(19)
(11)EP 3 693 423 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION
published in accordance with Art. 153(4) EPC

(43)Date of publication:
12.08.2020 Bulletin 2020/33

(21)Application number: 18864177.3

(22)Date of filing:  21.09.2018
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
C09D 201/00(2006.01)
C09D 5/10(2006.01)
C23C 26/00(2006.01)
C09D 5/08(2006.01)
C09D 7/61(2018.01)
(86)International application number:
PCT/JP2018/035158
(87)International publication number:
WO 2019/069724 (11.04.2019 Gazette  2019/15)
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(30)Priority: 06.10.2017 JP 2017196291
25.01.2018 WO PCT/JP2018/002344

(71)Applicants:
  • Kyoto Materials Co., Ltd.
    Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 615-8245 (JP)
  • Nagase & Co., Ltd.
    Osaka 550-8668 (JP)

(72)Inventors:
  • YAMASHITA, Masato
    Kyoto-shi Kyoto 615-8245 (JP)
  • KUWANO, Satoshi
    Osaka-shi Osaka 530-8270 (JP)
  • ITOKAWA, Atsushi
    Osaka-shi Osaka 530-8270 (JP)
  • NANJO, Shinichiro
    Osaka-shi Osaka 530-8270 (JP)
  • YANAGI, Shogo
    Osaka-shi Osaka 530-8270 (JP)

(74)Representative: Winter, Brandl, Fürniss, Hübner, Röss, Kaiser, Polte - Partnerschaft mbB 
Patent- und Rechtsanwaltskanzlei Alois-Steinecker-Straße 22
85354 Freising
85354 Freising (DE)

  


(54)REACTIVE COATING MATERIAL FOR STEEL MATERIAL PROVIDING HIGH CORROSION RESISTANCE


(57) Provided is a coating material including barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and a metal sulfate, wherein a soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C.




Description

Technical Field



[0001] The present invention relates to a reactive coating material for a steel material providing high corrosion resistance, and a coating film and a protective film, each obtained using the same. The present invention more specifically relates to a coating material for enhancing corrosion resistance of a steel material by application to a steel material, a steel material covered with a rust layer due to oxidation·corrosion, or a steel material covered with an organic layer or an inorganic layer (hereinafter sometimes collectively simply referred to as a steel material), and a coating film and a protective film. Further, the steel material mentioned herein also encompasses a steel material coated with zinc, aluminum or an alloy (hereinafter referred to as a plated metal) having the same as a main component (hereinafter referred to as a plated steel material).

Background Art



[0002] It is generally known that when an oxide layer having a high environmental barrier property is formed on a surface of steel, corrosion resistance of the steel is improved. For example, stainless steel forms a passive film which is an oxide layer having a high environmental barrier property, thereby exhibiting high corrosion resistance. However, the stainless steel has many restrictions in uses for structures and machines for reasons that it is expensive; also has problems in terms of corrosion resistance such as occurrence of pitting corrosion due to being a high-alloy steel, and the like; and has deterioration in mechanical properties such as strength, toughness, and the like, as compared with a low-alloy steel; and others reasons.

[0003] In addition, weather-resistant steel obtained by the addition of a small amount of an element such as P, Cu, Cr, Ni, and the like is a low-alloy steel which can form rust that is protective against corrosion (protective rust) with the progress of corrosion when placed outside, thus to improve corrosion resistance of the steel in the atmosphere, and is thus capable of reducing a necessity for an anti-corrosion treatment operation such as subsequent coating and the like. However, there were problems in that it took as long a period of time as approximately ten years or longer for the weather-resistant steel before formation of the protective rust; floating rust or flowing rust of red rust, yellow rust, or the like occurred due to corrosion at an initial stage in the above period of time, which was not only unfavorable in appearance but also caused remarkable damages such as a decrease in a plate thickness due to corrosion, and the like. In particular, in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides, protective rust was not even formed and sufficient corrosion resistance was not secured in some cases. In order to solve the problems, for example, in Patent Literature 1, a surface treatment method in which a phosphate film is formed on a steel material has been proposed.

[0004] On the other hand, examples of a general means for securing the corrosion resistance of a steel material include coating of a surface of a steel material. However, the coating cannot prevent the progress of corrosion resulting from deterioration of a coating film or defects of the coating film even in an ordinary corrosive environment, and only slows down the progress of corrosion. For example, there is a coating means exhibiting an high anti-corrosion property, such as a zinc-rich primer, a zinc-rich paint, or the like using a sacrificial anti-corrosion action with zinc dust, but this can only exert the effect restrictively in a relatively short period of time, and thus, the progress of corrosion resulting from deterioration of the coating film or defects of the coating film cannot be essentially prevented. In addition, in a case where a content of zinc dust is increased or the coating film is thickened in an attempt to increase the sacrificial anti-corrosion effect, remarkable damages in adhesiveness to or workability with a steel material are resulted. With regard to such problems, Patent Literature 2 discloses that corrosion resistance can be improved by a treatment in which an inorganic zinc-rich paint is applied onto a steel material and a solution including a Mg compound is applied onto a surface of the coating film.

[0005] In addition, in Patent Literatures 3 and 4, a coating material to be applied onto a steel material is disclosed. The coating material disclosed in these literatures is different from the above-mentioned coating materials which cannot prevent the progress of corrosion resulting from deterioration of a coating film or defects of the coating film. With a steel material having a film formed from the coating material provided on the surface, an oxide layer having corrosion resistance is formed early at an interface between the film and the steel material, as accompanied with a corrosion reaction of the steel material after forming the film, and thus, the corrosion resistance of the steel material can be obtained with the oxide layer.

Citation List


Patent Literature



[0006] 

Patent Literature 1: Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication No. H1-142088

Patent Literature 2: Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication No. 2017-35877

Patent Literature 3: Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication No. 2001-234369

Patent Literature 4: International Publication WO 2014/020665


Summary of Invention


Technical Problem



[0007] However, by the surface treatment method disclosed in Patent Literature 1, sufficient corrosion resistance could be not obtained, and the method was not compatible with an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides although it was compatible with an ordinary corrosive environment. In addition, it was necessary to perform a separate pretreatment before the formation of a phosphate film, and thus, the treatment process was complicated. Furthermore, a number of rust-stabilizing auxiliary treatment materials for use in the same surface treatment method have been developed, but these were essentially intended to assist an anti-corrosion function of a low-alloy steel and were not compatible with an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides.

[0008] Moreover, also with regard to the treatment disclosed in Patent Literature 2, an improvement ratio in the corrosion resistance improvement relative to non-treatment is only approximately three times at most, and it could not be said that the treatment provided sufficient corrosion resistance in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides although it could be said that the treatment was compatible with an ordinary corrosive environment.

[0009] Furthermore, such a zinc-rich paint is intended to be applied onto a surface of a clean steel material obtained by application of shot blasting or the like, and does not exhibit a high anti-corrosion property when applied to a steel material covered with a rust layer due to oxidation.corrosion.

[0010] The oxide layer formed at the interface between the film and the steel material disclosed in Patent Literatures 3 and 4 exhibited high corrosion resistance and was sufficiently compatible with an ordinary corrosive environment, but it could not be said that the oxide layer was sufficiently compatible with an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides.

[0011] The present invention has been made in view of the circumstances, and has an object to provide a coating material capable of providing high corrosion resistance for a steel material and the like in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides, and a coating film and a protective film, each obtained using the same.

Solution to Problem



[0012] The present invention provides a coating material comprising barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and a metal sulfate, wherein a soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C. With regard to a steel material and the like having the coating material applied thereon, the components of the coating material react with the steel material and the substances in the corrosive environment to form an anti-corrosion compound layer, thereby providing high corrosion resistance in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides.

[0013] A total content of barium oxide and barium hydroxide is preferably 0.05% to 50.0% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content of barium oxide and the like within the above range, there is a tendency that it is possible to obtain good adhesion of the coating film to the steel material and a high anti-corrosion property of the anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0014] The content of the metal sulfate is preferably 0.05% to 30.0% by mass with respect to a total solid content of the coating material. There is a tendency that it is possible to obtain a high anti-corrosion property of the anti-corrosion compound layer while suppressing a release of the coating film from the steel material. The metal sulfates can contain at least one selected from the group consisting of magnesium sulfate, aluminum sulfate, nickel sulfate, iron sulfate, cobalt sulfate, copper sulfate, zinc sulfate, tin sulfate, and chromium sulfate.

