(19)
(11)EP 3 647 668 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
06.05.2020 Bulletin 2020/19

(21)Application number: 19206957.3

(22)Date of filing:  04.11.2019
(51)Int. Cl.: 
F24D 19/08  (2006.01)
F24D 19/10  (2006.01)
F24H 9/20  (2006.01)
G01F 1/64  (2006.01)
G01M 3/16  (2006.01)
E03B 7/07  (2006.01)
F24H 9/16  (2006.01)
G01F 1/58  (2006.01)
F16K 17/00  (2006.01)
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(30)Priority: 05.11.2018 US 201862755857 P

(71)Applicant: Watts Regulator Co.
North Andover, MA 01845 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • BURKE, Joseph Michael
    Deerfield, NH New Hampshire 03037 (US)
  • AlMesad, Yousef S.
    Boston, MA Massachusetts 02115 (US)

(74)Representative: Reitstötter Kinzebach 
Patentanwälte Sternwartstrasse 4
81679 München
81679 München (DE)

  


(54)FLUID DISCHARGE EVENT DETECTOR


(57) A fluid discharge event detection apparatus measures a change in capacitance to detect the presence of a fluid in a sensing conduit where the presence of fluid indicates a discharge event. The apparatus includes a first conduit, the sensing conduit and a control valve, coupled between the first conduit and the sensing conduit. The control valve is configured to activate and fluidly couple the first conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the first conduit. A sensor, configured to measure a capacitance value, is disposed about the sensing conduit. A controller, coupled to the sensor, is configured to detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value and assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.




Description

Related Applications



[0001] This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 62/755,857, entitled "Detector For Sensing Fluid Leak Without Obstructing Flow," filed November 5, 2018, the entire contents of which is hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes.

Field of the Invention



[0002] The subject disclosure relates to sensing a fluid discharge, such as water, from, for example, a tank via a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. More particularly, a device including a capacitive sensor that detects a change in capacitance indicating there has been a fluid discharge by the valve, e.g., fluid drips and flowing fluid. In addition, the device detects fluid flow without obstructing the flow of fluid and that provides an indication of such discharge.

Background of the Invention



[0003] Generally, the ability to release fluid is designed in to many fluid systems for reasons including, for example, safety and contamination prevention. In one application, if the internal thermostat of a hot water heater becomes defective, the water can be heated to a temperature far exceeding the boiling point of 212 °F. At this high temperature, there is the potential that this superheated water rapidly becomes steam and the pressure within the tank can increase beyond a point that the tank can withstand and, therefore, presents a risk of exploding. To put the potential danger in perspective, a 30 gallon water heater tank can explode with the same force as one pound of dynamite, which would destroy most of a house. As a result, hot water heaters are provided with T&P relief valves.

[0004] Once installed, the T&P relief valve is normally closed and opens in the event of excess pressure or temperature to relieve the potentially dangerous situation. When the valve opens, water from the hot water heater is expelled via a drain tube. In some applications there is a floor drain, however, in most there is not. The amount of water expelled is dependent on the type of condition that caused the relief event such that, at times, the water can be a slow drip whereas, at other times, the released water is fully flowing. It is desirable to sense for any discharged water and to provide an alert or alarm in order to provide faster repair service or minimize any water damage.

[0005] Additional examples of fluid systems that may leak water are shown in U.S. Patents 7,753,071 and 10,127,790. Such systems may create an occasional ejection of some water or even the release of a significant amount of water.

[0006] The codes and regulations relevant to boiler and pressure vessel operation require that "no reducing coupling or other restriction shall be installed in the discharge line" for T&P valves. Accordingly, there is a need for sensing fluid discharge while not violating applicable codes.

Summary



[0007] One aspect of the present disclosure is directed to a fluid discharge event detection apparatus comprising: a first conduit; a sensing conduit; a control valve, coupled between the first conduit and the sensing conduit, configured to activate and fluidly couple the first conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the first conduit; and a sensor disposed about the sensing conduit. In addition, a controller, coupled to the sensor, is configured to: measure a capacitance value of the sensing conduit; detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.

[0008] A controller further configured to: detect a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and distinguish between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit may be provided in combination with the preceding features.

[0009] A control valve configured to activate when at least one of: a pressure within the first conduit that is not within a predetermined range of pressure values is detected; and a temperature within the first conduit that is not within a predetermined range of temperature values is detected may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features.

[0010] Another aspect of the present disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting a fluid discharge event, comprising: a sensing conduit having a first end configured to couple to a discharge conduit; a sensor disposed about the sensing conduit; and a controller, coupled to the sensor. The controller is configured to: measure a capacitance value of the sensing conduit; detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.

