(19)
(11)EP 3 310 190 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
22.07.2020 Bulletin 2020/30

(21)Application number: 16745519.5

(22)Date of filing:  17.06.2016
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A23L 3/3454(2006.01)
A23L 13/40(2016.01)
A23B 4/027(2006.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/NL2016/050435
(87)International publication number:
WO 2016/204618 (22.12.2016 Gazette  2016/51)

(54)

MEAT TREATMENT COMPOSITION AND USE THEREOF

FLEISCHBEHANDLUNGSZUSAMMENSETZUNG UND DEREN VERWENDUNG

COMPOSITION DE TRAITEMENT DE LA VIANDE ET SON UTILISATION


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 17.06.2015 EP 15172520
17.06.2015 US 201562180790 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
25.04.2018 Bulletin 2018/17

(73)Proprietor: Purac Biochem B.V.
4206 AC Gorinchem (NL)

(72)Inventors:
  • HILHORST, Gerrit Anthon Rene
    4206 AC Gorinchem (NL)
  • KROON, Harmen
    4206 AC Gorinchem (NL)
  • VERHEEZEN, Jacobus Johannes Adriana Maria
    4206 AC Gorinchem (NL)

(74)Representative: Nederlandsch Octrooibureau 
P.O. Box 29720
2502 LS The Hague
2502 LS The Hague (NL)


(56)References cited: : 
EP-A1- 2 227 965
US-A1- 2007 059 423
WO-A1-2015/026975
  
  • Anonymous: "Gesund grillen: Mit leckeren Marinaden!", , 3 September 2014 (2014-09-03), pages 1-4, XP002743118, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:https://web.archive.org/web/2014090306 4344/http://www.bildderfrau.de/kochschule/ gesund-grillen-grillfleisch-marinieren-d92 55.html [retrieved on 2015-08-07]
  • DATABASE GNPD [Online] MINTEL; March 2015 (2015-03), Anonymous: "Sweet Asian BBQ Marinade with Simply Asia", XP002743119, Database accession no. 3037251
  • DATABASE GNPD [Online] MINTEL; April 2015 (2015-04), Anonymous: "Western Marinated Pork Neck Steaks", XP002743120, Database accession no. 3130527
  • JOLANTA TOMASZEWSKA-GRAS ET AL: "Effect of Marination on the Thermodynamic Properties of Chicken Muscle Proteins Studied by DSC", CZECH JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, vol. 30, no. 4, 1 January 2012 (2012-01-01), pages 302-308, XP055206637, CZ ISSN: 1212-1800
  • SIJTSEMA P ET AL: "Cultured corn sugar and vinegar as a clean label antimicrobial solution in ready-to-eat meats", MEAT SCIENCE, vol. 96, no. 1, 1996, page 482, XP028742978, ISSN: 0309-1740, DOI: 10.1016/J.MEATSCI.2013.07.129
  • Philip J. Harris ET AL: "Plant cell walls and cell-wall polysaccharides: structures, properties and uses in food products", INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY., vol. 41, no. s2, 1 December 2006 (2006-12-01), pages 129-143, XP055541636, GB ISSN: 0950-5423, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2006.01470.x
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

FIELD OF INVENTION



[0001] This invention concerns reduction of moisture loss during the processing of meat. More in particular, compositions are provided that can be used for treatment of meat, thereby reducing meat juice loss during processing, resulting in an increase of both the mass yield and the organoleptic quality of the meat after the processing. Treatment of meat with compositions of the invention as well as the treated meat products obtained accordingly constitute part of the invention as well.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION



[0002] Juiciness and tenderness are quality attributes of meat that are highly discriminative for consumers in judging the quality thereof. These attributes are very much dependent on the amount of water in the meat at the time the food is consumed. All processing steps in the conversion of a fresh animal muscle into a ready-to-consume product however create a stress factor which results in the loss of moisture from the muscle in the form of "drip" in frozen and thawed products, "purge" in raw meats stored under refrigeration, and in cooking loss when the raw muscle is heated prior to serving.

[0003] Loss of liquid mainly reflects loss of water and, to a lesser extent loss of liquid fat, which collectively make up the juice of the meat. Moisture loss is problematic for all types of muscle meat products, which may contain as much as 80% moisture. Typically, during cooking meat may lose 30% to 40% of its weight as shrink during the cooking process. During refrigeration, meat may lose 1% to 3% of its total weight. Freezing and thawing of meat may result in loss of 3% to 7% of weight.

[0004] The overall appearance and quality is diminished when excessive moisture is lost during cooking. The ability to maintain total moisture enhances the ability of the meat products to retain flavor, and also enhances juiciness and tenderness of the cooked product.

[0005] Apart from the effect on quality attributes, loss of liquid is also problematic in that the shrinkage and weight loss caused represents loss in revenue to the producers of pre-cooked meat products.

[0006] The meat industry has relied heavily on the use of certain additives to reduce the loss of liquid during processing. It has become common practice to treat meat with brine solutions in order to partially inhibit as well as to compensate for excessive moisture loss incurred during cooking. One common approach is to combine fresh meat with an aqueous brine solution comprising salts and phosphates. Such conventional brines may increase the water content of meat in several ways.

[0007] Salts may cause the swelling of myofibrils in the meat, which may result in better water retention in the meat. The brining process typically increases the weight of fresh meat about five to fifteen percent. Although some of this water evaporates during cooking, the meat has a higher water content when cooking commences, and thus, the cooked meat may have a higher water content after cooking as compared to non-enhanced meat.

[0008] Phosphates may be used in brines to increase the pH of the meat and thereby increase the number of positively charged sites for binding water in the meat.

[0009] A factor in the use of brines that is becoming increasingly important, is the desire to work with more natural ingredients, so as to enable the meat processors to present a food ingredient label which is more "friendly". The ideal label statement must not only be truthful, but also would be perceived as natural. Another trend in the industry is the use of ingredients which consumers are already familiar with, such as those commonly seen in household kitchens. Label statements with minimal declared components would be considered as "clean label" and "consumer friendly".

[0010] Many other types of "brines" have been proposed over the years, which should address some of the draw-backs associated with conventional brine solutions based on salt and phosphate.