[0015] The coating material preferably further include calcium oxide and/or calcium hydroxide, and a total content of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide is preferably 30.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. With the coating material, the anti-corrosion compound layer becomes denser, and thus, there is a tendency that it is possible to obtain a higher anti-corrosion property.

[0016] The coating material preferably further includes phosphoric acid, and a content of phosphoric acid is preferably 10.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. With the coating material, there is a tendency that it is possible to improve the environmental barrier property of the anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0017] The coating material preferably further includes at least one metal powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum powder, zinc powder, and alloy powder containing aluminum and zinc, and a content of the metal powder is preferably 80.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. With the coating material, there is a tendency that it is possible to further improve the corrosion resistance of the anti-corrosion compound layer by forming a composite oxide or a sacrificial anti-corrosion action.

[0018] The present invention further provides a coating film including barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and a metal sulfate, wherein a soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C. By providing the coating film on a surface of the steel material and the like, it is possible to provide a high corrosion resistance for the steel material and the like in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides.

[0019] The present invention further provides a protective film which includes the coating film and a topcoating film arranged on the coating film, in which the topcoating film includes at least one layer of (A) to (C) below. With the protective film, it becomes possible to further improve the corrosion resistance of the steel material.
  1. (A) A layer which has a moisture permeability of 300 g/(m2·24 h) or less at a dry film thickness of 100 µm.
  2. (B) A layer which contains at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide; and does not contain a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C or contains the metal sulfate so that a ratio of the total mass of the metal sulfate to the total mass of the compound is 5.0% by mass or less.
  3. (C) A layer which contains a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C; and does not contain at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide or contains the compound so that a ratio of the total mass of the compound to the total mass of the metal sulfate is 5.0% by mass or less.


[0020] The topcoating film preferably includes the layer of (B) and the layer of (C), and more preferably includes all the layers of (A) to (C). With this configuration, it is possible to prevent excessive corrosion before the formation of an anti-corrosion compound layer while exerting an effect of making the anti-corrosion compound layer firm.

[0021] Furthermore, the metal sulfate in the layer of (C) preferably exhibits a pH of 5.5 or less in an aqueous solution thereof at a temperature 5°C and a concentration of 1 mol/L. In addition, the metal sulfate preferably contains at least one selected from the group consisting of aluminum sulfate, iron sulfate (II), iron sulfate (III), copper sulfate, and chromium sulfate (III). With this configuration, sulfuric acid is easily supplied to the coating film side and a firm anti-corrosion compound layer can be more easily obtained.

Advantageous Effects of Invention



[0022] According to the present invention, it is possible to provide a coating material capable of providing high corrosion resistance for a steel material and the like in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides, and a coating film and a protective film, each obtained using the same.

Brief Description of Drawings



[0023] FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view illustrating a coated steel material and a corrosion-resistant steel structure, each obtained using a coating material according to an embodiment of the present invention,

FIG. 1(a) illustrates a steel material 10, FIG. 1(b) illustrates a coated steel material 100 having the steel material 10 and a coating film 20 on a surface of the steel material 10, and FIG. 1(c) illustrates a corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 having an anti-corrosion compound layer 30 formed between the steel material 10 and the coating film 20.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view illustrating a coated steel material and a corrosion-resistant steel structure, each obtained using a coating material according to another embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 2(a) illustrates a plated steel material 14, FIG. 2(b) illustrates a coated steel material 100 having the plated steel material 14 and a coating film 20 on a surface of the plated steel material 14, and FIG. 2(c) illustrates a corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 having an anti-corrosion compound layer 30 formed between the plated steel material 14 and the coating film 20.


Description of Embodiments



[0024] Hereinafter, preferred embodiments of the present invention will be described.

[Coating Material]



[0025] The coating material according to the present embodiment is a reactive coating material for a steel material, and includes barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and a metal sulfate.

[0026] If the steel material is placed in a corrosive environment, a compound layer of an oxide referred to as so-called rust, and the like is produced by a corrosion reaction on the surface. If the compound layer is stable, dense, and anti-corrosive, the corrosion resistance of the steel material is secured, but if there is a high possibility that the compound layer causes a phase change, a density of the compound layer is low due to inclusion of a void and the like, and thus, penetration of water, oxygen, and various corrosive substances present in an external corrosive environment onto the surface of an underlying metal cannot be sufficiently suppressed.

[0027] With regard to a steel material having a coating film formed thereon (coated steel material) by applying the coating material according to the present embodiment, in an initial stage where the coated steel material is exposed to a corrosive environment, ions of metals such as iron and the like are supplied from the steel material, and a barium ion, a sulfate ion, a metal ion, and the like are supplied from the coating film, by means of water, oxygen, and various corrosive substances supplied by penetration through the coating film from the environment, so as to form an anti-corrosion compound layer including a composite oxide of a metal such as iron, barium, and the like, and a sulfate of a metal such as barium and the like between the steel material and the coating film or within the coating film.

[0028] An anti-corrosion compound layer obtained with the coating material of the present embodiment is dense and has high stability. The anti-corrosion compound layer thus produced can suppress excessive penetration of water, oxygen, and various corrosive substances present in the external corrosive environment into the steel material (barrier effect). The steel material having the anti-corrosion compound layer formed thereon (corrosion-resistant steel structure) has excellent corrosion resistance in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides. Therefore, the coating material according to the present embodiment can also be said to be a coating material for forming an anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0029] Moreover, the coating material according to the present embodiment can also be used after being mixed with a common coating material different from the coating material according to the present embodiment, for example, an epoxy resin coating material or the like. An effect obtained by using the coating material according to the present embodiment is necessarily exerted and cannot be impeded even in a case of mixing the coating material according to the present embodiment with a common coating material different from the coating material. In addition, an efficacy exerted by the components in the coating material according to the present embodiment cannot be impeded even in a case where the components and the other common coating material are mixed.

[0030] Hereinafter, the respective components included in the coating material according to the present embodiment will be described, and further, the behaviors of the respective components in the coating film when the coating material is applied onto the steel material and exposed to a corrosive atmosphere, and effects associated therewith will be described in detail.

(Barium Oxide and Barium Hydroxide)



[0031] Barium oxide and barium hydroxide react with water in a corrosive environment to supply barium ions. The barium ions become a part of crystal-constituting ions in an atomic sequence constituting the crystals of iron oxide in a process for producing iron oxide produced in the corrosion reaction of the steel material, thereby producing a compound including barium (a composite oxide including iron and barium). Here, since the ion radius of the barium ion is sufficiently larger than the ion radius of the iron ion, the crystal particle diameter of the composite oxide thus produced becomes extremely smaller, and therefore, its cohesiveness is improved and the anti-corrosion compound layer can be densified.

[0032] Since the anti-corrosion compound layer further including a barium ion has energetically higher stability, it has high resistance to oxidation and reduction and also exhibits strong cation-selective permeability, and therefore, it is possible to suppress the permeation of corrosive anions. In this case, since the ion radius of the barium ion is sufficiently larger than the ion radius of the iron ion, the difference in the ion radius can give a significant strain to the oxide crystal, and thus, can inhibit the rearrangement of atoms constituting the crystal. For this reason, the anti-corrosion compound layer including a barium ion also has an effect of remarkably increasing the thermodynamic stability of the oxide. The effect attained by the barium ion is significantly larger, as compared with a case of other ions having an ion radius which is not sufficiently larger than the iron ion, for example, a calcium ion.

[0033] Moreover, the barium ion reacts with a sulfate ion which is produced by dissociation from a metal sulfate which will be described later, thereby producing barium sulfate which is remarkably sparingly soluble in water. It is also possible to improve the corrosion resistance of the anti-corrosion compound layer by the formation of the barium sulfate, and for example, it is possible to suppress intrusion of air pollutants such as SOx and the like in a corrosive environment. The same effect can also be obtained from barium carbonate produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide barium ions in the air. Further, barium ions can enhance the thermodynamic stability of the anti-corrosion compound layer by forming a composite oxide with a metal ion produced by dissociation of metal sulfate, and thus, can make it difficult for oxidation and reduction of the anti-corrosion compound layer from proceeding. As described above, by incorporating barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide into the coating material, it is possible to obtain an anti-corrosion compound layer having a particularly high anti-corrosion function in a severe corrosive environment.