[0011] A controller further configured to: detect a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and distinguish between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition of a source of the fluid within the sensing conduit as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features.

[0012] A sensor comprising an electrically conductive material may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features.

[0013] A sensing conduit consisting of an electrically non-conductive material may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features.

[0014] A control valve, coupled between the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit, configured to activate and fluidly couple the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the discharge conduit may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features.

[0015] Yet another aspect of the present disclosure is directed to a method of detecting a fluid discharge event, comprising: coupling a first end of a sensing conduit to a discharge conduit; disposing a sensor about the sensing conduit; measuring, with the sensor, a capacitance value of the sensing conduit; detecting a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and asserting an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.

[0016] The detecting method can further comprise: detecting a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and distinguishing between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition of a source of the fluid within the sensing conduit as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit.

[0017] Coupling a fluid within the discharge conduit to ground may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features of the detecting method.

[0018] Coupling a control valve between the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit, the control valve configured to activate and fluidly couple the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the discharge conduit may be provided in combination with any of the preceding features of the detecting method.

Brief Description Of The Drawings



[0019] The various features and advantages of the present invention may be more readily understood with reference to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate like structural elements, and in which:

Figure 1 is a fluid discharge detection assembly in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure coupled to a known water heater;

Figure 2 is a block diagram of a fluid discharge detection assembly in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure;

Figure 3 shows an exemplary embodiment of a fluid discharge detection assembly in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure;

Figure 4 is a conceptual representation of the operation of the fluid discharge detection assembly in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure;

Figure 5 is a graph representing capacitance values versus time detected during a cyclic fluid discharge event occurring when a T&P valve releases fluid;

Figure 6 is a graph representing capacitance values versus time detected during another cyclic fluid discharge event occurring when a T&P valve releases fluid;

Figure 7A is a fluid discharge event detection apparatus in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure;

Figure 7B is a partial cutaway view of the fluid discharge event detection apparatus of Figure 7A;

Figure 7C is another view of the fluid discharge event detection apparatus in Figures 7A and 7B;

Figures 8A - 8D show an additional exemplary embodiment of a fluid discharge event detection apparatus in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure for attachment to either a T&P relief valve or a discharge pipe;

Figures 9A - 9D show another exemplary embodiment of a fluid discharge event detection apparatus constructed in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure for attachment to either a T&P relief valve or a discharge pipe; and

Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view of a T&P valve.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0020] This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 62/755,857, entitled "Detector For Sensing Fluid Leak Without Obstructing Flow," filed November 5, 2018, the entire contents of which is hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes.

[0021] Aspects of the present disclosure, as described below, use capacitance measurement technology to detect a fluid discharge and/or fluid flow without obstructing the flowpath and can be applied in T&P relief or other applications where fluid is discharged in order to provide relief. The advantages, and other features of the technology disclosed herein, will become more readily apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art from the following detailed description of certain embodiments taken in conjunction with the drawings which set forth representative embodiments of the present technology and wherein like reference numerals identify similar structural elements. Directional indications such as upward, downward, right, left and the like are used with respect to the figures and not meant in a limiting manner.

[0022] In brief, the subject technology relates to any assembly that may leak fluid, for example, water, whether by design or expected failure, so that upon leakage or improper flow, notification of the flowing or dripping condition without obstructing the flow path is performed. For example, such a device may be a backflow prevention device like a vented backflow preventer, a water shutoff assembly for a flood detection device, a water heater and the like.

[0023] One non-limiting example of an aspect of the present disclosure will be discussed with respect to Figure 1. As shown in Figure 1, a hot water heater 100, as is known, includes a cold water inlet 105 that feeds cold water to a tank 110. The water is heated in the tank 110 and provided via a hot water outlet 115. A T&P relief valve 120 connects to the tank 110 and, as known, operates to release fluid and, thereby, prevents pressure from building up. When the relief valve 120 releases water, the released water is carried away in a discharge pipe 125, oftentimes, to a drain in the floor.

[0024] In accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, a fluid detection assembly 130 is coupled to the discharge pipe 125. The fluid detection assembly 130 is configured to detect water that may be flowing or present within the discharge pipe 125 where the presence of water is indicative of an over temperature or over pressure condition, as will be described below in more detail.

