen Material und ein Pulver aus einem amorphen magnetischen Material enthält,
    wobei die Summe des Gehalts des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischen Material und des Gehalts des Pulvers aus amorphem magnetischen Material 83 Masseprozent oder mehr beträgt,
    wobei das Massenverhältnis des Gehalts des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischen Material zu der Summe des Gehalts des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischen Material und des Gehalts des Pulvers aus amorphem magnetischen Material 15 Masseprozent oder weniger beträgt,
    wobei der mittlere Durchmesser D50 des Pulvers aus amorphen magnetischen Material größer als oder gleich dem mittleren Durchmesser D50 des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischem Material ist,
    dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass das Verhältnis des kumulativen Durchmessers D10a von 10% in der volumenbasierten kumulativen Partikelgrößenverteilung des Pulvers aus amorphem magnetischen Material zu dem kumulativen Durchmesser D90b von 90% in der volumenbasierten kumulativen Partikelgrößenverteilung des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischen Material im Bereich von 0,3 bis 1,25 liegt.
     
    2. Staubkern (1) nach Anspruch 1,
    wobei der kumulative Durchmesser D10a von 10% in der volumenbasierten kumulativen Partikelgrößenverteilung des Pulvers aus amorphem magnetischen Material 9,5 µm oder weniger beträgt.
     
    3. Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 2,
    wobei das kristalline magnetische Material ein oder mehrere Materialien enthält, die aus der Gruppe ausgewählt sind, die aus Fe-Si-Cr-Legierungen, Fe-Ni-Legierungen, Fe-Co-Legierungen, Fe-V-Legierungen, Fe-Al-Legierungen, Fe-Si-Legierungen, Fe-Si-Al-Legierungen, Carbonyl-Eisen und reinem Eisen besteht.
     
    4. Staubkern (1) nach Anspruch 3,
    wobei das kristalline magnetische Material aus Carbonyl-Eisen besteht.
     
    5. Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 4,
    wobei das amorphe magnetische Material ein oder mehrere Materialien enthält, die aus der Gruppe ausgewählt sind, die aus Fe-Si-B-Legierungen, Fe-P-C-Legierungen und Co-Fe-Si-B-Legierungen besteht.
     
    6. Staubkern (1) nach Anspruch 5,
    wobei das amorphe magnetische Material aus einer Fe-P-C-Legierung besteht.
     
    7. Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 6,
    wobei das Pulver aus kristallinem magnetischen Material aus einem isolierten Material besteht.
     
    8. Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 7,
    wobei der mittlere Durchmesser D50 des Pulvers aus kristallinem magnetischen Material 10 µm oder weniger beträgt.
     
    9. Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 8,
    der eine Bindungskomponente enthält, die das Pulver aus kristallinem magnetischen Material und das Pulver aus amorphem magnetischen Material an ein weiteres in dem Staubkern enthaltenes Material bindet.
     
    10. Staubkern (1) nach Anspruch 9,
    wobei die Bindungskomponente eine Unterkomponente enthält, die auf einem Harzmaterial basiert.
     
    11. Induktor (10), der den Staubkern (1) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 10, eine Spule (2a) und Anschlussklemmen (2b, 2c) aufweist, die jeweils mit einem Endbereich (2d, 2e) der Spule (2a) verbunden sind, wobei mindestens ein Bereich des Staubkerns (1) derart angeordnet ist, dass er sich in einem induzierten Magnetfeld befindet, das durch den Strom erzeugt wird, der über die Anschlussklemmen (2b, 2c) an die Spule (2a) angelegt wird.
     
    12. Elektronische/elektrische Vorrichtung, an der der Induktor (10) nach Anspruch 11 angebracht ist, wobei der Induktor über die Anschlussklemmen (2b, 2c) mit einem Substrat verbunden ist.
     
    13. Verfahren zum Herstellen des Staubkerns (1) nach Anspruch 10,
    das einen Formgebungsschritt aufweist zum Erhalten eines geformten Produkts durch Formen, einschließlich Pressformen, einer Mischung, die das Material aus kristallinem magnetischen Material, das Material aus amorphem magnetischen Material und eine Bindemittelkomponente aus dem Harzmaterial enthält.
     