[0034] A total content of barium oxide and barium hydroxide can be, for example, 0.05 to 50.0% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content to 0.05% by mass or more, the above-mentioned effect attained by barium oxide and barium hydroxide can be easily obtained. Further, by setting the content to 50.0% by mass or less, the adhesiveness of the coating film to the steel material can be easily obtained. From the same viewpoint, the total content is preferably 0.1 to 50.0% by mass, more preferably 1.0 to 30.0% by mass, and still more preferably 10.0 to 25.0% by mass. In addition, from the viewpoint of setting a viscosity of the coating material at the time of applying the steel material and the like within a preferable range, it is preferable that the content is 1.0 to 10.0% by mass.

(Metal Sulfate)



[0035] The metal sulfate included in the coating material according to the present embodiment is water-soluble and the soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C. Therefore, in a typical atmospheric corrosive environment, even in the winter season when the temperature is low, dissociation of the metal sulfate can occur when moisture is supplied by rainfall or condensation. That is, the metal sulfate is dissociated into a metal ion and a sulfate ion at predetermined concentrations when water is supplied. The dissociated sulfate ion accelerates the dissolution of iron in the steel material at an initial stage of exposure to a corrosive environment, contributes to early formation of an anti-corrosion compound layer, and also enhances the thermodynamic stability of iron oxide thus produced, whereby it is possible to suppress the iron oxide from acting as an oxidizing agent when further exposed to a corrosive environment after the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer. In addition, the sulfate ion reacts with a barium ion dissociated from barium oxide or barium hydroxide as described above to produce a sulfate of barium which is extremely sparingly soluble in water. The barium sulfate thus produced fills voids of the anti-corrosion compound layer to densify the layer, whereby it is possible to improve the anti-corrosion property of the anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0036] In addition, the dissociated metal ion is adsorbed onto the anti-corrosion compound layer while forming a complex ion with a coexisting anion to give ion-selective permeability to the anti-corrosion compound layer, thereby providing an effect of suppressing the permeation of the corrosive anion into the steel material, and also produces an oxide of the metal ion, thereby providing an effect of enhancing an environmental barrier effect of the anti-corrosion compound layer. In addition, the dissociated sulfate ion forms a sulfate with the barium ion supplied from barium oxide or barium hydroxide, thereby providing the anti-corrosion effect as described above.

[0037] Examples of the metal sulfates include magnesium sulfate, aluminum sulfate, nickel sulfate, iron sulfate, cobalt sulfate, copper sulfate, zinc sulfate, tin sulfate, chromium sulfate, and the like. The metal sulfate is preferably at least one compound selected from the group consisting of aluminum sulfate, nickel sulfate, and magnesium sulfate.

[0038] A content of the metal sulfate can be, for example, 0.05 to 30.0% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content to 0.05% by mass or more, the above-mentioned effect attained by the metal sulfate can be easily obtained. By setting the content to 30.0% by mass or less, it is possible to suppress the coating film from being fragile and thus from being released before obtaining the effects of the present invention. However, if the coating film design that can avoid such a release of the coating film is separately realized, it is also possible to further increase the content. From the same viewpoint, the content is preferably 1.5 to of 25.0% by mass, and more preferably 6.0 to 20.0% by mass. Further, a ratio of the content of the metal sulfate to the total content of barium oxide and barium hydroxide (Content of metal sulfate/Content of barium oxide and the like) is, for example, 0.1 to 300.0, preferably 0.3 to 15.0, and more preferably 0.5 to 5.0.

(Calcium Oxide and Calcium Hydroxide)



[0039] The coating material according to the present embodiment may further include calcium oxide and/or calcium hydroxide. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide in the coating film react with water in a corrosive environment to supply calcium ions. The calcium ion can further improve the effect attained by the barium ion by being adsorbed on iron oxide to make the crystal particle diameter smaller when the barium ion becomes a composite oxide including iron and barium to form a fine and dense anti-corrosion compound layer. Further, the calcium ion reacts with the sulfate ion in the same manner as the barium ion to produce calcium sulfate which is sparingly soluble in water. This calcium sulfate can fill voids of the anti-corrosion compound layer to further densify the anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0040] A total content of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide can be, for example, 30.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content to 30.0% by mass or less, it becomes difficult to inhibit the barium ion from being an ion constituting the anti-corrosion compound layer crystal. The content is preferably 0.1 to 30.0% by mass, more preferably 1.0 to 25.0% by mass, and still more preferably 5.0 to 20.0% by mass.

(Phosphoric Acid)



[0041] The coating material according to the present embodiment may further include phosphoric acid. The phosphoric acid has an effect of improving the adhesiveness between the coating film and the steel material. Further, the phosphoric acid in the coating film is dissociated into a hydrogen ion and a phosphate ion when being in contact with moisture. In a process in which barium oxide or barium hydroxide makes iron oxide finer, it is possible to produce iron phosphate by a reaction of phosphoric acid with an iron ion eluted from the steel material to further densify the anti-corrosion compound layer. In addition, the dissociated phosphate ion reacts with the barium ion to produce barium phosphate which is sparingly soluble in water, and in a case where the coating material further includes calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide, it produces calcium phosphate which is sparingly soluble in water, and thus, it is possible to improve the environmental barrier property of the anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0042] The content of phosphoric acid can be, for example, 10.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content to 10.0% by mass or less, the densification of the anti-corrosion compound layer with barium oxide or barium hydroxide becomes predominant over the production of iron phosphate of the anti-corrosion compound layer, and thus, it is possible to suppress the corrosion of the steel material upon initial exposure to a corrosive environment from being accelerated unnecessarily. The content is preferably 0.3 to 10.0% by mass, more preferably 0.6 to 10.0% by mass, and still more preferably 1.0 to 10.0% by mass.

(Metal Powder)



[0043] The coating material according to the present embodiment may further include at least one metal powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum powder, zinc powder, and alloy powder containing aluminum and zinc. The constituent elements of the metal powder may be the same as the constituent elements of the plated metal used for the plating of the steel material. By incorporating the metal powder into the coating material, it is possible for the metal powder in the coating film to assist the sacrificial anti-corrosion action of a plated metal in a plated steel material or the like in which the plated metal is already worn due to corrosion or the like.

[0044] Furthermore, the metal powder in the coating film is ionized by a corrosion reaction to supply a metal ion. Incidentally, the supplied metal ion is oxidized with a barium ion and an iron ion to form an anti-corrosion composite oxide, which contributes to the formation of an anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0045] The content of the metal powder can be, for example, 80.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content to 80.0% by mass or less, it is possible to suppress the occurrence of a release of the coating film from the steel material at an early stage before the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer. In addition, if the coating film design that can avoid the release of the coating film is separately realized, the content of the metal powder may be more than 80% by mass.

(Resin)



[0046] The coating material according to the present embodiment may further include a resin. The resin is not particularly limited and examples thereof include vinyl butyral resins (a polyvinyl butyral resin and the like), epoxy resins, modified epoxy resins, acrylic resins, urethane resins, nitrocellulose resins, vinyl resins (polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, and the like), phthalic acid resins, melamine resins, fluorine resins, and the like. Such a resin may be either a thermoplastic resin or a thermosetting resin. In a case where the resin is the thermosetting resin, the coating material can further include a curing agent as necessary, and typically, the coating material is cured during or after drying. The weight average molecular weight of the thermosetting resin is not particularly limited, but is approximately 200 to 20,000. Further, the weight average molecular weight of the thermoplastic resin is also not particularly limited, but is approximately 10,000 to 5,000,000. By incorporating the resin into the coating material, the respective components in the coating material are easily retained near a surface of the steel material after the coating material is applied on the surface of the steel material. Accordingly, an action effect attained by the coating material according to the present embodiment can be more easily obtained by suppressing the respective components in the coating material from flowing out to the outside with rainfall, condensation, or the like before the formation of an anti-corrosion compound layer.

[0047] The lower limit value of a content of the resin in the coating material may be, for example, 3.0% by mass, 5.0% by mass, 10.0% by mass, or 20% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content of the resin to 3.0% by mass or more, there is a tendency that the respective components in the coating material are easily retained near a surface of the steel material until the anti-corrosion compound layer is formed on the steel material. The upper limit value of the content of the resin in the coating material may be, for example, 95.0% by mass, 90.0% by mass, 70.0% by mass, or 50.0% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material. By setting the content of the resin to 95.0% by mass or less, there is a tendency that an anti-corrosion compound layer is easily formed on the steel material.