[0011] For example, US 2004/0219283 describes the use of trehalose to treat uncooked meat in order to decrease shrinkage during cooking.

[0012] The use of sodium bicarbonate in the meat treatment industry has also been previously reported. For example, US 6,020,012 describes the use of sodium bicarbonate as an injectable treatment to reduce the rate of pH decline.

[0013] WO2015/026975 describes a phosphate-free composition for stabilizing moisture in muscle foods, prepared from lemon juice and vinegar, comprising acetate salt and citrate salt in an aqueous solution having a pH greater than 7.5 and an ionic strength greater than 0.2.

[0014] US2007/0059423 relates to a composition comprising a combination of neutralized lemon juice and vinegar with non-neutralized vinegar in proportions reflective to achieve the desired water binding and antimicrobial effects in marinated meats.

[0015] Despite the advances in the food processing arts represented by these and other prior art references, a need continues to exist for improved methods for increasing the moisture content of meats in order to enhance the taste and other desirable qualities of the meat product while at the same time supporting a more "clean and consumer friendly" label statement.

[0016] It is the objective of the present invention to provide compositions, which can be used in meat treatment in order to achieve one or more of these objectives.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0017] The present inventor surprisingly found that this can be accomplished with meat treatment compositions comprising certain combinations of one or more acetic acid salts and one or more polysaccharide materials.

[0018] More in particular, as will be illustrated in the appending examples, it has been established that pre-treatment of fresh meat with compositions comprising buffered vinegar and citrus fiber reduced the amount of cooked out juices with as much as 15 %.

[0019] The present compositions are based on ingredients that, depending on the forms in which they are provided, can be labeled as 'natural ingredients'. More in particular, the composition comprises a combination of natural vinegar and certain plant derived fiber compositions, which not only results in a significant reduction of moisture loss but is also highly advantageous in view of food regulations and labeling requirements.

[0020] Hence, the invention provides compositions comprising such combinations of one or more acetic acid salts with one or more polysaccharide materials; methods and uses involving the treatment of meat with said compositions; all as defined in the claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION



[0021] Hence, a first aspect of the invention concerns a meat treatment composition comprising
  1. i) one or more acetic acid salts; and
  2. ii) one or more polysaccharide materials; as defined in the claims.


[0022] As, will be understood by those skilled in the art, based on the foregoing, the compositions of the present invention are particularly suited for use a food additive, more in particular for use as in meat treatment. Hence, in accordance with the invention, the meat treatment composition as well as the components used to produce them are typically 'food grade', meaning that they are acceptable for use in foods and, more in particular, that they would be considered not to be harmful or toxic to a mammal upon consumption of the food products containing them, i.e. when applied at the levels taught herein.

[0023] The composition of the present invention comprises one or more salts of as sodium acetate, calcium acetate and potassium acetate.

[0024] In accordance with the invention the one or more acetic acid salts are provided in the form of a buffered vinegar.

[0025] Vinegars confer favorable organoleptic profiles to food products to which they are added. In a preferred embodiment the vinegar is selected from the group consisting of white vinegar, brandy vinegar, alcoholic vinegar, balsamic vinegar, wine vinegar, malt vinegar, beer vinegar, potato vinegar, rice vinegar, apple vinegar, cherry vinegar, and cane vinegar. In a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention, the vinegar is cane vinegar.

[0026] In this document, the term 'buffered vinegar' is used to refer to compositions obtainable by combining a vinegar with a (food grade) alkalizing agent. Such compositions will comprise a mixture of free acetic acid and one or more acetic acid salts or such compositions will comprise one or more acetic acid salts without free acetic acid, depending on the relative amounts of the vinegar and the alkalizing agent, as will be understood by those skilled in the art. In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, the meat treatment composition comprises a buffered vinegar, which typically is obtainable by combining a natural vinegar with an alkalizing agent, preferably an alkalizing metal salt, such as a metal carbonate, or a metal hydroxide. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the buffered vinegar is obtainable by combining a natural vinegar with sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide or a combination thereof.

[0027] In accordance with the invention, the meat treatment composition comprises a buffered vinegar, said buffered vinegar comprising metal cations, preferably sodium, potassium and/or calcium cations, at a level of more than 90 %, more than 95 %, more than 97.5 %, more than 98.5 %, more than 99 %, more than 99.5 % more than 99.7 %, more than 99.8 % or more than 99.9 % of the stoichiometric amount (relative to the acetic acid carboxylate groups). As will be understood by those skilled in the art, 'stoichiometric amount' in this context refers to the theoretical amount of metal cations necessary to provide a counterion for every acetic acid carboxylate group. Said stoichiometric amount thus depends on the amount of acetate anions present in the vinegar as well as on the valence of the metal cation(s) contained in the alkalizing agent, and those of average skill in the art are capable of calculating the appropriate amounts of vinegar and the alkalizing agent, to achieve the desired percentage as defined above.

[0028] In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, the vinegar is provided in the form of a free flowing powder. The production of free flowing powders from buffered vinegars, using conventional drying techniques such as spray-draying, has been described in the art. For example, international patent application no. WO/2014/021719 describes processes of producing free flowing powders from buffered vinegar, i.e. as an intermediate product. Additionally, buffered vinegars in free-flowing powder form are commercially available.

[0029] The meat treatment compositions of the invention comprise one or more polysaccharide materials.

[0030] Without wishing to be bound by any theory, it is believed that the advantageous effects of combinations of acetate salt(s) and polysaccharide material(s) are in part based on the water-binding capacity of the polysaccharide material(s). In accordance with the invention, the one or more polysaccharide materials exhibit a water holding capacity of at least 3 g of water per gram of polysaccharide material, preferably the one or more polysaccharide materials exhibit a water holding capacity within the range of 4-25 g of water per gram of polysaccharide material, most preferably within the range of 5-20 g of water per gram of polysaccharide material.

[0031] The water holding capacity of polysaccharide materials can be measured using the following procedure: 2.5 g of the polysaccharide material (dry powder) is placed into a 50 mL centrifuge tube and weighed (noted as W1). Then 40 g of milli-Q water (noted as W2) is added. The tube can then be closed and stirred by hand for one minute. The tube can be subjected to centrifugation for ten minutes at 2000 rpm, and the supernatant can then be decanted and weighed (noted as W3). The water holding capacity (WHC) of the polysaccharide material can be calculated by the following formula: WHC=(W2-W3)/W1. The WHC is expressed as grams of water per gram of polysaccharide material (g water/g polysaccharide material).

