(19)
(11)EP 3 763 214 A2

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
13.01.2021 Bulletin 2021/02

(21)Application number: 20171870.7

(22)Date of filing:  26.06.2015
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A01N 63/00(2020.01)
C05F 11/08(2006.01)
A01N 63/30(2020.01)
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR

(30)Priority: 26.06.2014 US 201462017813 P
26.06.2014 US 201462017796 P
26.06.2014 US 201462017809 P
26.06.2014 US 201462017815 P
26.06.2014 US 201462017816 P
26.06.2014 US 201462017818 P
26.06.2014 WO PCT/US2014/044427
30.12.2014 US 201462098296 P
30.12.2014 US 201462098298 P
30.12.2014 US 201462098299 P
30.12.2014 US 201462098302 P
30.12.2014 US 201462098304 P

(62)Application number of the earlier application in accordance with Art. 76 EPC:
15810847.2 / 3161124

(71)Applicant: Indigo Ag, Inc.
Boston, MA 02129 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • VON MALTZAHN, Geoffrey
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • FLAVELL, Richard, Bailey
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • TOLEDO, Gerardo V.
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • LEFF, Jonathan, W.
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • SAMAYOA, Philip
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • MARQUEZ, Luis, Miguel
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • JOHNSTON, David, Morris
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • DJONOVIC, Slavica
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • MILLET, Yves, Alain
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • SADOWSKI, Craig
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • LYFORD, Jeffrey
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • AMBROSE, Karen
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)
  • ZHANG, Xuecheng
    Boston, MA 02129 (US)

(74)Representative: Mewburn Ellis LLP 
Aurora Building Counterslip
Bristol BS1 6BX
Bristol BS1 6BX (GB)

 
Remarks:
The complete document including Reference Tables and the Sequence Listing can be downloaded from the EPO website
Remarks:
This application was filed on 28-04-2020 as a divisional application to the application mentioned under INID code 62.
Remarks:
Claims filed after the date of filing of the application /after the date of receipt of the divisional application (Rule 68(4) EPC).
 


(54)ENDOPHYTES, ASSOCIATED COMPOSITIONS, AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF


(57) Materials and methods for improving plant traits and for providing plant benefits are provided. In some embodiments, the materials, and methods employing the same, can comprise endophytes.




Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS



[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/017,796, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/017,809, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/017,816, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/017,813, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/017,815, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Provisional Application No 62/017,818, filed June 26, 2014, each of which is hereby incorporated in its entirety by reference.

SEQUENCE LISTING



[0002] The instant application contains a Sequence Listing which has been submitted via EFS-Web and is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Said ASCII copy, created on June 26, 2015, is named 29809_PCT_CRF_Sequence_Listing, and is 2,972,740 bytes in size.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION



[0003] This invention relates to compositions and methods for improving the cultivation of plants, particularly agricultural plants. For example, this invention describes beneficial bacteria and fungi that are capable of living in a plant, which may be used to impart improved agronomic traits to plants. The disclosed invention also describes methods of improving plant characteristics by introducing such beneficial bacteria and/or fungi to those plants. Further, this invention also provides methods of treating seeds and other plant elements with beneficial bacteria and/or fungi that are capable of living within a plant, to impart improved agronomic characteristics to plants, particularly agricultural plants.

BACKGROUND



[0004] Agriculture faces numerous challenges that are making it increasingly difficult to provide food, materials, and fuels to the world's population. Population growth and changes in diet associated with rising incomes are increasing global food demand, while many key resources for agriculture are becoming increasingly scarce. By 2050, the FAO projects that total food production must increase by 70% to meet the needs of the growing population, a challenge that is exacerbated by numerous factors, including diminishing freshwater resources, increasing competition for arable land, rising energy prices, increasing input costs, and the likely need for crops to adapt to the pressures of a more extreme global climate. The need to grow nearly twice as much food in more uncertain climates is driving a critical need for new innovations.

[0005] Today, crop performance is optimized via of technologies directed towards the interplay between crop genotype (e.g., plant breeding, genetically-modified (GM) crops) and its surrounding environment (e.g., fertilizer, synthetic herbicides, pesticides). While these paradigms have assisted in doubling global food production in the past fifty years, yield growth rates have stalled in many major crops and shifts in the climate have been linked to production declines in important crops such as wheat. In addition to their long development and regulatory timelines, public fears of GM-crops and synthetic chemicals has challenged their use in many key crops and countries, resulting in a complete lack of acceptance for GM traits in wheat and the exclusion of GM crops and many synthetic chemistries from European markets. Thus, there is a significant need for innovative, effective, and publically-acceptable approaches to improving the intrinsic yield and resilience of crops to severe stresses.

[0006] Like humans, which benefit from a complement of beneficial microbial symbionts, plants have been purported to benefit somewhat from the vast array of bacteria and fungi that live both within and around their tissues to support their health and growth. Endophytes are fungal or bacterial organisms that live within plants. Bacterial and fungal endophytes appear to inhabit various host plant tissues and have been isolated from plant leaves, stems, or roots.

