(19)
(11)EP 3 540 802 B1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT SPECIFICATION

(45)Mention of the grant of the patent:
09.06.2021 Bulletin 2021/23

(21)Application number: 19170703.3

(22)Date of filing:  15.08.2017
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H01L 43/08(2006.01)
G01R 33/09(2006.01)
H01L 43/12(2006.01)

(54)

DOUBLE PINNED MAGNETORESISTANCE ELEMENT WITH TEMPORARY FERROMAGNETIC LAYER TO IMPROVE ANNEALING

DOPPELT GEPINNTES MAGNETWIDERSTANDSBAUELEMENT MIT TEMPORÄRER FERROMAGNETISCHER SCHICHT ZUR VERBESSERUNG DES AUSHEILENS

COMPOSANT MAGNÉTORÉSISTIF À DOUBLE ANCRAGE COMPORTANT UNE COUCHE FERROMAGNÉTIQUE TEMPORAIRE POUR AMÉLIORER LE RECUIT


(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 26.08.2016 US 201615248500

(43)Date of publication of application:
18.09.2019 Bulletin 2019/38

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
17186272.5 / 3288091

(73)Proprietor: Allegro MicroSystems, LLC
Manchester, NH 03103-3353 (US)

(72)Inventor:
  • CAMPIGLIO, Paolo
    94110 Arcueil (FR)

(74)Representative: South, Nicholas Geoffrey et al
A.A. Thornton & Co. Octagon Point 5 Cheapside
London EC2V 6AA
London EC2V 6AA (GB)


(56)References cited: : 
WO-A1-2009/004714
US-A1- 2007 064 350
US-A1- 2015 192 648
US-A1- 2007 019 338
US-A1- 2010 039 734
  
  • SCHREIBER D K ET AL: "Enhanced magnetoresistance in naturally oxidized MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic CoFe/CoFeB bilayers", APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, vol. 98, 232506, 8 June 2011 (2011-06-08), XP012140964, ISSN: 0003-6951, DOI: 10.1063/1.3597224
  
Note: Within nine months from the publication of the mention of the grant of the European patent, any person may give notice to the European Patent Office of opposition to the European patent granted. Notice of opposition shall be filed in a written reasoned statement. It shall not be deemed to have been filed until the opposition fee has been paid. (Art. 99(1) European Patent Convention).


Description

FIELD



[0001] This invention relates generally to spin electronics magnetoresistance elements and, more particularly, to double pinned giant magnetoresistance (GMR) elements and double pinned tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) elements for which a temporary ferromagnetic layer is used to improve annealing of two pinning layers and two associated pinned layer structures to have magnetic directions that are ninety degrees apart.

BACKGROUND



[0002] As used herein, the term "magnetic field sensing element" is used to describe a variety of electronic elements that can sense a magnetic field. One such magnetic field sensing element is a magnetoresistance (MR) element. The magnetoresistance element has a resistance that changes in relation to a magnetic field experienced by the magnetoresistance element.

[0003] As is known, there are different types of magnetoresistance elements, for example, a semiconductor magnetoresistance element such as Indium Antimonide (InSb), a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) element, an anisotropic magnetoresistance element (AMR), and a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) element, also called a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) element.

[0004] Of these magnetoresistance elements, the GMR and the TMR elements operate with spin electronics (i.e., electron spins) where the resistance is related to the magnetic orientation of different magnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers. In spin valve configurations, the resistance is related to an angular direction of a magnetization in a so-called "free-layer" respective to another layer so-called "reference layer." The free layer and the reference layer are described more fully below.

[0005] The magnetoresistance element may be a single element or, alternatively, may include two or more magnetoresistance elements arranged in various configurations, e.g., a half bridge or full (Wheatstone) bridge.

[0006] As used herein, the term "magnetic field sensor" is used to describe a circuit that uses a magnetic field sensing element, generally in combination with other circuits. In a typical magnetic field sensor, the magnetic field sensing element and the other circuits can be integrated upon a common substrate.

[0007] Magnetic field sensors are used in a variety of applications, including, but not limited to, an angle sensor that senses an angle of a direction of a magnetic field, a current sensor that senses a magnetic field generated by a current carried by a current-carrying conductor, a magnetic switch that senses the proximity of a ferromagnetic object, a rotation detector that senses passing ferromagnetic articles, for example, magnetic domains of a ring magnet or a ferromagnetic target (e.g., gear teeth) where the magnetic field sensor is used in combination with a back-biased or other magnet, and a magnetic field sensor that senses a magnetic field density of a magnetic field.

[0008] Various parameters characterize the performance of magnetic field sensors and magnetic field sensing elements. With regard to magnetic field sensing elements, the parameters include sensitivity, which is the change in the output signal of a magnetic field sensing element in response to a magnetic field, and linearity, which is the degree to which the output signal of a magnetic field sensor varies linearly (i.e., in direct proportion) to the magnetic field.

[0009] GMR and TMR elements are known to have a relatively high sensitivity, compared, for example, to Hall elements. GMR and TMR elements are also known to have moderately good linearity, but over a restricted range of magnetic fields, more restricted in range than a range over which a Hall element can operate. However, it is known that even in the restricted range of magnetic fields, the linearity of the GMR or TMR element suffers from irregularities. Also, it is known that some GMR and TMR elements tend to change behavior after high temperature storage. Thus, it would be desirable to provide a GMR or a TMR element for which linearity irregularities are reduced and for which high temperature storage has a reduced effect.

[0010] Conventional GMR and TMR elements, and, in particular, spin valves, are known to also have an undesirable hysteresis behavior, which reduces their accuracy of magnetic field or current measurements. Thus, it would also be desirable to provide a GMR or TMR element with reduced hysteresis.

[0011] Conventional double pinned GMR and TMR elements and, in particular, spin valves, that have two pinning layers comprised of PtMn, are known to be difficult to anneal to two different annealed directions, e.g., two directions that are ninety degrees apart.

[0012] WO 2009/004714 A1 provides a magnetoresistive effect element, and method for manufacturing said element, comprising an insulating layer formed of MgO, and a magnetic head using the magnetoresistive effect element. During pinned layer annealing, a sacrifical second cap layer, which may comprise CoFe alloy or FeNi alloy, overlies a first cap layer of Ru formed on a simple bottom-pinned TMR stack.

[0013] US 2015/192648 A1 provides a magnetoresistance element having a pinning arrangement with two antiferromagnetic pinning layers, two pinned layers, and a free layer according to the preamble of the independent claims.

SUMMARY



[0014] The present invention provides a GMR or a TMR element (or any spin electronics magnetoresistance element) for which linearity irregularities are reduced, hysteresis behavior is strongly reduced, and for which high temperature and high field storage conditions have a reduced effect.

[0015] The present invention also provides a double pinned GMR or TMR element and, in particular, a spin valve, that has two pinning layers comprised of PtMn, and that can be annealed to two different annealed directions, e.g., two directions that are ninety degrees apart.

[0016] In accordance with a first aspect, the present invention provides a magnetoresistance element as defined in claim 1.

[0017] In accordance with another aspect, the invention provides a method of fabricating a magnetoresistance element, as defined in claim 12.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0018] The foregoing features of the invention, as well as the invention itself may be more fully understood from the following detailed description of the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a graph showing an ideal and an actual transfer characteristic of a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) element;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing layers of a conventional prior art GMR element with a single pinned arrangement;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing layers of a conventional prior art GMR element with a double pinned arrangement;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram showing layers of an example of a magnetoresistance element having a particular double pinned arrangement;

FIG. 5 is a top view diagram of magnetic field sensing element having a yoke shape that, in some examples, can describe a shape of the magnetoresistance element of FIGS. 4, 10, or 11;

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a magnetoresistance element magnetic field sensor placed above a magnetic target for rotation speed measurement; and

FIG. 7 is a flow chart showing an example of process steps that can be used to form the double pinned GMR element of FIGS. 4, 5, 10, and 11;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are flow charts showing examples of alternate process steps that can be used to form the double pinned GMR element of FIGS. 4, 5, 10, and 11,

FIG. 10 is a block diagram showing layers of another example of a magnetoresistance element having a particular double pinned arrangement having a generally reverse stackup from the arrangement of FIG. 4;

FIG. 11 is a block diagram showing layers of yet another example of a magnetoresistance element having a particular double pinned arrangement;

FIG. 12 is a block diagram showing layers of another example of a magnetoresistance element having a particular double pinned arrangement having a generally reverse stackup of layers from the arrangement of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a magnetoresistance element having a particular double pinned arrangement similar to the arrangement of FIG. 12, but having a temporary ferromagnetic layer in accordance with the invention and an optional temporary cap layer; and

FIG. 14 is a flow chart showing an example of process steps that can be used to form the double pinned GMR element of FIG. 13.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0019] Before describing the present invention, it should be noted that reference is sometimes made herein to GMR or TMR elements having particular shapes (e.g., yoke shaped). One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate, however, that the techniques described herein are applicable to a variety of sizes and shapes.

[0020] As used herein, the term "anisotropy" or "anisotropic" refer to a particular axis or direction to which the magnetization of a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic layer tends to orientate when it does not experience an additional external field. An axial anisotropy can be created by a crystalline effect or by a shape anisotropy, both of which allow two equivalent directions of magnetic fields. A directional anisotropy can also be created in an adjacent layer, for example, by an antiferromagnetic layer, which allows only a single magnetic field direction along a specific axis in the adjacent layer.

[0021] In view of the above, it will be understood that introduction of an anisotropy in a magnetic layer results in forcing the magnetization of the magnetic layer to be aligned along that anisotropy in the absence of an external field. In case of a GMR or TMR element, a directional anisotropy provides an ability to obtain a coherent rotation of the magnetic field in a magnetic layer in response, for example, to an external magnetic field, which has the property of suppressing the hysteresis behavior of the corresponding element.

[0022] As used herein, the term "magnetic field sensing element" is used to describe a variety of electronic elements that can sense a magnetic field. A magnetoresistance element is but one type of magnetic field sensing elements.

[0023] As used herein, the term "magnetic field sensor" is used to describe a circuit that uses a magnetic field sensing element, generally in combination with other circuits. Magnetic field sensors are used in a variety of applications, including, but not limited to, an angle sensor that senses an angle of a direction of a magnetic field, a current sensor that senses a magnetic field generated by a current carried by a current-carrying conductor, a magnetic switch that senses the proximity of a ferromagnetic object, a rotation detector that senses passing ferromagnetic articles, for example, magnetic domains of a ring magnet, and a magnetic field sensor that senses a magnetic field density of a magnetic field.

[0024] Structures and methods described herein apply to both GMR and TMR magnetoresistance elements. However, it should be appreciated that the same or similar structures and methods can apply to other spin electronics magnetoresistance elements, either now known or later discovered. This includes in particular oxide based spin electronics structures.