[0032] In accordance with the invention, the one or more polysaccharide material may be or comprise a fiber material obtained from parenchymal cell containing plant tissue. More in particular, the one or more polysaccharide materials may-comprise so-called shear-disrupted parenchymal cell wall (PCW) materials. These materials contain cellulose fiber as the main constituent together with hemicelluloses and pectin in varying (relative) amounts. They are typically obtained from plant parts containing PCW rich tissue, in particular non-woody plant parts, such as fruits and roots. Suitable materials for producing the shear-disrupted PCW materials are produce as side-streams in conventional food processing such as the production of juices from fruits and the production of sugar from beet root. The production of plant polymer materials suitable for use in the invention generally speaking, comprises pulping plant parts containing PCW rich tissue and subjecting the pulp thus obtained to mechanical shear while in a hydrated state, resulting in the opening up of the internal fiber structure, thereby increasing the water holding capacity of the PCW material. Such methods and the materials obtainable thereby are well-known in the art. PCW materials suitable for producing the plant materials of this invention are found, for example, in fruits and vegetables, such as tomatoes, peaches, pears, apples, plums, lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruits, peas, beets, carrots, potato, etc. Particularly good results though have been obtained with plant polymer material derived from citrus fruits, especially from citrus flesh, citrus peel and combinations thereof, most preferably from citrus flesh, such as lemon flesh, orange flesh, lime flesh and grapefruit flesh.

[0033] The plant derived fiber material is obtainable from such sources by processes generally known by those skilled in the art. In a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention, the plant polymer material is obtainable by a process comprising the steps of:
  1. a) providing a plant pulp rich in parenchymal cell wall material;
  2. b) soaking the plant pulp in an aqueous liquid;
  3. c) optionally draining and washing the soaked plant pulp one or several times; and
  4. d) subjecting the soaked plant pulp in a hydrated state to high pressure homogenization.
The materials accordingly obtained can be subjected to conventional drying processes resulting in free flowing powder that can be re-dispersed in water.

[0034] WO 2006/033697, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety, describes exemplary processes for producing the plant fiber materials suitable for use in the present invention.

[0035] It is known to those skilled in the art that treatment of the plant pulp with chemicals (e.g. acids and/or bases), enzymes (e.g. pectinase, protease, cellulase, hemicellulase or mixtures thereof) and/or heat, affects the solubilization and extraction of certain PCW components, in particular pectin and hemicelluloses. This may be used to tailor the specific properties of the fiber material, especially the water binding capacity and/or viscosifying properties.

[0036] Particularly suitable plant derived fiber materials are commercially available from suppliers like J. Rettenmaier and Sohne GMBH under the Vitacel brand/name; Herbafood Ingredients under the Herbacel brand/name; and Fiberstar under the Citri-fi brand/name. 5/1-1/1, more preferably in a weight ratio within the range of 3/1 - 1.5/1.

[0037] In an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided comprising the one or more acetic acid salts in an amount of up to 99 wt.%, up to 95 wt.% or up to 90 wt.%. In an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided comprising the one or more acetic acid salts in an amount of at least 50 wt.%, at least 60 wt.%, at least 70 wt.%, at least 80 wt.% or at least 90 wt.%.

[0038] In an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided comprising the one or more acetic acid salts in an amount of 50-90 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the composition, preferably in amount of 55-80 wt.%, more preferably in amount of 60-70 wt.%.

[0039] In an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided comprising the one or more polysaccharide materials in an amount of 1-70 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the composition, preferably in amount of 5-60 wt.%, more preferably in amount of 10-50 wt.%.

[0040] In an embodiment of the invention, meat treatment compositions as defined herein are provided, comprising additional ingredients commonly applied in food processing, especially in brining of meat. Such additional ingredients are typically selected from the group of sodium chloride, phosphate salts, potassium chloride, lemon juice, citric acid salts, sugar, spices, herbs, ascorbic acid or salts thereof, flavours and mixtures thereof. These further ingredients may be applied at an amount of 0-50 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the composition, preferably in amount of 2.5-40 wt.%, more preferably in amount of 5-30 wt.%.

[0041] In an embodiment of the invention, meat treatment composition as defined herein does not contain substantial amounts of phosphate. More preferably, the meat treatment composition of the invention, comprises less than 5 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the composition, of phosphate, preferably less than 1 wt.%, less than 0.5 wt.%.

[0042] The meat treatment compositions of the invention are typically produced by blending the polysaccharide material(s) with the acetic acid salt(s). Both the acetic acid salt and the polysaccharide material are commercially available products, as already noted herein. Suitable products containing the acetic acid salt are commercially available in liquid as well as solid form. The commercially available polysaccharide materials will typically be in solid form.

[0043] In one embodiment of the invention, the meat treatment composition is obtainable by blending a source of polysaccharide material, which will typically be provided in the form of a free flowing powder, with a (buffered) liquid vinegar, as described herein before. Next, the ingredients are typically agitated for a period of time sufficient to disperse the polysaccharide material uniformly throughout the liquid so as to form a slurry. After the agitation is completed, the slurry is typically allowed to stand in order for the polysaccharide material to become fully hydrated. Depending on the concentration of acetic acid salt in the liquid, a slurry may be produced that is ready for use in the treatment of meat, following the procedures described below. Alternatively, a concentrated slurry can be produced that intended for use after dilution with water. It is also contemplated that the slurry is processed into a solid or semi-solid composition by (conventional) drying techniques aimed at the removal of part of the water. This is particularly convenient when the meat treatment is not performed at the site where the meat treatment composition is produced, so as to reduce the volume of water in the product to be stored and transported, which has obvious advantages.

[0044] In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the meat treatment compositions of the invention can suitably be produced by dry blending an acetic acid salt and a polysaccharide material that are both in free-flowing powder form. As noted before, solid products offer particular advantages in case meat treatment is performed elsewhere. Before use, the dry blends are dispersed in water, typically with agitation for a period of time sufficient to disperse the polysaccharide material uniformly throughout the liquid so as to form a slurry. After the agitation is completed, the slurry is typically allowed to stand in order for the fiber material to become fully hydrated.