[0007] A small number of these symbiotic endophyte-host relationships have been purported in limited studies to provide agronomic benefits to model host plants within controlled laboratory settings, such as enhancement of biomass production (i.e., yield) and nutrition, increased tolerance to stress such as drought, and/or pests. Yet, such endophytes have been demonstrated to be ineffective in conferring benefits to a variety of agriculturally-important plants; as such, they do not adequately address the need to provide improved yield and tolerance to environmental stresses present in many agricultural situations for such crops.

[0008] Thus, there is a need for compositions and methods of providing agricultural crops with improved yield and resistance to various environmental stresses. Provided herein are novel compositions of bacterial and fungal endophytes and synthetic endophyte-plant compositions based on the analysis of the key properties that enhance the utility and commercialization of an endophytic composition.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



[0009] The disclosures of PCT/US2014/044427, filed June 26, 2014, and U.S. Application Serial No. 14/316,469, filed June 26, 2014, are incorporated by reference in their entirety, including the sequence listing containing SEQ ID NOs: 1-1448.

[0010] The present invention is based on the surprising discovery that a number of bacterial and fungal taxa of endophytes microbes are conserved across diverse species and/or cultivars of agricultural plants, and can be derived therefrom and heterologously associated with diverse new cultivars to provide benefits. The present invention is also based on the discovery that a plant element of a plant can be effectively augmented by coating its surface with such endophytes in an amount that is not normally found on the plant element. The endophytes can be isolated from inside the same plant or a different plant, or from inside a part or tissue of the same plant or different plant. The plant element thus coated with the endophyte can be used to confer improved agronomic trait or traits to the seed or the plant that is grown from the plant element.

[0011] The inventors have postulated that attempts to select for cultivars with certain improved traits and alterations in the environmental and chemical conditions of agriculture have led to the inadvertent loss of microbes in modern varieties that can provide beneficial traits to agricultural plants. The present invention is based on the surprising discovery that many modern cultivars of agricultural plants display striking distinctions in their microbial communities when compared with ancestral varieties. The present invention is also based on the observation that, in some cases, providing the microbial taxa present in such ancestral cultivars but are absent or underrepresented in modern varieties can lead to dramatic improvements in a number of agronomic traits in the modern cultivars.

SUMMARY



[0012] Described herein are methods for preparing an agricultural seed composition comprising contacting the surface of a plurality of seeds with a formulation comprising a purified microbial population that comprises at least two endophytes that are heterologous to the seed. The first endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin and the endophytes are present in the formulation in an amount capable of modulating a trait of agronomic importance, as compared to isoline plants grown from seeds not contacted with the formulation.

[0013] Also described herein are method for preparing an agricultural seed composition, comprising contacting the surface of a plurality of seeds with a formulation comprising a purified microbial population that comprises at least two endophytes that are heterologous to the seed. The first endophyte is capable of at least one function or activity selected from the group consisting of auxin production, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial compound, mineral phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, cellulase production, chitinase production, xylanase production, and acetoin production and the endophytes are present in the formulation in an amount capable of modulating a trait of agronomic importance, as compared to isoline plants grown from seeds not contacted with the formulation.

[0014] Also described are methods of improving a phenotype during water limited conditions of a plurality of host plants grown from a plurality of seeds, comprising treating the seeds with a formulation comprising at least two endophytes that are heterologous to the seeds. The first endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin. The phenotype improvement is selected from the group consisting of: disease resistance, heat tolerance, cold tolerance, salinity tolerance, metal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, chemical tolerance, improved nitrogen utilization, improved resistance to nitrogen stress, improved nitrogen fixation, pest resistance, herbivore resistance, pathogen resistance, increased yield, health enhancement, vigor improvement, growth improvement, photosynthetic capability improvement, nutrition enhancement, altered protein content, altered oil content, increased biomass, increased shoot length, increased root length, improved root architecture, increased seed weight, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, number of pods, delayed senescence, stay-green, and altered seed protein composition, increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant.

[0015] The seed or plant can be a dicot, e.g., soybean, cotton, tomato and pepper or a monocot, e.g., corn, wheat, barley and rice. In some embodiments, the seed is a transgenic seed.

[0016] The methods described herein include a first endophyte and a second endophyte. The first endophyte and/or the second endophyte can be, e.g., a bacterial endophyte or, e.g., a fungal endophyte. Examples of bacterial endophytes include, e.g., those from a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Chryseobacterium, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Saccharibacillus, Sphingomonas, and Stenotrophomonas. In some embodiments, the bacterial endophyte has a 16S rRNA sequence that is at least 95% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671.

[0017] Examples of fungal endophytes include, e.g., those from a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acremonium, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Cochliobolus, Embellisia, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Nigrospora, Phoma, and Podospora. In some embodiments, thefungal endophyte has an ITS rRNA at least 95% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0018] In some embodiments, the formulation comprises at least two endophytic microbial entities provided in Table 11.