[0025] Referring now to FIG. 1, a graph 100 has a horizontal axis with a scale in units of magnetic field in milliTesla (mT) and a vertical axis with a scale in units of resistance in arbitrary units.

[0026] A curve 102 is representative of a transfer function of an ideal GMR element, i.e., resistance versus magnetic field experienced by the GMR element. The transfer function 102 has a linear region 102a between an upper saturation point 102b and a lower saturation point 102c. Regions 102d, 102e are in saturation. It should be understood that the linear region 102a is an ideal linear region. Furthermore an ideal GMR element presents the same value of resistance for a given field independently of its magnetic history.

[0027] Steps, e.g., a step 104, are representative of an actual transfer function of the GMR element. Beyond the saturation points 102b, 102c, the actual transfer function represented by the steps 104 merges with the saturation regions 102d, 102e.

[0028] The steps 104 are not desirable. The steps 104 result from magnetic behavior of magnetic domains within a so-called free layer in a GMR element. Behavior of the free layer is described more fully below in conjunction with FIG. 2.

[0029] While the steps 104 are shown to be regular steps with equal spacing and equal step heights, the steps 104 can also be irregular, with unequal spacing and unequal step heights (i.e., amplitudes). The steps usually correspond to local hysteretic and on reproducible local rotation of the free layer.

[0030] Referring now to FIG. 2, a conventional prior art GMR element 200 includes a plurality of layers disposed over a substrate. An upper surface of the substrate is shown as a lowermost line at the bottom of FIG. 2.

[0031] On the left side of FIG. 2, each layer is identified by functional name. On the right side or FIG. 2 are shown magnetic characteristics of sub-layers that can form the functional layers. In general, magnetic materials can have a variety of magnetic characteristics and can be classified by a variety of terms, including, but not limited to, ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and nonmagnetic. Description of the variety of types of magnetic materials is not made herein in detail. However, let it suffice here to say, that a ferromagnetic material is one in which magnetic moments of atoms within the ferromagnetic material tend to, on average, align to be both parallel and in the same direction, resulting in a nonzero net magnetic magnetization of the ferromagnetic material.

[0032] Most materials like copper, silver, and gold are diamagnetic materials, which do not exhibit a net magnetization. These materials tend to present an extremely weak magnetization opposite and proportional to an applied (external) magnetic field. Diamagnetic materials are also called nonmagnetic materials.

[0033] An antiferromagnetic material is one in which magnetic moments within the antiferromagnetic material tend to, on average, align to be parallel, but in opposite directions, resulting in a zero net magnetization.

[0034] As shown, the conventional prior art GMR element 200 can include a seed layer 202 disposed over the substrate, an antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204 disposed over the seed layer 202, and a pinned layer 206 disposed over the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204. The pinned layer 206 can be comprised of a first ferromagnetic pinned layer 206a, a second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c, and a spacer layer 206b disposed there between.

[0035] The conventional GMR element 200 can also include a spacer layer 208 disposed over the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c, and a free layer 210 disposed over the spacer layer 208. The spacer layer 206b is a nonmagnetic metallic layer. The spacer 208 is also a nonmagnetic layer, which can be metallic for GMR or insulating for TMR. The free layer 210 can be comprised of a first ferromagnetic free layer 210a and a second ferromagnetic free layer 210b.

[0036] A cap layer 212 can be disposed over the free layer 210 to protect the GMR element 200.

[0037] Examples of thicknesses of the layers of the conventional prior art GMR element 200 are shown in nanometers. Examples of materials of the layers of the conventional prior art GMR element are shown by atomic symbols.

[0038] Within some layers, arrows are shown that are indicative or directions of magnetic field directions of the layers when the GMR element 200 does not experience an external magnetic field. Arrows coming out of the page are indicated as dots within circles and arrows going into the page are indicated as crosses within circles.

[0039] Taking the layers from the bottom upward, the seed layer 202 is used to provide a regular crystalline structure upon the substrate that affects crystal properties of layers above.

[0040] With regard to the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204, sub-layers (i.e., layer portions) within the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204 tend to have magnetic fields that point in alternating different directions indicated by right and left arrows, resulting in the antiferromagnetic pinning layer having a net magnetic field of zero. A top surface of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204 tends to have a magnetic moment pointing in one direction, here shown to the left.

[0041] With regard to the pinned layer 206, the first ferromagnetic pinned layer 206a tends to couple to the top surface of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204, and thus, the magnetic field in the first ferromagnetic pinned layer 206a can by aligned in parallel to the magnetic moments at the top surface of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 204, here shown to the left.

[0042] Due to the presence of the spacer layer 206b between the first and second ferromagnetic pinned layers 206a, 206c the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c tends to couple antiferromagnetically with the first ferromagnetic pinned layer 206a, and thus, it has a magnetic field pointing in the other direction, here shown pointing to the right. The combination of the three layers 206a, 206b, 206c can be referred to as a synthetic antiferromagnetic structure or layer.

[0043] The first and second free layers 210a, 210b have respective magnetic fields pointing out of the page in the absence of an external magnetic field. This pointing direction can be achieved by creating a specific anisotropy along a direction pointing out of the page. That anisotropy can be created by a shape of the GMR element. For example, the anisotropy can be created by patterning the GMR element 200 (top view) to have a yoke shape, or by a crystalline or a magnetic anisotropy. A yoke shape is more fully described below in conjunction with FIG. 5. By created the yoke shape, the free layer 210 has a preferential axis (the yoke axis). If the yoke axis is perpendicular to the reference magnetization a crossed anisotropy can be achieved, which allows obtaining a linear response on a field extension of the order of the free layer anisotropy.

[0044] In operation, when the conventional GMR element 200 is exposed to an external magnetic field pointing in a direction of an arrow 214, the magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b tend to rotate to the right to become more aligned (or fully aligned, i.e., pointing to the right) with the magnetic field pointing direction in the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c. However, the magnetic fields in the pinned layer 206 are pinned by the antiferromagnetic pinning layer and do not rotate. The amount of rotation of the magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b depends upon the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The increased alignment of the magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b with the direction of the magnetic field in the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c tends to make a resistance of the GMR element 200 lower. In particular, resistance tends to vary primarily in the first free layer 210a, in the second (Cu) spacer layer 208, and in the second ferromagnetic (e.g., CoFe) pinned layer 206c.

[0045] Conversely, when the GMR element is exposed to an external field pointing opposite to the direction of the arrow 214, the magnetic fields in the free layer 210 tend to rotate to the left to become more anti-aligned (or fully anti-aligned, i.e., pointing to the left) with the magnetic field pointing direction in the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c. The amount of rotation depends upon the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The increased anti-alignment of the magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b with the direction of the magnetic field in the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 206c tends to make a resistance of the GMR element 200 higher.

[0046] In view of the above, it will be understood that, referring briefly to FIG. 1, in the absence of an external magnetic field, a resistance of the GMR element 200 is at the center of the linear region 102a, and the resistance can move to the right or to the left on the transfer characteristic curve 102 (i.e., lower or higher) depending upon a direction of the external magnetic field 214. When full alignment or full anti-alignment of layers is achieved, the GMR element 200 will be in the lower saturation region 102e or the upper saturation region 102d, respectively.

[0047] In general, the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b tend to naturally have a plurality of magnetic domains, including, but not limited to, a first plurality of magnetic domains with magnetic fields pointing in a first direction and a second plurality of magnetic domains with magnetic fields pointing in one or more other directions. The first plurality of magnetic domains in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b have magnetic field pointing directions that are aligned with the net magnetic field of the free layer 210, shown to be coming out of the page when the GMR element 200 is not exposed to an external magnetic field, but which can rotate as the GMR element 200 is exposed to a magnetic field. As described above, the magnetic field pointing direction of the first plurality of magnetic domains rotates in response to the external magnetic field. The second plurality of magnetic domains tends to have magnetic field pointing directions that point in one or more other directions.

[0048] Simply stated, with regard to the steps 104 of FIG. 1, each step is generated when one or more of the magnetic domains that are not within the first plurality of magnetic domains (e.g., that are within the second plurality of magnetic domains), i.e., one or more of the magnetic domains with magnetic fields not pointing in the direction of the net magnetic field in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b, suddenly snaps (i.e., jumps) in direction to become aligned with the net magnetic field pointing direction of the magnetic field in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b, wherever the net field in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b may be pointing (i.e., may have rotated) in response to an external magnetic field. However, it is also possible that one or more of the magnetic domains with magnetic fields not pointing in the direction of the net magnetic field in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b more slowly transitions in direction to become aligned with the net magnetic field pointing direction of the magnetic field in the ferromagnetic free layers 210a, 210b, in which case one or more of the steps of FIG. 1 would be less steep than those shown, but still undesirable. Thus, it would be desirable to reduce a number of magnetic domains in the free layer 210 that point in directions other than the direction of the net magnetic field in the free layer 210 (i.e., reduce the quantity of magnetic domains within the second plurality of magnetic domains). This reduction would result in fewer steps 104, smaller steps 104, or no steps 104.

[0049] In order to reduce the number of magnetic domains in the free layer 210 that point at directions other than the direction of the net magnetic field of the free layer, i.e., in order to reduce the number of magnetic domains that point in directions other than out of the page, an external biasing magnet can be used. As an alternative, a plurality of layers can be added to the basic GMR element 200 in order to achieve an intra-stack magnetic bias with a so-called "double pinned" arrangement.

[0050] Referring now to FIG. 3, a conventional prior art double pinned GMR element 300 can include a nonmagnetic seed layer 302, an antiferromagnetic pinning layer 304 disposed over the seed layer 302, a pinned layer 306 disposed over the pinning layer 304, a spacer layer 308 disposed over the pinned layer 306, and a free layer 310 disposed over the spacer layer. In some arrangements, the free layer 310 can be comprised of two ferromagnetic free layers 310a, 310b. In some arrangements, the spacer layer 308 is a nonmagnetic layer.

[0051] The double pinned GMR element 300 can further include a spacer layer 312 disposed over the free layer 310, a second pinned layer 314 disposed over the spacer layer 312, a second pinning layer 316 disposed over the second pinned layer 314, and a nonmagnetic cap layer 318 disposed over the second pinning layer 316. In some arrangements, the spacer layer 312 is a nonmagnetic layer.

[0052] Examples of thicknesses of the layers of the GMR element 300 are shown in nanometers. Examples of materials of the layers of the GMR element 300 are shown by atomic symbols.

