(19)
(11)EP 3 399 770 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
02.12.2020 Bulletin 2020/49

(21)Application number: 18170461.0

(22)Date of filing:  02.05.2018
(51)Int. Cl.: 
H04R 1/10  (2006.01)
A61F 11/14  (2006.01)

(54)

EARMUFF WITH ELECTROACOUSTIC SHOCK ABSORBER

OHRENSCHÜTZER MIT DÄMPFER FÜR ELEKTROAKUSTISCHER STOSS

PROTÈGE-OREILLES AVEC ABSORBEUR DE CHOCS ÉLECTROACOUSTIQUE


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 03.05.2017 US 201762500655 P

(43)Date of publication of application:
07.11.2018 Bulletin 2018/45

(73)Proprietor: Honeywell International Inc.
Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • JENKINS, John
    Morris Plains, NJ New Jersey 07950 (US)
  • MUGGLETON, Neal
    Morris Plains, NJ New Jersey 07950 (US)
  • HENRIKSEN, Viggo
    Morris Plains, NJ New Jersey 07950 (US)
  • WILSON, May
    Morris Plains, NJ New Jersey 07950 (US)

(74)Representative: Haseltine Lake Kempner LLP 
138 Cheapside
London EC2V 6BJ
London EC2V 6BJ (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
US-A- 4 088 849
US-A1- 2017 040 012
US-A1- 2011 311 079
  
      
    Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


    Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS



    [0001] The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 62/500,655 filed May 3, 2017 by John Jenkins, et al. and entitled "Earmuff with Electroacoustic Shock Absorber".

    FIELD



    [0002] The present disclosure relates generally to hearing protection earmuffs, and more particularly, to hearing protection earmuffs comprising an electroacoustic shock absorber.

    BACKGROUND



    [0003] In industrial work environments, periodically and/or continuously generated noise (e.g. vibration), for example, from mechanical handling of machinery (e.g. drilling) and/or alarm speakers may be a common occurrence. Generally, at both low and high frequencies, this may be harmful to the workers' ears and may potentially cause vibration-induced hearing loss and/or hearing damage over short and/or prolonged exposure periods. The issue of potential hearing damage often arises in manufacturing and other industrial facilities, but may also arise in military settings, airport settings, entertainment settings, and various other environments that involve exposure to high levels of noise and/or vibration. Generally, hearing damage due to exposure to prolonged periods of vibration, especially at low frequencies, may go unnoticed in the short term, but may cause permanent damage to an individual's hearing in the long term. Thus, it may be especially important to safeguard the hearing of individuals (such as workers, employees, customers, etc.) against harmful and/or prolonged vibration exposure by implementing the use of hearing protection. Standard passive earmuffs and other such hearing protection devices typically focus exclusively on reducing passage of vibrations from the air into the user's ear (e.g. noise reduction rating). However, vibrations (such as those induced by sound waves contacting an earmuff surface) may also introduce another source of noise into the user's ear (e.g. despite wearing of protective earmuffs with high noise reduction rating) due to movement of the earmuff cup with respect to the headband of the earmuff, for example.

    [0004] US2011/0311079 discloses an earpiece comprising a housing; and a field responsive fluid, where the field responsive fluid is in the housing, where the housing is part of the earpiece, and where the earpiece is configured to vary a field to vary an acoustical property of the field responsive fluid.

    SUMMARY



    [0005] The invention is defined in the independent apparatus and method claims.

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



    [0006] For a more complete understanding of the present disclosure, reference is now made to the following brief description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and detailed description, wherein like reference numerals represent like parts.

    FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram illustrating an exemplary system for controlling an electroacoustic shock absorber of an exemplary earmuff;

    FIG. 2 illustrates a side view of an exemplary embodiment of an earmuff comprising an electroacoustic shock absorber; and

    FIG. 3 illustrates another side view of an exemplary embodiment of an earmuff comprising an electroacoustic shock absorber.


    DETAILED DESCRIPTION



    [0007] The disclosure should in no way be limited to the illustrative implementations, drawings, and techniques illustrated below, but may be modified within the scope of the appended claims.

