(19)
(11)EP 3 304 824 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
11.12.2019 Bulletin 2019/50

(21)Application number: 16729446.1

(22)Date of filing:  01.06.2016
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H04L 12/26(2006.01)
H04L 29/06(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/US2016/035351
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/196686 (08.12.2016 Gazette  2016/49)

(54)

POLICY-DRIVEN COMPLIANCE

RICHTLINIENGESTEUERTE KONFORMITÄT

CONFORMITÉ GÉRÉE PAR LA POLITIQUE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 05.06.2015 US 201562171899 P
19.04.2016 US 201615133155

(43)Date of publication of application:
11.04.2018 Bulletin 2018/15

(73)Proprietor: Cisco Technology, Inc.
San Jose, CA 95134 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • GUPTA, Sunil Kumar
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • YADAV, Navindra
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • WATTS, Michael Standish
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • PARANDEHGHEIBI, Ali
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • GANDHAM, Shashidhar
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • KULSHRESHTHA, Ashutosh
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)
  • DEEN, Khawar
    San Jose, California 95134 (US)

(74)Representative: Jarrett, Daniel Phillip et al
Kilburn & Strode LLP Lacon London 84 Theobalds Road
London WC1X 8NL
London WC1X 8NL (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 2 045 974
US-A1- 2013 290 521
US-B1- 7 610 330
US-A1- 2011 069 685
US-A1- 2015 142 962
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD



    [0001] The present technology pertains to compliance and more specifically pertains to effecting compliance via network policies.

    BACKGROUND



    [0002] Network attacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated and malicious, and the risk of data breaches and their consequences grows. Failure to thwart attacks can damage a business's reputation and result in loss of revenue. In addition, governments and other authoritative bodies are taking on a more active role in protecting individual's sensitive electronic information. For example, in the United States and abroad, statutes and standards such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Sarbanes Oxley (SOX), and the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) have been put in place for enterprises to take appropriate steps to ensure the proper use and protection of both corporate and personal communications and information. These regulations and standards are often backed by financial penalties for public or private organizations that fail to comply or where personal data is actually breached.

    [0003] Compliance can be a state of comporting with governmental regulations, industry standards, and similar guidelines, or the process toward this state. Conventional approaches for compliance may be inadequate to the challenges facing networks today. Many solutions tend to focus on the network edge (i.e., north-south traffic). Thus, networks using these solutions may be especially vulnerable to attacks occurring within the network (i.e., east-west traffic) and are likely to be non-compliant. Conventional techniques are also typically reactive and cannot resolve security breaches in real time or substantially real time. In addition, conventional networks often fail to gather all relevant information for preventing, diagnosing, and remedying malicious network activity.

    [0004] US 2011/069685 describes a system and methodology that facilitates signaling-less call setup and teardown by employing observed Quality of Experience (QoE) and resource demands. Moreover, the system provides an environment for supersonic treatment of observed QoE and Quality of Service (QoS) demands for mobile applications. Specifically, a monitoring component is employed to determine session state information associated with a traffic flow, which includes observed QoE and resource demand data. The session state information is stored in a shared memory location and can be analyzed to modify and/or create a network policy for the traffic flow. The network policy is applied to one or more traffic flows to minimize signaling exchanges between a communication network and a mobile station.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES



    [0005] In order to describe the manner in which the above-recited and other advantages and features of the disclosure can be obtained, a more particular description of the principles briefly described above will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments that are illustrated in the appended drawings. Understanding that these drawings depict only example embodiments of the disclosure and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope, the principles herein are described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

    FIG. 1 illustrates a network traffic monitoring system in accordance with an example embodiment;

    FIG. 2 illustrates a policy engine in accordance with an example embodiment;

    FIG. 3A-3C illustrates a compliance mapping in accordance with an example embodiment;

    FIG. 4 illustrates a network environment in accordance with an example embodiment;

    FIG. 5 shows an example process for providing compliance via network policies in accordance with an example embodiment; and

    FIGS. 6A and 6B show systems in accordance with some example embodiments.


    DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS



    [0006] The detailed description set forth below is intended as a description of various configurations of example embodiments and is not intended to represent the only configurations in which the subject matter of this disclosure can be practiced. The appended drawings are incorporated herein and constitute a part of the detailed description. The detailed description includes specific details for the purpose of providing a more thorough understanding of the subject matter of this disclosure. However, it will be clear and apparent that the subject matter of this disclosure is not limited to the specific details set forth herein and may be practiced without these details. In some instances, structures and components are shown in block diagram form in order to avoid obscuring the concepts of the subject matter of this disclosure. The scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims.

    Overview



    [0007] A network can achieve compliance by defining and enforcing a set of network policies to secure electronic information subject to a governmental regulation or an industry standard (i.e., protected electronic information). The network can monitor network information, host and/or endpoint information, process information, and user information for traffic passing through the network using a sensor network that provides multiple perspectives for the traffic. The sensor network can include sensors for networking devices, physical servers, hypervisors or shared kernels, and virtual partitions (e.g., virtual machines (VMs) or containers), and other network elements. The network can analyze the network information, host and/or endpoint information, process information, and user information to determine one or more policies for each flow. The network can determine an expected network action based on the policies for the flow. These network actions can include forwarding traffic, dropping traffic, marking traffic for a particular quality of service (QoS), redirecting traffic using a specific route, and selecting a service graph for traffic (e.g., forwarding traffic through a set of network service functions, such as a firewall, load balancer, wide area network (WAN) optimizer, among other network services). The network can update policy information based on comparisons between expected network actions to be performed on the traffic and actual network actions performed on the traffic. The policy information can be utilized for compliance reporting or investigating policy non-conformance.

    Description



    [0008] Various embodiments of the disclosure are discussed in detail below. While specific implementations are discussed, it should be understood that this is done for illustrative purposes only. A person skilled in the relevant art will recognize that other components and configurations may be used without departing from the scope of the disclosure.

    [0009] Systems and approaches in accordance with various embodiments of the present technology may overcome the foregoing and other limitations with conventional techniques by collecting, from multiple perspectives, a more thorough data set for analyzing compliance; designing dynamic network policies that account for the current states of hosts and/or endpoints, processes, and users; and tracking both conformance and non-conformance of network policies.

    [0010] Conventional compliance solutions are traditionally limited to packet data captured by networking devices. In some example embodiments, networks can be configured with sensors at multiple points, including on networking devices (e.g., switches, routers, gateways, firewalls, deep packet inspectors, traffic monitors, load balancers, etc.), physical servers, hypervisors or shared kernels, virtual partitions (e.g., VMs or containers), and other network elements. This can provide a more comprehensive view of the network. Further, network traffic data (e.g., flows) can be associated with host and/or endpoint data (e.g., host/endpoint name, operating system, CPU usage, network usage, disk space, logged users, scheduled jobs, open files, information regarding files stored on a host/endpoint, etc.), process data (e.g., process name, ID, parent process ID, path, CPU utilization, memory utilization, etc.), user data (e.g., user name, ID, login time, etc.), and other collectible data to provide more insight into network activity.

    [0011] Conventional approaches to compliance are also limited to static policies or rules such as access control lists (ACLs). For example, conventional network policies are an "Allow" rule for forwarding incoming traffic corresponding to a source address or a "Deny" rule for dropping incoming traffic. When the state of the endpoint changes and the traffic is to be permitted or denied, there can be a delay because conventional networks typically require manual intervention to change the appropriate policies. Further, propagating new policies throughout the network can compound the delay. In various example embodiments, networks can employ dynamic policies based on the state of a host and/or endpoint, process, and/or user associated with a flow. Networks can initially associate traffic with a first endpoint group (EPG) and then reassign traffic to one or more second EPGs if a host and/or endpoint state, process state, or user state changes.

    [0012] Compliance addresses the areas of confidentiality, integrity, availability, and auditability. Confidentiality tackles the challenges of protecting data as it traverses the network, limiting interception of data, and-in the event of interception-limiting usability of data by unauthorized persons. Integrity pertains to protection of data against improper alteration or destruction, and ensures that data is accurate and complete, and that accuracy and completeness are maintained. Availability is directed toward providing access to data by authorized persons at specified times. Auditability concerns providing proof that a network conforms to regulations, standards, and similar guidelines. Conventional compliance solutions often fail to address one or more of these aspects of compliance. For example, to the extent conventional networks are capable of monitoring security threats, these networks are incapable of verifying no security threat occurred. In various example embodiments, networks can monitor, log, and report compliance and non-compliance.

    [0013] Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 is an illustration of a network traffic monitoring system 100 in accordance with an example embodiment. The network traffic monitoring system 100 can include a configuration manager 102, sensors 104, a collector module 106, a data mover module 108, an analytics engine 110, and a presentation module 112. In an example embodiment of FIG. 1, the analytics engine 110 is also shown in communication with out-of-band data sources 114, third party data sources 116, and a network controller 118.

    [0014] The configuration manager 102 can be used to provision and maintain the sensors 104, including installing sensor software or firmware in various nodes of a network, configuring the sensors 104, updating the sensor software or firmware, among other sensor management tasks. For example, the sensors 104 can be implemented as virtual partition images (e.g., virtual machine (VM) images or container images), and the configuration manager 102 can distribute the images to host machines. In general, a virtual partition may be an instance of a VM, container, sandbox, or other isolated software environment. The software environment may include an operating system and application software. For software running within a virtual partition, the virtual partition may appear to be, for example, one of many servers or one of many operating systems executed on a single physical server. The configuration manager 102 can instantiate a new virtual partition or migrate an existing partition to a different physical server. The configuration manager 102 can also be used to configure the new or migrated sensor.

    [0015] The configuration manager 102 can monitor the health of the sensors 104. For instance, the configuration manager 102 may request for status updates and/or receive heartbeat messages, initiate performance tests, generate health checks, and perform other health monitoring tasks. In an example embodiment, the configuration manager 102 can also authenticate the sensors 104. For example, the sensors 104 can be assigned a unique identifier, such as by using a one-way hash function of a sensor's basic input/out system (BIOS) universally unique identifier (UUID) and a secret key stored by the configuration image manager 102. The UUID can be a large number that may be difficult for a malicious sensor or other device or component to guess. In an example embodiment, the configuration manager 102 can keep the sensors 104 up to date by installing the latest versions of sensor software and/or applying patches. The configuration manager 102 can obtain these updates automatically from a local source or the Internet.