[0053] The prior art double pinned GMR element 300 achieves a magnetostatic field created by the second pinned layer 314. The second pinned layer 314 layer is coupled ferromagnetically to the bottom surface of a second antiferromagnetic pinning layer 316, and thus, the magnetic field in the second pinned layer 314 points in the same direction as the magnetic moments at the bottom surface of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 316, here shown pointing into the page.

[0054] The material used for the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer 316 is different from the one used for the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer 304. In this way the magnetization of the two layers 304, 316 can be manipulated independently by exploiting different blocking temperatures of the two materials (below 230°C for IrMn and well above 250°C for PtMn).

[0055] The second pinned layer 314 has a magnetic field oriented, here shown to be pointing into the page, to be perpendicular to the magnetic field of the first pinned layer 306. In particular, the pointing direction of the magnetic field created by the second pinned layer 314 and experienced by the free layer 310 causes a reduction in the number of magnetic domains in the free layer 310 that point in directions other than the direction of the net magnetic field of the free layer 310, e.g., a reduction in the number of magnetic domains that point in directions other than out of the page.

[0056] A thickness of the spacer layer 312 is chosen to provide a desired magnetic coupling strength between the second pinned layer 314 and the free layer 310. In some arrangements, the thickness of the Ta of the spacer layer 312 is only a few Angstroms, and the coupling takes places also through pinholes in the spacer layer 312. It will be understood that a thickness of a deposition of only a few angstroms is difficult to control, and pinhole density is also difficult to control. Thus, the amount of magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer 314 and the free layer 310 is difficult to control.

[0057] For a GMR element, the spacer 308 is a metallic nonmagnetic layer (usually Copper). For a TMR element, the spacer 308 is an insulating nonmagnetic layer (e.g., Al2O3 or MgO). Otherwise, the GMR element 300 can have layers the same as or similar to a comparable TMR element. Thus, a TMR element is not explicitly shown.

[0058] Referring now to FIG. 4, an example of a double pinned GMR element 400 includes a plurality of layers disposed over a substrate. An upper surface of the substrate is shown as a dark line at the bottom of FIG. 4.

[0059] On the left side of FIG. 4, each layer is identified by functional name. On the right side or FIG. 4 are shown magnetic characteristics of sub-layers that can form the functional layers.

[0060] Examples of thicknesses of the layers of the GMR element 400 are shown in nanometers. Examples of materials of the layers of the GMR element 400 are shown by atomic symbols.

[0061] In general, magnetic materials can have a variety of magnetic characteristics and can be classified by a variety of terms, including, but not limited to, ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and nonmagnetic. Brief descriptions of these types of magnetic materials are given above.

[0062] As shown, the exemplary GMR element 400 can include some of the same layers described above for the prior art GMR element of FIG. 3. Like the prior art GMR element of FIG. 3, the exemplary GMR element 400 can include a seed layer 402 disposed over the substrate, an antiferromagnetic pinning layer 404 disposed over the seed layer 402, and a pinned layer 406 disposed over the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 404. However, in some examples, the pinned layer 406 can be comprised of a first ferromagnetic pinned layer 406a, a second ferromagnetic pinned layer 406c, and a spacer layer 406b disposed therebetween. In some examples, the spacer layer 406b is comprised of a nonmagnetic material.

[0063] In some other examples, the pinned layer 406 can instead be comprised of one pinned layer, the same as or similar to the pinned layer 306 of FIG. 3.

[0064] Due to the presence of the spacer 406b between the first and second ferromagnetic pinned layers 406a, 406c, the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 406c tends to couple antiferromagnetically with the first ferromagnetic pinned layer 406a, and thus, it has a magnetic field pointing in the other direction, here shown pointing to the right. As described above, the combination of the three layers 406a, 406b, 406c can be referred to as a synthetic antiferromagnetic structure or layer.

[0065] The exemplary GMR element 400 can also include a spacer layer 408 disposed over the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 406c, and a free layer 410 disposed over the spacer layer 408. In some examples, the free layer 410 can be comprised of a first ferromagnetic free layer 410a disposed under a second ferromagnetic free layer 410b. In some examples, the spacer layer 408 is comprised of a nonmagnetic material (e.g., conductive Cu for GMR or an insulating material for TMR).

[0066] Like the prior art GMR element 300 of FIG. 3, the GMR element 400 of FIG. 4 can further include a spacer layer 412 disposed over the second ferromagnetic free layer 410b, and a second pinned layer 414 disposed over the spacer layer 412. In some examples, the second pinned layer 414 can be comprised of a ferromagnetic material. In some examples, the spacer layer 412 is comprised of a nonmagnetic material (e.g., Ru).

[0067] The GMR element 400 of FIG. 4 can further include a second antiferromagnetic pinning layer 416 disposed over the second pinned layer 414.

[0068] A cap layer 418 can be disposed at the top of the GMR element 400 to protect the GMR element 400.

[0069] Within some layers, arrows are shown that are indicative or directions of magnetic fields of the layers when the GMR element 400 does not experience an external magnetic field. Arrows coming out of the page are indicated as dots within circles and arrows going into the page are indicated as crosses within circles.

[0070] In some examples, the seed layer 402 is comprised of Ru or Ta, and the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer 404 is comprised of PtMn. In some examples, the first pinned layer 406 is comprised of the first ferromagnetic pinned layer 406a comprised of CoFe, the spacer layer 406b comprised of Ru, and the second ferromagnetic pinned layer 406c comprised of CoFe. In some examples, the spacer layer 408 is comprised of Cu (or alternatively, Au, or Ag). In some embodiments, the first ferromagnetic free layer 410a is comprised of CoFe and the second ferromagnetic free layer 410b is comprised of NiFe. In some examples, the spacer layer 412 is comprised of Ru (or alternatively, Au, or Ag), the second pinned layer 414 is comprised of CoFe, the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer 416 is comprised of PtMn, and the cap layer 418 is comprised of Ta. However, other materials are also possible.

[0071] The spacer layer 412 being comprised of Ru (or Au, or Ag) allows realizable ranges of thicknesses (described below) of the spacer layer 412 to allow for partial pinning of the free layer 410. Partial pinning is described more fully below.

[0072] In some other examples, the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers 404 and 416 can be comprised of IrMn, FeMn, or any other type of antiferromagnetic material. PtMn or IrMn are shown in the figure, and PtMn is used in examples below. In some other examples, the second pinned layer 414 can instead be comprised of a plurality of sublayers, the same as or similar to the sublayers of the first pinned layer 406. In some other examples, the spacer layer 408 can be comprised of Ta or Cu.

[0073] A thickness of the spacer layer 412 is selected to provide a desired amount of (i.e., a partial) magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer 414 and the free layer 410. Also, the thickness of the spacer layer 412 is selected to provide a desired type of magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer 414 and the free layer 410, i.e., ferromagnetic coupling or antiferromagnetic coupling, or between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling. Here, the coupling is shown to be ferromagnetic coupling, but, by selection of the thickness of the spacer layer 412, the coupling can be antiferromagnetic or between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling. In other words, in the absence of an external magnetic field it is possible for a direction of magnetic fields of the free layers 410 to be rotated either as shown (out of the page) or into the page, depending upon a selected thickness of the spacer layer 412. This characteristic will be shown to be useful in the magnetoresistance elements described below in conjunction with FIGS. 17 and 20.

[0074] In some examples for which the spacer layer 412 is comprised of Ru, the thickness of the spacer layer 412 is selected to be within a range of about 0.1 to about 4 nm, but preferably between about 0.9 and 4.0 nm for robustness of the manufacturing process, i.e., thick enough that the spacer layer 412 can be deposited with repeatable and reliable thickness. In some examples, a thickness of the spacer layer 412 is greater than 0.5 nm, or greater than 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, or 2.0 nm, i.e., greater than a thickness of the spacer layer 312 of the prior art double pinned GMR element 300 of FIG. 3.

[0075] Taking CoFe and NiFe to have similar magnetic properties, it will be recognized that the layers of materials above the first ferromagnetic free layer 410a and below the first ferromagnetic free layer 410a are similar, but in reversed order, namely, NiFe (or CoFe)/Ru/CoFe/PtMn. However, it is desired that the spacer layer 406b provides high coupling between surrounding layers, thus it is thin, while it is desired that the spacer layer 412 provide less coupling between surrounding layers, thus it is thicker.

[0076] Ru is well suited for the spacer layer 412 because it allows antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic coupling (also called Ruderman Kittel Kasuya Yoshida or RKKY coupling) between surrounding layers, according to the Ru thickness. In essence, the Ru material permits coupling through it, as opposed to in spite of it. This allows for a thicker Ru layer 412, with a range of achievable thickness values, to achieve and to tune the desired partial pinning of the free layer 410. Partial pinning is more fully described above and below.

[0077] In contrast, it should be understood that the Ta spacer layer 312 of FIG. 3 is only used as a nonmagnetic spacer layer and does not provide RKKY coupling. In essence, the Ta spacer layer 312 only decouples the free layer 310 from the pinned layer 314. However, as described above, the Ru spacer layer 412 of FIG. 4 provides RKKY coupling between the free layer 410 and the pinned layer 414.

[0078] In some examples, the thickness of the Ru spacer layer 412 is selected to provide an RKKY coupling of between about -50mT and about 50mT. The RKKY coupling tends to be stable with respect to possible process drift, i.e., the amount of coupling tends to remain constant and stable even for a thickness change of about ten percent in the Ru layer due to manufacturing process variations or the like.

[0079] Operation of the layers 402-410 is discussed above in conjunction with similar layers in FIGS. 2 and 3.

[0080] The second pinned layer 414, having a pinned magnetic field pointing direction aligned with a pointing direction of the magnetic field in the free layer 410, tends to cause particular behavior within the free layer 410. In particular, the pointing direction of the magnetic field in the second pinned layer 414 causes a reduction in the number of magnetic domains in the free layer 410 that point at directions other than the direction of the net magnetic field of the free layer, i.e., a reduction in the number of magnetic domains that point in directions other than out of the page when in the presence of no external magnetic field.

[0081] As described above in conjunction with FIG. 2, in general, the ferromagnetic free layers 410a, 410b tend to naturally have a plurality of magnetic domains, including, but not limited to, a first plurality of magnetic domains with magnetic fields pointing in a first direction and a second plurality of magnetic domains with magnetic fields pointing in one or more directions different than the first direction. The first direction described above can be parallel to upper and lower surfaces of the free layer 410. The first plurality of magnetic domains have magnetic field pointing directions that are aligned with the net magnetic field of the free layer 410 shown to be coming out of the page when the GMR element 400 is not exposed to an external magnetic field, but which can rotate as the GMR element 400 is exposed to a magnetic field. As described above, the magnetic field pointing direction of the first plurality of magnetic domains in the free layer 410 rotates in response to an external magnetic field. The second plurality of magnetic domains will tend to have magnetic field pointing directions that point in the one or more directions different than the first direction.