    [0008] The following brief definition of terms shall apply throughout the application:

    [0009] The term "comprising" means including but not limited to, and should be interpreted in the manner it is typically used in the patent context;

    [0010] The phrases "in one embodiment," "according to one embodiment," and the like generally mean that the particular feature, structure, or characteristic following the phrase may be included in at least one embodiment of the present invention, and may be included in more than one embodiment of the present invention (importantly, such phrases do not necessarily refer to the same embodiment);

    [0011] If the specification describes something as "exemplary" or an "example," it should be understood that refers to a non-exclusive example;

    [0012] The terms "about" or "approximately" or the like, when used with a number, may mean that specific number, or alternatively, a range in proximity to the specific number, as understood by persons of skill in the art field (for example, +/- 10%); and

    [0013] If the specification states a component or feature "may," "can," "could," "should," "would," "preferably," "possibly," "typically," "optionally," "for example," "often," or "might" (or other such language) be included or have a characteristic, that particular component or feature is not required to be included or to have the characteristic. Such component or feature may be optionally included in some embodiments, or it may be excluded.

    [0014] Disclosed embodiments relate to an apparatus and a method for providing hearing protection, including a hearing protection earmuff comprising an electroacoustic shock absorber (which may allow for the dampening level of the shock absorber to be electrically adjusted, for example to account for a detected vibration source which might introduce noise into the ear cup of the earmuff). To counteract the detected vibration source, thereby improving the hearing protection of such an earmuff and/or the ability of such an earmuff to reduce noise inside an earmuff (which for example, could be helpful in allowing a user to clearly hear transmitted sound within an ear cup of the earmuff, for example radio or other wireless communication transmitted via speaker into the ear cup), the hearing protection device (e.g. earmuff) of the present invention comprises an electroacoustic shock absorber (for example, to dampen conduction of sound/noise/vibration from the interface of the ear cup and the headband of the earmuff).

    [0015] Generally, one or more sensor (such as a microphone) might detect one or more vibration source, and the electroacoustic shock absorber might then be automatically adjusted accordingly (e.g. the dampening level of the electroacoustic shock absorber might be altered in response to the detected vibration source). This may result in a better earmuff, for example by minimizing conduction of sound into the ear cup, increasing the noise reduction rating (NRR) of the earmuff design, and/or changing (e.g. tuning) the resonance frequency of the ear cup.

    [0016] In typical embodiments, the electroacoustic shock absorber comprises magnetorheological fluid (MRF) (e.g. iron particles (such as carbonyl iron), cobalt particles, other metal particles, and/or alloy particles suspended in, for example, mineral oil, synthetic oil, water, glycol, etc.), operable to change viscosity based on/in response to a magnetic field. Such embodiments typically employ an electromagnetic controller to generate the magnetic field for controlling the viscosity/dampening of the electroacoustic shock absorber, generally in response to (or based on) a sensor signal from a sensor configured to detect relevant vibrations of the sort that might impact the ear cup and impart some noise to the ear cup. So, for example, disclosed hearing protection earmuff embodiments comprise: two ear cups; a headband attached to and connecting the ear cups; a sensor (typically one for each ear cup); a processor; an electroacoustic shock absorber (typically one for/associated with each ear cup and) configured to dampen vibrations at an interface (e.g. between each ear cup and the headband); and an electromagnetic controller (typically one for/associated with each electroacoustic shock absorber and) configured to control the dampening level (e.g. viscosity) of the (corresponding) electroacoustic shock absorber. The sensor(s) of such embodiments might typically be configured to detect vibrations (e.g. sound, user movement, etc.) and transmit a sensor signal (indicative of such vibrations) to the processor. The processor would typically be configured to generate a control signal to the electromagnetic controller based on the sensor signal, while the electromagnetic controller would be configured to respond to the control signal by generating a magnetic field (based on the sensor signal and for interaction with the electroacoustic shock absorber). Typically, the electroacoustic shock absorber would comprise MRF operable to change viscosity based on/in response to a magnetic field (e.g. generated by the electromagnetic controller). Persons of skill should appreciate other types of electroacoustic shock absorbers configured to dampen vibrations. Generally, such electroacoustic shock absorber embodiments could be tuned/controlled/altered based on various types of vibrations to reduce negative vibrational impact to the earmuff (e.g. vibrations which might introduce noise into the ear cups of the earmuff) and, as a result, the user's hearing.