(Other Components)



[0048] The coating material according to the present embodiment can include other additives such as a common coloring pigment, an extender pigment, an anti-rust pigment, and a special functional pigment as well as a thixotropy-imparting agent, a dispersant, an antioxidant, and the like, as necessary. The coating material may include the anti-rust pigment in order to control the corrosion resistance in a case where the corrosive environment is severe, but a content of the anti-rust pigment can be 30.0% by mass or less, and may be 20.0% by mass or less, or 10.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material in order not to impart excessive corrosion resistance to a corrosion-resistant steel structure. In the present embodiment, an average particle diameter of the particulate materials included in the coating material can be 100 µm or less, and is preferably 30 µm or less.

(Solvent)



[0049] The coating material according to the present embodiment can further include a solvent. Examples of the solvent include non-aqueous solvents, such as aromatic solvents such as xylene, toluene, and the like, alcoholic solvents having 3 or more carbon atoms, such as, isopropyl alcohol, normal butanol, and the like, ester-based solvents such as ethyl acetate, and the like, and others; and aqueous solvents such as water, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, and the like. In addition, the resin can be a resin which is soluble in the solvent, or may be either a resin which is soluble in the non-aqueous solvent or a resin which is soluble in the aqueous solvent.

[0050] In the present specification, a viscosity of the coating material is measured by a Brookfield viscometer at 20°C. The viscosity of the coating material is suitably selected depending on an application method, but can be, for example, 200 to 1,000 cps. A content of the solvent in the coating material can be adjusted so that the viscosity of the coating material falls within the above range.

[Coated Steel material and Corrosion-Resistant Steel Structure]



[0051] FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view illustrating a coated steel material according to an embodiment of the present invention and a corrosion-resistant steel structure, each obtained using a coating material, FIG. 1(a) illustrates a steel material 10, FIG. 1(b) illustrates a coated steel material 100 having the steel material 10 and a coating film 20 arranged on a surface of the steel material 10, and FIG. 1(c) illustrates a corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 having an anti-corrosion compound layer 30 formed between the steel material 10 and the coating film 20.

[0052] The type of a steel of the steel material 10 illustrated in FIG. 1(a) is not particularly limited and may be a common steel material, a low-alloy steel material, a high-alloy steel material such as stainless steel and the like, or a special steel material. The steel material may not have a rust layer, or an organic layer or inorganic layer on the surface, and may have a rust layer, or an organic layer or inorganic layer on the surface.

[0053] Incidentally, a surface of the steel material 10 may be polished with shot blasting, an electric tool, or the like before application, and in a case where a rust layer is formed on the surface, rust which can easily removed with a wire brush or the like may be removed. In addition, in a case where the steel material has a rust layer, or an organic layer or inorganic layer on the surface, the layer need not be released, and the coating film may be provided on a surface of the steel material including the layer.

[0054] The coated steel material 100 having the coating film 20 in FIG. 1(b) can be obtained by applying the coating material onto a surface of the steel material 10 prepared in (a), and drying the coating material, as necessary . Accordingly, the composition of the coating film 20 can be substantially the same as the composition of the solid content in the coating material. That is, the coating film 20 includes barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and a metal sulfate. In the coating film 20, the soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C.

[0055] Examples of a method for applying the coating material include air spraying, air-less spraying, brush application, roller application, and the like. Further, the drying of the coating material is performed, for example, by natural drying in the air at normal temperature (25°C) and under normal pressure (1 atm), or the like. The drying time varies depending on a drying mode, but is typically from 30 minutes to 6 hours and selected to an extent to attain practical coating film strength. By the application method, the coating material can be applied onto any of places. In addition, since the coating film can be obtained by a single applying operation, the application method is excellent also in economic efficiency. Furthermore, since the application can be performed at a site where the coated steel material is installed, the application method is available to the application even after processing such as cutting, welding, and the like of the steel material on site. The coating film 20 can also be formed by applying the coating material once or may also be formed by applying the coating material a plurality of times. In a case where the coating film 20 is formed by repeatedly applying the coating material a plurality of times, the compositions of the coating materials may be the same as or different from each other.

[0056] A thickness of the coating film 20 can be 1 to 1,000 µm. By setting the thickness of the coating film 20 to 1 µm or more, the respective components in the coating material are sufficiently retained on the steel material, whereby when the coated steel material is exposed to a corrosive environment, there is a tendency that only the corrosion of the steel material does not precede the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 excessively. Accordingly, a sufficient barrier effect can be easily obtained with respect to the steel material by the anti-corrosion compound layer 30. In particular, even in an environment with air-borne sea-salt particles, there is a tendency that the excessive corrosion due to penetration of the chloride ion is prevented, and thus, the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 can be formed. Further, by setting the thickness of the coating film to 1,000 µm or less, it is not only economically advantageous, but also the coating film 20 can be suppressed from being cracked or released from a surface of the steel material in a case where a bending moment is generated in the coating film due to a stress generated in the underlying steel material by some influence, or other cases. The lower limit value of the thickness of the coating film 20 may be 3 µm, 5 µm, or 10 µm. The upper limit value of the thickness of the coating film 20 may be 750 µm or 500 µm.

[0057] Moreover, after the coating film 20 is formed, one or two or more layers of a topcoating film may be further formed on a surface of the coating film 20. The topcoating film preferably includes at least one layer of (A) to (C) below, more preferably includes any two or more layers of (A) to (C) below, still more preferably includes the layer of (B) below and the layer of (C) of below, and particularly preferably includes all of the layers of (A) to (C) below. In the present specification, in a case where the topcoating film includes two or more layers, the layers may sometimes be referred to as a first topcoating film, a second topcoating film, a third topcoating film, and the like, in order from the side closer to the coating film. The order of arrangement of the layers of (A) to (C) below in the topcoating film is not particularly limited, but in a case where the topcoating film is formed of two or more layers including the layer of (A) below, the layer of (A) below is preferably a layer which is the farthest from the coating film 20 (a layer constituting the outermost surface of the topcoating film). In this case, a layer (for example, the first topcoating film) which is closer to the coating film 20 can be the layer of (B) below or the layer of (C) below. The topcoating film may further include another layer other than (A) to (C) below within a range not interfering with the effects that can be obtained in the present embodiment. In addition, the topcoating film may or may not be in direct contact with the coating film 20.
  1. (A) A layer which has a moisture permeability of 300 g/(m2·24 h) or less at a dry film thickness of 100 µm.
  2. (B) A layer which contains at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide; and does not contain a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C or contains the metal sulfate so that a ratio of the total mass of the metal sulfate to the total mass of the compound is 5.0% by mass or less.
  3. (C) A layer which contains a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C; and does not contain at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide or contains the compound so that a ratio of the total mass of the compound to the total mass of the metal sulfate is 5.0% by mass or less.


[0058] Hereinafter, the layers of (A) to (C) will be described in order. The layer of (A) is a layer which has a moisture permeability of 300 g/(m2·24 h) or less at a dry film thickness of 100 µm. The layer of (A) preferably has a moisture permeability of 200 g/(m2·24 h) or less at a dry film thickness of 100 µm. The moisture permeability indicates an amount of water vapor passing through a unit area of a membrane-like substance in a predetermined time, and is a value obtained by keeping one side of air and the other side of air, both separated by the membrane-like substance as a border line, at a relative humidity of 90% and in a dry state with a moisture absorbent, respectively, and converting the amount of water vapor passing through the border line within 24 hours to one per square meters. It is possible to provide design properties to a steel material and the like by forming a topcoating film such as the layer of (A), while it is possible to assist an anti-corrosion effect by an anti-corrosion compound layer to further improve the corrosion resistance of the steel material. In addition, the moisture permeability of the layer of (A) may be a moisture permeability of 20 g/(m2·24 h) or more at a dry film thickness of 100 µm. By setting the moisture permeability of the layer of (A) to 20 g/(m2·24 h) or more at a dry film thickness of 100 µm, the moisture required for the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer is easily early supplied between the steel material 10 and the coating film 20, and thus, an effect of providing corrosion resistance is easily exerted. Thus, by incorporating the layer of (A) into the topcoating film, it is possible to control the amount of water supplied to the coating film 20 while not depending on the external environment. However, the moisture permeability of the layer of (A) may be less than 20 g/(m2·24 h) at a dry film thickness of 100 µm. If the moisture permeability of the layer of (A) is small, the supply of moisture between the steel material 10 and the coating film 20 is reduced, and thus, it becomes difficult to form the anti-corrosion compound layer early. However, it is also possible to prevent early corrosion, elution, and reduction in the plate thickness due to moisture permeation at the same time. This is because in a case where the corrosion of the steel material 10 is sufficiently prevented by the layer of (A), the anti-corrosion compound layer does not necessarily need to be formed early.