[0082] Also as described above in conjunction with FIG. 2, with regard to the steps 104 of FIG. 1, each step is generated when one or more of the magnetic domains that are not within the first plurality of magnetic domains (e.g., that are within the second plurality of magnetic domains), i.e., one or more of the magnetic domains with magnetic fields not pointing in the direction of the net magnetic field in the free layer 410, suddenly snaps (or more slowly rotates) in direction to become aligned with the magnetic field pointing direction of the net magnetic field in the free layer 410, wherever the net magnetic field in the free layer 410 may be pointing (i.e., may have rotated) in response to an external magnetic field.

[0083] The second pinned layer 414 is operable to partially magnetically couple, through the spacer layer 412, to the free layer 410, to reduce a number of magnetic domains (i.e., to reduce a quantity of magnetic domains in the second plurality of magnetic domains) in the free layer 410 that point in a direction other than the first direction, i.e., other than the direction of the net magnetic field in the free layer 410 in the absence of an external magnetic field. This reduction results in fewer steps 104, smaller steps 104, or no steps 104. The reduction can include a reduction in a quantity of magnetic domains within the above second plurality of magnetic domains.

[0084] By partial pinning, it is meant that there is less magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer 414 and the free layer 410 than between the first pinned layer 406 and the free layer 410. An amount of partial pinning is determined in part by a material and a thickness of the spacer layer 412.

[0085] The PtMn first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layer 404, 416 can have a Neel temperature and a blocking temperature that are both above about three hundred degrees Celsius. This high temperature is important to eliminate loss of magnetic characteristics of the GMR element 400 in high temperature applications, for example, automobile applications.

[0086] While the layers of the GMR element are shown in a particular order, it should be understood that, in other examples, the layers 404, 406 (i.e., 406a, 406b, 406c), and 408 can be exchanged with the layers 416, 414, 412, respectively. In some examples, all of the layers shown in FIG. 4, except for the seed layer and the cap layer, can be reversed in order from bottom to top, as shown below in conjunction with FIG. 10.

[0087] The coupling strength and hence the anisotropy amplitude is controlled by the nonmagnetic spacer layer 412 between the free layer 410 and the second pinned layer 414. In the prior art arrangement of FIG. 3, a very thin Ta spacer 312 is used. In manufacturing, it is difficult to control the thickness of the thin Ta spacer 312, and thus, it is difficult to control the amount of magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer 314 and the free layer 310 of FIG. 3. In contrast, the arrangement of FIG. 4 uses a different nonmagnetic spacer layer 412, allowing a strong RKKY coupling between the second pinned layer 414 and the free layer 410. Ru, Ag, or Au can be used for the spacer layer 412.

[0088] RKKY coupling decreases and switches between a maximum antiferromagnetic coupling and a maximum ferromagnetic coupling as the distance between the pinned layer 414 and the free layer 410 increases (i.e., as the thickness of the nonmagnetic spacer layer 412 is increased) . A minima of couplings (referred to as a second minimum of coupling) appears between these maxima and occurs at ranges of thicknesses where the coupling can be tuned by way of selection of the thickness. In some examples, a material of the spacer layer412 can be chosen around the second minimum of coupling (e.g., 1.3 nm for Ru), which allows a much more reproducible deposition process than currently used for the thin Ta spacer 312 of FIG. 2, which just decreases coupling rapidly with thickness.

[0089] For a GMR element, the spacer layer 408 is a metallic nonmagnetic layer (usually Copper). For a TMR element, the spacer layer 408 is an insulating nonmagnetic layer (e.g., Al2O3 or MgO). Otherwise, the GMR element 400 can have layers the same as or similar to a comparable TMR element. Thus, a TMR element is not explicitly shown.

[0090] Referring now to FIG. 5, in which like elements of FIG. 4 are shown having like reference designations, according to a specific example, the magnetoresistance element 400 of FIG. 4, and also magnetoresistance elements described below in conjunction with FIGS. 10 and 11, can be formed in the shape of a yoke 500. A section line A-A shows the perspective of FIGS. 4, 10, and 11.

[0091] The yoke 500 has a main part 501, two arms 506, 508 coupled to the main part 501, and two lateral arms 512, 514 coupled to the two arms 506, 508, respectively. In some examples, the main part 501, the two arms 506, 508, and the two lateral arms 512, 514 each have a width (w). However, in other examples, the widths can be different.

[0092] A length (L) of the yoke 500 and a length (d) of the lateral arms 512, 514 of the yoke 500 are each at least three times the width (w) of the yoke 500, and the width (w) of the yoke 500 can be between about one µm and about twenty µm.

[0093] The yoke dimensions can be, for example, within the following ranges:
  • the length (L) of the main part 501 of the yoke 500 can be between about ten µm and ten millimeters;
  • the length (I) of the arms 506, 508 of the yoke 500 can be at least three times the width (w);
  • the width (w) of the yoke 500 can be between about one µm and about twenty µm.


[0094] The arms 506, 508 of the yoke 500 are linked to the lateral arms 512, 514, which are parallel to the main part 501, and have a length I which is between about 1/4 and 1/3 of the overall length (L).

[0095] In general, sensitivity of the magnetoresistance element 400 having the yoke shape 500 decreases with the width (w), and the low frequency noise of the magnetoresistance element 400 increases with the width (w).

[0096] The yoke shape offers better magnetic homogeneity in a longitudinally central area of the main part 501. This is due to the demagnetizing field of the yoke length which is mainly along the main part 501, and this induces an anisotropy of the free layer 410 of FIG. 4, which can be seen as a magnetization at zero field along the length of the yoke 500. If the pinned layer (e.g., 406 of FIG. 4) has a magnetic field perpendicular to the yoke (e.g., arrow 502), when an external field is applied in direction of the arrow 502, the free layer 410 magnetization rotates uniformly, i.e. without domain jumps. The homogeneous rotation of the magnetization of the free layer 410 results in a response curve without steps in the response (see, e.g., FIG. 1)

[0097] For a GMR element, the overall stack can be designed in a yoke shape, but for a TMR element, in some examples, only the free layer can have a yoke shape.

[0098] In other examples, the GMR or TMR elements 400 is not formed in the shape of a yoke, but is instead formed in the shape of a straight bar, e.g., having the dimensions L and w, and not having features associated with the dimensions I and d. For the bar shaped GMR or TMR element, still the section line A-A is representative of the cross sections of the GMR element 400 of FIG. 4 or the magnetoresistance elements of FIGS. 10 and 11.

[0099] Referring now to FIG. 6, a magnetic field sensor 600 can include one or more magnetoresistance elements. Here, four magnetoresistance elements, which can be of a type described above in conjunction with FIG. 4, or below in conjunction with FIGS. 10, 11, 12, 17, or 20 are arranged over a common substrate. The four magnetoresistance elements can be arranged in a bridge. Other electronic components (not shown), for example, amplifiers and processors, i.e., an electronic circuit, can also be integrated upon the common substrate. In some examples, the electronic circuit can generate an output signal indicative of a movement, e.g., a rotation, of an object, e.g., 602.

[0100] A surrounding package (not shown) e.g., a plastic package, can surround or otherwise be included with the magnetic field sensor 600. Also, a leadframe (not shown) can be coupled to or otherwise be included with the magnetic field sensor 600.

[0101] The magnetic field sensor 600 can be disposed proximate to a moving magnetic object, for example, a ring magnet 602 having alternating north and south magnetic poles. The ring magnet 602 is subject to rotation.

[0102] The magnetic field sensor 600 can be configured to generate an output signal indicative of at least a speed of rotation of the ring magnet. In some arrangements, the ring magnet 602 is coupled to a target object, for example, a cam shaft in an engine, and the sensed speed of rotation of the ring magnet 602 is indicative of a speed of rotation of the target object.

[0103] While the magnetic field sensor 600 is used as a rotation detector, it should be understood that other similar magnetic field sensors, for example, current sensors, having one or more the magnetoresistance elements of FIGS. 4, 10, 11, 12, 17, or 20 can also be realized.

[0104] It should be appreciated that FIG. 7 shows a flowchart corresponding to the below contemplated technique that would be implemented with semiconductor manufacturing equipment. Rectangular elements (typified by element 704 in FIG. 7), herein denoted "processing blocks," represent process steps.

[0105] It will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that, unless otherwise indicated herein, the particular sequence of blocks described is illustrative only and can be varied without departing from the invention. Thus, unless otherwise stated the blocks described below are unordered meaning that, when possible, the steps can be performed in any convenient or desirable order.

[0106] Referring now to FIG. 7, an exemplary process 700 for manufacturing a double pinned GMR element as in FIG. 4 above, begins at block 702, where the full stack 400 of FIG. 4, or the magnetoresistance elements of FIGS. 10 or 11 below (also FIGS. 12, 17, 20), is deposited in sequential deposition steps. This deposition can be followed at block 704 by a patterning process. The patterning can result, for example, in the yoke shape of FIG. 5.

[0107] After the patterning of block 704, a first annealing is applied at block 706 to the processed wafer, where the direction of the magnetic field in the first pinned layer (e.g., 406 of FIG. 4), and also directions in the first antiferromagnetic layer (e.g., 404 of FIG. 4) are defined. Typically the annealing is performed at a temperature T1 with a magnetic field H1 applied parallel to the wafer and, for instance, parallel to the arrow 502 of FIG. 5. This annealing can have, for example, a one hour duration under a magnetic field of 1T at 295°C, but these values are adapted to the stack composition, i.e., layer materials.

[0108] After this first annealing of block 706, at block 708, a second annealing is performed to define the magnetization of the second pinned layer (e.g., 414 of FIG. 4) and of the second antiferromagnetic layer (e.g., 416 of FIG. 4), which provides a magnetic field in the second pinned layer and also in the second antiferromagnetic layer that are oriented perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field in the first pinned layer (e.g., 406 of FIG. 4) and the directions in the first antiferromagnetic layer (e.g., 404 of FIG. 4). This annealing step can have, for example, a one hour duration, at a temperature T2, which can be equal to T1, and with a magnetic field H2 that is lower than the magnetic field H1. The magnetic field H2 can be applied in a direction parallel to the arrow 504 of FIG. 5. This step is meant to orientate the magnetization of the second pinned layer (e.g., 414 of FIG. 4) without changing the magnetization direction and value of the first pinned layer (e.g., 406 of FIG. 4).