[0019] In some embodiments of the methods described herein, the first endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least two of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin. In some embodiements of the methods described herein, the second endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin.

[0020] The methods described herein include a formulation. In some embodiments, the formulation comprises the purified microbial population at a concentration of at least about 10^2 CFU/ml or spores/ml in a liquid formulation or about 10^2 CFU/gm or spores/ml in a non-liquid formulation. In some embodiments, the formulation further comprises one or more of the following: a stabilizer, or a preservative, or a carrier, or a surfactant, or an anticomplex agent, or any combination thereof and/or one or more of the following: fungicide, nematicide, bactericide, insecticide, and herbicide.

[0021] In some embodiments, the methods described herein modulate a trait agronomic importance. The trait of agronomic importance can be, e.g., disease resistance, drought tolerance, heat tolerance, cold tolerance, salinity tolerance, metal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, chemical tolerance, improved water use efficiency, improved nitrogen utilization, improved resistance to nitrogen stress, improved nitrogen fixation, pest resistance, herbivore resistance, pathogen resistance, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, health enhancement, vigor improvement, growth improvement, photosynthetic capability improvement, nutrition enhancement, altered protein content, altered oil content, increased biomass, increased shoot length, increased root length, improved root architecture, increased seed weight, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, number of pods, delayed senescence, stay-green, and altered seed protein composition.

[0022] The methods described herein can include at least one endophyte capable of localizing in a plant element of a plant grown from said seed, said plant element selected from the group consisting of: whole plant, seedling, meristematic tissue, ground tissue, vascular tissue, dermal tissue, seed, leaf, root, shoot, stem, flower, fruit, stolon, bulb, tuber, corm, keikis, and bud.

[0023] In some embodiments, the methods described herein further include placing the plurality of seeds into a substrate that promotes plant growth, including but not limited to soil. For examples, the seeds are placed in the soil in rows, with substantially equal spacing between each seed within each row.

[0024] Also described herein is a plant derived from the agricultural seed preparation of the methods described herein, wherein said plant comprises in at least one of its plant elements said endophytes, and/or wherein said progeny comprises in at least one of its plant elements said endophytes. Also described herein is a plurality of seed compositions prepared according to the methods described herein, wherein said seed compositions are confined within an object selected from the group consisting of: bottle, jar, ampule, package, vessel, bag, box, bin, envelope, carton, container, silo, shipping container, truck bed, and case.

[0025] Described herein are methods for preparing a seed comprising an endophyte population, said method comprising applying to an exterior surface of a seed a formulation comprising an endophyte population consisting essentially of an endophyte comprising a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700; methods for treating seedlings, the method comprising contacting foliage or the rhizosphere of a plurality of agricultural plant seedlings with a seed a formulation comprising an endophyte population consisting essentially of an endophyte comprising a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700; and growing the contacted seedlings; methods for modulating a plant trait comprising applying to vegetation or an area adjacent the vegetation, a seed a formulation comprising an endophyte population consisting essentially of an endophyte comprising a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700, wherein the formulation is capable of providing a benefit to the vegetation, or to a crop produced from the vegetation; and methods for modulating a plant trait comprising applying a formulation to soil, the seed a formulation comprising an endophyte population consisting essentially of an endophyte comprising a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700, wherein the formulation is capable of providing a benefit to seeds planted within the soil, or to a crop produced from plants grown in the soil. In some embodiments, the method includes applying or contacting by spraying, immersing, coating, encapsulating, or dusting the seeds or seedlings with the formulation.

[0026] Described herein are methods for improving an agricultural trait in an agricultural plant, the method comprising providing a modern agricultural plant, contacting said plant with a formulation comprising an endophyte derived from an ancestral plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant and allowing the plant to grow under conditions that allow the endophyte to colonize the plant, and methods for improving an agricultural trait in an agricultural plant, the method comprising providing an agricultural plant, contacting said plant with a formulation comprising an endophyte that is common to at least two donor plant types that is present in the formulation in an amount effective to colonize the plant, and growing the plants under conditions that allow the endophyte to improve a trait in the plant. In some embodiments, the endophyte comprises a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700. In some embodiments, the method includes applying or contacting by spraying, immersing, coating, encapsulating, or dusting the seeds or seedlings with the formulation.

[0027] The seed or plant can be a dicot, e.g., soybean, cotton, tomato and pepper or a monocot, e.g., corn, wheat, barley and rice. In some embodiments, the seed is a transgenic seed.

[0028] In some embodiments, the endophyte is capable of exhibiting production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, or production of acetoin, e.g., the endophyte exhibits at least two of: production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, and production of acetoin. In other embodiments, the endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin. In further embodiments, the endophyte is capable of capable of metabolizing at least two of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin.

[0029] In some embodiments, the endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 and 12-19, wherein the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to colonize the mature agricultural plant. In other embodiments, at least one of the endophytes comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 and 12-19, wherein the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to colonize the mature agricultural plant.