[0059] A resin coating material for forming the layer of (A) can be a polyethylene resin, an epoxy resin, a polyvinyl butyral resin, a polyvinyl alcohol resin, a mixture thereof, or the like. The moisture permeability of the layer of (A) can be controlled within a desired range by selecting or mixing the resins for use in the resin coating material. For example, the moisture permeability of the polyethylene resin at a dry film thickness of 100 µm is about 5 to 20 g/(m2·24 h), the moisture permeability of the epoxy resin is about 20 to 40 g/(m2·24 h), the moisture permeability of the polyvinyl butyral resin is about 100 g to 200 g/(m2·24 h), and the moisture permeability of the polyvinyl alcohol resin is about 200 to 400 g/(m2·24 h).

[0060] A thickness of the layer of (A) is, for example, 10 to 100 µm, and is preferably 10 to 50 µm, and more preferably 10 to 30 µm. Further, in order to obtain the effect attained by the layer of (A), the thickness of the layer of (A) is preferably 5 µm or more, more preferably 10 µm or more, still more preferably 15 µm or more, and particularly preferably 20 µm or more. The thickness of the layer of (A) can be, for example, 1 mm or less, 500 µm or less, 300 µm or less, 100 µm or less, or the like from an economic viewpoint, but it is not particularly limited from the viewpoint of obtaining the effect attained by the layer of (A).

[0061] Next, the layer of (B) will be described. The layer (B) is a layer containing at least one compound (oxide or hydroxide) selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide. The layer of (B) is a layer which does not contain a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C or contains the metal sulfate so that a ratio of the total mass of the metal sulfate to the total mass of the compound is 5.0% by mass or less. In a case where the layer of (B) contains the metal sulfate, the ratio of the total mass of the metal sulfate to the total mass of the compound is preferably 1.0% by mass or less, and more preferably 0.1% by mass or less. By forming a topcoating film such as the layer of (B) on the coating film 20, an acid or a chloride ion which is a corrosive substance present in the external corrosive environment and the like and a compound such as barium oxide and the like included in the layer of (B) can react with each other to trap the corrosive substance in the layer of (B). From the viewpoint that the content of the compound such as barium oxide and the like in the layer of (B) is sufficiently large, as compared with the content of the metal sulfate in the layer (B), the compound such as barium oxide and the like does not react with an sulfate ion generated from the metal sulfate, and a function of trapping the corrosive substance from the outside can be sufficiently exerted. Therefore, it is possible to prevent an excessive corrosion reaction of the steel material from proceeding until forming the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 between the steel material 10 and the coating film 20 by reducing an amount of the corrosive substance passing through the topcoating film and reaching the coating film 20. The layer of (B) preferably contains two or more of at least one of barium oxide and barium hydroxide, at least one of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide, and at least one of strontium oxide and strontium hydroxide.

[0062] A total content of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide can be, for example, 1.0 to 70.0% by mass with respect to the total mass of the layer of (B). By setting the content to 1.0% by mass or more, the above-mentioned effect attained by the layer of (B) can be easily obtained. Further, by setting the content to 70.0% by mass or less, the adhesiveness of the coating film to the steel material can be easily obtained. From the same viewpoint, the total content is preferably 2.0 to 60.0% by mass, and more preferably 3.0 to 50.0% by mass. In addition, the total content of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide in the layer of (B) is preferably larger than the total content of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide in the coating film.

[0063] Specific examples of the metal sulfate in the layer of (B) include the same ones as the metal sulfate included in the coating material.

[0064] In the same manner to the coating material, the layer of (B) can further contain a resin, phosphoric acid, metal powder, other components, and the like within a range not interfering with the action effect attained by the layer of (B). A content of each of the materials may be the same as the content in the solid content (coating film) of the coating material. Further, the moisture permeability of the layer of (B) is not particularly limited. Accordingly, the layer of (B) may satisfy the requirements of the moisture permeability in the layer of (A). In this case, the layer of (B) may also serve the function of the layer of (A). However, the layer of (B) may not satisfy the requirements of (A). That is, (B) may be a layer which has a moisture permeability of more than 300 g/(m2·24 h) at a dry film thickness of 100 µm.

[0065] A thickness of the layer of (B) is, for example, 10 to 200 µm, and is preferably 10 to 100 µm, and more preferably 10 to 50 µm. Further, the thickness of the layer of (B) may be 15 to 30 µm.

[0066] Next, the layer of (C) will be described. The layer of (C) is a layer which contains a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C. The layer of (C) is also a layer which does not contain at least one compound (oxide or hydroxide) selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide, or contains the compound so that a ratio of the total mass of the compound to the total mass of the metal sulfate is 5.0% by mass or less. In a case where the layer of (C) contains the compound, a ratio of the total mass of the compound to the total mass of the metal sulfate is preferably 1.0% by mass or less, and more preferably 0.1% by mass or less. By forming a topcoating film such as the layer of (C) on the coating film 20, the metal sulfate is dissolved in water which has infiltrated into the layer of (C) to supply sulfuric acid to the coating film 20. This is because the content of the metal sulfate in the layer of (C) is sufficiently larger than the content of the compound such as barium oxide and the like, and in the layer of (C), a sulfate ion produced by the dissolution of the metal sulfate does not react with cations of barium, calcium, strontium, and the like, and is not trapped with the cations. The supplied sulfuric acid reacts with barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide, and the like present on the coating film 20 side relative to the layer of (C) and accelerates the dissolution of the steel material, whereby it is possible to make the anti-corrosion compound layer firmer. The layer of (C) can supply a sulfate ion required for formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer even in a case where the coated steel material is placed under a weak corrosive environment. Further, even in a case where the coated steel material is placed under a severe corrosive environment, it is possible to prevent excessive corrosion before the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer while exerting an effect of making the anti-corrosion compound layer firm by suppressing the excessive supply of the sulfate ion with a combined use with the layer of (A) or the layer of (B). In the layer of (C), the metal sulfate preferably exhibits a pH of 5.5 or less in an aqueous solution thereof at a temperature 5°C and a concentration of 1 mol/L. In addition, the metal sulfate preferably contains at least one selected from the group consisting of aluminum sulfate, iron sulfate (II), iron sulfate (III), copper sulfate, and chromium sulfate (III). By using the compound as the metal sulfate, a firm anti-corrosion compound layer can be more easily obtained.

[0067] A total content of the metal sulfate can be, for example, 1.0 to 70.0% by mass with respect to the total mass of the layer of (C). By setting the content to 1.0% by mass or more, the above-mentioned effect attained by the layer of (C) can be easily obtained. Further, by setting the content to 70.0% by mass or less, the adhesiveness of the coating film to the steel material can be easily obtained. From the same viewpoint, the total content is preferably 2.0 to 60.0% by mass, and more preferably 3.0 to 50.0% by mass. The total content of the metal sulfate in the layer of (C) is preferably larger than the total content of the metal sulfate in the coating film.

[0068] In the same manner to the coating material, the layer of (C) can further contain a resin, phosphoric acid, metal powder, other components, and the like within a range not interfering with the action effect attained by the layer of (C). A content of each of the materials may be the same as the content in the solid content (coating film) of the coating material. Further, the moisture permeability of the layer of (C) is not particularly limited. Accordingly, the layer of (C) may satisfy the requirements of the moisture permeability in the layer of (A). In this case, the layer of (C) may also serve the function of the layer of (A). However, the layer of (C) may not satisfy the requirements of (A). That is, (C) may be a layer which has a moisture permeability of more than 300 g/(m2·24 h) at a dry film thickness of 100 µm.

[0069] A thickness of the layer of (C) is, for example, 10 to 200 µm, and is preferably 10 to 100 µm, and more preferably 10 to 50 µm. Further, the thickness of the layer of (A) may be 15 to 30 µm.

[0070] Examples of a method for forming the topcoating film include the same one as the method for applying the coating material when the coating film 20 is formed with a resin coating material for forming a topcoating film.