[0109] Example values and examples of ranges of values are listed below in Table 1 for the double pinned layer arrangement of FIG. 4 and also FIG. 10 below having two PtMn pinning layers 404, 416.
Table 1
ValueTypicalApproximate Range
T1 295 °C 260 °C to 320 °C
H1 1T ≥ 0.3T
Duration 1 1 Hour 30 minutes to 2 hours
T2 300 °C 180 °C to 350 °C
H2 80mT 20 mT to 200 mT
Duration 2 1 Hour 30 minutes to 5 hours


[0110] Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, in which like elements of FIG. 7 are shown having like reference designations, similar processes 800, 900 can be also applied according to the steps of FIG. 7 but in different orders as shown.

[0111] In all of the processes 700, 800, 900, the magnetic field H2 applied during the second annealing is smaller than H1 and applied in another direction, preferably perpendicularly to H1.

[0112] Referring now to FIG. 10, in which like elements of FIG. 4 are shown having like reference designation, a double pinned GMR element 1000 has layers 404, 406, 408, 412, 414 and 416 of FIG. 4 but reversed in stackup order from those described above in conjunction with FIG. 4. While the pinning layer 416 can again be comprised of PtMn, IrMn, FeMn, or any other type of antiferromagnetic material, PtMn or IrMn are shown in the figure, and IrMn is used in examples below. (PtMn is used for examples in conjunction with FIGS. 4 and 7-9).

[0113] Unlike the double pinned GMR element 400 of FIG. 4, the above described nonmagnetic layer 412, which provides the above-described desirable characteristics for partial pinning, is below rather than above the free layer 412.

[0114] It should be understood that the reversed stackup of the GMR element 1000 may be preferred when the pinning layer 416 is comprised of IrMn. For the GMR element 400 of FIG. 4, if IrMn were used for the pinning layer 416, it would be deposited on top of the CoFe pinned layer 414, which is not desirable. It has been identified that IrMn does not grow well, i.e., with a regular crystalline structure, when grown over a CoFe layer, alone or in combination with other layers. However, the IrMn layer 416 grows well over the seed layer 402.

[0115] In the double pinned GMR elements 400 and 1000 of FIGS. 4 and 10, respectively, it should be appreciated that the layers 406a, 406b, 406c form a so-called "synthetic antiferromagnet" (SAF) structure, for which the layers 406a, 406c are antiferromagnetically coupled (i.e., have magnetic fields in opposite directions). Thus, the pinned layer 406 forms a SAF structure. In contrast, the pinned layer 414 is but a single layer.

[0116] It has been observed that a SAF structure used as a pinned layer is more stable that a pinned layer formed as a single layer. In particular, under very high temperature storage life (VTSL) conditions with a magnetic field (e.g., 180 °C, 0.2 T) a single layer pinned layer tends to become aligned with or rotate toward a direction of the external magnetic field, even after the VTSL conditions are removed, and thus, can rotate from the direction in which it was originally annealed. The undesirable rotation can result in a less sensitive GMR element, or even in an insensitive GMR element, over parts of its operating characteristic curve.

[0117] In contrast, it has also been observed that a SAF structure used as a pinned layer is more stable and tends to rotate less in the presence of the same VTSL conditions, and comes back to the original position more easily (i.e., reduced hysteresis). To this end, in FIG. 11 described below, the single layer pinned layer 414 of FIGS. 4 and 10 can be replaced with a SAF structure. Thus, the free layer 410 can be surrounded with two SAF structures used as two pinned layers.

[0118] Referring now to FIG. 11, in which like elements of FIGS. 4 and 10 are shown having like reference designations, a double pinned GMR element 1100 is like the double pinned GMR element 1000 of FIG. 10, except the single layer pinned layer 414 of FIG. 10 is replaced by a SAF structure 1102. In some examples, the SAF structure 1102 can be comprised of a first ferromagnetic pinned layer 1102a, a second ferromagnetic pinned layer 1102c, and a spacer layer 1102b disposed therebetween. In some examples, the spacer layer 1102b is comprised of a nonmagnetic material.

[0119] It should be apparent that the free layer 410 is surrounded by pinned layers 406, 1102, both of which are SAF structures. Spacer layers 412, 408 are disposed between the free layer 410 and the SAF structures 1102, 206, respectively.

[0120] It should also be apparent that an upper surface of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer 416 has a magnetic field reversed in direction from an upper surface of the pinning layer 416 of FIG. 10.

[0121] Spacer layers 406b, 1102b (also referred to herein and nonmagnetic layers) within the two SAF structures have a material and a thickness selected to result in strong antiferromagnetic coupling between surrounding ferromagnetic layers 406a, 406b and 1102a, 1102b.

[0122] It has been observed that the double pinned GMR element 1100 has a greater stability with respect to VTSL conditions than the double pinned GMR element 1000 of FIG. 10 or the double pinned GMR element 400 of FIG. 4.

[0123] As in the double pinned GMR element 1000 of FIG. 10, the above described nonmagnetic layer 412 that provides the above-described desirable characteristics for partial pinning, is below rather than above the free layer 412. However, in other examples, all layers between the cap layer 418 and the seed layer 402 can be reversed in position.

[0124] It should be apparent that a reversed stackup of all layers other than the seed layer 402 and the cap layer 418 can provide a double pinned GMR element similar to the double pinned GMR element of FIG. 4, but with the various layers reversed and still with the pinned layer 414 of FIG. 4 replaced by the SAF structure 1102 of FIG. 11.

[0125] While particular layer thicknesses are shown in FIGS. 4, 10, and 11, it will be understood that the thicknesses of some layers can be manipulated to provide a more sensitive double pinned GMR element.

[0126] Referring briefly to FIG. 7 above, typical values for annealing a double pinned layer arrangement of FIG. 11 having a PtMn pinning layer 404 and a PtMn pinning layer 416, i.e., two PtMn pinning layers, are shown below in Table 2.

[0127] For Table 2 and for the double pinned GMR element of FIG. 11 and also FIG. 12 below, temperature T1, magnetic field H1, and duration 1, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 404 and of the SAF structure 406. Temperature T2, magnetic field H2, and duration 2, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 416 and of the SAF structure 1102.
Table 2
ValueTypicalApproximate Range
T1 295 °C 250 °C to 320 °C
H1 1T ≥ 0.3T
Duration 1 1 Hour 30 minutes to 2 hours
T2 230 °C 100°C to 350 °C
H2 0.35T 50 mT to 1T
Duration 2 1 Hour 30 minutes to 5 hours


[0128] Referring again briefly to FIG. 7 above, typical values for annealing a double pinned layer arrangement of FIGS. 4, 10, 11, 12, and 13 having a PtMn pinning layer 404 and an IrMn pinning layer 416 are shown below in Table 3.

[0129] For Table 3 and for the double pinned GMR elements of FIGS. 4 and 10, temperature T1, magnetic field H1, and duration 1, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 404 and of the pinned layer 406. Temperature T2, magnetic field H2, and duration 2, refer to annealing of the IrMn antiferromagnetic layer 416 and of the associated pinned layer 414.

[0130] For Table 3 and for the double pinned GMR elements of FIGS. 4, 10, 11 and also FIGS. 12 and 13 below, temperature T1, magnetic field H1, and duration 1, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 404 and of the pinned (SAF) structure 406. Temperature T2, magnetic field H2, and duration 2, refer to annealing of the IrMn antiferromagnetic layer 416 and of the pinned (SAF) structure 1102.
Table 3
ValueTypicalApproximate Range
T1 295 °C 280 °C to 320 °C
H1 1T ≥ 0.3T
Duration 1 1 Hour 30 minutes to 2 hours
T2 160 °C 100 °C to 260 °C
H2 1T 50 mT to 2 T
Duration 2 30 minutes 10 minutes to 2 hours


[0131] While double pinned GMR elements are described above, it should be understood that the double pinned arrangements can be part of a structure with additional pinning and/or pinned layers.

[0132] Referring now to FIG. 12, in which like elements of FIGS. 4 and 11 are shown having like reference designation, a double pinned GMR element 1200 has layers 404, 406, 408, 410, 412, 1102 and 416 of FIG. 11 but reversed in stackup order from that described above in conjunction with FIG. 11. While the pinning layer 416 can again be comprised of PtMn, IrMn, FeMn, or any other type of antiferromagnetic material, PtMn or IrMn are shown in the figure, and PtMn is used in examples below. (PtMn is used for examples in conjunction with FIGS. 4 and 7-9).

[0133] Unlike the double pinned GMR element 400 of FIG. 4, the above described nonmagnetic layer 412, which provides the above-described desirable characteristics for partial pinning, is above rather than below the free layer 412.

[0134] It should be understood that the non-reversed stackup of the GMR element 1100 may be preferred when the pinning layer 416 is comprised of IrMn. For the reversed stackup GMR element 1200 of FIG. 12, if IrMn were used for the pinning layer 416, it would be deposited on top of the CoFe pinned layer 1102a, which is not desirable. It has been identified that IrMn does not grow well, i.e., with a regular crystalline structure, when grown over a CoFe layer, alone or in combination with other layers. However, the IrMn layer 416 grows well over the seed layer 402. In one example, PtMn is used for both pinning layers 404, 416.

[0135] In the double pinned GMR elements 1100 and 1200 of FIGS. 11 and 12, respectively, it should be appreciated that the structures 406, 1102 form so-called "synthetic antiferromagnet" (SAF) structures as described above.

[0136] Referring now to FIG. 13, a double pinning magnetoresistance element 1300 according to the invention, in which like elements of FIGS. 4 and 12 are shown having like reference designations, includes a stack portion 1302 that is the same as or similar to a similar stack portion in the magnetoresistance element 1200 of FIG. 12.

[0137] Double pinned magnetoresistance elements described herein have a reference stack of layers and a bias stack of layers. Here, a reference stack of layers 1304 is below a bias stack of layers 1306 relative to a substrate upon which the magnetoresistance element 1300 is formed.

[0138] Is it described above, for example, in conjunction with Tables 1-3 and FIGS. 7-9, that the double pinned magnetoresistance elements described herein undergo two annealing steps, particularly to generate annealed magnetic directions in two pinning layers (e.g., 404, 416), and also in proximate pinned layers, that are oriented ninety degrees apart from each other.

[0139] As used herein, the term "structure," when referring to magnetoresistance element layers, can refer to either a single layer, e.g., the single-layer pinned layer 414 of FIG. 4, or to a multi-layer arrangement, e.g., the multi-layer pinned layer 406 of FIG. 4.

[0140] In essence, the first annealing step results in both of the pinning layers (e.g., 404, 416) and both of the pinned layers (406, 1102) (or pinned layer structures) being annealed to the same magnetic direction. In the second annealing step, only one of the pinning layers (e.g., 416) and one of the pinned layers (e.g., 1102) (or pinned layer structure) is annealed to a relative ninety degree direction, and without disturbing the annealed magnetic direction of the other pinning layer (e.g., 404) and the other pinned layer (e.g., 406) (or pinned layer structure).

