(19)
(11)EP 3 654 123 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
20.05.2020 Bulletin 2020/21

(21)Application number: 18206305.7

(22)Date of filing:  14.11.2018
(51)Int. Cl.: 
G05B 19/418  (2006.01)
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(71)Applicant: ABB Schweiz AG
5400 Baden (CH)

(72)Inventors:
  • BRAUN, Roland
    53859 Niederkassel Lülsdorf (DE)
  • MENDOZA CERVANTES, Francisco
    69198 Schriesheim (DE)
  • SCHULZ, Dirk
    67149 Meckenheim (DE)
  • KOZIOLEK, Heiko
    76227 Karlsruhe (DE)
  • BURGER, Andreas
    76356 Weingarten (DE)

(74)Representative: Kietzmann, Lutz 
Maiwald Patentanwalts- und Rechtsanwaltsgesellschaft mbH Grünstraße 25
40213 Düsseldorf
40213 Düsseldorf (DE)

  


(54)METHOD OF COMISSIONING A FIELD IN AN INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM NETWORK


(57) The present invention relates to a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network, the method comprising:
connecting a field device to an industrial system network;
providing, information about the field device, the information comprising functional information for the field device;
utilizing the functional information for the field device to retrieve information relating to a role of the field device in an automation application;
utilizing capability information relating to the field device type and the information relating to the role of the field device in the automation application to retrieve a parameter set for the field device for operation in the automation application; and downloading the parameter set to the field device.




Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION



[0001] The present invention relates to a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION



[0002] The commissioning of field devices in industrial system networks requires manual intervention that leads to errors, and costs time and effort.

[0003] There is a need to address this issue.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0004] Therefore, it would be advantageous to have means to reduce or remove manual intervention for the commissioning of field devices in an industrial system network. The object of the present invention is solved with the subject matter of the independent claims, wherein further embodiments are incorporated in the dependent claims.

[0005] In an aspect, there is provided a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network. The method comprises:

a) connecting a field device to an industrial system network;

c) providing, information about the field device, the information comprising functional information for the field device;

d) utilizing the functional information for the field device to retrieve information relating to a role of the field device in an automation application;

f) utilizing capability information relating to the field device type and the information relating to the role of the field device in the automation application to retrieve a parameter set for the field device for operation in the automation application; and

g) downloading the parameter set to the field device.



[0006] In an example, the functional information for the field device comprises an identity of the field device.

[0007] In an example, the identity of the field device is inferred from the industrial system network.

[0008] In an example, the identity of the field device is determined from one or more of: a location of the field device in the industrial system network; an identity of one or more devices that are neighbours to the field device; human input.

[0009] In an example, the functional information for the field device comprises at least one capability of the field device

[0010] In an example, step c) comprises providing by the field device the information about the device.

[0011] In an example, the method comprises step b), providing the field device with an address.

[0012] In an example, the address is a network address.

[0013] In an example, step b) comprises collecting meta data for the field device and for at least a part of the industrial system network in order to generate the address that is then provided to the field device.

[0014] In this manner, a DNS name can be generated and provided to the field device, that incorporates application related semantics into a station name of the field device. Thus, using a field device (DNS) name helps operators to retrieve / identify devices more efficiently and easily.

[0015] In an example, the method comprises step e), utilising the information about the field device, provided by the field device, to retrieve at least some of the capability information.

[0016] In an example, the at least some of the capability information is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0017] In an example, in step c) the information about the field device provided by the field device comprises at least some of the capability information.

[0018] In an example, in step d) the information relating to the role of the field device is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0019] In an example, in step f) the parameter set is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0020] In an example, the parameter set comprises data relating to a different device of the same device type.

[0021] In an example, the method comprises mapping the parameter set to the field device.

[0022] In an example, the mapping comprises a process of converting at least some of the data of the parameter set.

[0023] In this way, a parameter set can be for an older device of the same device family, and this older parameter set can be mapped to the newer field device, involving if necessary some data conversion. In this manner, device replacement is simplified.

[0024] In an example, the method comprises step h), implementing a browsing process to match a controller to the field device, the matching comprising utilization of control related functionality for the field device.

[0025] In an example, the control related functionality comes from an information model implemented in the field device.