[0030] The endophyte can be present at a concentration of, for example, at least 102 CFU or spores/seed on the surface of the seeds after contacting.

[0031] In some embodiments, the methods described herein modulate a trait agronomic importance. The benefit or agricultural trait can be selected from the group consisting of: increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome, relative to reference seeds or agricultural plants derived from reference seeds. In some embodiments, the benefit or agricultural trait comprises at least two benefits or agricultural traits selected from the group consisting of: increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome, relative to reference seeds or plants derived from reference seeds. Examples include but are not limited to increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress or increased nitrogen use efficiency, and the endophyte is non-diazotrophic or increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress or increased nitrogen use efficiency, and the endophyte is diazotrophic.

[0032] In some embodiments, the formulation comprises at least one member selected from the group consisting of an agriculturally compatible carrier, a tackifier, a microbial stabilizer, a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide, and a nutrient.

[0033] The methods described herein can include contacting the seed or plant with at least 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores or more, of the endophyte.

[0034] In some embodiments of the methods described herein, the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to be detectable within a target tissue of the agricultural plant selected from a fruit, seed, leaf, root or portion thereof. For example, the population is detected in an amount of at least 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores, or more, in the target tissue. Alternatively or in addition, the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to increase the biomass and/or yield of the fruit or seed produced by the plant by at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with the fruit or seed of a reference agricultural plant. Alternatively or in addition, the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to detectably increase the biomass of the plant, or a part or a tissue type thereof, e.g., detectably increased by at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant. Alternatively or in addition, the endophyte is present in the formulation in an amount effective to detectably increase the rate of germination of the seed, e.g., increased by at least 0.5%, at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100% or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0035] Also described herein are synthetic compositions comprising a purified microbial population in association with a plurality of seeds or seedlings of an agricultural plant, wherein the purified microbial population comprises a first endophyte capable of at least one of: production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, and production of acetoin, or a combination of two or more thereof, wherein the first endophyte comprises a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700, and wherein the endophyte is present in the synthetic combination in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the seeds or seedlings or the plants derived from the seeds or seedlings. In some embodiments, the formulation comprises at least two endophytes provided in Table 11.

[0036] Also described herein are synthetic compositions comprising a purified population in association with a plurality of seeds or seedlings of an agricultural plant, wherein the purified microbial population comprises a first endophyte wherein the first endophyte is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin, wherein the first endophyte comprises a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700, and wherein the endophyte is present in the synthetic combination in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the seeds or seedlings or the plants derived from the seeds or seedlings. In some embodiments, the microbial population further comprises a second endophyte, wherein the first and second endophytes are independently capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin, or a combination of two or more thereof. In some embodiments, the two endophytes are provided in Table 11.

[0037] Also described herein are synthetic compositions comprising at least two endophytes associated with a seed, wherein at least the first endophyte is heterologous to the seed and is capable of production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, and production of acetoin, or a combination of two or more thereof, wherein the endophytes are present in the formulation in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the seeds or seedlings or the plants derived from the seeds or seedlings. In some embodiments, both of the endophytes are heterologous to the seed. In some embodiments, the first and second endophytes are independently capable of at least one of production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, or production of acetoin, or a combination of two or more thereof. In some embodiments, first endophyte comprises a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700. In some embodiments, the formulation comprises at least two endophytes provided in Table 11.

[0038] Also described herein are synthetic compositions comprising at least two endophytes associated with a seed, wherein at least the first endophyte is heterologous to the seed and is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin, wherein the endophytes are present in the formulation in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the seeds or seedlings or the plants derived from the seeds or seedlings. In some embodiments, both of the endophytes are heterologous to the seed. In some embodiments, the first and second endophytes are independently capable of metabolizing at least one of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin, or a combination of two or more thereof. In some embodiments, first endophyte comprises a 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700.

[0039] In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein are disposed within a packaging material selected from a bag, box, bin, envelope, carton, or container. In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise 1000 seed weight amount of seeds, wherein the packaging material optionally comprises a dessicant, and wherein the synthetic combination optionally comprises an anti-fungal agent.

[0040] In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise a first endophyte that is localized on the surface of the seeds or seedlings; and/or obtained from a plant species other than the seeds or seedlings of the synthetic combination; and/or obtained from a plant cultivar different from the cultivar of the seeds or seedlings of the synthetic combination; and/or obtained from a plant cultivar that is the same as the cultivar of the seeds or seedlings of the synthetic combination.

[0041] In some embodiments, the synthetic compositions comprising a purified population in association with a plurality of seeds or seedlings of an agricultural plant the microbial population further comprise a second endophyte, for example, a second microbial endophyte having an 16S rRNA or ITS rRNA nucleic acid sequence less than 95% identical to that of the first microbial endophyte. In some embodiments, the first and second endophytes are independently capable of at least one of production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, or production of acetoin, or a combination of two or more thereof.