[0071] By providing the coating film 20 on a surface of the steel material or the like, it is possible to provide high corrosion resistance for the steel material or the like in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides. In addition, it can be said that the topcoating film is a protective film for protecting a steel material and the like, together with the above-mentioned coating film. That is, the protective film includes the coating film and a topcoating film provided on the coating film. By providing the protective film with the topcoating film, it is possible to provide design properties for the steel material or the like, and thus assist an anti-corrosion effect by the anti-corrosion compound layer, whereby it is possible to further improve the corrosion resistance of the steel material. Further, another layer for decoration, anti-corrosion, or the like may be provided between the coating film 20 and the steel material. Further, in a case where the steel material has rust, a surface of the steel material may be polished with shot blasting, an electric tool, or the like before application of the coating material, and rust may be removed with a wire brush or the like. In contrast, it is also possible to apply the coating material while not removing the rust of the steel material. Therefore, for example, with regard to a steel material constituting a bridge that is a real estate, in a case where rust is generated by the use of the steel material, it is possible to provide corrosion resistance for the steel material and achieve a flexible response on site by applying a coating material on the steel material in a state where rust is included, thus to form a coating film.

[0072] As illustrated in FIG 1(c), the corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 includes the steel material 10, the coating film 20, and the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 formed between the steel material 10 and the coating film. By exposing the coated steel material 100 illustrated in FIG. 1(b) to a corrosive environment including water, each of the components in the coating film 20 and the metal components such as iron and the like in the steel material 10 can form the anti-corrosion compound layer 30, as accompanied by the above-mentioned action, thereby obtaining the corrosion-resistant steel structure 200.

[0073] In order to form the anti-corrosion compound layer 30, a suitable exposure environment for the coated steel material 100 can be a water-containing environment capable of providing moisture to the coated steel material 100, and the exposure may be performed in, for example, an outdoor environment or an indoor environment, an acidic environment such as sulfuric acid and the like, an environment with air-borne sea-salt particles, an environment with air-borne air pollutants such as SOx, NOx, and the like, and other environments. In addition, examples of suitable exposure conditions for the coated steel material 100 include exposure to outdoors for approximately 1 to 30 days.

[0074] By allowing the corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 to include the anti-corrosion compound layer 30, it is possible to suppress excessive penetration of water, oxygen, and various corrosive substances present in the external corrosive environment into the steel material (barrier effect), and the corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 has excellent corrosion resistance in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides. After the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30, the coating film 20 may be released.

[0075] A thickness of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 may be approximately 0.5 to 50 µm. If the thickness of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 is 0.5 µm or more, the corrosion-resistant effect of the steel material can be easily obtained.

[0076] This anti-corrosion compound layer exerts its effects in not only an ordinary corrosive environment but also an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides. Further, the acidic environment or the severe corrosive environment including chlorides as mentioned herein is exemplified by a low-pH environment (for example, pH 4.0 or less); an environment (for example, on the ground near the sea) expected to remarkably accelerate corrosion of a steel material having a chloride which is constantly present on surfaces of various steel materials at a concentration higher than that in a natural atmospheric corrosive environment (typical corrosive environment) or others; and the like.

[0077] Furthermore, as illustrated in FIGS. 2(a) to 2(c), a plated steel material 14 may be used instead of the steel material 10. As illustrated in FIG. 2(a), the plated steel material 14 has a plated layer 12 with a metal having an anti-corrosion action, for example, a metal such as aluminum, zinc, an alloy thereof, and the like on a surface of the steel material 10. In a case where the plated steel material 14 is used instead of the steel material 10, the coated steel material 100 includes the plated steel material 14, and the coating film 20 formed on a surface of the plated steel material 14, as illustrated in FIG. 2(b). Examples of the plated steel material 14 include a hot-dip galvanized steel material.

[0078] In addition, in a case where the plated steel material 14 is used instead of the steel material 10, the corrosion-resistant steel structure 200 includes the plated steel material 14, and the anti-corrosion compound layer 30 formed between the plated steel material 14 and the coating film 20 or within the coating film 20, as illustrated in FIG. 2(c). Incidentally, when the coating material is applied onto the steel material 10 as illustrated in FIG. 1, the production of iron ions or iron oxides due to corrosion of some of iron and the like in the steel material 10 contributes to the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30, but when the coating material is applied onto the plated steel material 14 as in FIG. 2, the production of zinc ions and zinc oxides due to corrosion of some of zinc and the like in the plated layer 12 contributes to the formation of the anti-corrosion compound layer 30.

Examples



[0079] Hereinafter, Examples of the present invention will be shown to describe the present invention more specifically, but the present invention is not limited to these Examples while a variety of modifications can be made within a range not departing from the technical spirit of the present invention.

(Example 1)


<Preparation of Coating Material>



[0080] 0.05 parts by mass of barium hydroxide, 5 parts by mass of aluminum sulfate, 5 parts by mass of nickel sulfate, 5 parts by mass of magnesium sulfate, 10 parts by mass of an extender/coloring pigment, and 74.95 parts by mass of a polyvinyl butyral resin (a resin X shown in Table 4) were mixed with appropriate amounts of xylene, toluene, and isopropyl alcohol so that a viscosity of the coating material was 200 to 1,000 cps at 20°C, thereby obtaining a coating material. Further, the extender/coloring pigment is formed of barium sulfate and calcium carbonate as the extender pigment, and red iron oxide, carbon (inorganic pigments), and phthalocyanine blue (organic pigment) as the coloring pigment, respectively, in which both the pigments were included at equivalent parts by mass. The compositions of the solid content of the coating material are shown in Table 5.

<Manufacture of Coated Steel material for Acid Resistance Test>



[0081] A specimen (I) shown in Table 1 below, having a dimension of 30 × 25 × 5 mm, was prepared. Table 1 shows the chemical components of a steel material used for an acid resistance test and the presence or absence of galvanization. All of the units of the numerical values in Table 1 are % by mass and the chemical components other than those described in Table 1 are iron (Fe). A surface of the specimen (I) was subjected to a pretreatment α shown in Table 2 below and the specimen having a clean surface thus obtained was taken as a specimen (Iα). A test material A in Table 5 means the specimen (Iα) with respect to the acid resistance test.

[0082] The obtained coating material was applied onto a surface of the specimen (Iα) after the pretreatment by an air spray method. Then, the test material after the application was dried for 7 days in the air at normal temperature (25°C) according to an ordinary coating film test method to obtain a coated steel material. The thickness of the coating film formed from the coating material was 15 µm.
[Table 1]
 CSiMnPS
I Common steel 0.10 0.03 0.30 0.005 0.003
II Hot-dip galvanized steel material Steel material obtained by subjecting the common steel material (I) to hot-dip galvanization with an average plating thickness of 20 µm
[Table 2
α A black scale or a stain on a surface of a specimen is removed by polishing.
β A specimen is exposed to the atmosphere for 3 months in advance to naturally form a rust layer such as an oxide and the like on a surface of the specimen, and the rust layer is simply cleaned with a wire brush.

<Manufacture of Coated Steel material for Chloride Resistance Test>



[0083] A specimen (III) shown in Table 3 below, having a dimension of 30 × 25 × 5 mm, was prepared. Table 3 shows the chemical components of a steel material used for a chloride resistance test and the presence or absence of galvanization. All of the units of the numerical values in Table 3 are % by mass and the chemical components other than those described in Table 3 are iron (Fe).

[0084] A surface of the specimen (III) was subjected to a pretreatment α shown in Table 2 above, and the obtained specimen having a clean surface was taken as a specimen (IIIα). A test material A in Table 5 means a specimen (IIIα) for the chloride resistance test.

[0085] The obtained coating material was applied onto a surface of the specimen (IIIα) after the pretreatment by an air spray method. Then, the test material after the application was dried for 7 days in the air at normal temperature (25°C) according to an ordinary coating film test method to obtain a coated steel material. The thickness of the coating film formed from the coating material was 15 µm.
[Table 3]
  CSiMnPS
III Common steel 0.05 0.03 0.33 0.005 0.003
IV Hot-dip galvanized steel material Steel material obtained by subjecting common steel material (III) to hot-dip galvanization at average plating thickness of 20 µm

(Examples and Comparative Examples 2 to 728)



[0086] A coating material of Examples and Comparative Examples 2 to 728 was obtained in the same manner as in Example 1, except that the composition of the coating material was changed to those described in Tables 5 to 77. Further, as the coating material of Comparative Examples 641 to 645, commercially available organic zinc-rich coating materials specified in JIS K 5553 were used. Incidentally, the amount of the solvent in the coating material was appropriately adjusted so that the viscosity of the coating material at 20°C as determined using a B-type viscometer was 200 to 1,000 cps. In addition, in Examples and Comparative Examples 2 to 728, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test were obtained in the same manner as in Example 1, except that the specimen of the steel material, the pretreatment method, and the thickness of the coating film were changed to those described in Tables 5 to 77.