[0026] In an example, the control related functionality for the field device is comprised within the functional information provided by the device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0027] Exemplary embodiments will be described in the following with reference to the following drawings:

Fig. 1 shows a detailed static view of an architecture implementing an example of a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network;

Fig. 2 shows a detailed example of device discovery and parametrization (UML interaction Diagram) within an example of a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network;

Fig. 3 shows a detailed example of signal matching (UML interaction Diagram) within an example of a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network;

Figs. 4-5 show detailed examples of the deployment of components to hardware nodes within an example of a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network;

Fig. 6 depicts an excerpt of the OPC UA address space of the device OPC UA server; and

Fig. 7 shows an exemplar control flow diagram of HMI service.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS



[0028] Figs. 1-7 relate to a method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network. The method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network comprises:

a) connecting a field device to an industrial system network;

c) providing, information about the field device, the information comprising functional information for the field device;

d) utilizing the functional information for the field device to retrieve information relating to a role of the field device in an automation application;

f) utilizing capability information relating to the field device type and the information relating to the role of the field device in the automation application to retrieve a parameter set for the field device for operation in the automation application; and

g) downloading the parameter set to the field device.



[0029] According to an example, the functional information for the field device comprises an identity of the field device.

[0030] According to an example, the identity of the field device is inferred from the industrial system network.

[0031] According to an example, the identity of the field device is determined from one or more of: a location of the field device in the industrial system network; an identity of one or more devices that are neighbours to the field device; human input.

[0032] According to an example, the functional information for the field device comprises at least one capability of the field device

[0033] According to an example, step c) comprises providing by the field device the information about the device.

[0034] According to an example, the method comprises step b), providing the field device with an address.

[0035] According to an example, the address is a network address.

[0036] According to an example, step b) comprises collecting meta data for the field device and for at least a part of the industrial system network to generate the address that is then provided to the field device.

[0037] According to an example, the method comprises step e), utilising the information about the field device, provided by the field device, to retrieve at least some of the capability information.

[0038] According to an example, the at least some of the capability information is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0039] According to an example, in step c) the information about the field device provided by the field device comprises at least some of the capability information.

[0040] According to an example, in step d) the information relating to the role of the field device is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0041] According to an example, in step f) the parameter set is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.

[0042] According to an example, the parameter set comprises data relating to a different device of the same device type.

[0043] According to an example, the method comprises mapping the parameter set to the field device.

[0044] According to an example, the mapping comprises a process of converting at least some of the data of the parameter set.

[0045] According to an example, the method comprises step h), implementing a browsing process to match a controller to the field device, the matching comprising utilization of control related functionality for the field device.

[0046] According to an example, the control related functionality comes from an information model implemented in the field device.

[0047] According to an example, the control related functionality for the field device is comprised within the functional information provided by the device.

[0048] Continuing with the figures, a plug and produce system implementing the method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network is shown and is now described in detail.
Fig. 1 depicts a static view of the reference architecture, which focuses on ANSI/ISA-95 level 2 and 1. Controllers and field devices communicate via OPC UA over Ethernet both for commissioning and operation. Existing field buses and analog connections may be included by having an IO gateway node that arbitrates between the different networks. With the OPC UA servers, controllers and field devices become IIoT devices, which can be accessed from the internet if desired by the plant owner and are capable of self-description.

[0049] Specifically, Fig. 1 shows a Controller OPC UA Server that stores control logic programs and controller status information. There is also a Device OPC UA Server providing data and services for the connected field devices. While classical client/server connections manage the self-commissioning of controllers and field devices, the cyclic, real-time communication for closed-loop control is supported by OPC UA publish/subscribe connections (IEC 62541-14).
With TSN-enabled network switches, a deterministic real-time control loop becomes possible. The publish/subscribe communication can either be broker-based (e.g., via AMQP or MQTT) or broker-less. In the latter case, publishers send data sets to multicast IP addresses via UDP, to which subscribers listen. Using lower-level network protocols IGMP or MMRP, network traffic can be reduced, so that the network switches only forward network packets for which a subscriber has been registered.