    [0016] The sensors 104 can reside on various nodes of a network, such as a virtual partition (e.g., VM or container) 120; a hypervisor or shared kernel managing one or more virtual partitions and/or physical servers 122, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) 124 of a switch, router, gateway, or other networking device, or a packet capture (pcap) 126 appliance (e.g., a standalone packet monitor, a device connected to a network devices monitoring port, a device connected in series along a main trunk of a datacenter, or similar device) or other component of a network operating system. The sensors 104 can monitor network traffic between nodes, and send network traffic data and corresponding data (e.g., host data, process data, user data, etc.) to the collectors 108 for storage. For example, the sensors 104 can sniff packets being sent over its hosts' physical or virtual network interface card (NIC), or individual processes can be configured to report network traffic and corresponding data to the sensors 104. Incorporating the sensors 104 on multiple nodes and within multiple partitions of some nodes of the network can provide for robust capture of network traffic and corresponding data. In an example embodiment, each node of the network (e.g., VM, container, or other virtual partition 120, hypervisor, shared kernel, or physical server 122, ASIC 124, pcap 126, etc.) includes a respective sensor 104. However, it should be understood that various software and hardware configurations can be used to implement the sensor network 104.

    [0017] As the sensors 104 capture communications and corresponding data, they may continuously send network traffic and corresponding data to the collectors 108. The network traffic data can include metadata relating to a packet, a collection of packets, a flow, a group of flows, etc. That is, the network traffic data can generally include any information describing communication on all layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model. For example, the network traffic data can include source/destination MAC address, source/destination IP address, protocol, port number, etc. In some example embodiments, the network traffic data can also include summaries of network activity or other network statistics such as number of packets, number of bytes, number of flows, bandwidth usage, response time, latency, packet loss, jitter, and other network statistics.

    [0018] The sensors 104 can also determine additional data for each session, bidirectional flow, flow, packet, or other more granular or less granular network communication. The additional data can include host and/or endpoint information, virtual partition information, sensor information, process information, user information, tenant information, application information, network topology, application dependency mapping, cluster information, or other information corresponding to each flow.

    [0019] In some example embodiments, the sensors 104 can perform some preprocessing of the network traffic and corresponding data before sending the data to the collectors 108. For example, the sensors 104 can remove extraneous or duplicative data or they can create summaries of the data (e.g., latency, number of packets per flow, number of bytes per flow, number of flows, etc.). In some example embodiments, the sensors 104 can be configured to only capture certain types of connection information and disregard the rest. In some example embodiments, the sensors 104 can be configured to capture only a representative sample of packets (e.g., every 1,000th packet or other suitable sample rate) and corresponding data.

    [0020] Since the sensors 104 may be located throughout the network, network traffic and corresponding data can be collected from multiple vantage points or multiple perspectives in the network to provide a more comprehensive view of network behavior. The capture of network traffic and corresponding data from multiple perspectives rather than just at a single sensor located in the data path or in communication with a component in the data path, allows data to be correlated from the various data sources, which may be used as additional data points the analytics engine 110. Further, collecting network traffic and corresponding data from multiple points of view ensures more accurate data is captured. For example, a conventional sensor network may be limited to sensors running on external-facing network devices (e.g., routers, switches, network appliances, etc.) such that east-west traffic, including VM-to-VM or container-to-container traffic on a same host, may not be monitored. In addition, packets that are dropped before traversing a network device or packets containing errors may not be accurately monitored by the conventional sensor network. The sensor network 104 of various example embodiments substantially mitigates or eliminates these issues altogether by locating sensors at multiple points of potential failure. Moreover, the network traffic monitoring system 100 can verify multiple instances of data for a flow (e.g., source endpoint flow data, network device flow data, and endpoint flow data) against one another.

    [0021] In some example embodiments, the network traffic monitoring system 100 can assess a degree of accuracy of flow data sets from multiple sensors and utilize a flow data set from a single sensor determined to be the most accurate and/or complete. The degree of accuracy can be based on factors such as network topology (e.g., a sensor closer to the source may be more likely to be more accurate than a sensor closer to the destination), a state of a sensor or a node hosting the sensor (e.g., a compromised sensor/node may have less accurate flow data than an uncompromised sensor/node), or flow data volume (e.g., a sensor capturing a greater number of packets for a flow may be more accurate than a sensor capturing a smaller number of packets).

    [0022] In some example embodiments, the network traffic monitoring system 100 can assemble the most accurate flow data set and corresponding from multiple sensors. For instance, a first sensor along a data path may capture data for a first packet of a flow but may be missing data for a second packet of the flow while the situation is reversed for a second sensor along the data path. The network traffic monitoring system 100 can assemble data for the flow from the first packet captured by the first sensor and the second packet captured by the second sensor.

    [0023] As discussed, the sensors 104 can send network traffic data to the collectors 106. In an example embodiment, each sensor can be assigned to a primary collector and a secondary collector as part of a high availability scheme. If the primary collector fails or communications between the sensor and the primary collector are not otherwise possible, a sensor can send its network traffic and corresponding data to the secondary collector. In another example embodiment, the sensors 104 are not assigned specific collectors but the network traffic monitoring system can determine an optimal collector for receiving the network traffic and corresponding data through a discovery process. For example, a sensor can change where it sends it network traffic data if its environments changes, such as if a default collector fails or if the sensor is migrated to a new location and it would be optimal for the sensor to send its data to a different collector. For instance, it may be preferable for the sensor to send its network traffic and corresponding data on a particular path and/or to a particular collector based on latency, shortest path, monetary cost (e.g., using private resources versus a public resources provided by a public cloud provider), error rate, or some combination of these factors. In another example embodiment, a sensor can send different types of network traffic and corresponding data to different collectors. For example, the sensor can send network traffic data and corresponding related to one type of process to one collector and network traffic and corresponding data related to another type of process to another collector.

    [0024] The collectors 106 can be any type of storage medium that can serve as a repository for the network traffic and corresponding data recorded by the sensors 104. In an example embodiment, data storage for the collectors 106 is located in an in-memory database, such as dashDB from IBM®, although it should be appreciated that the data storage for the collectors 106 can be any software and/or hardware capable of providing rapid random access speeds typically used for analytics software. In various example embodiments, the collectors 106 can utilize solid state drives, disk drives, magnetic tape drives, or a combination of the foregoing according to cost, responsiveness, and size requirements. Further, the collectors 106 can utilize various database structures such as a normalized relational database or a NoSQL database, among others.

    [0025] In some example embodiments, the collectors 106 may only serve as network storage for the network traffic monitoring system 100. In such example embodiments, the network traffic monitoring system 100 can include a data mover module 108 for retrieving data from the collectors 106 and making the data available to network clients, such as the components of the analytics engine 110. In effect, the data mover module 108 can serve as a gateway for presenting network-attached storage to the network clients. In other example embodiments, the collectors 106 can perform additional functions, such as organizing, summarizing, and preprocessing data. For example, the collectors 106 can tabulate how often packets of certain sizes or types are transmitted from different nodes of the network. The collectors 106 can also characterize the traffic flows going to and from various nodes. In some example embodiments, the collectors 106 can match packets based on sequence numbers, thus identifying traffic flows and connection links. As it may be inefficient to retain all data indefinitely in certain circumstances, in some example embodiments, the collectors 106 can periodically replace detailed network traffic and corresponding data with consolidated summaries. In this manner, the collectors 106 can retain a complete dataset describing one period (e.g., the past minute or other suitable period of time), with a smaller dataset of another period (e.g., the previous 2-10 minutes or other suitable period of time), and progressively consolidate network traffic data of other periods of time (e.g., day, week, month, year, etc.). In some example embodiments, network traffic and corresponding data for a set of flows identified as normal or routine can be winnowed at an earlier period of time while a more complete data set may be retained for a lengthier period of time for another set of flows identified as anomalous or as an attack.

    [0026] Computer networks may be exposed to a variety of different attacks that expose vulnerabilities of computer systems in order to compromise their security. Some network traffic may be associated with malicious programs or devices. The analytics engine 110 may be provided with examples of network states corresponding to an attack and network states corresponding to normal operation. The analytics engine 110 can then analyze network traffic and corresponding data to recognize when the network is under attack. In some example embodiments, the network may operate within a trusted environment for a period of time so that the analytics engine 110 can establish a baseline of normal operation. Since malware is constantly evolving and changing, machine learning may be used to dynamically update models that are used to identify malicious traffic patterns. Machine learning algorithms may be used to provide for the identification of anomalies within the network traffic based on dynamic modeling of network behavior.

    [0027] In some example embodiments, the analytics engine 110 may be used to identify observations which differ from other examples in a dataset. For example, if a training set of example data with known outlier labels exists, supervised anomaly detection techniques may be used. Supervised anomaly detection techniques utilize data sets that have been labeled as normal and abnormal and train a classifier. In a case in which it is unknown whether examples in the training data are outliers, unsupervised anomaly techniques may be used. Unsupervised anomaly detection techniques may be used to detect anomalies in an unlabeled test data set under the assumption that the majority of instances in the data set are normal by looking for instances that seem to fit to the remainder of the data set.

    [0028] In an example embodiment, the analytics engine 110 can include a data lake 130, an application dependency mapping (ADM) module 140, and elastic processing engines 150. The data lake 130 is a large-scale storage repository that provides massive storage for various types of data, enormous processing power, and the ability to handle nearly limitless concurrent tasks or jobs. In an example embodiment, the data lake 130 is implemented using the Hadoop® Distributed File System (HDFS™) from Apache® Software Foundation of Forest Hill, Maryland. HDFS™ is a highly scalable and distributed file system that can scale to thousands of cluster nodes, millions of files, and petabytes of data. HDFS™ is optimized for batch processing where data locations are exposed to allow computations to take place where the data resides. HDFS™ provides a single namespace for an entire cluster to allow for data coherency in a write-once, read-many access model. That is, clients can only append to existing files in the node. In HDFS™, files are separated into blocks, which are typically 64 MB in size and are replicated in multiple data nodes. Clients access data directly from data nodes.