    [0017] So, for example, if the vibrations being detected and accounted for are external sounds (which might, for example, induce vibrations in the ear cup relative to the headband), each sensor would typically comprise a microphone configured to detect (external) sound. Then, each electroacoustic shock absorber would typically be configured to dampen vibrations between the corresponding ear cup and the headband, and the processor would typically be configured to generate a control signal directing the electromagnetic controller to interact with the electroacoustic shock absorber (via magnetic field) to change the clamping force at the interface between the corresponding ear cup and the headband (for example, at a rate and an amplitude based on the sensor signal). In some embodiments, the sensor to detect movement/vibration may be located on an end of the headband closest to the ear cup. In some embodiments, there may be one or more sensors to detect movement. For example, in some embodiments, a first sensor may be located on the right end of the headband closest to the right ear cup, and a second sensor may be located on the left end of the headband closest to the left ear cup. By way of example, the viscosity of the electroacoustic shock absorber might be changed at a rate (e.g. frequency in Hz) identical to that of the sensor signal, and might decrease in proportion to any increase in amplitude based on the sensor signal. Generally, the electroacoustic shock absorber may adjust to have a lower viscosity to account for an increase in vibrations due to, for example, an increase in movement. Thus, the electroacoustic shock absorber could be adjusted to minimize any sound input into the ear cup from vibration transmission at the interface of the headband and the ear cup (e.g. dampening conduction of sound/noise/vibration from the interface of the headband to the ear cup) and/or to alter the resonance frequency of the corresponding ear cup. In some embodiments, each interface/electroacoustic shock absorber would comprise a wireguide connecting the corresponding ear cup to the headband, where movement might be imparted based on the viscosity of the surrounding smart fluid (e.g. MRF) in the electroacoustic shock absorber. In some embodiments, the sensor (for example, for each ear cup) might comprise a (one or more) microphone configured to detect external sounds. In some embodiments, an external microphone may be configured to detect external sound vibrations. For example, such a microphone could be located on an exterior of the ear cup.

    [0018] Alternatively, the electroacoustic shock absorber might be controlled to compensate or minimize other types of noise/vibration sources. In other words, in addition to embodiments that account for external sound vibrations, other embodiments might account for speaker generated noise within an ear cup and/or vibrations due to movement of the user (e.g. movement vibrations imparted by contact of the earmuff with the user's head, at the headband and/or seal cushion of the ear cup). Thus, one or more vibration sources might be sensed (e.g. with a corresponding sensor configured to detect such vibration source), with the electroacoustic shock absorber then being adjusted to account for the one or more sensed vibrations, in order to minimize noise transmission (for example, noise conduction) into the ear cups of the earmuff.

    [0019] In some embodiments, if the vibrations being sensed and accounted for are generated by a speaker within the ear cup, then the earmuff might further (or alternatively) comprise a speaker located (e.g. mounted) within (one or both) ear cup (for example, configured or operable to pass-through external sound, configured for communication (e.g., with other earmuffs), and/or configured for music or other entertainment projection into the ear). Then, the sensor (or perhaps a second sensor if the embodiment adjusts based on both external sound and speaker sound) (e.g., for each ear cup) might comprise a microphone configured to detect sound from the speaker. For example, such a microphone would generally be located (e.g. mounted) on the interior of the ear cup, to detect the speaker sound within the ear cup. Alternatively, the speaker vibrations might be detected using another sort of sensor (still configured to detect the speaker sound to be transmitted into the ear cup). For instance, the sensor (or perhaps a second sensor if embodiments adjust based on both external sound and speaker sound) (e.g., for each ear cup) could detect a speaker electrical signal, and translate that into a sensor signal indicative of the speaker sound output into the ear cup.