[0050] For discovery of connected OPC UA servers, the reference architecture suggests an OPC UA Controller Local Discovery server and a Device Local Discovery server according to IEC 62541-12. Resource-constrained devices can alternatively use Multicast DNS (mDNS) instead of local discovery servers, which is for example also implemented by Apple Bonjour or Spotify Connect. mDNS can use DNS SRV records to advertise discovery URLs for OPC UA servers to clients.

[0051] A controller in the reference architecture provides an IEC 61131 Runtime that can execute PLCopen control logic programs (R5). It can import PLCopen-compliant control logic from the Engineering Repository via the Controller OPC UA Server. The control logic exposes function blocks that require connected input signals, e.g., from a sensor such as a level indicator. The control algorithm then computes output values, e.g., for an actuator such as a valve for a heat exchanger. Control algorithms run cyclically, e.g., every 100 ms, and for special applications even every 1 ms. The 61131 Runtime is decoupled from the actual field device and can run on different deployment targets.

[0052] OPC UA servers expose information about field devices in the reference architecture. Such a server may run on a dedicated network node or directly on a field device, if it has appropriate CPU capability and memory. On a dedicated node such as an IO gateway, the server may manage data and services for numerous field devices. The Field Device is connected to the OPC UA server via a Communication Channel. This may encapsulate fieldbus or analog communication, in which case it needs to be configured appropriately.

[0053] The Device Management is responsible for supplying a Communication Channel with drivers and the field device with a parameterization. It gets the driver from a Public Device Driver Repository, e.g., from specific vendors or other organizations. For example, the Fieldcom Group is in the process of setting up such a server for FDI Device Packages. Parameterization can rely on imported engineering data, and if necessary for fine tuning also be altered via user input from OPC UA clients. To get a device running with basic features, the imported engineering data is however sufficient. The Device Management uploads the parameterization to the field device.

[0054] Finally, the architecture contains a Plug and Produce Service that looks for connected controllers and handles the signal matching with field devices. It has a built-in OPC UA client to retrieve required signal names from the controller and to browse OPC UA servers for field devices for the matching signal names. It is aware of different semantic standards, such as OPC UA for Devices, IEC 61987, or NAMUR NE131, which aids in executing the signal matching. It may be deployed for example on an Industrial PC or a controller.

[0055] The device parametrization follows the procedure in Fig. 2. First, the Device OPC UA Server optionally scans its connected Communication Channels, in case the field device is connected via an additional network connection. Otherwise, this step can be omitted. Then, it announces itself on the network, which gets picked up by the Device Management component.

[0056] The Device Management retrieves the device IDs of the connected field devices, which may be composed of manufacturer name, product type id, and serial number (cf. IEC 62541-100).

[0057] If the Device OPC UA Server does not supply an ID or if the supplied ID is unknown or of an unknown format for the Device Management, it can try to infer the device identity from contextual information. The Device Management may for example analyze the network address of the device and determine surrounding devices in the same subnet. If these devices are known to the Device Management, and the Engineering Repository includes specification of devices in the same area that are not yet found on the network, it can predict which device has been connected. The device may also carry other information, e.g., geolocation, known properties of device type characteristics, or references to other device, which may help to infer its identity. If the Device Management cannot determine the device identity with any of the described methods, it can query a human user for input and thus retrieve the device ID.

[0058] Using the IDs, it queries the Public Device Driver Repository for device drivers and the Engineering Repository parameterization data. If the device has no meaningful host name, the Device Management can generate such a name by incorporating information from the device's OPC UA server. The Engineering Repository may contain parameterization data for an older type of the device, for example in case a device has be replaced with a newer version. In this case, the Engineering Repository can provide a mechanism that allows mapping parameters from one device type to another device type, if the devices belong to the same family or at least have a significant overlap of functionality. The mapping may involve altering parameter names, changing the parameter types (e.g., convert 32-bit encoding to 64-bit encoding), and even changing parameter values (e.g., converting a predefined parameter value range to another range).

[0059] It uploads the information to the OPC UA server, which forwards it to the actual field devices. Finally, the OPC UA server updates its contents and signals its readiness to the Device Management. After this update process, the field device is readily parameterized.