[0042] In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise, for example, a first endophyte that is a bacterial endophyte; a first endophyte that is a bacterial endophyte and a second endophyte that is a bacterial endophyte; a first endophyte that is a bacterial endophyte and a second endophyte that is a fungal endophyte; a first endophyte that is a fungal endophyte; and/or a first endophyte that is a fungal endophyte and a second endophyte that is a fungal endophyte.

[0043] In the embodiments with a second endophyte, the bacterial endophyte can be, e.g., of a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Chryseobacterium, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Saccharibacillus, Sphingomonas, and Stenotrophomonas; and/or the bacterial endophyte can be one with a 16S rRNA sequence that is at least 95% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671.

[0044] The fungal endophyte can be, e.g., of a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acremonium, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Cochliobolus, Embellisia, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Nigrospora, Phoma, and Podospora and/or have an ITS rRNA at least 95% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0045] The synthetic combinations described herein can include, for example, a first endophyte capable of at least two of: production of an auxin, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial, production of a siderophore, mineral phosphate solubilization, production of a cellulase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, utilization of arabinose as a carbon source, and production of acetoin; and/or capable of metabolizing at least two of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin, or a combination of two or more thereof.

[0046] The synthetic combinations described herein can include, for example, a first endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 and 12-19.

[0047] The synthetic combinations described herein can include, for example, first endophytes present in an amount of at least about 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU spores per seed.

[0048] In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise a benefit selected from the group consisting of increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant. In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise at least two benefits selected from the group consisting of increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome, relative to a reference plant.

[0049] In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein comprise seeds and the first endophyte is associated with the seeds as a coating on the surface of the seeds; and/or comprises seedlings and the first endophyte is contacted with the seedlings as a spray applied to one or more leaves and/or one or more roots of the seedlings; and/or further comprises one or more additional endophyte species.

[0050] The effective amount of the synthetic combinations described herein can be, for example, 1x10^3 CFU or spores/per seed; from about 1x10^2 CFU or spores/per seed to about 1x10^8 CFU or spores/per seed.

[0051] In some embodiments, the seed is a seed from an agricultural plant. In some embodiments, the seed is a transgenic seed.

[0052] The synthetic combinations described herein can further comprise, e.g., one or more of the following: a stabilizer, or a preservative, or a carrier, or a surfactant, or an anticomplex agent, or any combination thereof. In some embodiments, the synthetic combinations described herein further comprising one or more of the following: fungicide, nematicide, bactericide, insecticide, and herbicide.

[0053] Also described herein are a plurality of any of the synthetic combinations described herein, placed in a medium that promotes plant growth, said medium selected from the group consisting of: soil, hydroponic apparatus, and artificial growth medium. In some embodiments, the plurality of synthetic combinations are placed in the soil in rows, with substantially equal spacing between each seed within each row. Also described herein are a plurality of synthetic combinations confined within an object selected from the group consisting of: bottle, jar, ampule, package, vessel, bag, box, bin, envelope, carton, container, silo, shipping container, truck bed, and case; in some embodiments, the synthetic combinations are shelf-stable.

[0054] Also described herein are plants grown from the synthetic combinations described herein, said plant exhibiting an improved phenotype of agronomic interest, selected from the group consisting of: disease resistance, drought tolerance, heat tolerance, cold tolerance, salinity tolerance, metal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, chemical tolerance, improved water use efficiency, improved nitrogen utilization, improved nitrogen fixation, pest resistance, herbivore resistance, pathogen resistance, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, health enhancement, vigor improvement, growth improvement, photosynthetic capability improvement, nutrition enhancement, altered protein content, altered oil content, increased biomass, increased shoot length, increased root length, improved root architecture, increased seed weight, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, number of pods, delayed senescence, stay-green, and altered seed protein composition. In one embodiment, described herein is a plant or progeny of the plant of the synthetic combinations described herein, wherein said plant or progeny of the plant comprises in at least one of its plant elements said endophytes.

[0055] Described herein is an agricultural plant, or portion or tissue thereof, comprising a formulation comprising an endophyte that is common to at least two donor plant types that is disposed on an exterior surface of or within the plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant, and in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the modern agricultural plant. In some embodiments, the endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence provided in Tables 1-10. Also described herein is a modern agricultural plant, or portion or tissue thereof, comprising a formulation comprising an endophytic microbial entity derived from an ancestral agricultural plant that is disposed on an exterior surface of or within the plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant, and in an amount effective to provide a benefit to the modern agricultural plant. In some embodiments, the endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 95% identical to a nucleic acid sequence provided in Tables 12-19.

[0056] The plants described herein are provided a benefit that is, for example, selected from the group consisting of increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant. In some embodiments, at least two benefits are provided to the agricultural plant.

[0057] In some embodiments, the plant is contacted with at least 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores or more, of the endophyte.

[0058] In some embodiments, the plant is a seed. In some embodiments, the plant is a seed and the population is disposed on the surface of the seed.

[0059] The plants described herein are can include at least two endophytic microbial entities comprising a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 in an amount effective to colonize the mature agricultural plant.