[0045] As will be understood, on the basis of the foregoing, the compositions of the present invention can have widely varying amounts of dry solids. More in particular, compositions are envisaged substantially consisting of the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharide materials, which compositions are typically intended for use after dispersing in water, as well as ready-to-use compositions comprising the acetic acid salt(s) and polysaccharide material(s) at concentrations suitable for treatment of meat.

[0046] Hence, in an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided, wherein the composition is formulated as a dry powder comprising the one or more acetic acid salt(s) and the one or more polysaccharide material(s) in a combined amount of at least 75 wt.%, based on the total weight of the dry powder, more preferably in a combined amount of at least 80 wt.%, most preferably in a combined amount of at least 90 wt.%. In an embodiment of the invention, the dry powder consists substantially or entirely of the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharide materials. In an embodiment of the invention, the dry powder consists substantially or entirely of a vinegar powder and a polysaccharide material.

[0047] In an embodiment of the invention, a meat treatment composition as defined herein is provided, wherein the composition is formulated as a concentrated slurry. The concentrated slurry typically comprises the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharides in combination with water. Such concentrated slurries are typically intended for dilution with water before use. Such concentrated slurries will typically comprise the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharide materials in a combined amount of at least 20 wt.%, based on the total weight of the concentrated slurry, more preferably in a combined amount of at least 40 wt.%, most preferably in a combined amount of at least 50 wt.%.

[0048] In an embodiment of the invention, a ready-to-use liquid slurry (or 'brine') is provided comprising the meat treatment composition as defined herein. This liquid slurry typically comprises the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharides in combination with water. Such liquid slurries will typically comprise the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharide materials in a combined amount of 0.1-20 wt.%, based on the total weight of the liquid slurry, more preferably in a combined amount of 0.25-10 wt.%, most preferably in a combined amount of 0.5-8 wt.%. In an embodiment of the invention, this ready-to-use liquid slurry comprises the one or more acetic acid salts in an amount within the range of 0.5-15 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the liquid slurry, more preferably in an amount of 1-10 wt.%, most preferably in an amount of 2-5 wt.%, based on the total dry weight of the liquid slurry. In an embodiment of the invention, the ready-to-use liquid slurry comprises the one or more polysaccharide materials in an amount within the range of 0.25-10 wt.%, based on the total weight of the liquid slurry, more preferably in an amount of 0.5-7 wt.%, most preferably in an amount of 1-5 wt.%, based on the total weight of the liquid slurry. In an embodiment of the invention, the ready-to-use liquid slurry has a pH within the range of 4-9., more preferably within the range of 5-8., most preferably within the range of 5,5-7

[0049] A second aspect of the invention concerns a method of treating meat to reduce and/or compensate for moisture loss during cooking and/or during other kinds of processing, such as cooling, freezing and/or thawing.

[0050] In an embodiment of the invention, a method as defined herein is provided, wherein the meat is treated with a meat treatment composition of the invention, typically in the form of a liquid slurry referred to here above as the 'ready-to-use' liquid slurry (or 'brine').

[0051] The method of the invention typically comprises the steps of:
  1. a) providing a quantity of meat;
  2. b) providing a meat treatment composition as defined herein, typically in the form of a liquid slurry as defined herein; and
  3. c) treating said meat with the meat treatment composition by mixing, injection or surface treatment.


[0052] The method according to the present invention is suitable and beneficial for the treatment of most conventional meat products typically offered for human consumption, regardless of the source and/or form in which it is offered.

[0053] In an embodiment of the invention, the meat is selected from the group consisting of whole muscle meat, cuts or slices of whole muscle meat, ground or comminuted muscle meat and emulsified meat. In a preferred embodiment of the invention the meat is fresh meat, which may be in the form of whole muscle meat, cuts or slices of whole muscle meat or ground or comminuted muscle meat. In this context the term 'fresh' means that the meat has not been treated by cooking in between removal from the animal carcass and the treatment according to the invention. In a preferred embodiment, the meat is uncooked meat. Embodiments are envisaged wherein the meat has been stored, typically under refrigeration for some time in between removal from the animal carcass and the treatment according to the invention.

[0054] In an embodiment of the invention, the meat is obtained from beef cattle, pork, lamb, poultry, and game, most preferably from pork, chicken and turkey.

[0055] The actual amount of slurry to used for treating meat and/or the weight gain of the meat will vary depending on the method of treating the method, the type of meat, and the particular meat treatment composition used.

[0056] In accordance with certain embodiments of the invention, the meat is treated with a sufficient amount of the liquid slurry and in a manner sufficient to cause a weight increase in the range of 2-20%, more preferably in the range of 5-15%.

[0057] In accordance with certain embodiments of the invention, the meat is treated with a composition in the form of a liquid slurry as defined herein before, in quantities providing a weight ratio of aqueous slurry to meat within the range of 1/10-1/2, preferably within the range of 1/8-1/3, more preferably within the range of 1/7-1/4.

[0058] In accordance with certain embodiments of the invention, the meat is treated with a liquid slurry as defined herein before, in quantities providing a level of the one or more acetic acid salts of 0.1-2.5 g per 100 g of meat, more preferably 0.2-2.5 g per 100 g of meat, most preferably 0.5-2. g per 100 g of meat. In accordance with certain embodiments of the invention, the meat is treated with a liquid slurry as defined herein before, in quantities providing a level of the polysaccharide material of 0.1-2.5 g per 100 g of meat, more preferably 0.2-2 g per 100 g of meat, most preferably 0.3-1 g per 100 g of meat.

[0059] The methods for treating the meat may utilize any method that is known and/or conventionally used for combining fresh meat and a brine product. For example, meat may be treated with the composition of the invention by dispersing it throughout the fresh meat. Suitable methods include injecting, pumping, spraying, soaking, dipping or otherwise dispersing the composition into or onto the meat. In addition, the method may comprise tumbling, kneading, massaging or otherwise manipulate the meat to further disperse the composition throughout the meat. In some embodiments, the composition is injected under pressure into the meat as part of an automated commercial meat production step. Suitable injectors may be set to pump a particular volume of the composition into each piece of meat.