[0060] Now, signal matching can start as shown in Fig. 3. The Plug and Produce Service constantly searches for Controller OPC UA servers connected to the network. It connects to such servers and retrieves a list of the input and output signals required for the execution of the configured control logic programs. Then, the service connects to any Device OPC UA servers that are already connected or are being connected during plant commissioning.

[0061] The Plug and Produce Service browses the OPC UA server's address space and tries to find a matching tag name for the configured device. It then searches for PLCopen function blocks with a specification of input signals (mainly for actuators) and output signals (mainly for sensors). Once found, it attempts to find a match with the signal names from the controller. In case the controller and the device use different signal names, since they have been configured independently, matching may also rely on other information, such as the physical location and network configuration in the OPC UA address space.

[0062] In case of a match, the Plug and Produce Service sets up a subscription of the controller to the output signals. This can either be an OPC UA client/server connection, which then requires handling a client session on the Device OPC UA server, or it can be an OPC UA publish / subscribe connection via multicast UDP/IP or a broker. For fast cyclic control, the Controller OPC UA Server may bypass writing the signal values into its address space, but instead directly forward them to the 61131 Runtime for calculating the control logic outputs.

[0063] After setting up the subscription, the Plug and Produce Service disconnects from the Device OPC UA server, and sets a flag in the Controller OPC UA server to query a human engineer for final approval. The found configuration can be relayed to the engineer, who can perform a final checkup, before actually starting the process.

[0064] The deployment of the components to hardware nodes is flexible and allows addressing different application contexts and resource constraints. Fig. 4 and 5 show two different variants, with Fig. 4 showing a classical set up (UML Deployment Diagram), and with Fig. 5 showing a set up with Intelligent Field Devices (UML Deployment Diagram).

[0065] The classical deployment in Fig. 4 features a controller device, an IO gateway with connected field devices, and a device management server. The latter also hosts the Plug and Produce Service, which can then serve different controllers and IO gateways connected to the Ethernet network link. The benefit of this deployment is investment protection. It does not require IIoT-enabled field devices, as the IO gateway manages the required IIoT communication. Existing installations with fieldbuses or analog connections can be updated with small additions to the hardware.

[0066] The deployment with intelligent IIoT field devices (Fig. 5) does not include an IO gateway device. Field devices have sufficient computing power and memory, and network interfaces to host their own OPC UA servers and expose them on the Ethernet network link. As a deployment variant, the controller device hosts the Plug and Produce Service and thus becomes a self-contained autonomous agent with the ability to configure itself given network access.

[0067] Many other forms of deployment are conceivable, e.g., hosting the 61131 runtime on a powerful actuator, a plant-side server, or on cloud platforms. These deployments depend on the specific application context, business constraints, and available hardware.

[0068] Fig. 6 depicts an excerpt of the OPC UA address space of the Device OPC UA server. The address space follows the OPC UA for Devices specification and contains a DeviceSet in its object tree. The included IoTDevice is a special CtrlConfiguration according to PLCopen and also a Device itself. Thus, it exposes important identification information, such as serial number, manufacturer and required communication protocols.

[0069] As suggested by this reference architecture, the IoTDevice contains a special function block that exposes its input and output variables, which is normally only prescribed for controllers. This function block on the device is independent of any application or control function running on top of it. The Plug and Produce Service uses this information to match the signal names from the controllers.

[0070] The following provides further information on specifics of the method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network.

PnP Service Specifications



[0071] The following section specifies different services of the Plug-and-Produce Service (PnPService) from Fig. 1, which are used to fulfill the plug-and-produce functionality. The services are described with the focus that the reader of this document should be able to implement them. For each service, a detailed description is given and the service's in- and outputs. Additionally to some core services, also provided is a pseudo code abstraction of the implementation created.

FindServers



[0072] The findServers functionality allows identifying OPC UA server available in the network and make them accessible for further processing within the PnPService.

[0073] The findServers service returns the servers known to a server or a discovery server. The detailed behavior of Discovery Servers is described in detail for example in the paper by L. Durkop et al, Using OPC-UA for the Autoconfiguration of real-time Ethernet Systems, In Industrial Informatics (INDIN), July 2013 11th IEEE International Conference pp 248-253. Additionally, if, for example, resource constraints within a device exist, the same behavior can be implemented by using the multicast DNS (mDNS) protocol. The PnPService uses discovery methods to identify all available OPC UA servers within the network in order to support the self-commissioning step. Hence, the PnPService also filters the already exploited OPC UA servers in order to avoid a double processing of devices.
The mDNS version of this service needs no specific parameters.