    [0020] In another embodiment, the vibrations being sensed and accounted for may be generated by user movement. Typically, an internal microphone may detect resulting noise from user movement, and correlate (via a processor) (e.g. using pre-determined algorithms, etc.) the amount of user movement with the viscosity of the smart fluid in the shock absorber and/or seal cushion. In some embodiments, the sensor may measure the rotation of the headband with respect to the ear cup and/or longitudinal movement of the wireguide of the headband with respect to the ear cup connection and/or movement of the seal cushion of the ear cup with respect to the user's head. In some embodiments, the seal cushion of the ear cup may be filled with smart fluid, (e.g., MRF) and the smart fluid's viscosity may be manipulated to alter the compressibility/spring value of the seal cushion in a way that would be effective in minimizing noise transmission into the ear cup.

    [0021] While persons of skill should understand the disclosed embodiments based on the above disclosure, the following figures may provide specific examples that may further clarify the disclosure.

    [0022] Turning now to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic diagram of an exemplary system 100 for controlling an electroacoustic shock absorber of an exemplary earmuff. Typically, the components (of the system 100) involved in controlling the electroacoustic shock absorber may include at least one sensor (e.g. microphone) 101, a processor 102, an electrical controller 103, and a smart fluid 104. The one or more sensors 101 may typically be configured to detect vibrations (e.g. sound/user movement, etc.) and transmit a sensor signal (indicative of such vibrations) to the processor 102. Generally, the sensor 101 may be a microphone to detect external sounds and/or movement from the user. The processor 102 may typically be configured to receive a one or more sensor signals from the one or more sensors 101 and may typically be configured to generate a control signal to the electrical (e.g. electromagnetic) controller 103 based on the sensor signal. Typically, the electrical controller 103 may be configured to respond to the control signal by generating a magnetic field to interact with the smart fluid of the electroacoustic shock absorber 104 (e.g., wherein the magnetic field would be generated in response to the control signal, which is indicative of/related to the sensor signal regarding vibrations).The electrical controller 103 may comprise an electromagnet. Typically, the smart fluid may comprise MRF operable to change viscosity based on/in response to the applied magnetic field. For example, if the amplitude of the sensor signal is high (e.g. more vibration is occurring), then the viscosity of the smart fluid may decrease (e.g. to reduce the amount of sound transmitted through the smart fluid). On the contrary, if the amplitude of the sensor signal is low (e.g. less vibration is occurring), then the viscosity of the smart fluid may increase (e.g. to increase the amount of sound transmitted through the smart fluid).

    [0023] In some instances, the amount of viscosity may change over the course of vibrations, for example a high sensor signal might initially cause a decrease in viscosity of the smart fluid (e.g. to reduce sound transmission) but if the amplitude is sufficiently large that there is a risk of bottoming-out of the shock absorber, then the viscosity might be increases as the shock absorber approaches the bottom-out situation. Generally, the amount of noise/sound transmitted to the user's ears may depend on the NRR of the earmuff. In other words, the amount of noise/sound transmitted to the user's ears may be adjusted to achieve a specific NRR. Conceptually, in some embodiments, the electroacoustic shock absorber 104 may be tuned/controlled/altered based on various types of vibrations which might introduce noise into the ear cups of the earmuff.

    [0024] FIG. 2 illustrates a side view of an exemplary embodiment of an earmuff 200 comprising one or more ear cups 211, a headband 215 configured to connect the ear cups 211, a microphone 214, an electroacoustic shock absorber 213, a seal cushion 216, and a wireguide 217. In some embodiments, the earmuff 200 may comprise two ear cups 211, for example a left ear cup and a right ear cup, configured to cover both of the user's ears. In some embodiments, the left ear cup and the right ear cup may comprise the same elements, while in other embodiments, the left ear cup and the right ear cup may comprise different elements. In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 2, the microphone 214 is located on the exterior of the ear cup 211 to detect external sounds. Typically, the microphone 214 of the electroacoustic shock absorber 213 may interact with the processor, the electrical controller, and the smart fluid 212 in a manner similar to that described in reference to FIG. 1. Additionally, the electroacoustic shock absorber 213 may typically be configured to dampen the vibrations occurring between the ear cup 211 and the headband 215. The processor may typically be configured to generate a control signal directing the electromagnetic controller to interact with the electroacoustic shock absorber 213 (via magnetic field) to change the clamping force at the interface between the headband 215 and the ear cup 211. For example, the viscosity of the smart fluid 212 of the electroacoustic shock absorber 213 might change at a rate (e.g. frequency in Hz) identical to that of the sensor signal, and/or might decrease in proportion to any increase in amplitude based on the sensor signal. Thus, the electroacoustic shock absorber 213 may be adjusted to minimize any sound input (e.g. vibrational transmission) into the ear cup 211 by controlling the clamping force at the interface between the headband 215 and the ear cup 211. Generally, the clamping force may vary as the viscosity of the smart fluid 212 changes. In some embodiments, each interface/electroacoustic shock absorber 213 may comprise a wireguide 217 connecting the corresponding ear cup 211 to the headband 215, where movement may be imparted based on the viscosity of the surrounding smart fluid 212 (e.g. MRF) in the electroacoustic shock absorber 213.