[0141] In general, the more different are the two pinning layers and the two pinned layers (or pinned layer structures), the easier it is to achieve the second annealing to the relative ninety degree direction without disturbing the annealed magnetic direction of the other pinning layer and the other pinned layer (or pinned layer structure).

[0142] Referring briefly to FIGS. 4 and 10, it can be seen that one of the two pinned layers 414 (or pinned layers structures) is a single layer, while the other pinned layer 406 (or pinned layer structure) is a three layer synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF). This difference, among other differences described below, by way of different annealing parameters (e.g., duration, temperature, and/or magnetic field) enables the two annealing steps that result in the relative ninety degree difference of magnetic directions to be achieved.

[0143] Referring briefly to FIG. 12, it can be seen that both pinned layers 1102, 406 (or pinned layer structures) are SAFs. Thus, the structures of the pinning and pinned layers (or pinned layer structures) are more similar. Therefore, it is more difficult to achieve the two annealing steps for the magnetoresistance element 1200 that result in the relative ninety degree difference of magnetic directions.

[0144] Referring again to FIG. 13, in general, in a double pinned magnetoresistance element (e.g., 1300), the reference stack of layers (e.g., 1304) is magnetically stiffer and less subject to change of magnetic direction than the bias stack of layer (e.g., 1306). Similarly, the bias stack of layers (e.g., 1306) is easier to anneal (e.g., lower duration, lower temperature, and/or lower magnetic field) than the reference stack of layers (e.g., 1304). Thus, the bias stack of layers (e.g., 1306) can be annealed (or, more specifically, re-annealed) in the second annealing step without disturbing the annealing of the reference stack of layers (e.g., 1304).

[0145] A difference that makes the two annealing directions possible is described above, i.e., a single layer pinned layer (or pinned layer structure) in combination with a SAF pinned layer (or pinned layer structure) as in FIGS. 4 and 10 versus two SAF pinned layers (or pinned layer structures) as in FIGS. 11 and 12.

[0146] Other physical difference can also make it easier to anneal a double pinned magnetoresistance element to have ninety degree magnetic directions in two annealing steps:
  1. a) the material of the two pining layers (e.g., 404, 416) can be different, e.g., one PtMn and one IrMn;
  2. b) thicknesses of the two pinning layers (e.g., 404, 416), and of various other layers, including spacer layers (e.g., 408, 412), can be different; and
  3. c) materials of spacer layers (e.g., 408, 412) can be different, e.g., one Cu and one Ru.


[0147] In addition, here, unlike the magnetoresistance element 1200 of FIG. 12, the magnetoresistance element 1300 has a temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308, with or without an optional cap layer 1310. The temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 is operable to provide a further magnetic difference between the reference stack of layers 1304 and the bias stack of layers 1306. In particular, the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 provides a magnetic difference between the bias stack of layers 1306 and the reference stack of layers 1304, promoting the annealing of the bias stack of layers 1306 at lower duration, lower temperature, and/or lower annealing magnetic fields during the second annealing step without disturbing the annealing of the reference stack of layers 1304 annealed during the first annealing step. In essence, the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 provides a more effective magnetic rotational torque on the pinning layer 404.

[0148] The temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 is shown to have a thickness of about two nanometers. However, in other embodiments, the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 can have a thickness in a range of about one to about ten nanometers.

[0149] The temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 is shown to be comprised of CoFe. However, in other embodiments, the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 can be comprised of a different ferromagnetic material, for example, NiFe, CoFeB, which may have thicknesses generally in a range of about 2.0 nanometers to about six nanometers.

[0150] In some other embodiments, the spacer layers 408, 412 are switched in position in the layer stack.

[0151] As described below in conjunction with FIG. 14, the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 and the optional temporary cap layer 1310 are sacrificial, and are removed after the second annealing step. A replacement cap layer, like the cap layer 418 of FIG. 12 can thereafter be deposited over the magnetoresistance element 1300.

[0152] Referring now to FIG. 14, with reference to the magnetoresistance element of FIG. 13, a method 1400 of fabricating a magnetoresistance element (e.g.., 1300) includes, in a first fabrication step 1402, fabricating a stack portion, e.g., 1302, upon a substrate. The stack portion 1302 does not yet include the temporary ferromagnetic layer 1308 or the optional temporary cap layer 1310 of FIG. 13.

[0153] At block 1404, the temporary (sacrificial) ferromagnetic layer (e.g., 1308) and optionally, the temporary (sacrificial) cap layer (e.g., 1310) are deposited over the stack portion 1302.

[0154] At block 1406, a first annealing is performed upon the magnetoresistance element (e.g., 1300). The first annealing step results in annealing of all pinning and pinned layers (or pinned layer structures), but notably, the reference stack of layers 1304 of FIG. 13.

[0155] At block 1406, a second annealing is performed upon the magnetoresistance element (e.g., 1300). The second annealing step results in annealing of only one of the pinning and pinned layers (or pinned layer structures), and notably, the bias stack of layers 1306 of FIG. 13.

[0156] When both of the antiferromagnetic layers 416, 404 are comprised of PtMn, the first and second annealings can be performed in accordance with duration, temperature, and magnetic field values shown below in conjunction with Table 4.

[0157] When the antiferromagnetic layer 404 is comprised of PtMn and the antiferromagnetic layer 416 is comprised of IrMn, the first and second annealings can be performed in accordance with duration, temperature, and magnetic field values shown below in conjunction with Table 3.

[0158] For Table 4 and for the double pinned GMR element of FIG. 13, temperature T1, magnetic field H1, and duration 1, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 404 and of the pinned (SAF) structure 406. Temperature T2, magnetic field H2, and duration 2, refer to annealing of the PtMn antiferromagnetic layer 416 and of the pinned (SAF) structure 1102.
Table 4
ValueTypicalApproximate Range
T1 295 °C 250 °C to 320 °C
H1 1T ≥ 0.3T
Duration 11 Hour30 minutes to 2 hours
T2 300 °C 100°C to 350 °C
H2 0.12T 50 mT to 1T
Duration 2 1 Hour 30 minutes to 5 hours


[0159] As described above, magnetic directions of the first and second annealings are oriented ninety degrees relative to each other.

[0160] At block 1410, the temporary ferromagnetic layer (e.g., 1308) and the optional temporary cap layer (e.g., 1310) are removed. Ion beam etching can be used to remove these layers. Ion beam etching for a time period of about thirty seconds at room temperature can remove the temporary cap layer and the temporary ferromagnetic layer. However, other thicknesses and other materials of the temporary ferromagnetic layer (e.g., 1308) and the optional temporary cap layer (e.g., 1310) can require more than or less than thirty seconds.

[0161] The etching may remove some of the antiferromagnetic layer 416, and thus, the antiferromagnetic layer 416 is shown to be thicker than the same layer in FIG. 12.

[0162] At block 1412, a new cap layer (e.g., 418, not shown in FIG. 13 but indicated in FIG. 12) can be deposited upon the remaining layers of the magnetoresistance element (e.g., 1300). The new cap layer can be comprised of Ta, which is metallic, or the new cap layer can be comprised of an insulating material, for example, Al2O3 (aluminum oxide) or Si3N4 (silicon nitride).

[0163] At block 1414, the magnetoresistance element can be patterned, for example, to form a yoke shape. Illustrative yoke shapes are described above in conjunction with FIG. 5.

[0164] In an alternate process, blocks 1412 and 1414 can be reversed so that the new cap layer is deposited after the stack is patterned.

[0165] Having described preferred embodiments, which serve to illustrate various concepts, structures and techniques, which are the subject of this patent, it will now become apparent that other embodiments incorporating these concepts, structures and techniques may be used. Accordingly, it is submitted that that scope of the patent should not be limited to the described embodiments but rather should be limited only by the scope of the following claims.


Claims

1. A magnetoresistance element (1300) deposited upon a substrate, comprising:

a plurality of layers deposited in a stack of layers upon the substrate, wherein the stack of layers comprises:

first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers (404, 416);

a first pinned layer structure (406) and a second pinned layer structure (1102), wherein the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer is deposited proximate to the first pinned layer structure, and wherein the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer is deposited proximate to the second pinned layer structure, such that the first and second pinned layer structures are deposited between the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers;

a free layer structure (410) disposed between the first and second pinned layer structures;

a first nonmagnetic layer (408) deposited between the first pinned layer structure (406) and the free layer structure (410); and

a second nonmagnetic layer (412) deposited between the second pinned layer structure (1102) and the free layer structure (410),

characterised in that the magnetoresistance element further comprises a temporary ferromagnetic layer (1308) deposited directly over the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer (416), the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer being distal from the substrate.


 
2. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 1, wherein magnetic field directions in the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers are annealed to have different directions.
 
3. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 1 or 2, wherein a material of the second nonmagnetic layer is selected to allow a thickness of the second nonmagnetic layer to be greater than 0.5 nm while allowing a desired partial pinning between the second pinned layer structure and the free layer structure, wherein the material of the second nonmagnetic layer is selected to allow a thickness of the first nonmagnetic layer of greater than 0.5 nm to allow a magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer structure and the free layer structure to be between a maximum ferromagnetic coupling and a maximum antiferromagnetic coupling.
 
4. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 3, wherein the second nonmagnetic layer is comprised of Ru.
 
5. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 4, wherein a material and a thickness of the first nonmagnetic layer is selected to allow substantially zero magnetic coupling between the first pinned layer structure and the free layer structure.
 
6. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 4, wherein the first nonmagnetic layer is comprised of Cu, Au or Ag.
 
7. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 4, wherein a thickness of the first nonmagnetic layer is between about 2.0 nm and about 3.0 nm.
 
8. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 3, wherein the magnetoresistance element comprises a spin valve.
 
9. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 3, wherein the magnetoresistance element comprises a GMR sensing element or a TMR sensing element.
 
10. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 3, wherein the free layer structure comprises first and second ferromagnetic free layers (410a,b) coupled together with no spacer layer between the first and second ferromagnetic free layers.
 
11. The magnetoresistance element of Claim 10, wherein the first ferromagnetic free layer (410a) is comprised of CoFe and the second ferromagnetic free layer (410b) is comprised of NiFe.
 
12. A method of fabricating a magnetoresistance element (1300), comprising:

depositing a plurality of layers in a stack of layers upon a substrate, the stack of layers comprising:

first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers (404, 416);

a first pinned layer structure (406) and a second pinned layer structure (1102), wherein the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer is deposited proximate to the first pinned layer structure, and wherein the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer is deposited proximate to the second pinned layer structure, such that the first and second pinned layer structures are deposited between the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers;

a free layer structure (410) disposed between the first and second pinned layer structures;

a first nonmagnetic layer (408) deposited between the first pinned layer structure (406) and the free layer structure (410); and

a second nonmagnetic layer (412) deposited between the second pinned layer structure (1102) and the free layer structure (410),

characterised by depositing a temporary ferromagnetic layer (1308) directly over the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer (416), the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer being distal from the substrate.