[0060] In the case of comminuted or emulsified meat, the slurry may simply be added to the meat followed by tumbling, kneading or massaging of the meat so as to cause the slurry to be evenly distributed throughout the meat. The treated meat may then be molded or otherwise shaped to form any number of food products including patties, sausages, wieners and luncheon meats.

[0061] Once the slurry has been dispersed throughout the meat, the meat may subsequently be cooked until the desired internal temperature is reached, packaged and refrigerated or frozen. Alternatively, once the slurry has been dispersed throughout the meat, the meat may be packaged, cooked then refrigerated or frozen. Hence, in an embodiment of the invention, a method as defined herein is provided, further comprising one or more of the following steps (in any order/sequence):

d) forming the meat into shaped food products;

e) cooking the meat;

f) refrigerating or freezing the meat; and

g) packaging the meat.



[0062] It will be understood by those skilled in the art, that the benefits of the invention may also be achieved by treating meat sequentially with the one or more acetic acid salts and the one or more polysaccharide materials, although such an embodiment would be less preferred for practical reasons. It is entirely within the skills and capabilities of those skilled in the art to develop such a variant of the process though.

[0063] A further aspect of the invention concerns the use of a combination of:
  1. i) one or more acetic acid salts; and
  2. ii) a one or more polysaccharide material(s);
    as defined herein before, for reducing moisture loss during processing, cooking, refrigerating, freezing, thawing and/or storage of meat.


[0064] The invention has been described by reference to certain embodiments discussed above. It will be recognized that these embodiments are susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms well known to those of skill in the art.

[0065] Many modifications in addition to those described above may be made to the structures and techniques described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, although specific embodiments have been described, these are examples only and are not limiting upon the scope of the invention.

[0066] Furthermore, for a proper understanding of this document and in its claims, it is to be understood that the verb "to comprise" and its conjugations is used in its nonlimiting sense to mean that items following the word are included, but items not specifically mentioned are not excluded. In addition, reference to an element by the indefinite article "a" or "an" does not exclude the possibility that more than one of the element is present, unless the context clearly requires that there be one and only one of the elements. The indefinite article "a" or "an" thus usually means "at least one".

EXAMPLES


Example 1: Effect of various fiber compositions in turkey breast (not according to the invention)



[0067] The increase of cook yield by various fiber compositions in a turkey meat formulation was investigated. Laboratory scale tests were performed using 13 mm pieces of turkey breast to which 33% w/w of a brine solution was added containing, in water, 6.9% sea salt, 2.8% cane sugar, and 4.0 or 8.0% of one of the following fiber compositions: citrus flour (Citri-Fi® 100, Fiberstar Inc), oat fiber (SunOpta™), carrot fiber (BI Nutraceuticals).

[0068] The meat pieces and brine were mixed slowly by hand for 1 minute and tumbled in bags to distribute the brine and improve cohesiveness' in the final cooked product. After aluminum can. The cans were heated in a steam oven until the meat has reached an internal temperature of 72° C and then cooled down.

[0069] The cook loss was assessed as the weight difference between the turkey meat product before and after cooking (without unbound liquid), related to the weight of the meat product before cooking. The cook yield is defined as 100 % minus the % cook loss. The yield improvement was assessed as the difference in yield between the test product and a control product wherein the brine didn't comprise any fiber (or other yield improving ingredient).

[0070] The use of 4 % citrus flour in the brine improved the yield in turkey breast with 3.2 % compared to the control.

[0071] The use of 8 % oat fiber flour in the brine improved the yield in turkey breast with 4.5 % compared to the control.

[0072] The use of 8 % carrot fiber in the brine improved the yield in turkey breast with 6 % compared to the control.

Example 2: Effect of various polysaccharide compositions in ground turkey meat (not according to the invention)



[0073] The experiment set-up was the same as in example 1. The following polysaccharides were used: potato extract (IQA 5038, Basic American Foods, apple fiber (COG, BI Nutraceuticals), citrus flour (CitriFi® 100 M40, Fiberstar Inc), potato starch (N-HANCE 59, Ingredion).

[0074] The following improvements of yield were obtained compared to a control without polysaccharide:
Polysaccharide (% in brine)Improvement (compared to control)
8% potato extract 5.6%
8% apple fiber 1.4%
2% citrus flour 4.6%
8% potato starch 9.2%

Example 3: Effect of fiber and vinegar in turkey breast



[0075] The increase of cook yield by citrus flour combined with buffered vinegar in a turkey meat formulation was investigated. Laboratory scale tests were performed using grinded pieces (13 mm) of turkey breast to which 33% w/w of a brine solution was added containing, in water, 6.9% sea salt, 2.8% cane sugar, 1.8% of citrus flour (Citri-Fi® 100, Fiberstar Inc) and 3.6% of vinegar that has been combined with a stoichiometric amount of NaOH and dried to > 98% dry matter.

[0076] The meat pieces and brine were mixed slowly by hand for 1 minute and tumbled in bags to distribute the brine and improve cohesiveness' in the final cooked product. After tumbling the meat slurry was vacuumized in a cook-in shrink bag and shaped in an aluminum can. The cans were heated in a steam oven until the meat has reached an internal temperature of 72° C and then cooled down.

[0077] A combination of buffered vinegar and citrus flour with a total use level of 1.35 % improved the yield in turkey breast with 3.9 % compared to a control without those ingredients.

Example 4: Effect of carrageenan and vinegar in pork (not according to the invention)



[0078] Enhancement of water binding in pork with a 25% brine pump containing NaCl (8.5%), cane sugar (3.5%) and 2.5% carrageenan (ME2251, FMC) or 2.5% carrageenan in combination with 3.5% buffered vinegar (see example 3] in water. The brine was added to ground pork meat (size of the pieces 13 mm), mixed, tumbled and packed in vacuum bags. The hams were cooked in cooking cans to an internal temperature of 72°C.

[0079] If only carrageenan was used the yield was improved with 5.8% compared to the control (no yield enhancer). Use of the combination of vinegar and carrageenan improved the yield with 10.2%.