[0060] In some embodiments, the plant is a monocot, e.g., selected from the group consisting of corn, wheat, barley and rice. In some embodiments, the plant is a dicot, e.g., selected from the group consisting of a soybean, canola, cotton, tomato and pepper.

[0061] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the endophyte can be disposed in an amount effective to be detectable within a target tissue of the mature target tissue of the mature agricultural plant selected from a fruit, seed, leaf, root or portion thereof.

[0062] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the target tissue can be selected from the group consisting of the root, shoot, leaf, flower, fruit and seed.

[0063] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population can be detected in an amount of at least 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores, or more, in the plant or target tissue thereof.

[0064] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population of is disposed in an amount effective to be detectable in the rhizosphere surrounding the plant. For example, the population can be detected in an amount of at least 100 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores, or more, in the rhizosphere surrounding the plant.

[0065] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population is disposed in an amount effective to detectably increase the biomass of the plant. For example, the biomass of the plant can be detectably increased by at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0066] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population is disposed in an amount effective to increase the biomass of a fruit or seed of the plant. For example, the biomass of the fruit or seed of the plant can be detectably increased by at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with the fruit or seed of a reference agricultural plant.

[0067] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population is disposed in an amount effective to increase the height of the plant. For example, the height of the plant can be detectably increased by at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with the height of a reference agricultural plant.

[0068] In some embodiments of the plants described herein, the population is disposed in an amount effective to effective to increase resistance to any of the stress conditions selected from the group consisting of a drought stress, heat stress, cold stress, salt stress, and low mineral stress. For example, the population can be disposed in an amount effective to effective to increase resistance to any of the biotic stress conditions selected from the group consisting of a nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, bacterial pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress.

[0069] Also described herein are agricultural products comprising a 1000 seed weight amount of a plant described herein. In some embodiments of the agricultural products described herein, endophytes are present in a certain concentration. For example, the concentration of endophytes in the agricultural product is from about 102 to about 105 CFU or spores/ml. In another example the concentration of endophytes in the agricultural product is from about 105 to about 108 CFU or spores/ml.

[0070] Also described herein is an agricultural formulation comprising a synthetic combination described herein. In some embodiments, the formulation is a gel or powder and the microbial concentration is from about 10^3 to about 10^11 CFU or spores/gm. In some embodiments, the agricultural product or formulation provides a benefit is selected from the group consisting of: increased root biomass, increased root length, increased height, increased shoot length, increased leaf number, increased water use efficiency, increased tolerance to low nitrogen stress, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased overall biomass, increase grain yield, increased photosynthesis rate, increased tolerance to drought, increased heat tolerance, increased salt tolerance, increased resistance to nematode stress, increased resistance to a fungal pathogen, increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, increased resistance to a viral pathogen, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant, or a combination thereof.

[0071] Described herein are commodity plant products comprising the plants described herein. In some embodiments, the product is a grain, a flour, a starch, a syrup, a meal, an oil, a film, a packaging, a nutraceutical product, a pulp, an animal feed, a fish fodder, a bulk material for industrial chemicals, a cereal product, a processed human-food product, a sugar or an alcohol and protein. Also described herein are method of producing a commodity plant product, comprising: obtaining a plant or plant tissue from any of the plants described herein, or progeny or derivative thereof, and producing the commodity plant product therefrom.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES



[0072] 

Figure 1. Non-metric multidimensional scaling plot showing the differences in overall bacterial community composition between (A) wild and modern corn seeds and (B) wild and modern wheat seeds. Points represent community composition for an individual sample. Points closer together represent more similar communities while points further apart represent more dissimilar communities.

Figure 2. Non-metric multidimensional scaling plot showing the differences in overall fungal community composition between (A) wild and modern corn seeds and (B) wild and modern wheat seeds. Points represent community composition for an individual sample. Points closer together represent more similar communities while points further apart represent more dissimilar communities.

Figure 3. Differences in seed bacterial diversity among various cultivars of corn. Shown are the Shannon Diversity indices of bacterial communities found in Teosinte, Landrace, Inbred and Modern cultivars of corn.

Figure 4. Differences in seed bacterial diversity among various cultivars of wheat. Shown are the Shannon Diversity indices of bacterial communities found in Wild, Landrace and Modern cultivars of wheat.

Figure 5. Differences in seed fungal diversity across different cultivars of corn. Shown are the Shannon Diversity indices of fungal communities found in Teosinte, Landrace, Inbred and Modern cultivars of corn, illustrating the lower diversity of fungal communities within modern corn.

Figure 6. Differences in seed fungal diversity across different cultivars of wheat. Shown are the Shannon Diversity indices of fungal communities found in Wild, Landrace and Modern cultivars of wheat which, as with corn, demonstrate a reduced diversity of fungal communities within modern corn.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0073] The inventors have undertaken a systematic comparison of the microbial communities that reside within a wide diversity of agricultural plants. The present invention is based on the striking finding that key constituents of the plant microbiome can be shared across diverse crop varieties, and the identification of bacterial and fungal species that provide diverse advantages to novel crop hosts via heterologous administration. As such, the endophytic microbes useful for the invention generally relate to endophytic microbes that are present in agricultural plants.