 
13. The method of Claim 12, wherein magnetic field directions in the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers are annealed to have different directions, the method further comprising:
removing the temporary antiferromagnetic layer.
 
14. The method of Claim 12, or the magnetoresistance element of Claim 2, wherein the temporary ferromagnetic layer is comprised of CoFe.
 
15. The method of Claim 12, or the magnetoresistance element of Claim 2, wherein the temporary ferromagnetic layer has a thickness of about two nanometers before it is removed.
 
16. The method of Claim 12, wherein the removing comprises ion beam etching to remove the temporary ferromagnetic layer.
 
17. The method of Claim 16, wherein the ion beam etching comprises ion beam etching for a time period of about thirty seconds.
 
18. The method of Claim 12, wherein a material of the second nonmagnetic layer is selected to allow a thickness of the second nonmagnetic layer to be greater than 0.5 nm while allowing a desired partial pinning between the second pinned layer structure and the free layer structure, wherein the material of the second nonmagnetic layer is selected to allow a thickness of the second nonmagnetic layer of greater than 0.5 nm to allow a magnetic coupling between the second pinned layer structure and the free layer structure to be between a maximum ferromagnetic coupling and a maximum antiferromagnetic coupling.
 
19. The method of Claim 18, further comprising:
before the removing the temporary ferromagnetic layer:

annealing the first pinned layer structure and the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer at a first annealing temperature, with a first annealing magnetic field, with a first annealing magnetic field direction, and with a first annealing duration; and

annealing the second pinned layer structure and the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer at a second annealing temperature, with a second annealing magnetic field, with a second annealing magnetic field direction, and with a second annealing duration, wherein:

the first annealing magnetic field direction is in a selected magnetization direction,

the second annealing magnetic field direction is different than the first annealing magnetic field direction, and

the first annealing magnetic field is higher than the second annealing magnetic field, wherein the second annealing magnetic field is selected to result in annealing of the second pinned layer structure and annealing of the second antiferromagnetic pinning layer without affecting the annealing of the first pinned layer structure or the annealing of the first antiferromagnetic pinning layer.


 
20. The method of Claim 19, wherein the first and second pinned layer structures are both comprised of two or more CoFe layers.
 
21. The method of Claim 19, wherein the first and second antiferromagnetic pinning layers are each comprised of PtMn, and wherein the first annealing magnetic field is about one Tesla, and wherein the second annealing magnetic field is about 0.12 Tesla.
 
22. The method of Claim 21, wherein the first annealing temperature is about two hundred ninety five degrees Celsius, wherein the second annealing temperature is about three hundred degrees Celsius, and wherein the first annealing duration is about one hour and the second annealing duration is about one hour.
 
23. The method of Claim 18, or the magnetoresistance element of Claim 4, wherein a thickness of the second nonmagnetic layer is between about 0.5 nm and about 4 nm, and preferably between about 2.0 nm and about 4.0 nm.
 
24. The method of Claim 18, or the magnetoresistance element of Claim 3, wherein the second nonmagnetic layer is comprised of a material selected to provide an adjustable RKKY coupling between the first pinned layer structure and the free layer structure.
 
25. The method of Claim 13, further comprising:
patterning at least a portion of the magnetoresistance element in a yoke shape.
 
26. The method of Claim 13, further comprising:

depositing a cap layer over a selected one of the first or second antiferromagnetic pinning layer after the removing;

patterning at least a portion of the magnetoresistance element in a yoke shape.


 
27. The method of Claim 25 or 26, wherein a length (L) of the yoke shape and a length (d) of lateral arms of the yoke shape are each at least three times a width (w) of the yoke shape, and the width (w) of the yoke shape is between about one µm and about twenty µm, wherein the length (L) is a longest dimension of the yoke shape.
 


Ansprüche

1. Auf einem Substrat abgeschiedenes magnetoresistives
Element (1300), das Folgendes umfasst:

mehrere Schichten, die als Schichtstapel auf dem Substrat abgeschieden sind, wobei der Schichtstapel Folgendes umfasst:

eine erste und eine zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht (404, 416),

einen ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau (406) und einen zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau (1102), wobei die erste antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht in der Nähe des ersten verankerten Schichtaufbaus und die zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht in der Nähe des zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbaus abgeschieden ist, so dass der erste und der zweite verankerte Schichtaufbau zwischen der ersten und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht abgeschieden sind,

einen freien Schichtaufbau (410), der zwischen dem ersten und dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau angeordnet ist,

eine erste nichtmagnetische Schicht (408), die zwischen dem ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau (406) und dem freien Schichtaufbau (410) abgeschieden ist, und

eine zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht (412), die zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau (1102) und dem freien Schichtaufbau (410) abgeschieden ist,

dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass das magnetoresistive Element ferner eine temporäre ferromagnetische Schicht (1308) umfasst, die direkt auf der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht (416) abgeschieden ist, wobei die zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht vom Substrat entfernt liegt.


 
2. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 1, wobei Magnetfeldrichtungen in der ersten und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht so geglüht sind, dass sie sich unterscheiden.
 
3. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, wobei ein Material für die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht so gewählt ist, dass eine Dicke der zweiten nichtmagnetischen Schicht mehr als 0,5 nm betragen kann, während eine gewünschte teilweise Verankerung zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau möglich ist, wobei das Material für die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht so gewählt ist, dass eine Dicke der ersten nichtmagnetischen Schicht mehr als 0,5 nm betragen kann, so dass eine magnetische Kopplung zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau zwischen einer maximalen ferromagnetischen und einer maximalen antiferromagnetischen Kopplung liegen kann.
 
4. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 3, wobei die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht aus Ru besteht.
 
5. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 4, wobei ein Material und eine Dicke der ersten nichtmagnetischen Schicht so gewählt sind, dass eine magnetische Kopplung zwischen dem ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau im Wesentlichen null betragen kann.
 
6. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 4, wobei die erste nichtmagnetische Schicht aus Cu, Au oder Ag besteht.
 
7. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 4, wobei eine Dicke der ersten nichtmagnetischen Schicht zwischen etwa 2,0 nm und etwa 3,0 nm liegt.
 
8. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 3, wobei das magnetoresistive Element ein Spin-Ventil umfasst.
 
9. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 3, wobei das magnetoresistive Element ein GMR-Sensorelement oder ein TMR-Sensorelement umfasst.
 
10. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 3, wobei der freie Schichtaufbau eine erste und eine zweite freie ferromagnetische Schicht (410a, b) umfasst, die ohne Abstandhalterschicht dazwischen gekoppelt sind.
 
11. Magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 10, wobei die erste freie ferromagnetische Schicht (410a) aus CoFe und die zweite freie ferromagnetische Schicht (410b) aus NiFe besteht.
 
12. Verfahren zum Fertigen eines magnetoresistiven Elements (1300), das Folgendes umfasst:

Abscheiden mehrerer Schichten als Schichtstapel auf einem Substrat, wobei der Schichtstapel Folgendes umfasst:

eine erste und eine zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht (404, 416),

einen ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau (406) und einen zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau (1102), wobei die erste antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht in der Nähe des ersten verankerten Schichtaufbaus und die zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht in der Nähe des zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbaus abgeschieden ist, so dass der erste und der zweite verankerte Schichtaufbau zwischen der ersten und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht abgeschieden sind,

einen freien Schichtaufbau (410), der zwischen dem ersten und dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau angeordnet ist,

eine erste nichtmagnetische Schicht (408), die zwischen dem ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau (406) und dem freien Schichtaufbau (410) abgeschieden ist, und

eine zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht (412), die zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau (1102) und dem freien Schichtaufbau (410) abgeschieden ist,

gekennzeichnet durch das Abscheiden einer temporären ferromagnetischen Schicht (1308) direkt auf der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht (416), wobei die zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht vom Substrat entfernt liegt.


 
13. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12, wobei Magnetfeldrichtungen in der ersten und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht so geglüht werden, dass sie sich unterscheiden, wobei das Verfahren ferner Folgendes umfasst:
Entfernen der temporären antiferromagnetischen Schicht.
 
14. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12 oder magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 2, wobei die temporäre ferromagnetische Schicht aus CoFe besteht.
 
15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12 oder magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 2, wobei die temporäre ferromagnetische Schicht eine Dicke von etwa zwei Nanometern aufweist, bevor sie entfernt wird.
 
16. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12, wobei das Entfernen ein Ionenstrahlätzen zum Entfernen der temporären ferromagnetischen Schicht umfasst.
 
17. Verfahren nach Anspruch 16, wobei das Ionenstrahlätzen ein Ionenstrahlätzen für einen Zeitraum von etwa dreißig Sekunden umfasst.
 
18. Verfahren nach Anspruch 12, wobei ein Material für die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht so gewählt wird, dass eine Dicke der zweiten nichtmagnetischen Schicht mehr als 0,5 nm betragen kann, während eine gewünschte teilweise Verankerung zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau möglich ist, wobei das Material für die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht so gewählt wird, dass eine Dicke der zweiten nichtmagnetischen Schicht mehr als 0,5 nm betragen kann, so dass eine magnetische Kopplung zwischen dem zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau zwischen einer maximalen ferromagnetischen und einer maximalen antiferromagnetischen Kopplung liegen kann.
 
19. Verfahren nach Anspruch 18, das ferner Folgendes umfasst:
vor dem Entfernen der temporären ferromagnetischen Schicht:

Glühen des ersten verankerten Schichtaufbaus und der ersten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht bei einer ersten Glühtemperatur mit einem ersten Glühmagnetfeld, einer ersten Glühmagnetfeldrichtung und einer ersten Glühdauer und

Glühen des zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbaus und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht bei einer zweiten Glühtemperatur mit einem zweiten Glühmagnetfeld, einer zweiten Glühmagnetfeldrichtung und einer zweiten Glühdauer, wobei:

die erste Glühmagnetfeldrichtung in einer gewählten Magnetisierungsrichtung verläuft,

sich die zweite Glühmagnetfeldrichtung von der ersten Glühmagnetfeldrichtung unterscheidet und

das erste Glühmagnetfeld stärker ist als das zweite Glühmagnetfeld, wobei das zweite Glühmagnetfeld so gewählt wird, dass ein Glühen des zweiten verankerten Schichtaufbaus und der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht erfolgt, ohne dass das Glühen des ersten verankerten Schichtaufbaus oder der ersten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht beeinflusst wird.