Example 5: Effect of citrus flour and vinegar in pork



[0080] Enhancement of water binding in pork with a 25% brine pump containing NaCl (8.5%), cane sugar (3.5%) and 2.5% citrus flour (Herbacel AQ plus N01, Herbafood Ingredients GmbH) in combination with 3.5% buffered vinegar [see example 3] in water. The brine was added to ground pork meat (size of the pieces 13 mm), mixed, tumbled and packed in vacuum bags. The hams were cooked in cooking cans to an internal temperature of 72°C.

[0081] Vinegar with citrus flour (2.5% Herhacel) improved the yield with 10.1% compared to the control (no yield enhancer).

Example 6: Effect of citrus flour and vinegar in turkey



[0082] The increase of cook yield by citrus flour combined with buffered vinegar in a turkey meat formulation was investigated. Laboratory scale tests were performed using pieces of grinded turkey breast (size 13 mm) to which 33% w/w of a brine solution was added containing, in water, 6.9% sea salt, 28% cane sugar, 2.0% of citrus flour (Citri-Fi® 100, Fiberstar Inc) or 2.0 % of citrus flour (Herbacel AQ plus N01, Herbafood Ingredients GmbH) and 2.8% of vinegar that has been combined with a stoichiometric amount of NaOH and dried up to at least 98% dry matter.

[0083] The meat pieces and brine were mixed slowly by hand for 1 minute and tumbled in bags to distribute the brine and improve cohesiveness' in the final cooked product. After tumbling the meat slurry was vacuumized in a cook-in shrink bag and shaped in an aluminum can. The cans were heated in a steam oven until the meat has reached an internal temperature of 72° C and then cooled down.

[0084] The second experiment gave the following results:
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Herbacel) improved the yield with 5.2% compared to the control.
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Citri-Fi) improved the yield with 3.7% compared to the control.


[0085] A second experiment with turkey meat from another origin resulted in the following results:
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Herbacel) improved the yield with 6.0% compared to the control.
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Citri-Fi) improved the yield with 2.4% compared to the control.


[0086] A third experiment with turkey meat from another origin and carried out at another lab with slightly different equipment resulted in the following results:
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Herbacel) improved the yield with 4.6% compared to the control.
  • Vinegar with citrus flour (Citri-Fi) improved the yield with 3.3% compared to the control.

Example 7: Effect of potato starch and vinegar in turkey (not according to the invention)



[0087] The increase of cook yield by potato starch combined with buffered vinegar in a turkey meat formulation was investigated. Laboratory scale tests were performed using grinded turkey breast (size pieces 13 mm) to which 33% w/w of a brine solution was added containing, in water, 6.9% sea salt, 2.8% cane sugar, 8% potato starch (N-HANCE 59, Ingredion), 10% lemon juice (clarified, pH 9.5) and 2.8% of vinegar that has been combined with a stoichiometric amount of NaOH. and dried up to >98% dry matter.

[0088] The meat pieces and brine were mixed slowly by hand for 1 minute and tumbled in bags to distribute the brine and improve cohesiveness' in the final cooked product. After tumbling the meat slurry was vacuumized in a cook-in shrink bag and shaped in an aluminum can. The cans were heated in a steam oven until the meat has reached an internal temperature of 72° C and then cooled down.

[0089] With the combination of potato starch, lemon juice and vinegar, the yield was improved with 10.5% compared to a control without these ingredients.


Claims

1. Meat treatment composition comprising:

i) buffered vinegar said buffered vinegar comprising sodium, potassium and/or calcium cations, at a level of more than 90 % of the stoichiometric amount (relative to the acetic acid carboxylate groups); and

ii) one or more polysaccharide materials having a water holding capacity of at least 3 g of water per gram of polysaccharide material, as determined using the following procedure:

a) 2.5 g of the polysaccharide material in dry powder form is placed into a 50 mL centrifuge tube and the weight ('W1') is determined;

b) 40 g of milli-Q water is weighed ('W2') and added;

c) the tube is centrifuged for 10 minutes at 2000 rpm, after which the supernatant is decanted and weighed ('W3');

d) the water holding capacity ('WHC') is calculated using the following equation:

wherein the polysaccharide material comprises shear-disrupted parenchymal cell wall material containing cellulose together with hemicelluloses and pectin, said parenchymal cell wall material being derived from citrus fruits, and wherein the ratio of buffered vinegar and the polysaccharide material is within the range of 5/1 - 1/1.


 
2. Meat treatment composition according to claim 1, wherein the ratio of buffered vinegar and the polysaccharide material is within the range of 3/1 - 1.5/1.
 
3. Meat treatment composition according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polysaccharide material is obtainable by pulping plant parts containing parenchymal cell wall rich tissue and subjecting the pulp thus obtained to mechanical shear while in a hydrated state.
 
4. Meat treatment composition according to any one of claims 1-3, in the form of dry powder comprising 50-90 wt.% of buffered vinegar and 10-50 wt.% of the one or more polysaccharide materials.
 
5. Meat treatment composition according to any one of claims 1-3, in the form of a liquid slurry, wherein buffered vinegar is present in an amount of 0.5-15 wt.%, based on the total weight of the slurry, and the one or more polysaccharide materials are present in an amount of 0.25-10 wt.%, based on the total weight of the slurry.
 
6. Method of treating meat to reduce moisture loss incurred during cooking, refrigerating, freezing, thawing and/or storage of the meat, said method comprising the steps of:

a) providing a quantity of uncooked meat;

b) providing a meat treatment composition as defined in any one of claims 1-5; and

c) treating said meat with the meat treatment composition by mixing, injection or surface treatment.


 
7. Method according to claim 6, wherein the meat treatment composition is formulated as an aqueous slurry as defined in claim 5.
 
8. Method according to claim 7, wherein the quantities of the uncooked meat and the aqueous slurry provide a ratio of aqueous slurry to uncooked within the range of 1/10-1/2.
 
9. Method according to any one of claims 6-8, further comprising one or more of the following steps:

d) forming the meat into a shaped food product;

e) cooking the meat;

f) refrigerating or freezing the meat; and

g) packaging the meat.


 
10. Method according to any one of claims 6-9, wherein the uncooked meat is whole muscle meat, comminuted meat or emulsified meat.
 