[0074] Currently, the generally accepted view of plant endophytic communities focuses on their homologous derivation, predominantly from the soil communities in which the plants are grown (Hallman, J., et al., (1997) Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 43(10): 895-914). Upon observing taxonomic overlap between the endophytic and soil microbiota in A. thaliana, it was stated, "Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plant-microbe interactions derived from complex soil communities" (Lundberg et al., (2012) Nature. 488, 86-90). There is strong support in the art for soil representing the repository from which plant endophytes are derived. New Phytologist (2010) 185: 554-567. Notable plant-microbe interactions such as mycorrhyzal fungi and bacterial rhizobia fit the paradigm of soil-based colonization of plant hosts and appear to primarily establish themselves independently of seed. As a result of focusing attention on the derivation of endophytes from the soil in which the target agricultural plant is currently growing, there has been an inability to achieve commercially significant improvements in plant yields and other plant characteristics such as altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant.

[0075] In part, the present invention describes preparations of novel seed- or plant-derived endophytes, and the creation of synthetic combinations of agricultural seeds and/or seedlings with heterologous seed- or plant-derived endophytes and formulations containing the synthetic combinations, as well as the recognition that such synthetic combinations display a diversity of beneficial properties present in the agricultural plants and the associated endophyte populations newly created by the present inventors. Such beneficial properties include metabolism, transcript expression, proteome alterations, morphology, and the resilience to a variety of environmental stresses, and the combination of a plurality of such properties.

[0076] Little attention has been provided in the art to understand the role of plant elements as reservoirs for microbes that can efficiently populate the endosphere of agricultural plants. While the concept that plant elements may harbor plant pathogens was promoted by Baker and Smith (Annu Rev Phytopathol 14: 311-334(1966)), and the understanding that bacterial and fungal pathogens are known to be able to infect plant elements, the ability to harness endophytes derived from a broad spectrum of plant elements to heterologously confer single or multiple advantages to agricultural crops was previously unrecognized. As the presence of detectable pathogens in a plant element lot can necessitate destruction of vast numbers of agricultural germplasm (Gitaitis, R. and Walcott, R. (2007) Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 45:371-97), safety concerns have surrounded the consideration of seed-associated microbes or non-soil endophytes. Moreover, when seed pathogens are detected, their transfer to the growing plant can be highly inefficient. For example, a study of seed-based transmission of the seed pathogen, Pantoea stewartii, found that seed produced from a population of pathogen-infected plants gave rise to infected seedlings in only 0.0029% of cases (1 of 34,924 plants) and artificially infected kernels only gave rise to infected seedlings in 0.022% of cases (Block, C. C., el al., (1998). Plant disease. 82(7). 775-780). Thus, the efficiency with which plants introduce microbes into their seeds, and with which microbes within seeds propagate within the resulting plant tissues, has been previously thought to be low and often substantially variable. Thus, the potential for microbial content within seeds to populate the resulting plant has been unclear.

[0077] The potential for agricultural plant elements to serve as reservoirs for non-pathogenic microbes also remains controversial (Hallman, J., et al., (1997) Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 43(10): 895-914). Sato, et al., did not detect any bacteria inside rice seeds ((2003) In. Morishima, H. (ed.) The Natural History of Wild Rice - Evolution Ecology of Crop. p.91-106) and Mundt and Hinkle only obtained endophytes from seed samples where seed coats had been broken or fractured in 29 kinds of plant seed (Appl Environ Microbiol. (1976) 32(5):694-8). Another group detected simply bacterial populations inside rice seeds ranging in population size from 10^2 to 10^6 CFU/g fresh weight (Okunishi, S., et al., (2005) Microbes and Environment. 20:168-177). Rosenblueth et al described seeds to harbor very simple microbial communities with significant variability of the microbial communities between individual maize seeds, including substantial variability between seeds taken from the same cobb (Rosenblueth, M. et al, Seed Bacterial Endophytes: Common Genera, Seed-to-Seed Variability and Their Possible Role in Plants; Proc. XXVIIIth IHC - IS on Envtl., Edaphic & Gen. Factors; Affecting Plants, Seeds and Turfgrass; Eds.: G.E. Welbaum et al. Acta Hort. 938, ISHS 2012).