    [0029] In an example embodiment, the data mover 108 receives raw network traffic and corresponding data from the collectors 106 and distributes or pushes the data to the data lake 130. The data lake 130 can also receive and store out-of-band data 114, such as statuses on power levels, network availability, server performance, temperature conditions, cage door positions, and other data from internal sources, and third party data 116, such as security reports (e.g., provided by Cisco® Systems, Inc. of San Jose, California, Arbor Networks® of Burlington, Massachusetts, Symantec® Corp. of Sunnyvale, California, Sophos® Group plc of Abingdon, England, Microsoft® Corp. of Seattle, Washington, Verizon® Communications, Inc. of New York, New York, among others), geolocation data, IP watch lists, Whois data, configuration management database (CMDB) or configuration management system (CMS) as a service, and other data from external sources. In another example embodiment, the data lake 130 may instead fetch or pull raw traffic and corresponding data from the collectors 106 and relevant data from the out-of-band data sources 114 and the third party data sources 116. In yet another example embodiment, the functionality of the collectors 106, the data mover 108, the out-of-band data sources 114, the third party data sources 116, and the data lake 130 can be combined. Various combinations and configurations are possible as would be known to one of ordinary skill in the art.

    [0030] Each component of the data lake 130 can perform certain processing of the raw network traffic data and/or other data (e.g., host data, process data, user data, out-of-band data, third party data, etc.) to transform the raw data to a form useable by the elastic processing engines 150. In an example embodiment, the data lake 130 can include repositories for flow attributes 132, host and/or endpoint attributes 134, process attributes 136, and policy attributes 138. In some embodiments, the data lake 130 can also include repositories for VM or container attributes, application attributes, tenant attributes, network topology, application dependency maps, cluster attributes, etc.

    [0031] The flow attributes 132 relate to information about flows traversing the network. A flow is generally one or more packets sharing certain attributes that are sent within a network within a specified period of time. The flow attributes 132 can include packet header fields such as a source address (e.g., Internet Protocol (IP) address, Media Access Control (MAC) address, Domain Name System (DNS) name, or other network address), source port, destination address, destination port, protocol type, class of service, among other fields. The source address may correspond to a first endpoint (e.g., network device, physical server, virtual partition, etc.) of the network, and the destination address may correspond to a second endpoint, a multicast group, or a broadcast domain. The flow attributes 132 can also include aggregate packet data such as flow start time, flow end time, number of packets for a flow, number of bytes for a flow, the union of TCP flags for a flow, among other flow data.

    [0032] The host and/or endpoint attributes 134 describe host and/or endpoint data for each flow, and can include host and/or endpoint name, network address, operating system, CPU usage, network usage, disk space, ports, logged users, scheduled jobs, open files, and information regarding files and/or directories stored on a host and/or endpoint (e.g., presence, absence, or modifications of log files, configuration files, device special files, or protected electronic information). As discussed, in some embodiments, the host and/or endpoints attributes 134 can also include the out-of-band data 114 regarding hosts such as power level, temperature, and physical location (e.g., room, row, rack, cage door position, etc.) or the third party data 116 such as whether a host and/or endpoint is on an IP watch list or otherwise associated with a security threat, Whois data, or geocoordinates. In some embodiments, the out-of-band data 114 and the third party data 116 may be associated by process, user, flow, or other more granular or less granular network element or network communication.

    [0033] The process attributes 136 relate to process data corresponding to each flow, and can include process name (e.g., bash, httpd, netstat, etc.), ID, parent process ID, path (e.g., /usr2/username/bin/, /usr/local/bin, /usr/bin, etc.), CPU utilization, memory utilization, memory address, scheduling information, nice value, flags, priority, status, start time, terminal type, CPU time taken by the process, the command that started the process, and information regarding a process owner (e.g., user name, ID, user's real name, e-mail address, user's groups, terminal information, login time, expiration date of login, idle time, and information regarding files and/or directories of the user).

    [0034] The policy attributes 138 contain information relating to network policies. Policies establish whether a particular flow is allowed or denied by the network as well as a specific route by which a packet traverses the network. For example, policies can be used to mark packets so that certain kinds of traffic receive differentiated service when used in combination with queuing techniques such as those based on priority, fairness, weighted fairness, token bucket, random early detection, round robin, among others. The policy attributes 138 can include policy statistics such as a number of times a policy was enforced or a number of times a policy was not enforced. The policy attributes 138 can also include associations with network traffic data. For example, flows found to be non-conformant can be linked or tagged with corresponding policies to assist in the investigation of non-conformance.

    [0035] The analytics engine 110 may include any number of engines 150, including for example, a flow engine 152 for identifying flows (e.g., flow engine 152) or an attacks engine 154 for identify attacks to the network. In an example embodiment, the analytics engine can include a separate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack engine 155 for specifically detecting DDoS attacks. In other example embodiments, a DDoS attack engine may be a component or a sub-engine of a general attacks engine. In some example embodiments, the attacks engine 154 and/or the DDoS engine 155 can use machine learning techniques to identify security threats to a network. For example, the attacks engine 154 and/or the DDoS engine 155 can be provided with examples of network states corresponding to an attack and network states corresponding to normal operation. The attacks engine 154 and/or the DDoS engine 155 can then analyze network traffic data to recognize when the network is under attack. In some example embodiments, the network can operate within a trusted environment for a time to establish a baseline for normal network operation for the attacks engine 154 and/or the DDoS.

    [0036] The analytics engine 110 may further include a search engine 156. The search engine 156 may be configured, for example to perform a structured search, an NLP (Natural Language Processing) search, or a visual search. Data may be provided to the engines from one or more processing components.

    [0037] The analytics engine 110 can also include a policy engine 158 that manages network policy, including creating and/or importing policies, monitoring policy conformance and non-conformance, enforcing policy, simulating changes to policy or network elements affecting policy, among other policy-related tasks.

    [0038] The ADM module 140 can determine dependencies of applications of the network. That is, particular patterns of traffic may correspond to an application, and the interconnectivity or dependencies of the application can be mapped to generate a graph for the application (i.e., an application dependency mapping). In this context, an application refers to a set of networking components that provides connectivity for a given set of workloads. For example, in a conventional three-tier architecture for a web application, first endpoints of the web tier, second endpoints of the application tier, and third endpoints of the data tier make up the web application. The ADM module 140 can receive input data from various repositories of the data lake 130 (e.g., the flow attributes 132, the host and/or endpoint attributes 134, the process attributes 136, etc.). The ADM module 140 may analyze the input data to determine there is first traffic flowing between external endpoints on port 80 of the first endpoints corresponding to Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests and responses. The input data may also indicate second traffic between first ports of the first endpoints and second ports of the second endpoints corresponding to application server requests and responses and third traffic flowing between third ports of the second endpoints and fourth ports of the third endpoints corresponding to database requests and responses. The ADM module 140 may define an ADM for the web application as a three-tier application including a first EPG comprising the first endpoints, a second EPG comprising the second endpoints, and a third EPG comprising the third endpoints.

    [0039] The presentation module 116 can include an application programming interface (API) or command line interface (CLI) 160, a security information and event management (SIEM) system interface 162, and a web front-end 164. As the analytics engine 110 processes network traffic and corresponding data and generates analytics data, the analytics data may not be in a human-readable form or it may be too large for a user to navigate. The presentation module 116 can take the analytics data generated by analytics engine 110 and further summarize, filter, and organize the analytics data as well as create intuitive presentations of the analytics data.

    [0040] In an example embodiment, the API or CLI 160 is implemented using Hadoop® Hive from Apache® for the back end, and Java® Database Connectivity (JDBC) from Oracle® Corporation of Redwood Shores, California, as an API layer. Hive is a data warehouse infrastructure that provides data summarization and ad hoc querying. Hive provides a mechanism to query data using a variation of structured query language (SQL) that is called HiveQL. JDBC is an application programming interface (API) for the programming language Java®, which defines how a client may access a database.

    [0041] In an example embodiment, the SIEM interface 162 can be implemented using Hadoop® Kafka for the back end, and software provided by Splunk®, Inc. of San Francisco, California as the SIEM platform. Kafka is a distributed messaging system that is partitioned and replicated. Kafka uses the concept of topics. Topics are feeds of messages in specific categories. For example, Kafka can take raw packet captures and telemetry information from the data mover 108 as input, and output messages to a SIEM platform, such as Splunk®. The Splunk® platform is utilized for searching, monitoring, and analyzing machine-generated data.

    [0042] In an example embodiment, the web front-end 164 can be implemented using software provided by MongoDB®, Inc. of New York, New York and Hadoop® ElasticSearch from Apache® for the back-end, and Ruby on Rails™ as the web application framework. MongoDB® is a document-oriented NoSQL database based on documents in the form of JavaScript® Object Notation (JSON) with dynamic schemas. ElasticSearch is a scalable and real-time search and analytics engine that provides domain-specific language (DSL) full querying based on JSON. Ruby on Rails™ is model-view-controller (MVC) framework that provides default structures for a database, a web service, and web pages. Ruby on Rails™ relies on web standards such as JSON or extensible markup language (XML) for data transfer, and hypertext markup language (HTML), cascading style sheets, (CSS), and JavaScript® for display and user interfacing.

    [0043] Although FIG. 1 illustrates an example configuration of the various components of a network traffic monitoring system, those of skill in the art will understand that the components of the network traffic monitoring system 100 or any system described herein can be configured in a number of different ways and can include any other type and number of components. For example, the sensors 104, the collectors 106, the data mover 108, and the data lake 130 can belong to one hardware and/or software module or multiple separate modules. Other modules can also be combined into fewer components and/or further divided into more components.

    [0044] FIG. 2 illustrates a policy engine 200, such as the policy engine 138 of FIG. 1, in accordance with an example embodiment. The policy engine 200 can include a policy builder module 202, a policy importer module 204, a policy simulation module 206, a policy utilization module 208, a conditional policies module 210, and a compliance module 212. In some example embodiments, a network traffic monitoring system, such as the network traffic monitoring system 100 of FIG. 1, can automatically determine network topology. Using network traffic data captured by sensors, such as the sensors 104 of FIG. 1, the network traffic monitoring system can determine the type of devices existing in the network (e.g., brand and model of switches, gateways, machines, etc.), physical locations (e.g., latitude and longitude, building, datacenter, room, row, rack, machine, etc.), interconnection type (e.g., 10Gb Ethernet, fiber-optic, etc.), and network characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, latency, etc.). In addition, the network traffic monitoring system 110 can automatically detect changes to the network topology without the need for further configuration. In other example embodiments, the network topology and changes to the network topology can be configured by a network administrator.