    14. Verfahren nach Anspruch 13,
    wobei das geformte Produkt, das in dem Formgebungsschritt erhalten wird, der Staubkern (1) ist.
     
    15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 13,
    das einen Wärmebehandlungsschritt aufweist zum Erhalten des Staubkerns (1) durch Wärmebehandlung des geformten Produkts, das in dem Formgebungsschritt erhalten wird.
     


    Revendications

    1. Noyau aggloméré (1) contenant une poudre constituée d'une matière magnétique cristalline et une poudre constituée d'une matière magnétique amorphe ; dans lequel
    la somme de la teneur en poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline et de la teneur en poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe s'élève à 83 % en masse ou plus ;
    le rapport massique de la teneur en poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline à la somme de la teneur en poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline et de la teneur en poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe s'élève à 15 % en masse ou moins ;
    le diamètre médian D50 de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe est supérieur ou égal au diamètre médian D50 de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline ;
    caractérisé en ce que le rapport des diamètres cumulés à 10% D10a dans les distributions granulométriques cumulées basées sur les volumes, de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe, aux diamètres cumulés à 90 % D90b dans les distributions granulométriques cumulées basées sur les volumes, de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline, se situe dans une plage de 0,3 à 1,25.
     
    2. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les diamètres cumulés à 10 % D10a dans les distributions granulométriques cumulées basées sur les volumes, de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe s'élève à 9,5 µm ou moins.
     
    3. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 2, dans lequel la matière magnétique cristalline contient une ou plusieurs matières choisies parmi le groupe constitué par des alliages de Fe-Si-Cr, des alliages de Fe-Ni, des alliages de Fe-Co, des alliages de Fe-V, des alliages de Fe-Al, des alliages de Fe-Si, des alliages de Fe-Si-Al, du fer-carbonyle et du fer pur.
     
    4. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon la revendication 3, dans lequel la matière magnétique cristalline est réalisée à partir de fer-carbonyle.
     
    5. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 4, dans lequel la matière magnétique amorphe contient une ou plusieurs matières choisies parmi le groupe constitué par des alliages de Fe-Si-B, des alliages de Fe-P-C, et des alliages de Co-Fe-Si-B.
     
    6. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon la revendication 5, dans lequel la matière magnétique amorphe est réalisée à partir d'un alliage de Fe-P-C.
     
    7. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 6, dans lequel la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline est réalisée à partir d'un matériau isolant.
     
    8. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 7, dans lequel le diamètre médian D50 de la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline s'élève à 10 µm ou moins.
     
    9. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 8, comprenant un composant de liaison qui lie la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline et la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe à une autre matière que contient le noyau aggloméré.
     
    10. Noyau aggloméré (1) selon la revendication 9, dans lequel le composant de liaison contient un sous-composant à base d'une matière résineuse.
     
    11. Inducteur (10) comprenant le noyau aggloméré (1) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 10, une bobine (2a) et des bornes de connexion (2b, 2c), chacune de celles-ci étant reliée à une portion terminale (2d, 2e) de la bobine (2a) ; dans lequel au moins une portion du noyau aggloméré (1) est placée d'une manière telle qu'elle vient se situer dans un champ magnétique induit généré par le courant appliqué sur la bobine (2a) par l'intermédiaire des bornes de connexion (2b, 2c).
     
    12. Dispositif électronique/électrique sur lequel est monté l'inducteur (10) selon la revendication 11, dans lequel l'inducteur est relié à un substrat par l'intermédiaire des bornes de connexion (2b, 2c).
     
    13. Procédé pour la fabrication du noyau aggloméré (1) selon la revendication 10, comprenant une étape de moulage pour obtenir un produit moulé par l'intermédiaire d'un moulage, y compris un moulage sous pression, d'un mélange contenant la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique cristalline, la poudre constituée de la matière magnétique amorphe et un composant faisant office de liant constitué de la matière à base de résine.
     
    14. Procédé selon la revendication 13, dans lequel le produit moulé, que l'on obtient dans l'étape de moulage, représente le noyau aggloméré (1).
     
    15. Procédé selon la revendication 13, comprenant une étape de traitement thermique pour obtenir le noyau aggloméré (1 ) par le fait de soumettre à un traitement thermique le produit moulé que l'on obtient dans l'étape de moulage.
     




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    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description