[0025] In an alternative aspect of the present disclosure, as will be discussed below, the fluid detection assembly 130 and the relief valve 120 can be incorporated into a single unit. Advantageously, in any arrangement, no portion of the fluid detection assembly 130, or any portion or component thereof, is placed in the flow path of the discharge pipe 125 in order to avoid the possibility of obstructing fluid flow.

[0026] Referring now to Figure 10, the T&P relief valve 120 includes a body 140 having a first conduit 142 that connects to the water heater 110, and a second conduit 144 that connects to the discharge pipe 125. A valve member 146 is biased into a closed position by a compression spring 150 to prevent flow between the first conduit 142 and the second conduit 144. An expandable thermal actuator 160 is secured in the first conduit 142 so that a first end 162 engages the valve member 146 and a second end 164 extends into the water heater 110. The T&P relief valve 120 also includes a handle 152 connected to the valve member 146. When the pressure within the water heater 110 exceeds a predetermined level, the pressure at the first conduit 142 overcomes the compression spring 150 to move the valve member 146 and allow water to escape through the second conduit 144. Likewise, when temperature within the water heater 110 exceeds a predetermined level, the thermal actuator 160 expands and overcomes the compression spring 150 to move the valve member 146 and allow water to escape through the second conduit 144. The handle 152 can be used to manually test the T&P relief valve 120 by moving the valve member 146 to open the valve.

[0027] Referring now to Figure 2, the fluid detection assembly 130 includes a sensor electrode 205 operative to generate a signal indicative of the presence of water or fluid in the discharge pipe 125. The sensor electrode 205 will be described in more detail below. The fluid detection assembly 130 also includes a controller 210 coupled to the sensor electrode 205 by an operative connection 215 such as, but not limited to, a wire. As such, the controller 210 receives a signal generated by the sensor electrode 205 for processing, as will be described below. The controller 210 can include: a processing unit 220, for example, a micro-controller such as an Arduino controller, memory 225, an I/O device 230, analog circuitry 235 including miscellaneous electrical components such as resistors, capacitors and the like to interface the sensor electrode 205 to the processing unit 220 , a power source 240, e.g., a battery, or power connector to receive external power, all connected to one another by a bus 245 and all mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB), not shown. The controller 210 is configured to store, process and output data indicative of whether or not fluid is detected in the discharge pipe 125. An Arduino controller is an open-source hardware and software project and user community that designs and manufactures single-board microcontrollers and microcontroller kits for building digital and interactive devices that can sense and control objects in the analog and digital domains.

[0028] Referring to Figure 3, in one non-limiting example, the sensor electrode 205 is positioned around the discharge pipe 125 but is not within the discharge pipe 125 and, therefore, is never in contact with any fluid that might be within. Accordingly, the sensor electrode 205 can be encapsulated or insulated by a wall portion 305 of the discharge pipe 125, i.e., placed within the material of the discharge pipe 125. The sensor electrode 205 can be a circular ring, or portion of a ring, that surrounds the discharge pipe 125. The sensor electrode 205 may be made from copper or any suitable metal or material.

[0029] The sensor electrode 205 can comprise any conductive material wrapped around the discharge pipe 125 that is made of a material with a low dielectric constant. The materials are selected to create as large as a difference between the dielectric constant of the sensor electrode 205 and the discharge pipe 125. Air has a dielectric constant, for most purposes, of one, whereas water is closer to 80, while most plastics are generally no higher than five.

[0030] Capacitive sensing technology is known and applied in many common applications, e.g., smartphone touch screens, proximity detection devices and keyboards. Capacitive sensors utilize Gauss' law for electricity:



[0031] For two parallel plates, this simplifies down to:


where:

C= capacitance (farads)

k= relative permittivity of material between two plates (unitless)

εo permittivity of space (8.854*10-12 F/m)

d= separation between two parallel plates (m)



[0032] Accordingly, with a fixed sensor area, the following parameters will affect the RC time constant producing a reading: a distance between the sensor and the target object/ground electrode; a dielectric constant of the target object; and an area of the target object.

[0033] In operation, as discussed below, the fluid detection assembly 130 continuously, i.e., periodically, measures a capacitance value of the discharge pipe 125 with the sensor 205. A change in the measured capacitance value, e.g., greater than a predetermined threshold value or outside a predetermined range of values, may be indicative of fluid in the discharge pipe 125 as the measured capacitance is a function of an amount of fluid within the discharge pipe 125.