    [0045] In some example embodiments, the policy builder module 202 can receive the network topology (whether automatically generated, manually configured, or some combination thereof) and application dependency mappings, such as generated by the application dependency mapping (ADM) module 140 of FIG. 1, and the policy builder module 202 can automatically determine policies for the network. The policies can be based on whitelist rules or blacklist rules. A network defined by whitelist rules allows a communication between a source and a destination or otherwise defaults to denial of the communication system while a network defined by blacklist rules denies a communication between a source and a destination or otherwise defaults to allowing the communication. As an example of whitelist rule generation, suppose there is an edge of an application dependency mapping between a first endpoint or EPG E1 and a second endpoint or EPG E2. Permissible traffic flows on a set of ports of E1 to one or more ports of E2. A policy can be defined to reflect the permissible traffic from the set of ports of E1 to the one or more ports of E2.

    [0046] The policy importer module 204 imports a preexisting set of network policies to the policy engine 138. In some example embodiments, the preexisting set of policies may be based on blacklist rules, and the policy importer module 204 can translate the set of blacklist rules to a set of whitelist rules. For example, the policy importer module 204 can receive ADMs for each application running in the network and the blacklist rules. The policy importer module 204 can utilize the ADMs to define policies limiting communication between endpoints and EPGs corresponding to edges of the ADMs.

    [0047] The policy engine 200 can also verify that the generated policies based on whitelist rules prevent any traffic that was explicitly denied by the preexisting set of policies based on the blacklist rules. To that end, the policy simulation module 206 can be used to validate that changes to policy will not result in network misconfiguration and vulnerability to attacks. The policy simulation module 206 provides what if analysis, i.e., analyzing what would happen to network traffic upon adding one or more new policies, removing one or more existing policies, or changing membership of one or more EPGs (e.g., adding one or more new endpoints to an EPG, removing one or more endpoints from an EPG, or moving one or more endpoints from one EPG to another). In some example embodiments, the policy simulation module 206 utilizes historical ground truth flows for simulating network traffic based on what if experiments. That is, the policy simulation module 206 may apply the addition or removal of policies and/or changes to EPGs to a simulated network environment that mirrors the actual network to evaluate the effects of the addition or removal of policies and/or EPG changes. The policy simulation module 206 can determine whether the policy changes break or misconfigure networking operations of any applications in the simulated network environment or allow any attacks to the simulated network environment that were previously thwarted by the actual network with the original set of policies. The policy simulation module 206 can also determine whether the policy changes correct misconfigurations and prevent attacks that occurred in the actual network. In some example embodiments, the policy simulation module 206 can evaluate real time flows in a simulated network environment configured to operate with an experimental policy set or experimental set of EPGs to understand how changes to particular policies or EPGs affect network traffic in the actual network.

    [0048] The policy utilization module 208 evaluates network traffic for conformance or non-conformance with policies of the network. The policy utilization module 208 analyzes each flow in the network over a specified period of time (e.g., time of day, day of week or month, month(s) in a year, etc.) to determine which policies are being enforced and the extent (e.g., number of packets, number of bytes, number of flows , etc.) to which those policies are being enforced within the network. These policy utilization statistics can be used for smart ordering of policies, i.e., optimize ordering of policies in a policy table or garbage collection, i.e., removing unused policies from the policy table. Smart ordering reorders the sequence of policies such that those policies that are utilized more often are placed in a position where they will be checked faster. For example, policies with higher utilization can be cached for longer periods of time than policies with lower utilization and/or higher utilization policies can be sequenced higher than lower utilization policies for policy schemes that apply the first policy matching a flow. Garbage collection removes policies with zero (or effectively zero) utilization which can save memory usage on a network device and/or reduce processing for policy schemes that apply all policies matching a flow.

    [0049] In some example embodiments, policies may be more than just a set of access control lists (ACLs), and policies can include a collection of inbound/outbound filters, traffic quality settings, marking rules/redirection rules, and Layers 4-7 service device graphs. In some example embodiments, a network can be configured to operate with dynamic policies using the conditional policies module 210. The conditional policies module 210, for example, allows policies to take into account the behavior or the state of an endpoint. In some example embodiments, endpoints in the network can be assigned a reputation, vulnerability index, or similar security measure that changes over time based on the security state of each endpoint. Each endpoint can also be grouped according to reputational EPGs depending on the value of the security measurement of each endpoint. For example, endpoints with high security scores can be assigned to a first EPG, endpoints with moderate security score can be assigned to a second EPG, and endpoints with a low security score can be assigned to a third EPG. The network can be configured to enforce a policy that denies all communications from endpoints in the third EPG but allow the endpoints in the third EPG access to image update servers or other remediation servers. Under this policy, an endpoint in the third EPG can make no communication in the network except to the image update or remediation servers. Upon the endpoint updating its image or otherwise becoming remediated, the endpoint may be assigned to the first or second EPGs and be allowed to communicate according to the policies applicable to one of those EPGs. Thus, the policies for the endpoint do not need to be manually updated to account for the changes to the security state of the endpoint. A variety of groupings can be utilized in other example embodiments, including binary groupings, groupings based on a scale between -1 to 1 or from 0 to 100, and semantic groupings (e.g., "Good," "OK," "Bad"), among other possibilities.

    [0050] The compliance module 212 provides for design, implementation, management, monitoring, and auditing/reporting of regulatory compliance matters. In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can automatically generate network policies to ensure regulatory compliance. In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can analyze network traffic data to ensure the network enforces the network policies. In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can generate reports regarding the network's effectiveness with respect to compliance.

    [0051] As discussed, all around the world, regulators and standards bodies are tightening compliance through expanded powers, higher penalties, and harsh enforcement actions. Some of these regulations and standards include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Sarbanes Oxley (SOX), the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), California Senate Bill 1386 (CA SB 1386), and the International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards (Basel II).

    [0052] HIPAA requires covered entities and business associates that create, receive, transmit, or maintain protected health information (PHI) in electronic form must make a good faith effort to protect the corporate computing environment from reasonably anticipated threats and vulnerabilities; and take reasonable and appropriate measures to protect the integrity, confidentiality, and security of such electronic data. Covered entities and business associates must perform an analysis of the potential risks to the electronic PHI for which they are responsible; and to then develop, implement, and maintain appropriate security measures to safeguard the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of that data. HIPAA provides standards and, in some cases, implementation specifications with which covered entities and business associates must comply.

    [0053] SOX requires that the annual reports of public companies include an end-of-fiscal-year assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. SOX also requires that companies' independent auditors attest to, and report on, this assessment. The assessment of financial controls has been extended into network environments by the opinion of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), a private-sector, non-profit entity created by SOX to oversee the auditors of public companies.

    [0054] GBLA protects the privacy and security of individuals' financial information collected, held, and processed by financial institutions. The privacy component requires financial institutions to provide their customers with an annual notice of their privacy practices and to allow customers to choose not to share such information. The safeguards component requires that financial institutions establish a comprehensive security program to protect the confidentiality and integrity of the private financial information in their records.

    [0055] PCI DSS was developed to ensure safe handling of protected payment information, such as storage and transfer of credit card information. PCI DSS is the umbrella program for other credit card security programs, such as the Visa® Cardholder Information Security Program (CISP), MasterCard® Site Data Protection (SDP) program, and other credit card companies' standards for protecting customers' protected electronic information.

    [0056] CA SB 1386 was promulgated to regulate the privacy of personal information to address the problem of identity theft. The bill requires an agency, person, or business that conducts business in California and owns or licenses computerized "personal information" to disclose any breach of security (to any resident whose unencrypted data is believed to have been disclosed). Many states and other jurisdictions have also proposed or enacted similar legislation.

    [0057] Basel II provides recommendations from bank supervisors and central bankers of member countries of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision for ensuring banks are not overleveraged. This agreement was created to promote universal consistency in the way banks and regulators approach risk management.

    [0058] Although some vital differences exist among the various regulations and standards, there is a substantial amount of overlap in their areas of concern. FIG. 3 illustrates a mapping 300 of compliance recommendations and requirements 302 to relevant provisions of HIPAA 304, SOX 306, and PCI DSS 308 to network policies to address the compliance categories 302 in accordance with an example embodiment. For purposes of conciseness, citation is made only to HIPAA 304, SOX 306, and PCI DSS 308 in FIG. 3, but the principles disclosed herein are applicable for compliance relating to other regulations and standards. Compliance recommendations are safeguards that do not require strong technical controls. The compliance recommendations can be thought of as suggested best practices or "should-haves," and network policies are only incidentally implicated or not applicable. The compliance recommendations can include risk analysis 312, risk management 314, information system activity review 316, assigned security 318, authorization and/or supervision 320, contingency plan 338, and facility access control and validations 342.

    [0059] The risk analysis recommendation 312 advises conducting an accurate and thorough assessment of the potential risks and vulnerabilities to protected electronic information stored by a network. The risk management recommendation 314 suggests implementing security measures to sufficiently reduce risks and vulnerabilities to a reasonable and appropriate level. The information system activity review recommendation 316 recommends procedures to regularly review records of information system activity, such as audit logs, access reports, and security incident tracking. The assigned security recommendation 318 advises assigning responsibility for the development and implementation of procedures for protecting protected electronic information stored in the network. The authorization and/or supervision recommendation 320 suggests procedures for the authorization and/or supervision of workforce members who work with protected electronic information or in locations where it might be accessed. The contingency plan recommendation 338 recommends establishing procedures that allow for facility access in support of restoration of lost data under disaster recovery plan and emergency access mode operations. The facility access control and validations recommendation 342 suggests implementing procedures to document repairs and modifications to the physical components of a facility related to security.

    [0060] Terminations procedure recommendation 322 advises implementing policies and procedures to prohibit access to protected electronic information to an employee or a business upon termination of the employee or cease of business with the business associate. Although the terminations procedure recommendation 322 falls within the category of a compliance recommendation, network policies can be defined to address this safeguard. For example, the compliance module 212 can define a network policy to explicitly deny traffic associated with a terminated user (in a blacklist system) or reassigning the terminated user to an EPG prohibited from accessing the network (in a whitelist system).