11. Use of a combination of:

i) buffered vinegar, said buffered vinegar comprising sodium, potassium and/or calcium cations, at a level of more than 90 % of the stoichiometric amount (relative to the acetic acid carboxylate groups); and

ii) one or more polysaccharide materials having a water holding capacity of at least 3 g of water per gram of polysaccharide material, as determined using the following procedure:

a) 2.5 g of the polysaccharide material in dry powder form is placed into a 50 mL centrifuge tube and the weight ('W1') is determined;

b) 40 g of milli-Q water is weighed ('W2') and added;

c) the tube is centrifuged for 10 minutes at 2000 rpm, after which the supernatant is decanted and weighed ('W3');

d) the water holding capacity ('WHC') is calculated using the following equation:

for reducing moisture loss during processing, cooking, refrigerating, freezing, thawing and/or storage of meat, wherein the polysaccharide material comprises shear-disrupted parenchymal cell wall material containing cellulose together with hemicelluloses and pectin, said parenchymal cell wall material being derived from citrus fruits and wherein the ratio of buffered vinegar and the polysaccharide material is within the range of 10/1 - 0.5/1.


 


Ansprüche

1. Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung, umfassend;

i) gepufferten Essig, wobei der gepufferte Essig Natrium-, Kalium- und/oder Calcium-Kationen bei einem Niveau von mehr als 90 % der stöchiometrischen Menge (relativ zu den Essigsäure-Carboxylatgruppen) umfasst; und

ii) ein oder mehrere Polysaccharidmaterialien mit einer Wasserhaltekapazität von mindestens 3 g Wasser pro Grammm Polysaccharidmaterial, bestimmt unter Verwendung des folgenden Verfahrens:

a) 2,5 g des Polysaccharidmaterials in Form von Trockenpulver wird in ein 50 ml Zentrifugenröhrchen gegeben und das Gewicht ('W1') wird bestimmt;

b) 40 g Milli-Q-Wasser wird abgewogen ('W2') und zugegeben;

c) das Röhrchen wird 10 Minuten lang bei 2000 rpm zentrifugiert, wonach der Überstand dekantiert und gewogen wird (,W3');

d) die Wasserhaltekapazität (,WHC') wird unter Verwendung der folgenden Gleichung berechnet: WHC = (W2-W3)/W1;

wobei das Polysaccharidmaterial geschertes parenchymales Zellwandmaterial umfasst, das Cellulose zusammen mit Hemicellulosen und Pektin enthält, wobei das parenchymale Zellwandmaterial aus Zitrusfrüchten abgeleitet ist, und wobei das Verhältnis von gepuffertem Essig und dem Polysaccharidmaterial im Bereich von 5/1 - 1/1 liegt.


 
2. Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung gemäß Anspruch 1, wobei das Verhältnis von gepuffertem Essig und dem Polysaccharidmaterial im Bereich von 3/1 - 1,5/1 liegt.
 
3. Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung gemäß einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, wobei das Polysaccharidmaterial durch Aufschließen von Pflanzenteilen erhalten werden kann, die an parenchymaler Zellwand reiches Gewebe enthalten, und den so erhaltenen Fruchtbrei in einem hydrierten Zustand mechanischer Scherung zu unterwerfen.
 
4. Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung gemäß einem der Ansprüche 1 - 3 in Form von Trockenpulver, umfassend 50 - 90 Gewichts-% gepufferten Essig und 10 - 50 Gewichts-% des einen oder der mehreren Polysaccharidmaterialien.
 
5. Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung gemäß einem der Ansprüche 1 - 3 in Form eines flüssigen Breis, in dem gepufferter Essig in einer Menge von 0,5 - 15 Gewichts-%, beruhend auf dem Gesamtgewicht des Breis, vorliegt und das eine oder die mehreren Polysaccharidmaterialien in einer Menge von 0,25 - 10 Gewichts-%, beruhend auf dem Gesamtgewicht des Breis, vorliegen.
 
6. Verfahren zum Behandeln von Fleisch, um Feuchtigkeitsverlust, der beim Kochen, Kühlen, Gefrieren, Auftauen und/oder Aufbewahren des Fleisches anfällt, zu reduzieren, wobei das Verfahren die Schritte umfasst:

a) Bereitstellen einer Menge ungekochten Fleisches;

b) Bereitstellen einer Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung wie in einem der Ansprüche 1 - 5 definiert und

c) Behandeln des Fleisches mit der Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung durch Mischen, Injizieren oder Oberflächenbehandlung.


 
7. Verfahren gemäß Anspruch 6, wobei die Fleischbehandlungszusammensetzung als wässriger Brei wie in Anspruch 5 definiert formuliert ist.
 
8. Verfahren gemäß Anspruch 7, wobei die Mengen des ungekochten Fleisches und des wässrigen Breis ein Verhältnis von wässrigem Brei zu Ungekochtem innerhalb des Bereichs von 1/10 - 1/2 bereitstellen.
 
9. Verfahren gemäß einem der Ansprüche 6 - 8, ferner umfassend einen oder mehrere der folgenden Schritte:

d) Formen des Fleisches in ein geformtes Nahrungsmittelprodukt;

e) Kochen des Fleisches;

f) Kühlen oder Gefrieren des Fleisches und

g) Verpacken des Fleisches.


 
10. Verfahren gemäß einem der Ansprüche 6 - 9, wobei es sich bei dem ungekochten Fleisch um ganzes Muskelfleisch, zerkleinertes Fleisch oder emulgiertes Fleisch handelt.
 
11. Verwendung einer Kombination von;

i) gepuffertem Essig, wobei der gepufferte Essig Natrium-, Kalium- und/oder Calcium-Kationen umfasst, bei einem Niveau von mehr als 90 % der stöchiometrischen Menge (relativ zu den Essigsäure-Carboxylatgruppen), und

ii) einem oder mehreren Polysaccharidmaterialien mit einer Wasserhaltekapazität von mindestens 3 g Wasser pro Grammm Polysaccharidmaterial, bestimmt unter Verwendung des folgenden Verfahrens:

a) 2,5 g des Polysaccharidmaterials in Form von Trockenpulver wird in ein 50 ml Zentrifugenröhrchen gegeben und das Gewicht ('W1') wird bestimmt;

b) 40 g Milli-Q-Wasser wird abgewogen ('W2') und zugegeben;

c) das Röhrchen wird 10 Minuten lang bei 2000 rpm zentrifugiert, wonach der Überstand dekantiert und gewogen wird (,W3');

d) die Wasserhaltekapazität (,WHC') wird unter Verwendung der folgenden Gleichung berechnet: WHC = (W2-W3)/W1;

zum Reduzieren von Feuchtigkeitsverlust beim Verarbeiten, Kochen, Kühlen, Gefrieren, Auftauen und/oder Aufbewahren des Fleisches, wobei das Polysaccharidmaterial geschertes parenchymales Zellwandmaterial umfasst, das Cellulose zusammen mit Hemicellulosen und Pektin enthält, wobei das parenchymale Zellwandmaterial aus Zitrusfrüchten abgeleitet ist, und wobei das Verhältnis von gepuffertem Essig und dem Polysaccharidmaterial im Bereich von 5/1 - 1/1 liegt.