Browse



[0074] The PnP Service provides a browse functionality to scan through an OPC UA information model and check for signals, which can be matched to each other.

[0075] The browse service analyzes the information model of the discovered OPC UA servers. Once the findServers service identified an OPC UA endpoint, the browse service starts to connect to this server and browse its information model. Thereby the service starts for browsing of types, which are inherited by PLCopen [3] types. Once they are identified, they are stored by the service for the second stage of the browsing process. In this second stage the browse service looks for instances of the collect PLCopen types. During the two-staged browsing process, the service follows only hierarchically references of the information model by using the depth-first-search algorithm (DFS). At each node, the browse service calls the match service to look for possible matches between identified signals of the control logic and potential in- and output signals of the browsed device. By using this match service, the browse service can be used also for non-PLCopen conform information models. The following pseudo code snippet visualize the functionality of the browse service. It also includes the match service call for each node.


Parameters



[0076] In:
  • the ID of the current node
  • a list of matching rules which should be applied during the browse process
  • Integer which indicates the browse direction, following the OPC UA specification for references


[0077] Out:
  • positive matched nodes are stored in a global list

Match



[0078] This service matches two signals to each other as long they fulfill the matching criteria described in a so-called matching rule object.
The match service is used to identify which input signal of a device fits to an output signal of the control logic and vice versa. The service itself can only be used together with the browse service. It cannot be invoked by itself. Hence so-called matching rule objects needs to be implemented and added to the browse service. These matching rule objects check at each node if the in/out signals may fit to a signal of the control logic. If they fit, due to the specification of the matching rule objects, the PnPService will take care of it, and subscribe to the necessary multicast address to start publishing the signal within a specific multicast group.

Parameters



[0079] In:
  • the ID of the current node
  • pointer to an OPC UA client instance to get if necessary more information from the current node


[0080] Out:
  • a Boolean indicating a positive or a negative matching result

MatchingRule



[0081] A matching rule is an object, which inherits from a base class and provides the functionality to match two given signals as Nodelds to each other.
The matching rule concept allows for easily extending the PnPService with different business logic for matching signals of a controller and a device. Due to that, this is not a clear service of the PnPService but a core functionality to keep the PnPService flexible and easily extensible. The following pseudo code shows the structure of the base class and its functionality, which needs to be implemented by derived objects.



These matching objects are used in the match service to identify which nodes/signals should be matched to each other. A match indicates to subscribe or publish this value stored within the node depending on the type of the signal (in- or output signal).

AddNodes



[0082] The addNodes service is designed for adding a propriety signal structure to the controller storing necessary information for matching the in- and output signals. This structure is not necessary if the controller supports PLCopen.
The addNodes services enables to add nodes to the information model during runtime. The PnPService uses this functionality to support controllers or devices that are not PLCopen conform. These devices are supported by adding a specific node structure to the information model, storing details about their in- and output signals, datatype, and endpoint information. Afterwards, the PnPService uses this data to realize the matching between two signals.

Parameters



[0083] In:
  • A list of nodes to add to the information model
  • Endpoint url


[0084] Out:
  • Status flag

Run



[0085] This subsection describes the runtime functionality of the PnPService.
At start up, the PnP Service updates its matching table. This means the PnP Service retrieves all in- and output signals from the controller to provide input for the match service. During runtime, the PnP Service itself is organized in different states. Most of these states are set internally for example to check if a new device that was not explored before is available (state_new_device_is_available). Nevertheless, some of them are set externally, especially from other functionalities of the PnP Service like the replacement functionality (state_matching_mode). While the PnP Service is in the matching mode, it waits for a new device, which was not browsed before.

[0086] The communication between its discovery server listener is done via a message queue. Once a new endpoint is received, the PnP Service updates the signal matching table, which contains signals from the controller and already matched signals from the devices to the controller. If not all signals are matched, the PnP Service calls the browse service. If after such a browse process all signals are matched, the PnP Service will no longer try to match signals even a new device will be available. The pseudo code below will give a rough understanding of the process flow of the PnP Service.