    [0061] Compliance requirements are "must-haves" for the network. In some example embodiments, compliance requirements, such as protection from malicious software 330 and response and reporting 338, can be fulfilled primarily by other components of a network traffic monitoring system (e.g., the network traffic monitoring system 100 of FIG. 1). The protection from malicious software requirement 330 requires appropriate protections against malicious software are in effect in the network. The response and reporting requirement 338 calls for identifying and responding to suspected or known security incidents; mitigate, to the extent practicable, harmful effects of security incidents that are known to the network; and document security incidents and their outcomes. The protection from malicious software requirement 330 and the response and reporting requirement 338 can be handled by an attacks engine, such as the attacks engine 154 or the DDoS engine 155 of FIG. 1. However, network policies can be defined that deny compromised endpoints general access to the network but allow access to image update, patch management, and other remediation endpoints.

    [0062] In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can address compliance requirements directly, such as security management process requirement 310, healthcare clearinghouse isolation requirement 324, access authorization requirement 326, access establishment and modification requirement 328, login monitoring requirement 332, password management requirement 334, evaluation requirement 340, unique user identification requirement 344, emergency access requirement 346, automatic logoff requirement 348, encryption and decryption requirement 350, data integrity requirement 354, person or entity authentication requirement 356, and integrity controls requirement 358.

    [0063] In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can define ACL-like policies and EPGs to satisfy compliance requirements, such as for the isolating healthcare clearinghouse requirement 324, the access authorization requirement 326, the access establishment and modification requirement 328, and the person or entity authentication requirement 356. The healthcare clearinghouse isolation requirement 324 dictates that if a health clearinghouse is part of a larger organization, the clearinghouse must implement policies and procedures that protect electronic PHI of the clearinghouse from unauthorized access by the larger organization. The compliance module 212 can segment the healthcare clearing house from the larger organization utilizing network policies that limit access of electronic PHI to healthcare cleaning house (in a whitelist system) or deny access to the electronic PHI to the larger organize (in a blacklist system). The access authorization requirement 326 concerns policies and procedures for granting access to protected electronic information, for example, through access to a workstation, transaction, program, process or mechanism. The access establishment and modification requirement 328 relates to policies and procedures that, based upon the network's access authorization policies, establish, document, review, and modify a user's right of access to a workstation, transaction, program, or process. The person or entity authentication requirement 356 assures that policies and procedures are in place to identify persons or entities seeking access to protected electronic information. The compliance module 212 can satisfy the access authorization 326, the access establishment and modification 328, and the person or entity authentication 356 requirements by defining network policies and EPGs limiting access to protected electronic information to appropriate users, processes, hosts and/or endpoints, etc. For example, the compliance module 212 could create a HIPAA EPG and define policies for this EPG to enforce HIPAA requirements.

    [0064] In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can define conditional network policies in which traffic is allowed or denied depending on the state of a host and/or endpoint, process, or user associated with the flow. In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can define host/endpoint and/or process state-based network policies and EPGs relating to copying, saving, modifying, and deleting data and encryption of data during transit to protect against improper alteration or destruction of data, and to ensure that the data is accurate and complete. These policies can be designed to address the encryption and decryption requirement 350, the data integrity requirement 354, and the integrity controls requirement 358. The encryption and decryption requirement 350 concerns implementing a mechanism to encrypt and decrypt protected electronic information. The data integrity requirement 354 is directed to policies and procedures to secure protected electronic information from improper alteration or destruction. The integrity controls requirement 358 mandates policies and procedures for verifying that data has not been altered or destroyed in an unauthorized manner during transmission. When a host/endpoint or a process transacts with protected electronic information, the compliance module 212 can assign the host/endpoint or process to a special EPG that enforces data integrity. For example, an endpoint sensor can detect that its endpoint is handling electronic protected information and assign the endpoint to the special EPG.

    [0065] In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can define user state-based network policies and EPGs for the login monitoring requirement 332, the password management requirement 334, the unique user identification requirement 344, the emergency access requirement 346, and the automatic logoff requirement 348. The login monitoring requirement 332 requires policies and procedures for monitoring login attempts and reporting discrepancies. In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can establish a user's reputation to be inversely related to the number of unsuccessful login attempts within a session or assign the user to a restricted EPG based on the number of unsuccessful logins exceeding an unsuccessful login threshold. The password management requirement 334 ensures that appropriate policies and procedures are in place to manage passwords for network access and access to protected electronic information and to limit passwords that are strong enough to prevent them from being guessed or exposed to brute force attacks or to otherwise become comprised. In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can determine the user's reputation to be related to the strength of the user's password or assign the user to a restricted EPG if the user's password does not meet password requirements. The unique user identification requirement 344 dictates that each user who has access to protected electronic information has a unique identifier. In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can assign different users with a same identifier to a restricted EPG. The emergency access requirement 346 relates to policies and procedures for obtaining necessary protected electronic information during an emergency. In an example embodiment, during times of emergency, the compliance module 212 can assign emergency response handlers to a superuser or privileged EPG. The automatic logoff requirement 348 requires that policies, procedures, and technical controls are in place to automatically logoff (terminate) a session after a predetermined period of inactivity. In an example embodiment, the compliance module 212 can compute the user's reputation as a function (e.g., linear or exponential declay) of the amount time the user is idle or assign the user to a restricted EPG if the user's idle time exceeds an idle time threshold.

    [0066] In some example embodiments, the compliance module 212 can define comprehensive network policies and periodically audit or validate these policies to satisfy the security management process 310, the evaluation 340, and the audit controls 352 requirements. The security management process requirement 310 mandates implementing policies and procedures to prevent, detect, contain, and correct security violations. The evaluation requirement 340 obligates periodic technical evaluations to ensure that protections are still in place and working effectively. The audit controls requirement 352 pertains to implementing hardware, software, and/or procedural mechanisms that record and examine activity in information systems that contain or use protected electronic information.

    [0067] FIG. 4 illustrates a network environment 400 in accordance with an example embodiment. It should be understood that, for the network environment 400 and any environment discussed herein, there can be additional or fewer nodes, devices, links, networks, or components in similar or alternative configurations. Example embodiments with different numbers and/or types of clients, networks, nodes, cloud components, servers, software components, devices, virtual or physical resources, configurations, topologies, services, appliances, deployments, or network devices are also contemplated herein. Further, the network environment 400 can include any number or type of resources, which can be accessed and utilized by clients or tenants. The illustrations and examples provided herein are for clarity and simplicity.

    [0068] The network environment 400 can include a network fabric 402, a Layer 2 (L2) network 404, a Layer 3 (L3) network 406, and servers 408a, 408b, 408c, 408d, and 408e (collectively, 408). The network fabric 402 can include spine switches 410a, 410b, 410c, and 410d (collectively, 410) and leaf switches 412a, 412b, 412c, 412d, and 412e (collectively, 412). The spine switches 410 can connect to the leaf switches 412 in the network fabric 402. The leaf switches 412 can include access ports (or non-fabric ports) and fabric ports. The fabric ports can provide uplinks to the spine switches 410, while the access ports can provide connectivity to endpoints (e.g., the servers 408), internal networks (e.g., the L2 network 404), or external networks (e.g., the L3 network 406).

    [0069] The leaf switches 412 can reside at the edge of the network fabric 402, and can thus represent the physical network edge. For instance, in an example embodiment, the leaf switches 412d and 412e operate as border leaf switches in communication with edge devices 414 located in the external network 406. The border leaf switches 412d and 412e may be used to connect any type of external network device, service (e.g., firewall, deep packet inspector, traffic monitor, load balancer, etc.), or network (e.g., the L3 network 406) to the fabric 402.

    [0070] Although the network fabric 402 is illustrated and described herein as an example leaf-spine architecture, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that various embodiments can be implemented based on any network topology, including any data center or cloud network fabric. Indeed, other architectures, designs, infrastructures, and variations are contemplated herein. For example, the principles disclosed herein are applicable to topologies including three-tier (including core, aggregation, and access levels), fat tree, mesh, bus, hub and spoke, etc. Thus, in some example embodiments, the leaf switches 412 can be top-of-rack switches configured according to a top-of-rack architecture. In other example embodiments, the leaf switches 412 can be aggregation switches in any particular topology, such as end-of-row or middle-of-row topologies. In some example embodiments, the leaf switches 412 can also be implemented using aggregation switches.

    [0071] Moreover, the topology illustrated in FIG. 4 and described herein is readily scalable and may accommodate a large number of components, as well as more complicated arrangements and configurations. For example, the network may include any number of fabrics 402, which may be geographically dispersed or located in the same geographic area. Thus, network nodes may be used in any suitable network topology, which may include any number of servers, virtual machines or containers, switches, routers, appliances, controllers, gateways, or other nodes interconnected to form a large and complex network. Nodes may be coupled to other nodes or networks through one or more interfaces employing any suitable wired or wireless connection, which provides a viable pathway for electronic communications.

    [0072] Network communication in the network fabric 402 can flow through the leaf switches 412. In an example embodiment, the leaf switches 412 can provide endpoints (e.g., the servers 408), internal networks (e.g., the L2 network 404), or external networks (e.g., the L3 network 406) access to the network fabric 402, and can connect the leaf switches 412 to each other. In some example embodiments, the leaf switches 412 can connect endpoint groups (EPGs) to the network fabric 402, internal networks (e.g., the L2 network 404), and/or any external networks (e.g., the L3 network 406). EPGs are groupings of applications, or application components, and tiers for implementing forwarding and policy logic. EPGs can allow for separation of network policy, security, and forwarding from addressing by using logical application boundaries. EPGs can be used in the network environment 400 for mapping applications in the network. For example, EPGs can comprise a grouping of endpoints in the network indicating connectivity and policy for applications.

    [0073] As discussed, the servers 408 can connect to the network fabric 402 via the leaf switches 412. For example, the servers 408a and 408b can connect directly to the leaf switches 412a and 412b, which can connect the servers 408a and 408b to the network fabric 402 and/or any of the other leaf switches. The servers 408c and 408d can connect to the leaf switches 412b and 412c via the L2 network 404. In an example embodiment, the servers 408c and 408d and the L2 network 404 make up a local area network (LAN) LANs can connect nodes over dedicated private communications links located in the same general physical location, such as a building or campus.