(Examples 731 to 750)



[0087] A coating material of Examples 731 to 750 was obtained in the same manner as in Example 1, except that the composition of the coating material was changed to those described in Table 78 and Table 79. Incidentally, the amount of the solvent in the coating material was appropriately adjusted so that the viscosity of the coating material at 20°C as determined using a B-type viscometer was 200 to 1,000 cps. In addition, in Examples 731 to 750, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test were obtained in the same manner as in Example 1, except that the specimen of the steel material, the pretreatment method, and the thickness of the coating film were changed to those described in Table 78 and Table 79 to form a coating film, and a topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (A)) provided by further applying topcoating materials onto the coating film so that the thickness and the moisture permeability were as described in Table 78 and Table 79 was formed. In addition, the moisture permeability of the topcoating film was adjusted by use of a polyethylene resin, an epoxy resin, a polyvinyl butyral resin, and a polyvinyl alcohol resin alone or in mixture as the topcoating material. A topcoating film having a thickness of 100 µm for measurement of the moisture permeability using the topcoating material as in each of Examples and Comparative Examples was measured, and the moisture permeability of the topcoating film was measured in accordance with a condition B (a temperature of 40°C, a relative humidity of 90%) in JIS Z 0208 (a cup method).

(Examples 751 to 760)



[0088] A coating material of Examples 751 to 760 was obtained as shown in Table 80 in the same manner as in Example 204, and thus, a coating film was formed on a surface of a specimen. The amount of a solvent in the coating material was appropriately adjusted so that the viscosity of the coating material at 20°C as determined using a B-type viscometer was 200 to 1,000 cps. In addition, in Examples 751 to 760, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test were obtained in the same manner as in Example 204, except that a topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 751, 753, 755, 757, and 759, and corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 752, 754, 756, 758, and 760) provided by applying a topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the coating films with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 80, respectively, was formed.

(Examples 761 to 770)



[0089] A coating material of Examples 761 to 770 was obtained as shown in Table 82 in the same manner as in Example 254, and thus, a coating film was formed on a surface of a specimen. The amount of a solvent in the coating material was appropriately adjusted so that the viscosity of the coating material at 20°C as determined using a B-type viscometer was 200 to 1,000 cps. In addition, in Examples 761 to 770, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test were obtained in the same manner as in Example 254, except that a first topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 761, 763, 765, 767, and 769, and corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 762, 764, 766, 768, and 770) provided by applying a topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the coating film with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 82, respectively, was formed and a second topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 761, 763, 765, 767, and 769, and corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 762, 764, 766, 768, and 770) provided by applying a second topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the first topcoating film with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 82, respectively, was formed.

(Examples 771 to 774)



[0090] A coating material of Examples 771 to 774 was obtained as shown in Table 83 in the same manner as in Example 204, and thus, a coating film was formed on a surface of a specimen. Next, in Examples 771 to 774, a first topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 771 and 773, and corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 772 and 774) provided by further applying a first topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the coating film with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 83, respectively, was formed. Further, a second topcoating film provided by further applying a second topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the first topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 771 and 773, and corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 772 and 774) with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 83, respectively, was formed. In addition, a third topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (A)) provided by further applying a third topcoating material onto the second topcoating film so that the thickness and the moisture permeability were as described in Table 83. Thus, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test of Examples 771 to 774 were obtained. Incidentally, the moisture permeability of the third topcoating film was adjusted by use of a polyethylene resin, an epoxy resin, a polyvinyl butyral resin, and a polyvinyl alcohol resin alone or in mixture as the topcoating material.

(Examples 781 to 784)



[0091] A coating material of Examples 781 to 784 was obtained as shown in Table 84 in the same manner as in Example 254, and thus, a coating film was formed on a surface of a specimen. Next, in Examples 781 to 784, a first topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (B) in Examples 781 and 783, and corresponding to the layer of (C) in Examples 782 and 784) provided by further applying a first topcoating material having the composition described in Table 81 onto the coating films with the thickness and the resin system as described in Table 84, respectively, was formed. In addition, in Examples 783 and 784, a second topcoating film (corresponding to the layer of (A)) provided by further applying a second topcoating material onto the first topcoating film so that the thickness and the moisture permeability were as described in Table 84, respectively, was formed. Thus, coated steel materials for an acid resistance test and a chloride resistance test of Examples 781 to 784 were obtained. Incidentally, the moisture permeability of the second topcoating film was adjusted by use of a polyethylene resin, an epoxy resin, a polyvinyl butyral resin, and a polyvinyl alcohol resin alone or in mixture as the topcoating material.

[0092] Moreover, in the acid resistance test and the chloride resistance test of Examples and Comparative Examples 2 to 784, the test materials B to D were used together with the test material A as a test material. The test materials A to D in Examples and Comparative Examples 2 to 784 will be described as follows.

[0093] A specimen (I) and a specimen (II) shown in Table 1 above were prepared. A surface of the specimen (II) was subjected to the pretreatment α shown in Table 2 above and the obtained specimen was taken as a specimen (IIα). In addition, surfaces of the specimen (I) and the specimen (II) were subjected to the pretreatment β shown in Table 2 above and the obtained specimens were taken as a specimen (Iβ) and a specimen (IIβ), respectively.

[0094] Furthermore, a specimen (III) and a specimen (IV) shown in Table 3 above were prepared. A surface of the specimen (IV) was subjected to the pretreatment α shown in Table 2 above and the obtained specimen was taken as a specimen (IVα). In addition, surfaces of the specimen (III) and the specimen (IV) were subjected to the pretreatment β shown in Table 2 above and the obtained specimens were taken as a specimen (IIIβ) and a specimen (IVβ), respectively.

[0095] As described above, the test material A described in the column of the test material in Tables 5 to 80 and 82 to 84 means that the specimen (Iα) was used as a test material for a coated steel material for an acid resistance test and the specimen (IIIα) was used as a test material of a coated steel material for a chloride resistance test. The test material B means that the specimen (Iβ) was used as a test material for a coated steel material for an acid resistance test and the specimen (IIIβ) was used as a test material of a coated steel material for a chloride resistance test. The test material C means that the specimen (IIα) was used as a test material for a coated steel material for an acid resistance test and the specimen (IVα) was used as a test material of a coated steel material for a chloride resistance test. The test material D means that the specimen (IIβ) was used as a test material for a coated steel material for an acid resistance test and the specimen (IVβ) was used as a test material of a coated steel material for a chloride resistance test.

[0096] In addition, exposure to the atmosphere in the pretreatment β was performed in a horizontal posture at a location 20 m from the seashore having Obama-bay located in the west in Obama-shi, Fukui-ken, Japan (35° 31' 49.39" N, 135° 45' 4.69" E). An annual average content of air-borne salts in the exposed area was about 0.8 mg NaCl/100 cm2/day, which indicates a corrosive environment being strongly affected by air-borne movement of sea-salts.

[0097] The meanings of the symbols in the column of Resin system in Tables 5 to 80 and 82 to 84 are as shown in Table 4 below. For example, Examples described as Y in the column of Resin system indicates that the same mass of a mixture of an epoxy resin and a polyaminoamide resin was used instead of the polyvinyl butyral resin (resin X) in Example 1. In addition, the average particle diameter of the zinc powder in Tables 5 to 80 and 82 to 84 is 4 µm, and the average particle diameter of the aluminum powder is 6 µm.
Table 4
 Resin
X Polyvinyl butyral resin S-LEC B, manufactured by Sekisui Chemical Co., Ltd., Molecular weight: 25,000
Y Epoxy resin Epikote, manufactured by Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Epoxy equivalent: 160 to 170
Polyaminoamide resin Tohmide, manufactured by Fuji Kasei Co., Ltd., Amine value: 212

<Evaluation of Reduction in Thickness of Steel Material before and after Acid Resistance Test>



[0098] The coated steel material obtained in Examples and Comparative Examples was placed horizontally on a ceramic-made base and exposed to an environment at a temperature of 70°C and a relative humidity of 80% for 2,880 hours, during which an acidic aqueous solution at a pH 3 (H2SO4 + 10,000 mg/L NaCl) was sprayed 240 times every 12 hours. Spraying was carried out so that the entire surface of a test material was sufficiently covered with the liquid film. Further, although the acidic aqueous solution was not directly sprayed on the back surface of the test material, the acidic aqueous solution reaches the back surface in a state where it passes around between the test material and the ceramic-made base, and therefore, the back surface is also similarly exposed to the acidic aqueous solution. In a case where the specimen (Iα) was used as the test material, the coating film was removed from the coated steel material after the exposure test using a coating film releasing agent, and then the obtained steel material was immersed in a mixed aqueous solution of diammonium citrate and a trace amount of a corrosion inhibiting liquid in order to perform derusting. By comparing the mass of the steel material after the derusting with the mass of the specimen before the exposure test, a reduction in the thickness of the specimen before and after the exposure test was determined. In addition, the reduction in the thickness was determined with an assumption that the thickness of the steel material was reduced uniformly on the entire surface of the steel material.