 


Revendications

1. Composition de traitement de viande comprenant :

i) du vinaigre tamponné, ledit vinaigre tamponné comprenant des cations de sodium, potassium et/ou calcium, à un niveau supérieur à 90 % de la quantité stoechiométrique (par rapport aux groupes carboxylate d'acide acétique) ; et

ii) un ou plusieurs matériaux polysaccharides ayant une capacité de rétention d'eau d'au moins 3 g d'eau par gramme de matériau polysaccharide, comme déterminé en utilisant la méthode suivante :

a) 2,5 g du matériau polysaccharide sous forme de poudre sèche sont placés dans un tube à centrifuger de 50 ml et le poids (« W1 ») est déterminé ;

b) 40 g d'eau milli-Q sont pesés (« W2 ») et ajoutés ;

c) le tube est centrifugé pendant 10 minutes à 2 000 tr/min, après quoi le surnageant est décanté et pesé (« W3 ») ;

d) la capacité de rétention d'eau (« WHC ») est calculée à l'aide de l'équation suivante :

dans lequel le matériau polysaccharide comprend un matériau de paroi de cellule parenchymateuse perturbé par cisaillement contenant de la cellulose ainsi que des hémicelluloses et de la pectine, ledit matériau de paroi de cellule parenchymateuse étant dérivé d'agrumes, et dans lequel le rapport du vinaigre tamponné et du matériau polysaccharide est dans la plage de 5/1 à 1/1.


 
2. Composition de traitement de viande selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle le rapport du vinaigre tamponné et du matériau polysaccharide se situe dans la plage de 3/1 à 1,5/1.
 
3. Composition de traitement de viande selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes,
dans lequel le matériau polysaccharide peut être obtenu en réduisant en pulpe des parties végétales contenant du tissu riche en paroi de cellule parenchymateuse et en soumettant la pâte ainsi obtenue à un cisaillement mécanique lorsqu'elle est dans un état hydraté.
 
4. Composition de traitement de viande selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 3, sous forme de poudre sèche comprenant 50 à 90 % en poids de vinaigre tamponné et 10 à 50 % en poids d'un ou plusieurs matériaux polysaccharides.
 
5. Composition de traitement de viande selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 3, sous la forme d'une suspension liquide, dans laquelle du vinaigre tamponné est présent en une quantité de 0,5 à 15 % en poids, sur la base du poids total de la suspension, et les un ou plusieurs matériaux polysaccharides sont présents en une quantité de 0,25 à 10 % en poids, sur la base du poids total de la suspension.
 
6. Méthode de traitement de viande pour réduire une perte d'humidité encourue pendant la cuisson, la réfrigération, la congélation, la décongélation et/ou le stockage de la viande, ladite méthode comprenant les étapes consistant à :

a) fournir une quantité de viande non cuite ;

b) fournir une composition de traitement de la viande telle que définie dans l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 5 ; et

c) traiter ladite viande avec la composition de traitement de viande par mélange, injection ou traitement de surface.


 
7. Méthode selon la revendication 6, dans laquelle la composition de traitement de viande est formulée sous la forme d'une suspension aqueuse telle que définie dans la revendication 5.
 
8. Méthode selon la revendication 7, dans laquelle les quantités de la viande non cuite et de la suspension aqueuse fournissent un rapport de suspension aqueuse sur la viande non cuite dans la plage de 1/10 à 1/2.
 
9. Méthode selon l'une quelconque des revendications 6 à 8, comprenant en outre une ou plusieurs des étapes suivantes consistant à :

d) transformer la viande en un produit alimentaire façonné ;

e) cuire la viande ;

f) réfrigérer ou congeler la viande ; et

g) conditionner la viande.


 
10. Méthode selon l'une quelconque des revendications 6 à 9, dans laquelle la viande non cuite est de la viande musculaire entière, de la viande hachée ou de la viande émulsifiée.
 
11. Utilisation d'une combinaison de :

i) vinaigre tamponné, ledit vinaigre tamponné comprenant des cations sodium, potassium et/ou calcium, à un niveau supérieur à 90 % de la quantité stoechiométrique (par rapport aux groupes carboxylate d'acide acétique) ; et

ii) un ou plusieurs matériaux polysaccharides ayant une capacité de rétention d'eau d'au moins 3 g d'eau par gramme de matériau polysaccharide, comme déterminé en utilisant la méthode suivante :

a) 2,5 g du matériau polysaccharide sous forme de poudre sèche sont placés dans un tube à centrifuger de 50 ml et le poids (« W1 ») est déterminé ;

b) 40 g d'eau milli-Q sont pesés (« W2 ») et ajoutés ;

c) le tube est centrifugé pendant 10 minutes à 2 000 tr/min, après quoi le surnageant est décanté et pesé (« W3 ») ;

d) la capacité de rétention d'eau (« WHC ») est calculée à l'aide de l'équation suivante :

pour réduire la perte d'humidité pendant le traitement, la cuisson, la réfrigération, la congélation, la décongélation et/ou le stockage de la viande, dans lequel le matériau polysaccharide comprend un matériau de paroi de cellule parenchymateuse perturbé par cisaillement contenant de la cellulose ainsi que des hémicelluloses et de la pectine, ledit matériau de paroi de cellule parenchymateuse étant dérivé d'agrumes, et dans lequel le rapport du vinaigre tamponné et du matériau polysaccharide est dans la plage de 5/1 à 1/1.


 






Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description