    [0074] The WAN 406 can connect to the leaf switches 412d or 412e via the L3 network 406. WANs can connect geographically dispersed nodes over long-distance communications links, such as common carrier telephone lines, optical light paths, synchronous optical networks (SONET), or synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) links. LANs and WANs can include L2 and/or L3 networks and endpoints.

    [0075] The Internet is an example of a WAN that connects disparate networks throughout the world, providing global communication between nodes on various networks. The nodes typically communicate over the network by exchanging discrete frames or packets of data according to predefined protocols, such as the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). In this context, a protocol can refer to a set of rules defining how the nodes interact with each other. Computer networks may be further interconnected by an intermediate network node, such as a router, to extend the effective size of each network. The endpoints 408 can include any communication device or component, such as a computer, server, blade, hypervisor, virtual machine, container, process (e.g., running on a virtual machine), switch, router, gateway, host, device, external network, etc.

    [0076] In an example embodiment, the network environment 400 also includes a network controller running on the host 408a. The network controller is implemented using the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC™) from Cisco®. The APIC™ provides a centralized point of automation and management, policy programming, application deployment, and health monitoring for the fabric 402. In an example embodiment, the APIC™ is operated as a replicated synchronized clustered controller. In other example embodiments, other configurations or software-defined networking (SDN) platforms can be utilized for managing the fabric 402.

    [0077] In some example embodiments, a physical server 408 may have instantiated thereon a hypervisor 416 for creating and running one or more virtual switches (not shown) and one or more virtual machines 418, as shown for the host 408b. In other example embodiments, physical servers may run a shared kernel for hosting containers. In yet other embodiments, the physical server 408 can run other software for supporting other virtual partitioning approaches. Networks in accordance with various embodiments may include any number of physical servers hosting any number of virtual machines, containers, or other virtual partitions. Hosts may also comprise blade/physical servers without virtual machines, containers, or other virtual partitions, such as the servers 408a, 408c, 408d, and 408e.

    [0078] The network environment 400 can also integrate a network traffic monitoring system, such as the network traffic monitoring system 100 shown in FIG. 1. For example, the network traffic monitoring system of FIG. 4 includes sensors 420a, 420b, 420c, and 420d (collectively, 420), collectors 422, and an analytics engine, such as the analytics engine 110 of FIG. 1, executing on the server 408e. The analytics engine 408e can receive and process network traffic data collected by the collectors 422 and detected by the sensors 420 placed on nodes located throughout the network environment 400. Although the analytics engine 408e is shown to be a standalone network appliance in FIG. 4, it will be appreciated that the analytics engine 408e can also be implemented as a virtual partition (e.g., VM or container) that can be distributed onto a host or cluster of hosts, a software as a service (SaaS), or other suitable method of distribution. In an example embodiment, the sensors 420 are run on the leaf switches 412 (e.g., the sensor 420a), the hosts 408 (e.g., the sensor 420b), the hypervisor 416 (e.g., the sensor 420c), and the VMs 418 (e.g., the sensor 420d). In other example embodiments, the sensors 420 can also run on the spine switches 410, virtual switches, service appliances (e.g., firewall, deep packet inspector, traffic monitor, load balancer, etc.) and in between network elements. In some example embodiments, the sensors 420 can be located at each (or nearly every) network component to capture granular packet statistics and corresponding data at each hop of data transmission. In other example embodiments, the sensors 420 may not be installed in all components or portions of the network (e.g., shared hosting environment in which customers have exclusive control of some virtual machines).

    [0079] As shown in FIG. 4, a host may include multiple sensors 420 running on the host (e.g., the host sensor 420b) and various components of the host (e.g., the hypervisor sensor 420c and the VM sensor 420d) so that all (or substantially all) packets traversing the network environment 400 may be monitored. For example, if one of the VMs 418 running on the host 408b receives a first packet from the WAN 406, the first packet may pass through the border leaf switch 412d, the spine switch 410b, the leaf switch 412b, the host 408b, the hypervisor 416, and the VM. Since all or nearly all of these components contain a respective sensor, the first packet will likely be identified and reported to one of the collectors 422. As another example, if a second packet is transmitted from one of the VMs 418 running on the host 408b to the host 408d, sensors installed along the data path, such as at the VM 418, the hypervisor 416, the host 408b, the leaf switch 412b, and the host 408d will likely result in capture of metadata from the second packet.

    [0080] FIG. 5 illustrates an example process 500 for providing compliance via network policies in accordance with an example embodiment. It should be understood that, for any process discussed herein, there can be additional, fewer, or alternative steps performed in similar or alternative orders, or in parallel, within the scope of the various example embodiments unless otherwise stated. The process 500 can be performed by a network, and particularly, a network traffic monitoring system (e.g., the network traffic monitoring system 100 of FIG. 1), a network controller (e.g., the network controller 118 of FIG. 1), a policy engine (e.g., the policy engine 200 of FIG. 2), a compliance module (e.g., the compliance module 212 of FIG. 2), a network operating system, a virtualization manager, a network virtualization manager, or a similar system.

    [0081] In the example embodiment of FIG. 5, the process 500 can begin at step 502 in which protected electronic information is sent and/or received to a first endpoint of a network. A second endpoint receiving and/or sending the protected electronic information can also be a part of the same network or may be external to the network. Protected electronic information can refer to electronic data that is subject to a governmental regulation, industry standard, or similar guideline. Although there is an expectation of security for most if not all data traversing a network, there are situations in which some types of data can be classified as having a higher security priority than other types of data, certain types of data require encryption and others do not, breaches to particular types of data must be disclosed and other types of data have no such requirement, availability of some data is guaranteed while there is no guarantee for other types of data, and transactions relating to certain types of data must be monitored while other types of data do not require monitoring. Compliance concerns each of the former characteristics of data.

    [0082] The process can continue at step 504 with the collection of network traffic data (e.g., metadata for sessions, flows, packets, etc.) and host data (e.g., network usage, CPU usage, information regarding files of the host, etc.), process data (process name, ID, parent process ID, path, CPU utilization, memory utilization, start-up command, etc.), and user data (e.g., user name, ID, information regarding files of the user, etc.) associated with the traffic. In some example embodiments, the traffic data can also be associated with out of band data (e.g., power level, temperature, and physical location) and third party data (e.g., security reports, IP watchlists, Whois, etc.). In some example embodiments, traffic can also be associated with application data (e.g., tenant information, application dependency mapping, application policies, etc.).

    [0083] A sensor network can capture the collected data from multiple perspectives to provide a comprehensive view of network behavior. The sensor network may include sensors at multiple nodes of a data path (e.g., network devices, physical servers) and within multiple partitions of a node (e.g., hypervisor, shared kernel, VM, container, etc.).

    [0084] After collection of the network traffic information, host and/or endpoint information, process information, user information, and other relevant information, at step 506, the network can determine the policies applicable to the network traffic. In some example embodiments, the network can determine one or more policies that are applicable for individual flows but it will be appreciated that other granularities are also possible (e.g., session, bidirectional flow, packet, etc.).

    [0085] The policies may be mapped to specific provisions of regulations or standards (e.g., FIG. 3), and the policies can be applicable to an endpoint or a collection of endpoints (i.e., an EPG). In some example embodiments, the network can determine applicable policies for traffic by determining a source EPG and destination EPG and retrieving the applicable policies based on the source EPG and destination EPG. In some example embodiments, the network can dynamically determine an EPG associated with traffic based on a state of a host and/or endpoint, process, or user corresponding to the traffic. For instance, an endpoint associated with a flow may be a part of different EPGs over a period of time depending on a reputation or other security metric of the endpoint or a condition relating to the endpoint (e.g., the endpoint transacts with protected electronic information, a user of the endpoint has been idle for a period of time over an idle time threshold, the user has root access, etc.).

    [0086] At step 508, the network can determine whether the applicable policies were enforced for traffic. In some example embodiments, the network can determine an expected network action for each flow and compare it to the actual or ground truth network action for each flow. Network actions can include allowing or forwarding a flow, denying or dropping the flow, marking the flow for quality of service (QoS), logging the flow, redirecting the flow, or selecting a service graph for the flow.

    [0087] If the network determines that the applicable policies for a flow was not enforced, at step 510, the network can trigger an alert or otherwise report non-conformance to escalate a response. The process 500 can conclude at step 510 in which policy attributes can be updated based on conformance or non-conformance, and instances of policy non-conformance can be linked to corresponding network traffic. In some example embodiments, the policy attributes can be utilized to facilitate investigations regarding policy non-conformance. In some example embodiments, the policy attributes can be analyzed for both policy conformance and non-conformance, and compliance reports can be generated based on a mapping of a policy to a provision of a regulation, standard, or similar guideline.

    [0088] FIG. 6A and FIG. 6B illustrate systems in accordance with various example embodiments. The more appropriate system will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art when practicing the various embodiments. Persons of ordinary skill in the art will also readily appreciate that other systems are possible.

    [0089] FIG. 6A illustrates an example architecture for a conventional bus computing system 600 wherein the components of the system are in electrical communication with each other using a bus 605. The computing system 600 can include a processing unit (CPU or processor) 610 and a system bus 605 that may couple various system components including the system memory 615, such as read only memory (ROM) in a storage device 670 and random access memory (RAM) 675, to the processor 610. The computing system 600 can include a cache 612 of high-speed memory connected directly with, in close proximity to, or integrated as part of the processor 610. The computing system 600 can copy data from the memory 615 and/or the storage device 630 to the cache 612 for quick access by the processor 610. In this way, the cache 612 can provide a performance boost that avoids processor delays while waiting for data. These and other modules can control or be configured to control the processor 610 to perform various actions. Other system memory 615 may be available for use as well. The memory 615 can include multiple different types of memory with different performance characteristics. The processor 610 can include any general purpose processor and a hardware module or software module, such as module 1 632, module 2 634, and module 3 636 stored in storage device 630, configured to control the processor 610 as well as a special-purpose processor where software instructions are incorporated into the actual processor design. The processor 610 may essentially be a completely self-contained computing system, containing multiple cores or processors, a bus, memory controller, cache, etc. A multi-core processor may be symmetric or asymmetric.