[0034] Referring to Figure 4, the time constant in the sensor/discharge pipe combination 205/115 in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, is analogous to that in an RC circuit, and will be the resistance of the line multiplied by the combined capacitance. The sensor electrode 205 forms a capacitance with the surrounding ground and its size and shape will affect the flux field orientation, and the sensing distance. The surrounding ground could be a ground plate, the surrounding structure/plumbing or a target object. It should be noted that in most residential water supply systems, the piping through which the water flows is coupled to ground and, therefore, the water is also coupled to ground. In operation, the capacitor is cyclically charged and the discharge time is constantly recorded or stored, i.e., how long the capacitor takes to discharge, which is representative of the capacitance. As the measured capacitance for a "dry" discharge pipe 125 will be different from a "wet" discharge pipe 125, the presence of fluid, specifically, water, can be detected.

[0035] The circuit consists of a capacitor and a resistor connected in parallel, both going to ground. The processing unit 220 cyclically switches between send and receive states, while measuring the time it takes for discharge. The sensitivity can be adjusted as necessary by altering the resistance, changing the discharge time for a given capacitance and altering what the clock can and cannot pickup. The maximum distance sensed and the amounts of discharge cycles that occur per unit time are inversely proportional.

[0036] Figure 5 is a graph of the capacitance reading of the sensor electrode 205 through five cycles where a T&P valve releases fluid into the discharge pipe 125 to relieve an over-pressure condition. Figure 6 is a graph of the capacitance measured by the sensor electrode 205 in which a ramp response 605 from a flow increase due, in this example, to an over-temperature condition, can be seen. Once full flow 610 occurs, the capacitance value is essentially constant. As the flow returns to no flow 615, i.e., the T&P valve closes, the capacitance returns to the lower no flow reading 615.

[0037] Referring to the graphs in Figures 5 and 6, it is clear that the sensor assembly of the present disclosure can detect an initial leak event that is occurring. It has been observed that, during this initial time, the relief valve produces a stream of fluid that engulfs under a quarter of the inner surface area of the discharge tube 125. As the release event continues, however, the flow increases and fluctuates until it develops into a full flow covering most of the inner surface are of the discharge tube 125. Advantageously, the fluid detection assembly generates three readings: no flow, some flow, i.e., the first continuous stream, and full flow, i.e., a full discharge state.

[0038] It should be noted that the release event presented in Figure 6 is an over-temperature event, which is believed to present the changing capacitance as a ramp input onto the sensor electrode 205. In contrast, the over-pressure event shown in Figure 5 presents like a step input. The rise time during a pressure relief event is minimal as the seat of the T&P valve would reach its full open position very quickly. Even with a relatively fast closure of the relief valve, there is a drip region as the water leaves the valve. This difference can be utilized in a feedback mechanism to control either the pressure or the temperature response.

[0039] Furthermore, this difference in the rate of change allows for aspects of the present disclosure to be used to diagnose other parts of the water system, for example, the thermal expansion tank. Accordingly, for example, if a thermal expansion tank has a ruptured bladder that causes the T&P valve to open under pressure, and this is occurring cyclically, that could be indicative of an expansion tank problem.

[0040] Referring now to Figures 7A-7C, a fluid discharge event detection apparatus 700 in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure comprises a housing 702, a first conduit 705, a second, sensing conduit 710 and a control valve 715, coupled between the first conduit 705 and the sensing conduit 710. The control valve 715 is configured to activate and fluidly couple the first conduit 705 and the sensing conduit 710 to one another when the control valve 715 detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the first conduit 705. The valve 715 can be, for example, a T&P valve 120 and can include a thermal actuator 716 similar to the thermal actuator 164 as described above. A sensor electrode 720 is disposed about the sensing conduit 710 and a controller 725 is coupled to the sensor electrode 720.

[0041] As set forth above, the controller 725 is configured to: measure a capacitance value of the sensing conduit 710; detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.

[0042] The sensing conduit 710 can be coupled to an extension pipe and the first conduit 705 can be coupled to, for example, a hot water heater tank; a boiler; a backflow relief valve; a fire sprinkler apparatus or the like.

[0043] Referring now to Figures 8A - 8D, an exemplary embodiment of an apparatus 800 for detecting a fluid discharge event in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure is presented. The apparatus 800 is configured for attachment to either a T&P relief valve or its discharge pipe via a conduit 810. This embodiment includes a sensor electrode 820 integrated into a housing 825 that also encloses a controller 830 as set forth above.

[0044] Another fluid discharge event detector 900 is shown in Figures 9A - 9D in accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure for attachment to either a T&P relief valve or its discharge pipe. Similar to the detector 800 shown in Figures 8A - 8D, this embodiment includes a housing 905 with a sensor electrode 920, and a controller 930 as set forth above. As can be seen, the housing 905 includes a threaded nipple 935 for coupling into a fluid system. The housing 905, of course, may include any desired coupling as may be needed for a particular application.