    [0025] FIG. 3 illustrates an alternative side view of an exemplary embodiment of an earmuff 300 comprising one or more ear cups 321, a seal cushion 326, a headband 324 configured to connect the ear cups 321, a wireguide 325, and an electroacoustic shock absorber 323. In some embodiments, the electroacoustic shock absorber 323 may account for speaker generated noise within an ear cup 321 and/or vibrations due to movement of the user. Typically, movement/vibration may be imparted by contact of the earmuff 300 with the user's head at the headband 324 and/or seal cushion 326 of the ear cup 321. Thus, one or more vibration sources might be sensed, with the electroacoustic shock absorber 323 then being adjusted to account for the one or more sensed vibrations in order to minimize noise transmission into the ear cups 321 of the earmuffs 300.

    [0026] In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 3, the vibrations being sensed and accounted for may be generated by user movement. Typically, an internal microphone 314 may detect resulting noise from user movement, and correlate (via a processor) (e.g. using pre-determined algorithms, etc.) the amount of user movement with the viscosity of the smart fluid 322 in the shock absorber. In some embodiments, the sensor may measure the rotation of the headband 324 with respect to the ear cup 321 and/or longitudinal movement of the wireguide 325 of the headband 324 with respect to the ear cup 321 connection and/or movement of the seal cushion of the ear cup 321 with respect to the user's head. In some embodiments, the seal cushion 326 of the ear cup 321 may be filled with smart fluid 322, and the smart fluid's 322 viscosity may be manipulated to alter the compressibility/spring value of the seal cushion 326 in a way that would be effective in minimizing noise transmission into the ear cup 321.

    [0027] The exemplary embodiment of FIG. 3 may sense vibration occurring due to noise being transmitted by a speaker. The speaker may be located (e.g. mounted) within (one or both) ear cup 321 (for example, configured or operable to pass-through external sound, configured for communication (e.g. with other earmuffs), and/or configured for music or other entertainment projection into the ear). Then, the sensor (or perhaps a second sensor if the embodiment adjusts based on both external sound and speaker sound) (for each ear cup 321) might comprise a microphone configured to detect sound from the speaker. For example, such a microphone would generally be located (e.g. mounted) on the interior of the ear cup 321, to detect the speaker sound within the ear cup 321. Alternatively, the speaker vibrations might be detected using another sort of sensor (still configured to detect the speaker sound to be transmitted into the ear cup 321). For instance, the sensor (or perhaps a second sensor if embodiments adjust based on both external sound and speaker sound) (for each ear cup 321) could detect a speaker electrical signal, and translate that into a sensor signal indicative of the speaker sound output into the ear cup 321.

    [0028] Alternative embodiments that result from combining, integrating, and/or omitting features of the embodiment(s) are also within the scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, the scope of protection is not limited by the description set out above, but is defined by the claims which follow that scope.