[0099] In a case where the specimen (Iβ) was used as the test material, another specimen which had been subjected to a pretreatment β was subjected to derusting as described above, and a reduction in the thickness of the steel material was determined in the same manner as in the specimen (Iα), except that the mass of the specimen after the derusting was regarded as the mass of the specimen before the exposure test.

[0100] In a case where the specimen (IIα) or the specimen (IIβ) shown in Table 1 above was used as the test material, the thickness of the galvanized layer was measured from observation of the cross-sections of the specimens before and after the exposure test, and the both were compared to determine a reduction in the thickness (plate thickness) of the steel material before and after the exposure test (a reduction in a combined thickness of the galvanized steel material and the common steel material as a base). The evaluation results are shown in Tables 5 to 80 and 82 to 84

<Evaluation of Reduction in Thickness of Steel Material before and after Chloride Resistance Test>



[0101] The coated steel material obtained in Examples and Comparative Examples was placed horizontally on a ceramic-made base and a cyclic corrosion test was performed for 2 years with the following steps (1) to (4) in one cycle in accordance with JIS K5600-7-9: 2006 Annex 1 (specified) Cycle D.
  1. (1) An aqueous solution adjusted to pH 4 by addition of hydrochloric acid to commercially available artificial seawater at a temperature of 30°C is sprayed for 0.5 h.
  2. (2) The solution is maintained at a temperature of 30°C and a relative humidity of 98% for 1.5 h.
  3. (3) The solution is maintained at a temperature of 50°C and a relative humidity of 25% for 2 h.
  4. (4) The solution is maintained at a temperature of 30°C and a relative humidity of 25% for 2 h.


[0102] In a case where the specimen (IIIα) was used as the test material, the coating film was removed from the coated steel material after the exposure test using a coating film releasing agent, and then the obtained steel material was immersed in a mixed aqueous solution of diammonium citrate and a trace amount of a corrosion inhibiting solution in order to perform derusting. By comparing the mass of the steel material after the derusting with the mass of the specimen before the exposure test, a reduction in the thickness of the specimen before and after the exposure test was determined. In addition, the reduction in the thickness was determined with an assumption that the thickness of the steel material was reduced uniformly on the entire surface of the steel material.

[0103] In a case where the specimen (IIIβ) was used as the test material, another specimen which had been subjected to a pretreatment β was subjected to derusting as described above, and a reduction in the thickness of the steel material was determined in the same manner as in the specimen (IIIα), except that the mass of the specimen after the derusting was regarded as the mass of the specimen before the exposure test

[0104] In a case where the specimen (IVα) or the specimen (IVβ) shown in Table 3 above as the test material, the thickness of the galvanized layer was measured from observation of the cross-sections of the specimens before and after the exposure test, and the both were compared to determine a reduction in the thickness (plate thickness) of the steel material before and after the exposure test (a reduction in a combined thickness of the galvanized steel material and the common steel material as a base). The evaluation results are shown in Tables 5 to 80 and 82 to 84.

































































































































































[0105] The test results revealed the following. That is, in any of cases in Examples, the reduction in the plate thickness or the reduction in the thickness of galvanization layer was extremely small, as compared with Comparative Examples; for example, in Comparative Examples 643 to 645 in which no coating had been performed, the reduction in the plate thickness was very high; and in Comparative Examples 641 and 642 in which a zinc-rich coating material had been applied, corrosion was suppressed, as compared with a case where no coating had been performed, but a large reduction in the plate thickness was shown. In addition, in Comparative Example 645, the galvanization disappeared, leading to generation of red rust due to the corrosion of the steel material as a base. From these facts, it can be concluded that the coating material according to the present invention can provide high corrosion resistance for a steel material even in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides.

[0106] Furthermore, in the coated steel materials of Examples 731 to 784, a topcoating film was further provided on the coating film, and thus, the reduction in the plate thickness was smaller, as compared with the coated steel material provided with only the coating film.. Therefore, it can be confirmed that a coated steel material has even higher corrosion resistance even in an acidic environment or a severe corrosive environment including chlorides by providing a topcoating film on a coating film, in addition to the coating film.

[0107] In addition, the corrosive environment for the acid resistance test and the chloride resistance test as described above is significantly stricter than a natural corrosive environment (general corrosive environment) in which a steel material is directly exposed to rainfall or sunshine near the coast. A reason therefor is, for example, that in a natural corrosive environment such as those near the coast, a large amount of sea-salt particles move airborne to the steel material, and thus, corrosion proceeds easily, but on the other hand, the sea-salt particles that are air-borne deposited are washed away with rainfall.

Reference Signs List



[0108] 10: steel material, 12: plated layer, 14: plated steel material, 20: coating film, 30: anti-corrosion compound layer, 100: coated steel material, 200: corrosion-resistant steel structure.


Claims

1. A coating material comprising:

barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide; and

a metal sulfate,

wherein a soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C.


 
2. The coating material according to claim 1,
wherein a total content of barium oxide and barium hydroxide is 0.05 to 50.0% by mass with respect to a total solid content of the coating material.
 
3. The coating material according to claim 1 or 2,
wherein a content of the metal sulfate is 0.05 to 30.0% by mass with respect to the total solid content of the coating material.
 
4. The coating material according to any one of claims 1 to 3,
wherein the metal sulfate contains at least one selected from the group consisting of magnesium sulfate, aluminum sulfate, nickel sulfate, iron sulfate, cobalt sulfate, copper sulfate, zinc sulfate, tin sulfate, and chromium sulfate.
 
5. The coating material according to any one of claims 1 to 4, further comprising calcium oxide and/or calcium hydroxide,
wherein a total content of the calcium oxide and the calcium hydroxide is 30.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material.
 
6. The coating material according to any one of claims 1 to 5, further comprising phosphoric acid,
wherein a content of the phosphoric acid is 10.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material.
 
7. The coating material according to any one of claims 1 to 6, further comprising at least one metal powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum powder, zinc powder, and alloy powder containing aluminum and zinc,
wherein a content of the metal powder is 80.0% by mass or less with respect to the total solid content of the coating material.
 
8. A coating film comprising:

barium oxide and/or barium hydroxide; and

a metal sulfate,

wherein a soluble amount of the metal sulfate in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C.


 
9. A protective film comprising:

the coating film according to claim 8; and

a topcoating film arranged on the coating film,

wherein the topcoating film includes at least one layer of (A) to (C) below:

(A) a layer which has a moisture permeability of 300 g/(m2·24h) or less at a dry film thickness of 100 µm;

(B) a layer which contains at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide; and does not contain a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C or contains the metal sulfate so that a ratio of the total mass of the metal sulfate to the total mass of the compound is 5.0% by mass or less; and

(C) a layer which contains a metal sulfate whose soluble amount in 100 g of water is 0.5 g or more at 5°C; and does not contain at least one compound selected from the group consisting of barium oxide, barium hydroxide, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, strontium oxide, and strontium hydroxide or contains the compound so that a ratio of the total mass of the compound to the total mass of the metal sulfate is 5.0% by mass or less.


 
10. The protective film according to claim 9,
wherein the topcoating film includes the layer of (B) and the layer of (C).
 
11. The protective film according to claim 9,
wherein the topcoating film includes all the layers (A) to (C).
 
12. The protective film according to any one of claims 9 to 11,
wherein the metal sulfate in the layer of (C) exhibits a pH of 5.5 or less in an aqueous solution thereof at a temperature 5°C and a concentration of 1 mol/L.
 
13. The protective film according to any one of claims 9 to 11,
wherein the metal sulfate in the layer of (C) contains at least one selected from the group consisting of aluminum sulfate, iron sulfate (II), iron sulfate (III), copper sulfate, and chromium sulfate (III).
 




Drawing










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Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description