[0045] For all of the sensor electrodes discussed herein, a larger sensor will allow for a higher resolution. The device can only pick up the capacitance via the time delay, and the added capacitance of the water will create a comparable time delay regardless of the capacitance of the sensor. That being said, the device only needs to be designed so that the SNR is adequate for the desired application; i.e., a 1 inch length of metal for the T&P valve is more than sufficient, and likewise can be said for the 2 inch application.

[0046] In one aspect of the disclosure, sensor assemblies in accordance with the subject technology can be powered by a battery and/or have the option to be wired to a power source.

[0047] The fluid detection assembly may include wired and/or wireless communications to notify of leaks and full discharge.

[0048] It will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the pertinent art that the functions of several elements may, in alternative embodiments, be carried out by fewer elements, or a single element. Similarly, in some embodiments, any functional element may perform fewer, or different, operations than those described with respect to the illustrated embodiment. Also, functional elements (e.g., modules, databases, interfaces, computers, servers and the like) shown as distinct for purposes of illustration may be incorporated within other functional elements in a particular implementation.

[0049] While the subject technology has been described with respect to various embodiments, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that various changes and/or modifications can be made to the subject technology without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the claims as set forth herein.


Claims

1. A fluid discharge event detection apparatus, comprising:

a first conduit;

a sensing conduit;

a control valve, coupled between the first conduit and the sensing conduit, configured to activate and fluidly couple the first conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the first conduit;

a sensor disposed about the sensing conduit; and

a controller, coupled to the sensor, configured to:

measure a capacitance value of the sensing conduit;

detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and

assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.


 
2. The fluid discharge event detection apparatus of claim 1, wherein the controller is further configured to:

detect a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and

distinguish between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit.


 
3. The fluid discharge event detection apparatus of any one of claims 1 and 2, wherein the control valve is configured to activate when at least one of:

a pressure within the first conduit that is not within a predetermined range of pressure values is detected; and

a temperature within the first conduit that is not within a predetermined range of temperature values is detected.


 
4. The fluid discharge event detection apparatus of any one of claims 1 - 3, wherein the sensor comprises an electrically conductive material.
 
5. The fluid discharge event detection apparatus of any one of claims 1 - 4, wherein the sensing conduit consists of an electrically non-conductive material.
 
6. An apparatus for detecting a fluid discharge event, comprising:

a sensing conduit having a first end configured to couple to a discharge conduit;

a sensor disposed about the sensing conduit; and

a controller, coupled to the sensor, configured to:

measure a capacitance value of the sensing conduit;

detect a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and

assert an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.


 
7. The fluid discharge detecting apparatus of claim 6, wherein the controller is further configured to:

detect a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and

distinguish between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition of a source of the fluid within the sensing conduit as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit.


 
8. The fluid discharge detecting apparatus of claim 7, wherein the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit is a function of a flow rate of fluid within the sensing conduit.
 
9. The fluid discharge detecting apparatus of any one of claims 6 - 8, wherein the sensing conduit consists of an electrically non-conductive material.
 
10. The fluid discharge detecting apparatus of any one of claims 6 - 9, further comprising:
a control valve, coupled between the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit, configured to activate and fluidly couple the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the discharge conduit.
 
11. A method of detecting a fluid discharge event, comprising:

coupling a first end of a sensing conduit to a discharge conduit;

disposing a sensor about the sensing conduit;

measuring, with the sensor, a capacitance value of the sensing conduit;

detecting a change in the sensing conduit capacitance value; and

asserting an alarm condition upon detection of the change in the sensing conduit capacitance value.


 
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising:

detecting a rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit; and

distinguishing between an excess temperature condition and an excess pressure condition of a source of the fluid within the sensing conduit as a function of the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit.


 
13. The method of any one of claims 11 and 12, further comprising:
coupling a fluid within the discharge conduit to ground.
 
14. The method of any one of claims 11 - 13, further comprising:
coupling a control valve between the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit, the control valve configured to activate and fluidly couple the discharge conduit and the sensing conduit to one another when the control valve detects at least one predetermined condition of a fluid within the discharge conduit.
 
15. The method of any one of claims 12 - 14, wherein the detected rate of change of the capacitance value of the sensing conduit is a function of a flow rate of the fluid within the sensing conduit.
 




Drawing









































REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description