    Claims

    1. A hearing protection earmuff (200, 300) comprising:

    two ear cups (211, 321);

    a headband (215, 324) attached to and connecting the ear cups (211, 321);

    one or more sensors (101) attached to at least one of the ear cups (211, 321) and configured to detect vibrations at an interface;

    a processor (102) configured to receive a sensor signal from the one or more sensors (101), and configured to generate a control signal based on the sensor signal;

    one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) configured to dampen the detected vibrations, and

    one or more electromagnetic controllers (103) configured to control dampening of the vibrations via the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) in response to the control signal from the processor (102) by generating a magnetic field;

    wherein the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) comprise magnetorheological fluid configured to change viscosity in response to the magnetic field; and

    wherein the interface is between the ear cups (211, 321) and the headband (215, 324) or between a seal cushion of the ear cups and a head of a user.


     
    2. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the processor (102) is configured to generate the control signal directing the one or more electromagnetic controllers (103) to interact with the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) to change a clamping force at the interface at a rate and an amplitude based on the sensor signal.
     
    3. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the viscosity of the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) is changed at a rate identical to that of the sensor signal and decreases in proportion to any increase in amplitude based on the sensor signal.
     
    4. The earmuff of claim 3, wherein the viscosity of the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) is adjusted to alter a resonance frequency of the corresponding ear cup (211, 321).
     
    5. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the one or more sensors (101) comprise one or more microphones configured to detect external sound.
     
    6. The earmuff of claim 1, further comprising a speaker located within at least one ear cup, wherein the one or more sensors (101) comprise a microphone configured to detect sound from the speaker.
     
    7. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the one or more sensors (101) detect vibrations arising from movement of the user of the earmuff.
     
    8. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) are located in a wireguide attachment (217, 325) of the headband to the ear cups.
     
    9. The earmuff of claim 1, wherein the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) are located within the seal cushion (216, 326).
     
    10. A method for dampening conduction of vibration within a hearing protection earmuff (200, 300) comprising two ear cups (211, 321) and a headband (215, 324) attached to and connecting the ear cups, the method comprising:

    detecting vibrations at an interface by one or more sensors (101) attached to at least one of the ear cups (211, 321) of the earmuff (200, 300);

    sending a sensor signal to a processor (102) from the one or more sensors (101);

    generating a control signal by the processor (102) to one or more electromagnetic controllers (103);

    generating a magnetic field by the one or more electromagnetic controllers (103) to control dampening of the detected vibrations via one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) in response to the control signal from the processor (102) and

    dampening the detected vibrations by the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104);

    wherein the one or more electroacoustic shock absorbers (104) comprise magnetorheological fluid configured to change viscosity in response to the magnetic field; and

    wherein the interface is between the ear cups (211, 321) and the headband (215, 324) or between a seal cushion of the ear cups and a head of a user.


     
    11. The method of claim 10, wherein detecting vibrations by the one or more sensors (101) comprises
    detecting sounds external to the ear cups (211, 321), and wherein the one or more sensors (101) comprise microphone.
     
    12. The method of claim 10, wherein detecting vibrations by the one or more sensors (101) comprises
    detecting sounds from a speaker located within at least one ear cup (211, 321), and wherein the one or more sensors (101) comprise microphone.
     


    Ansprüche

    1. Gehörschutz-Ohrenschützer (200, 300), umfassend:

    zwei Ohrmuscheln (211, 321);

    ein Kopfband (215, 324), das an den Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) befestigt ist und diese verbindet;

    einen oder mehrere Sensoren (101), die an mindestens einer der Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) befestigt und konfiguriert sind, um Schwingungen an einer Grenzfläche zu detektieren; einen Prozessor (102), der konfiguriert ist, um ein Sensorsignal von dem einen oder den mehreren Sensoren (101) zu empfangen, und konfiguriert ist, um ein Steuersignal basierend auf dem Sensorsignal zu erzeugen;

    einen oder mehrere Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß, die konfiguriert sind, um die detektierten Schwingungen zu dämpfen, und

    eine oder mehrere elektromagnetische Steuerungen (103), die konfiguriert sind, um die Dämpfung der Schwingungen mittels des einen oder der mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß als Reaktion auf das Steuersignal vom Prozessor (102) durch Erzeugen eines Magnetfelds zu steuern;

    wobei der eine oder die mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß ein magnetorheologisches Fluid umfassen, das konfiguriert ist, um die Viskosität als Reaktion auf das Magnetfeld zu ändern; und

    wobei die Grenzfläche zwischen den Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) und dem Kopfband (215, 324) oder zwischen einem Dichtungskissen der Ohrmuscheln und einem Kopf eines Benutzers liegt.