HMI



[0087] Fig. 7 shows control flow of HMI service. In the demonstrator implementation, the PnPService provides a simple command line interface (CLI). The CLI is used to trigger the different services/functionalities of the PnPService

[0088] In general, the control flow of the HMI service is separated in two parts: commissioning and device replacement. The commissioning phase begins directly after startup. In this phase, the PnPService waits for new devices announced by the discovery server/functionality. Therefore, the user presses "I" to listen for new devices. Once a new device shows up, the PnPService browses the device and uses the match service for identifying possible signals to be matched. If a signal is matched and not all signals of the controller are matched yet, the HMI jumps back to the state for listening for new devices. If all signals are matched, the PnPService shows a matching table and asks for a validation of this table. If the user presses "ok", the PnPService will trigger the controller and all other devices to start production. In the other case the matching result may be flawed, such that a manual fix of the signal matching is necessary.

[0089] The second part of the HMI service is the announcement of a device replacement. This functionality is triggered by pressing "r" during the production state. After that, the PnPService lists all devices which can be replaced. The user needs to choose the device from the list. In the next step an affected by analysis will be done by the PnPService and presented to the user. Based on this analysis the PnPService ask for a confirmation to replace this device and set all affected by devices in simulation mode. Now the device, which should be replaced, can be unplugged and the new device plugged in. Doing that, the PnPService jumps back to listening, identifying the new device, starting to browse it, and matching the new signals to the unmatched signals in the controller. Once more, the matching table is presented and needs to be validated by the user.


Claims

1. A method of commissioning a field device in an industrial system network, the method comprising:

a) connecting a field device to an industrial system network;

c) providing, information about the field device, the information comprising functional information for the field device;

d) utilizing the functional information for the field device to retrieve information relating to a role of the field device in an automation application;

f) utilizing capability information relating to the field device type and the information relating to the role of the field device in the automation application to retrieve a parameter set for the field device for operation in the automation application; and

g) downloading the parameter set to the field device.


 
2. Method according to claim 1, wherein the functional information for the field device comprises an identity of the field device.
 
3. Method according to claim 2, wherein the identity of the field device is inferred from the industrial system network.
 
4. Method according to any of claims 2-3, wherein the identity of the field device is determined from one or more of: a location of the field device in the industrial system network; an identity of one or more devices that are neighbours to the field device; human input.
 
5. Method according to any of claims 1-4, wherein the functional information for the field device comprises at least one capability of the field device
 
6. Method according to any of claims 1-5, wherein step c) comprises providing by the field device the information about the device.
 
7. Method according to any of claims 1-6, comprising step b), providing the field device with an address.
 
8. Method according to claim 7, wherein the address is a network address.
 
9. Method according to any of claims 7-8, wherein step b) comprises collecting meta data for the field device and for at least a part of the industrial system network to generate the address that is then provided to the field device.
 
10. Method according to any of claims 1-9, comprising step e), utilising the information about the field device, provided by the field device, to retrieve at least some of the capability information.
 
11. Method according to claim 10, wherein the at least some of the capability information is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.
 
12. Method according to any of claims 1-11, wherein in step c) the information about the field device provided by the field device comprises at least some of the capability information.
 
13. Method according to any of claims 1-12, wherein in step d) the information relating to the role of the field device is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.
 
14. Method according to any of claims 1-13, wherein in step f) the parameter set is retrieved from a server separate to the field device.
 
15. Method according to claim 14, wherein the parameter set comprises data relating to a different device of the same device type.
 
16. Method according to any of claims 14-15, wherein the method comprises mapping the parameter set to the field device.
 
17. Method according to claim 16, wherein the mapping comprises a process of converting at least some of the data of the parameter set.
 
18. Method according to any of claims 1-17, comprising step h), implementing a browsing process to match a controller to the field device, the matching comprising utilization of control related functionality for the field device.
 
19. Method according to claim 18, wherein the control related functionality comes from an information model implemented in the field device.
 
20. Method according to any of claims 18-19, wherein the control related functionality for the field device is comprised within the functional information provided by the device.
 




Drawing
































REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Non-patent literature cited in the description