    [0090] To enable user interaction with the computing system 600, an input device 645 can represent any number of input mechanisms, such as a microphone for speech, a touch-protected screen for gesture or graphical input, keyboard, mouse, motion input, speech and so forth. An output device 635 can also be one or more of a number of output mechanisms known to those of skill in the art. In some instances, multimodal systems can enable a user to provide multiple types of input to communicate with the computing system 600. The communications interface 640 can govern and manage the user input and system output. There may be no restriction on operating on any particular hardware arrangement and therefore the basic features here may easily be substituted for improved hardware or firmware arrangements as they are developed.

    [0091] Storage device 630 can be a non-volatile memory and can be a hard disk or other types of computer readable media which can store data that are accessible by a computer, such as magnetic cassettes, flash memory cards, solid state memory devices, digital versatile disks, cartridges, random access memories (RAMs) 625, read only memory (ROM) 620, and hybrids thereof.

    [0092] The storage device 630 can include software modules 632, 634, 636 for controlling the processor 610. Other hardware or software modules are contemplated. The storage device 630 can be connected to the system bus 605. In one aspect, a hardware module that performs a particular function can include the software component stored in a computer-readable medium in connection with the necessary hardware components, such as the processor 610, bus 605, output device 635, and so forth, to carry out the function.

    [0093] FIG. 6B illustrates an example architecture for a conventional chipset computing system 650 that can be used in accordance with an example embodiment. The computing system 650 can include a processor 655, representative of any number of physically and/or logically distinct resources capable of executing software, firmware, and hardware configured to perform identified computations. The processor 655 can communicate with a chipset 660 that can control input to and output from the processor 655. In this example, the chipset 660 can output information to an output device 665, such as a display, and can read and write information to storage device 670, which can include magnetic media, and solid state media, for example. The chipset 660 can also read data from and write data to RAM 675. A bridge 680 for interfacing with a variety of user interface components 685 can be provided for interfacing with the chipset 660. The user interface components 685 can include a keyboard, a microphone, touch detection and processing circuitry, a pointing device, such as a mouse, and so on. Inputs to the computing system 650 can come from any of a variety of sources, machine generated and/or human generated.

    [0094] The chipset 660 can also interface with one or more communication interfaces 690 that can have different physical interfaces. The communication interfaces 690 can include interfaces for wired and wireless LANs, for broadband wireless networks, as well as personal area networks. Some applications of the methods for generating, displaying, and using the GUI disclosed herein can include receiving ordered datasets over the physical interface or be generated by the machine itself by processor 655 analyzing data stored in the storage device 670 or the RAM 675. Further, the computing system 600 can receive inputs from a user via the user interface components 685 and execute appropriate functions, such as browsing functions by interpreting these inputs using the processor 655.

    [0095] It will be appreciated that computing systems 600 and 650 can have more than one processor 610 and 655, respectively, or be part of a group or cluster of computing devices networked together to provide greater processing capability.

    [0096] For clarity of explanation, in some instances the present technology may be presented as including individual functional blocks including functional blocks comprising devices, device components, steps or routines in a method embodied in software, or combinations of hardware and software.

    [0097] In some embodiments the computer-readable storage devices, mediums, and memories can include a cable or wireless signal containing a bit stream and the like. However, when mentioned, non-transitory computer-readable storage media expressly exclude media such as energy, carrier signals, electromagnetic waves, and signals per se.

    [0098] Methods according to the above-described examples can be implemented using computer-executable instructions that are stored or otherwise available from computer readable media. Such instructions can comprise, for example, instructions and data which cause or otherwise configure a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, or special purpose processing device to perform a certain function or group of functions. Portions of computer resources used can be accessible over a network. The computer executable instructions may be, for example, binaries, intermediate format instructions such as assembly language, firmware, or source code. Examples of computer-readable media that may be used to store instructions, information used, and/or information created during methods according to described examples include magnetic or optical disks, flash memory, USB devices provided with non-volatile memory, networked storage devices, and so on.

    [0099] Devices implementing methods according to these disclosures can comprise hardware, firmware and/or software, and can take any of a variety of form factors. Typical examples of such form factors include laptops, smart phones, small form factor personal computers, personal digital assistants, rackmount devices, standalone devices, and so on. Functionality described herein also can be embodied in peripherals or add-in cards. Such functionality can also be implemented on a circuit board among different chips or different processes executing in a single device, by way of further example.

    [0100] The instructions, media for conveying such instructions, computing resources for executing them, and other structures for supporting such computing resources are means for providing the functions described in these disclosures.

    [0101] Although a variety of examples and other information was used to explain aspects within the scope of the appended claims, no limitation of the claims should be implied based on particular features or arrangements in such examples, as one of ordinary skill would be able to use these examples to derive a wide variety of implementations. Further and although some subject matter may have been described in language specific to examples of structural features and/or method steps, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to these described features or acts. For example, such functionality can be distributed differently or performed in components other than those identified herein. Rather, the described features and steps are disclosed as examples of components of systems and methods within the scope of the appended claims.


    Claims

    1. A method comprising:

    capturing (504) first network data (132) corresponding to a first flow that includes protected electronic information,

    the first network data captured by a first sensor of a first endpoint of a network, a second sensor of a second endpoint of the network, and a third sensor of a networking device along a data path corresponding to the first flow;

    analyzing the first network data to determine (506) a policy applicable to the first flow; and

    updating (512) policy conformance data (138) based on:

    an expected network action for the first flow based on the policy applicable to the first flow, and

    an actual network action for the first flow.


     
    2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

    determining a source endpoint group corresponding to the first flow; and

    determining the first flow includes protected electronic information based on the source endpoint group.


     
    3. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

    determining a first degree of accuracy of first flow data corresponding to the first flow captured by the first sensor;

    determining a second degree of accuracy of second flow data corresponding to the first flow captured by the second sensor;

    determining a third degree of accuracy of third flow data corresponding to the first flow captured by the third sensor; and

    utilizing flow data having a highest degree of accuracy for the first flow.


     
    4. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    assembling flow data for the first flow using a first packet captured by one of the first sensor, the second sensor, or the third sensor and a second packet captured by another of the first sensor, the second sensor, or the third sensor.
     
    5. The method of claim 1, wherein the first endpoint is a virtual partition, and the first network data further includes flow data captured by a fourth sensor of a host of the virtual partition.
     
    6. The method of any preceding claim, wherein the capturing further comprises capturing first host data (134) regarding a host associated with the first flow, first process data (136) regarding a process associated with the first flow, and first user data regarding a user associated with the first flow, and
    wherein the analyzing further comprises analyzing the first host data, the first process data and the first user data.
     
    7. The method of claim 6, wherein the first host data includes information regarding at least one of a name of the host corresponding to the first flow, a network address of the host, an operating system of the host, CPU utilization by the host, network utilization by the host, disk space of the host, ports of the host, users logged into the host, scheduled jobs, or a file or a directory of the host.
     
    8. The method of claim 6, further comprising:

    determining a state of at least one of a host, a process, or a user corresponding to the first flow based on at least one of the first host data, the first process data, or the first user data; and

    determining a source endpoint group for the first flow based on the state,

    wherein the policy is determined based at least in part on the source endpoint group.


     
    9. The method of claim 1, wherein the policy conformance data comprises statistics regarding conformance and non-conformance of the policy, and the method further comprises:

    mapping the policy to a compliance requirement; and

    generating a compliance report based on the mapping and the policy conformance data.


     
    10. The method of claim 1, wherein the policy conformance data comprises associations between flows not conforming to policies of the network, and the method further comprises:

    determining the first flow does not conform to the determined policy applicable to the first flow;

    associating the first flow with the policy in the policy conformance data; and

    determining a cause of non-conformance of the policy based on the policy conformance data.


     
    11. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

    determining a network topology for the network;

    determining an application dependency mapping for an application including the first endpoint as a component of the application; and

    determining, based on the network topology and the application dependency mapping, a set of policies for the application.


     
    12. The method of claim 1, wherein a first set of policies for the network comprises blacklist rules, and the method further comprises:
    generating a second set of policies for the network by translating the first set of policies to whitelist rules.
     
    13. The method of claim 12, further comprising:
    applying the second set of policies to network data traversing the network in a network environment simulating the network.
     
    14. A system comprising:

    a processor (610, 655); and

    memory (615, 620, 625, 675) including instructions that, upon being executed by the processor, cause the system to perform a method according to any of claims 1 through 13.


     
    15. A non-transitory computer-readable medium having computer readable instructions that, upon being executed by a processor of a first endpoint of a network, cause the first endpoint to perform a method according to any of claims 1 through 13.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Verfahren, das aufweist:

    Erfassen (504) erster Netzwerkdaten (132), die einem ersten Fluss entsprechen, der geschützte elektronische Informationen enthält,

    wobei die ersten Netzwerkdaten von einem ersten Sensor eines ersten Endpunkts eines Netzwerks, einem zweiten Sensor eines zweiten Endpunkts des Netzwerks und einem dritten Sensor einer Netzwerkvorrichtung entlang eines Datenpfads, der dem ersten Fluss entspricht, erfasst werden;

    Analysieren der ersten Netzwerkdaten, um eine Richtlinie festzulegen (506), die für den ersten Fluss zutrifft; und

    Aktualisieren (512) von Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten (138) basierend auf:

    einer erwarteten Netzwerkaktion für den ersten Fluss basierend auf der Richtlinie, die für den ersten Fluss zutrifft, und

    einer tatsächlichen Netzwerkaktion für den ersten Fluss.


     
    2. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, das des Weiteren aufweist:

    Bestimmen einer Quellendpunktgruppe, die dem ersten Fluss entspricht; und

    Bestimmen, dass der erste Fluss geschützte elektronische Informationen enthält, basierend auf der Quellendpunktgruppe.


     
    3. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, das des Weiteren aufweist:

    Bestimmen eines ersten Genauigkeitsgrads erster Flussdaten entsprechend dem ersten Fluss, die von dem ersten Sensor erfasst wurden;

    Bestimmen eines zweiten Genauigkeitsgrads zweiter Flussdaten entsprechend dem ersten Fluss, die von dem zweiten Sensor erfasst wurden; und

    Bestimmen eines dritten Genauigkeitsgrads dritter Flussdaten entsprechend dem ersten Fluss, die von dem dritten Sensor erfasst wurden; und

    Verwenden der Flussdaten, die den höchsten Genauigkeitsgrad für den ersten Fluss haben.