     
    2. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei der Prozessor (102) konfiguriert ist, um das Steuersignal zu erzeugen, das die eine oder die mehreren elektromagnetischen Steuerungen (103) anweist, mit dem einen oder den mehreren Dämpfern (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß zu interagieren, um eine Klemmkraft an der Grenzfläche mit einer Rate und einer Amplitude basierend auf dem Sensorsignal zu ändern.
     
    3. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Viskosität des einen oder der mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß mit einer Rate geändert wird, die mit der des Sensorsignals identisch ist, und proportional zu einer Zunahme der Amplitude basierend auf dem Sensorsignal abnimmt.
     
    4. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 3, wobei die Viskosität des einen oder der mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß eingestellt wird, um eine Resonanzfrequenz der entsprechenden Ohrmuschel (211, 321) zu ändern.
     
    5. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) ein oder mehrere Mikrofone umfassen, die zum Detektieren von externem Schall konfiguriert sind.
     
    6. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, ferner umfassend einen Lautsprecher, der innerhalb mindestens einer Ohrmuschel positioniert ist, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) ein Mikrofon umfassen, das konfiguriert ist, um Schall von dem Lautsprecher zu detektieren.
     
    7. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) Schwingungen detektieren, die sich aus der Bewegung des Benutzers des Ohrenschützers ergeben.
     
    8. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß in einer Drahtführungsbefestigung (217, 325) des Kopfbands an den Ohrmuscheln positioniert sind.
     
    9. Ohrenschützer nach Anspruch 1, wobei der eine oder die mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß innerhalb des Dichtungskissens (216, 326) positioniert sind.
     
    10. Verfahren zum Dämpfen der Schwingungsleitung innerhalb eines Gehörschutz-Ohrenschützers (200, 300), umfassend zwei Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) und ein Kopfband (215, 324), das an den Ohrmuscheln befestigt ist und diese verbindet, wobei das Verfahren umfasst:

    Detektieren von Schwingungen an einer Grenzfläche durch einen oder mehrere Sensoren (101), die an mindestens einer der Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) des Ohrenschützers (200, 300) befestigt sind;

    Senden eines Sensorsignals von einem oder mehreren Sensoren (101) an einen Prozessor (102);

    Erzeugen eines Steuersignals durch den Prozessor (102) für eine oder mehrere elektromagnetische Steuerungen (103);

    Erzeugen eines Magnetfelds durch die eine oder mehreren elektromagnetischen Steuerungen (103) zur Steuerung der Dämpfung der detektierten Schwingungen mittels eines oder mehrerer Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß als Reaktion auf das Steuersignal vom Prozessor (102); und

    Dämpfen der detektierten Schwingungen durch den einen oder die mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß;

    wobei der eine oder die mehreren Dämpfer (104) für elektroakustischer Stoß ein magnetorheologisches Fluid umfassen, das konfiguriert ist, um die Viskosität als Reaktion auf das Magnetfeld zu ändern; und

    wobei die Grenzfläche zwischen den Ohrmuscheln (211, 321) und dem Kopfband (215, 324) oder zwischen einem Dichtungskissen der Ohrmuscheln und einem Kopf eines Benutzers liegt.


     
    11. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei das Detektieren von Schwingungen durch den einen oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) umfasst
    Detektieren von Schall außerhalb der Ohrmuscheln (211, 321), und wobei der eine oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) ein Mikrofon umfassen.
     
    12. Verfahren nach Anspruch 10, wobei das Detektieren von Schwingungen durch den einen oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) umfasst
    Detektieren von Schall von einem Lautsprecher, der innerhalb mindestens einer Ohrmuschel (211, 321) positioniert ist, und wobei der eine oder die mehreren Sensoren (101) ein Mikrofon umfassen.
     