 
20. Verfahren nach Anspruch 19, wobei sowohl der erste als auch der zweite verankerte Schichtaufbau aus zwei oder mehr CoFe-Schichten besteht.
 
21. Verfahren nach Anspruch 19, wobei die erste und die zweite antiferromagnetische Verankerungsschicht jeweils aus PtMn bestehen und das erste Glühmagnetfeld etwa ein Tesla und das zweite Glühmagnetfeld etwa 0,12 Tesla beträgt.
 
22. Verfahren nach Anspruch 21, wobei die erste Glühtemperatur etwa zweihundertfünfundneunzig Grad Celsius, die zweite Glühtemperatur etwa dreihundert Grad Celsius und die erste Glühdauer und die zweite Glühdauer jeweils etwa eine Stunde beträgt.
 
23. Verfahren nach Anspruch 18 oder magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 4, wobei eine Dicke der zweiten nichtmagnetischen Schicht zwischen etwa 0,5 nm und etwa 4 nm und vorzugsweise zwischen etwa 2,0 nm und etwa 4,0 nm liegt.
 
24. Verfahren nach Anspruch 18 oder magnetoresistives Element nach Anspruch 3, wobei die zweite nichtmagnetische Schicht aus einem Material besteht, das so ausgewählt wird, dass es für eine anpassbare RKKY-Kopplung zwischen dem ersten verankerten Schichtaufbau und dem freien Schichtaufbau sorgt.
 
25. Verfahren nach Anspruch 13, das ferner Folgendes umfasst:
Strukturieren von zumindest einem Teil des magnetoresistiven Elements in eine Jochform.
 
26. Verfahren nach Anspruch 13, das ferner Folgendes umfasst:

Abscheiden einer Deckschicht auf der ersten oder der zweiten antiferromagnetischen Verankerungsschicht nach dem Entfernen,

Strukturieren von zumindest einem Teil des magnetoresistiven Elements in eine Jochform.


 
27. Verfahren nach Anspruch 25 oder 26, wobei eine Länge (L) der Jochform und eine Länge (d) von Seitenarmen der Jochform jeweils mindestens dem Dreifachen einer Breite (w) der Jochform entsprechen und die Breite (w) der Jochform zwischen etwa einem µm und etwa zwanzig µm liegt, wobei die Länge (L) einem längsten Maß der Jochform entspricht.
 


Revendications

1. Élément magnétorésistif (1300) déposé sur un substrat, comprenant :

une pluralité de couches déposées en un empilement de couches sur le substrat, dans lequel l'empilement de couches comprend :

des première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques (404, 416) ;

une première structure de couche ancrée (406) et une deuxième structure de couche ancrée (1102), dans lequel la première couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique est déposée à proximité de la première structure de couche ancrée et dans lequel la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique est déposée à proximité de la deuxième structure de couche ancrée de telle façon que les première et deuxième structures de couche ancrée sont déposées entre les première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques ;

une structure de couche libre (410) disposée entre les première et deuxième structures de couche ancrée ;

une première couche amagnétique (408) déposée entre la première structure de couche ancrée (406) et la structure de couche libre (410) ; et

une deuxième couche amagnétique (412) déposée entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée (1102) et la structure de couche libre (410),

caractérisé en ce que l'élément magnétorésistif comprend en outre une couche ferromagnétique temporaire (1308) déposée directement par-dessus la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique (416), la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique étant distale par rapport au substrat.


 
2. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les directions du champ magnétique dans les première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques sont recuites pour avoir des directions différentes.
 
3. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 1 ou la revendication 2, dans lequel un matériau de la deuxième couche amagnétique est choisi pour permettre une épaisseur de la deuxième couche amagnétique supérieure à 0,5 nm tout en permettant un ancrage partiel voulu entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre, dans lequel le matériau de la deuxième couche amagnétique est choisi pour permettre une épaisseur de la première couche amagnétique supérieure à 0,5 nm pour permettre entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre un couplage magnétique qui se situe entre un couplage ferromagnétique maximum et un couplage antiferromagnétique maximum.
 
4. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 3, dans lequel la deuxième couche amagnétique est constituée de Ru.
 
5. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 4, dans lequel un matériau et une épaisseur de la première couche amagnétique sont choisis pour permettre un couplage magnétique pratiquement nul entre la première structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre.
 
6. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 4, dans lequel la première couche amagnétique est constituée de Cu, Au ou Ag.
 
7. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 4, dans lequel une épaisseur de la première couche amagnétique se situe entre environ 2,0 nm et environ 3,0 nm.
 
8. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 3, dans lequel l'élément magnétorésistif comprend une valve de spin.
 
9. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 3, dans lequel l'élément magnétorésistif comprend un élément sensible GMR ou un élément sensible TMR.
 
10. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 3, dans lequel la structure de couche libre comprend des première et deuxième couches libres ferromagnétiques (410a, b) couplées l'une à l'autre sans couche d'espacement entre les première et deuxième couches libres ferromagnétiques.
 
11. Élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 10, dans lequel la première couche libre ferromagnétique (410a) est constituée de CoFe et la deuxième couche libre ferromagnétique (410b) est constituée de NiFe.
 
12. Procédé de fabrication d'un élément magnétorésistif (1300), comprenant :

le dépôt d'une pluralité de couches en un empilement de couches sur un substrat, l'empilement de couches comprenant :

des première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques (404, 416) ;

une première structure de couche ancrée (406) et une deuxième structure de couche ancrée (1102), dans lequel la première couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique est déposée à proximité de la première structure de couche ancrée et dans lequel la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique est déposée à proximité de la deuxième structure de couche ancrée de telle façon que les première et deuxième structures de couche ancrée sont déposées entre les première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques ;

une structure de couche libre (410) disposée entre les première et deuxième structures de couche ancrée ;

une première couche amagnétique (408) déposée entre la première structure de couche ancrée (406) et la structure de couche libre (410) ; et

une deuxième couche amagnétique (412) déposée entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée (1102) et la structure de couche libre (410),

caractérisé par le dépôt d'une couche ferromagnétique temporaire (1308) directement par-dessus la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique (416), la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique étant distale par rapport au substrat.


 
13. Procédé selon la revendication 12, dans lequel des directions du champ magnétique dans les première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques sont recuites pour avoir des directions différentes, le procédé comprenant en outre :
l'élimination de la couche antiferromagnétique temporaire.
 
14. Procédé selon la revendication 12, ou élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 2, dans lequel la couche ferromagnétique temporaire est constituée de CoFe.
 
15. Procédé selon la revendication 12, ou élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 2, dans lequel la couche ferromagnétique temporaire a une épaisseur d'environ deux nanomètres avant son élimination.
 
16. Procédé selon la revendication 12, dans lequel l'élimination comprend une gravure par faisceau ionique pour éliminer la couche ferromagnétique temporaire.
 
17. Procédé selon la revendication 16, dans lequel la gravure par faisceau ionique comprend une gravure par faisceau ionique pendant une durée d'environ trente secondes.
 
18. Procédé selon la revendication 12, dans lequel un matériau de la deuxième couche amagnétique est choisi pour permettre une épaisseur de la deuxième couche amagnétique supérieure à 0,5 nm tout en permettant un ancrage partiel voulu entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre, dans lequel le matériau de la deuxième couche amagnétique est choisi pour permettre une épaisseur de la deuxième couche amagnétique supérieure à 0,5 nm pour permettre entre la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre un couplage magnétique qui se situe entre un couplage ferromagnétique maximum et un couplage antiferromagnétique maximum.
 
19. Procédé selon la revendication 18, comprenant en outre :
avant l'élimination de la couche ferromagnétique temporaire :

le recuit de la première structure de couche ancrée et de la première couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique à une première température de recuit, avec un premier champ magnétique de recuit, avec une première direction du champ magnétique de recuit et avec une première durée de recuit ; et

le recuit de la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et de la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique à une deuxième température de recuit, avec un deuxième champ magnétique de recuit, avec une deuxième direction du champ magnétique de recuit et avec une deuxième durée de recuit, dans lequel :

la première direction du champ magnétique de recuit est dans une direction d'aimantation choisie,

la deuxième direction du champ magnétique de recuit est différente de la première direction du champ magnétique de recuit, et

le premier champ magnétique de recuit est supérieur au deuxième champ magnétique de recuit, dans lequel le deuxième champ magnétique de recuit est choisi pour donner un recuit de la deuxième structure de couche ancrée et un recuit de la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique sans affecter le recuit de la première structure de couche ancrée ou le recuit de la première couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique.


 
20. Procédé selon la revendication 19, dans lequel les première et deuxième structures de couche ancrée sont constituées l'une et l'autre de deux couches de CoFe ou plus.
 
21. Procédé selon la revendication 19, dans lequel les première et deuxième couches d'ancrage antiferromagnétiques sont constituées chacune de PtMn, et dans lequel le premier champ magnétique de recuit est d'environ un tesla et dans lequel le deuxième champ magnétique de recuit est d'environ 0,12 tesla.
 
22. Procédé selon la revendication 21, dans lequel la première température de recuit est d'environ deux cent quatre-vingt-quinze degrés Celsius, dans lequel la deuxième température de recuit est d'environ trois cent degrés Celsius, et dans lequel la première durée de recuit est d'environ une heure et la deuxième durée de recuit est d'environ une heure.
 
23. Procédé selon la revendication 18, ou élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 4, dans lequel une épaisseur de la deuxième couche amagnétique se situe entre environ 0,5 nm et environ 4 nm et de préférence entre environ 2,0 nm et environ 4,0 nm.
 
24. Procédé selon la revendication 18, ou élément magnétorésistif selon la revendication 3, dans lequel la deuxième couche amagnétique est constituée d'un matériau choisi pour donner un couplage RKKY ajustable entre la première structure de couche ancrée et la structure de couche libre.
 
25. Procédé selon la revendication 13, comprenant en outre :
la structuration d'au moins une partie de l'élément magnétorésistif sous la forme d'un étrier.
 
26. Procédé selon la revendication 13, comprenant en outre :

le dépôt d'une couche de couverture par-dessus une couche choisie parmi la première ou la deuxième couche d'ancrage antiferromagnétique après l'élimination ;

la structuration d'au moins une partie de l'élément magnétorésistif sous la forme d'un étrier.


 
27. Procédé selon la revendication 25 ou la revendication 26, dans lequel une longueur (L) de la forme d'étrier et une longueur (d) des bras latéraux de la forme d'étrier sont égales chacune à au moins trois fois une largeur (w) de la forme d'étrier, et la largeur (w) de la forme d'étrier se situe entre environ un µm et environ vingt µm, dans lequel la longueur (L) est une dimension la plus grande de la forme d'étrier.
 




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Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



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Patent documents cited in the description