     
    4. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, das des Weiteren aufweist:
    Zusammensetzen von Flussdaten für den ersten Fluss unter Verwendung eines ersten Pakets, das von einem des ersten Sensors, des zweiten Sensors oder des dritten Sensors erfasst wurde, und eines zweiten Pakets, das von einem anderen des ersten Sensors, des zweiten Sensors oder des dritten Sensors erfasst wurde.
     
    5. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei der erste Endpunkt eine virtuelle Partitionierung ist, und die ersten Netzwerkdaten des Weiteren Flussdaten aufweisen, die von einem vierten Sensor eines Hosts der virtuellen Partitionierung erfasst wurden.
     
    6. Verfahren nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das Erfassen des Weiteren das Erfassen erster Hostdaten (134) hinsichtlich eines Hosts, der zu dem ersten Fluss gehört, erster Verarbeitungsdaten (136) hinsichtlich eines Prozesses, der zu dem ersten Fluss gehört, und erster Nutzerdaten hinsichtlich eines Nutzers, der zu dem ersten Fluss gehört, aufweist, und
    wobei das Analysieren des Weiteren das Analysieren der ersten Hostdaten, der ersten Verarbeitungsdaten und der ersten Nutzerdaten aufweist.
     
    7. Verfahren nach Anspruch 6, wobei die ersten Hostdaten Informationen hinsichtlich wenigstens einem aufweisen von einem Namen des Hosts, der dem ersten Fluss entspricht, einer Netzwerkadresse des Hosts, einem Betriebssystem des Hosts, CPU-Nutzung des Hosts, Netzwerknutzung durch den Host, Speicherplatz des Hosts, Ports des Hosts, Nutzern, die in den Host eingeloggt sind, geplanten Aufgaben oder einer Datei oder einem Dateiverzeichnis des Hosts.
     
    8. Verfahren nach Anspruch 6, das des Weiteren aufweist:

    Bestimmen eines Zustands von wenigstens einem von einem Host, einem Prozess oder einem Nutzer entsprechend dem ersten Fluss basierend auf wenigstens einem von den ersten Hostdaten, den ersten Prozessdaten oder den ersten Nutzerdaten; und

    Bestimmen einer Quellendpunktgruppe für den ersten Fluss basierend auf dem Zustand,

    wobei die Richtlinie basierend wenigstens teilweise auf der Quellendpunktgruppe bestimmt wird.


     
    9. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten Statistik hinsichtlich der Konformität und Nichtkonformität der Richtlinie enthalten, und das Verfahren des Weiteren aufweist:

    Abbilden der Richtlinie auf ein Konformitätserfordernis; und

    Erzeugen eines Konformitätsberichts basierend auf dem Abbilden und den Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten.


     
    10. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten Verbindungen zwischen Flüssen aufweisen, die nicht mit den Richtlinien des Netzwerks konform sind, und das Verfahren des Weiteren aufweist:

    Ermitteln, dass der erste Fluss nicht mit der bestimmten Richtlinie konform ist, die für den ersten Fluss zutrifft;

    Assoziieren des ersten Flusses mit der Richtlinie in den Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten; und

    Ermitteln eines Grunds für die Nichtkonformität der Richtlinie basierend auf den Richtlinienkonformitätsdaten.


     
    11. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, das des Weiteren aufweist:

    Bestimmen einer Netzwerktopologie für das Netzwerk;

    Bestimmen einer Anwendungsabhängigkeitsabbildung für eine Anwendung, die den ersten Endpunkt als Komponente der Anwendung aufweist; und

    Bestimmen, basierend auf der Netzwerktopologie und der Anwendungsabhängigkeitsabbildung, eines Satzes von Richtlinien für die Anwendung.


     
    12. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, wobei ein erster Satz von Richtlinien für das Netzwerk Negativlisten- bzw. Blacklist -Regeln aufweist und das Verfahren des Weiteren aufweist:
    Erzeugen eines zweiten Satzes von Richtlinien für das Netzwerk durch Übersetzen des ersten Satzes von Richtlinien in Positivlisten- bzw. Whitelist -Regeln.
     
    13. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12, das des Weiteren aufweist:
    Anwenden des zweiten Satzes von Richtlinien auf Netzwerkdaten, die das Netzwerk in einer Netzwerkumgebung durchqueren, die das Netzwerk simuliert.
     
    14. System, das aufweist:

    einen Prozessor (610, 655); und

    einen Speicher (615, 620, 625, 675), der Befehle aufweist, die, wenn sie von dem Prozessor ausgeführt werden, veranlassen, dass das System ein Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 13 durchführt.


     
    15. Nicht flüchtiges computerlesbares Medium, das computerlesbare Befehle hat, die, wenn sie von einem Prozessor eines ersten Endpunkts eines Netzwerks ausgeführt werden, veranlassen, dass der erste Endpunkt ein Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 13 durchführt.
     


    Revendications

    1. Procédé, comprenant les étapes consistant à :

    capturer (504) des premières données de réseau (132) correspondant à un premier flux qui inclut des informations électroniques protégées,

    les premières données de réseau étant capturées par un premier capteur d'un premier point d'extrémité d'un réseau, un deuxième capteur d'un deuxième point d'extrémité du réseau, et un troisième capteur d'un dispositif de mise en réseau le long d'un trajet de données correspondant au premier flux ;

    analyser les premières données de réseau pour déterminer (506) une politique applicable au premier flux ; et

    mettre à jour (512) des données de conformité de politique (138) sur la base :

    d'une action de réseau attendue pour le premier flux sur la base de la politique applicable au premier flux, et

    d'une action de réseau réelle pour le premier flux.


     
    2. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre l'étape consistant à :

    déterminer un groupe de points d'extrémité de source correspondant au premier flux ; et

    la détermination du premier flux inclut des informations électroniques protégées sur la base du groupe de points d'extrémité de source.


     
    3. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre les étapes consistant à :

    déterminer un premier degré de précision de premières données de flux correspondant au premier flux capturées par le premier capteur ;

    déterminer un deuxième degré de précision de deuxièmes données de flux correspondant au premier flux capturées par le deuxième capteur ;

    déterminer un troisième degré de précision de troisièmes données de flux correspondant au premier flux capturées par le troisième capteur ; et

    utiliser des données de flux présentant le plus haut degré de précision pour le premier flux.


     
    4. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre l'étape consistant à :
    assembler des données de flux pour le premier flux en utilisant un premier paquet capturé par l'un du premier capteur, du deuxième capteur ou du troisième capteur et un second paquet capturé par un autre du premier capteur, du deuxième capteur ou du troisième capteur.
     
    5. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le premier point d'extrémité est une partition virtuelle, et les premières données de réseau incluent en outre des données de flux capturées par un quatrième capteur d'un hôte de la partition virtuelle.
     
    6. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes, dans lequel la capture comprend en outre la capture de premières données d'hôte (134) concernant un hôte associé au premier flux, de premières données de processus (136) concernant un processus associé au premier flux, et de premières données d'utilisateur concernant un utilisateur associé au premier flux, et
    dans lequel l'analyse comprend en outre l'analyse des premières données d'hôte, des premières données de processus et des premières données d'utilisateur.
     
    7. Procédé selon la revendication 6, dans lequel les premières données d'hôte incluent des informations concernant au moins un parmi un nom de l'hôte correspondant au premier flux, une adresse de réseau de l'hôte, un système d'exploitation de l'hôte, une utilisation de CPU par l'hôte, une utilisation de réseau par l'hôte, un espace de disque de l'hôte, des ports de l'hôte, des utilisateurs connectés à l'hôte, des travaux planifiés, ou un fichier ou un répertoire de l'hôte.
     
    8. Procédé selon la revendication 6, comprenant en outre les étapes consistant à :

    déterminer un état d'au moins un parmi un hôte, un processus ou un utilisateur correspondant au premier flux sur la base d'au moins certaines des premières données d'hôte, des premières données de processus ou des premières données d'utilisateur ; et

    déterminer un groupe de points d'extrémité de source pour le premier flux sur la base de l'état,

    dans lequel la politique est déterminée sur la base au moins en partie du groupe de points d'extrémité de source.


     
    9. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les données de conformité de politique comprennent des statistiques concernant la conformité et la non-conformité de la politique, et le procédé comprend en outre les étapes consistant à :

    mapper la politique avec une exigence de conformité ; et

    générer un rapport de conformité sur la base du mappage et de données de conformité à une politique.


     
    10. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les données de conformité à une politique comprennent des associations entre des flux non conformes aux politiques du réseau, et le procédé comprend en outre les étapes consistant à :

    déterminer que le premier flux n'est pas conforme à la politique déterminée applicable au premier flux ;

    associer le premier flux à la politique dans les données de conformité à une politique ; et

    déterminer une cause de non-conformité de la politique sur la base des données de conformité à une politique.


     
    11. Procédé selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre les étapes consistant à :

    déterminer une topologie de réseau pour le réseau ;

    déterminer un mappage de dépendance d'application pour une application incluant le premier point d'extrémité en tant que composant de l'application ; et

    déterminer, sur la base de la topologie de réseau et du mappage de dépendance d'application, un ensemble de politiques pour l'application.


     
    12. Procédé selon la revendication 1, dans lequel un premier ensemble de politiques pour le réseau comprend des règles de liste noire, et le procédé comprend en outre l'étape consistant à :
    générer un second ensemble de règles pour le réseau en traduisant le premier ensemble de politiques en règles de liste blanche.
     
    13. Procédé selon la revendication 12, comprenant en outre l'étape consistant à :
    appliquer le second ensemble de politiques à des données de réseau traversant le réseau dans un environnement de réseau simulant le réseau.
     
    14. Système comprenant :

    un processeur (610, 655) ; et

    une mémoire (615, 620, 625, 675) incluant des instructions qui, lorsqu'elles sont exécutées par le processeur, amènent le système à exécuter un procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 13.


     
    15. Support lisible par ordinateur non transitoire présentant des instructions lisibles par ordinateur qui, lorsqu'elles sont exécutées par un processeur d'un premier point d'extrémité d'un réseau, amènent le premier point d'extrémité à exécuter un procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 13.
     




    Drawing





























    Cited references

    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



    This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

    Patent documents cited in the description