    Revendications

    1. Casque de protection auditive (200, 300) comprenant :

    deux oreillettes (211, 321) ;

    un serre-tête (215, 324) fixé aux oreillettes (211, 321) et les reliant ;

    un ou plusieurs capteurs (101), fixés à au moins l'une des oreillettes (211, 321) et conçus pour détecter des vibrations au niveau d'une interface ; un processeur (102), configuré pour recevoir un signal de capteur du ou des capteurs (101) et configuré pour générer un signal de régulation en fonction du signal de capteur ;

    un ou plusieurs amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104), conçus pour amortir les vibrations détectées, et

    un ou plusieurs régulateurs électromagnétiques (103), configurés pour réguler l'amortissement des vibrations par l'intermédiaire du ou des amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) en réponse au signal de régulation du processeur (102) par production d'un champ magnétique ;

    le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) comprenant un fluide magnétorhéologique, conçu pour changer de viscosité en réponse au champ magnétique ; et

    l'interface étant entre les oreillettes (211, 321) et le serre-tête (215, 324) ou entre un coussin d'étanchéité des oreillettes et une tête d'un utilisateur.


     
    2. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le processeur (102) est configuré pour générer le signal de régulation dirigeant le ou les régulateurs électromagnétiques (103) pour qu'ils interagissent avec le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) pour modifier une force de serrage au niveau de l'interface à une vitesse et à une amplitude en fonction du signal du capteur.
     
    3. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel la viscosité du ou des amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) est modifiée à une vitesse identique à celle du signal de capteur et diminue proportionnellement à toute augmentation d'amplitude en fonction du signal de capteur.
     
    4. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 3, dans lequel la viscosité du ou des amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) est ajustée pour modifier une fréquence de résonance de l'oreillette correspondante (211, 321).
     
    5. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le ou les capteurs (101) comprennent un ou plusieurs microphones conçus pour détecter un son externe.
     
    6. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre un haut-parleur situé à l'intérieur d'au moins une oreillette, le ou les capteurs (101) comprenant un microphone conçu pour détecter le son provenant du haut-parleur.
     
    7. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le ou les capteurs (101) détectent les vibrations résultant du mouvement de l'utilisateur du casque antibruit.
     
    8. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) sont situés dans une fixation de guide-fil (217, 325) du serre-tête aux oreillettes.
     
    9. Casque antibruit selon la revendication 1, dans lequel le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) sont situés à l'intérieur du coussin d'étanchéité (216, 326).
     
    10. Procédé d'amortissement de la conduction des vibrations à l'intérieur d'un casque antibruit (200, 300) comprenant deux oreillettes (211, 321) et un serre-tête (215, 324) fixés aux oreillettes et les reliant, le procédé comprenant :

    la détection des vibrations au niveau d'une interface par un ou plusieurs capteurs (101) fixés à au moins l'une des oreillettes (211, 321) du casque (200, 300) ;

    l'envoi d'un signal de capteur à un processeur (102) à partir du ou des capteurs (101) ;

    la production d'un signal de régulation par le processeur (102) vers un ou plusieurs régulateurs électromagnétiques (103) ;

    la production d'un champ magnétique par le ou les régulateurs électromagnétiques (103) pour réguler l'amortissement des vibrations détectées par l'intermédiaire d'un ou de plusieurs amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) en réponse au signal de régulation du processeur (102) ; et

    l'amortissement des vibrations détectées par le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) ;

    le ou les amortisseurs électroacoustiques (104) comprenant un fluide magnétorhéologique, conçu pour changer de viscosité en réponse au champ magnétique ; et

    l'interface étant entre les oreillettes (211, 321) et le serre-tête (215, 324) ou entre un coussin d'étanchéité des oreillettes et une tête d'un utilisateur.


     
    11. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la détection de vibrations par le ou les capteurs (101) comprend
    la détection des sons externes aux oreillettes (211, 321), et dans lequel le ou les capteurs (101) comprennent un microphone.
     
    12. Procédé selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la détection de vibrations par le ou les capteurs (101) comprend
    la détection des sons provenant d'un haut-parleur situé à l'intérieur d'au moins une oreillette (211, 321) et dans lequel le ou les capteurs (101) comprennent un microphone.
     




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    REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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    Patent documents cited in the description