[0078] These findings demonstrate limitations recognized in the art regarding the attempted use of endophytes derived from seeds; i.e., maize seeds appear to contain limited taxonomic diversity, and that the microbiota of individual seeds produced by plants is often distinct, indicating that there may not be single seed- or plant-derived symbionts capable of providing benefits across a large population of agricultural plants and in specific, the utilization of endophytes on seed. For example, characterization of ∼15 pooled seeds from within various cultivars from the genus Zea showed that populations of maize seeds tend to harbor a very limited number of taxa that appear to be conserved across modern and ancestral variants, and that the maize seed content of such taxa is low and substantially variable. It is unclear whether the presence of such limited taxa resulted from common storage conditions, environmental contamination, or a potential vertical transmission of microbes via seeds, and also uncertain was the applicability of such limited taxa in increasing agricultural yield. Notably, 99% of these strains were shown to provide detrimental or to lack beneficial effects on agricultural plants, e.g., when tested in a potato growth assay (Johnston-Monje D, Raizada MN (2011) Conservation and Diversity of Seed Associated Endophytes in Zea across Boundaries of Evolution, Ethnography and Ecology. PLoS ONE 6(6): e20396. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020396). Further, some of the microbes isolated bear close evolutionary relation to plant pathogens, making it possible that such microbes represent a latent reservoir of pathogens, rather than potentially beneficial constituents.

[0079] Surprisingly, we discovered here that seed- or plant-derived endophytes can confer significant advantages to agricultural crops, spanning growth under normal and stressed conditions, altered expression of key plant hormones, altered expression of key transcripts in the plant, and other desirable features. Provided are novel compositions, methods, and products related our invention's ability to overcome the limitations of the prior art in order to provide reliable increases in crop yield, biomass, germination, vigor, stress resilience, and other properties to agricultural crops.

[0080] Our invention is surprising for multiple reasons based on the previous demonstrations in the art. Notably, there has been a lack of clarity related to whether endophytes are associated with healthy plant elements, whether microbes isolated from plant elements could efficiently colonize the host if disposed on the exterior of a plant element or seedling, and whether such microbes would confer a beneficial or detrimental effects on hosts. It has been further unclear whether the heterologous application of such microbes to distinct plant elements from which they were derived could provide beneficial effects.

[0081] We find that beneficial microbes from within the conserved microbial taxa can be robustly derived from agricultural plant elements, optionally cultured, administered heterologously to agricultural plant elements or seedlings, and colonize the resulting plant tissues with high efficiency to confer multiple beneficial properties. This is surprising given the variability observed in the art in microbe isolation from healthy plant elements and the previous observations of inefficient plant element pathogen colonization of plant host's tissues. Further, the ability of heterologously disposed seed- or plant-derived endophytes to colonize seeds and seedlings from the exterior of seeds is surprising, given that such endophytes can be isolated from within internal seed tissues and therefore do not natively need the capacity to externally penetrate and invade into host tissues.

[0082] Prior characterization of microbial content of seeds has indicated that microbial concentrations in seeds can be variable and are generally very low (ie, less than 10, 100, 10^3, 10^4, 10^5 CFUs/seed). As such, it has been unclear whether altered or increased concentrations of microbes associated with seeds could be beneficial. We find that microbes can confer beneficial properties across a range of concentrations.

[0083] A significant limitation of the existing art in endophytes is the very limited perspective on endophyte community compositions across a diversity of plant genotypes and environments. This has led to endophyte isolations that have lacked the ability to colonize multiple hosts or to reproducibly confer benefits in multiple locations and soil types.

[0084] The inventors conceived that the bacterial and fungal microbiota of large numbers of agricultural seeds and wild seeds from a diversity of geographic locations would have an improved ability to colonize and benefit multiple plant genotypes across multiple environments. The inventors have developed a method to introduce isolated endophytes to another plant by coating the microbes onto the surface of a seed of a plant. By combining an endophyte sourced from one plant, it is possible to transfer new beneficial agronomic traits onto an agricultural plant, which therefore holds great promise for increasing agricultural productivity. Additionally, as demonstrated herein, the microbial endophytes were in many cases able to additively confer benefits to recipient seeds, seedlings, or plants.

[0085] Combining a selected plant species, OTU, strain or cultivar with one or more types of endophytes thus provides mechanisms by which, alone or in parallel with plant breeding and transgenic technologies, is provided improved yield from crops and generation of products thereof. Therefore, in one aspect, the present invention provides a synthetic combination of a seed of a first plant and a preparation of an endophyte that is coated onto the surface of the seed of the first plant such that the endophyte is present at a higher level on the surface of the seed than is present on the surface of an uncoated reference seed, wherein the endophyte is isolated from the inside the seed of a second plant. As described herein, the combination is achieved by artificial coating, application, or other infection of a seed of a plant with an endophyte strain. In some embodiments, endophytes are introduced onto the surface of host plant seeds, which upon cultivation confer improved agronomic traits to said host plant, which may then generate progeny seeds.

Definitions



[0086] A "synthetic combination" includes a combination of a host plant and an endophyte. The combination may be achieved, for example, by coating the surface of the seed of a plant, such as an agricultural plant, or host plant tissues with an endophyte.

[0087] As used herein, an "agricultural seed" is a seed used to grow a plant in agriculture (an "agricultural plant"). The seed may be of a monocot or dicot plant, and is planted for the production of an agricultural product, for example grain, food, feed, fiber, fuel, etc. As used herein, an agricultural seed is a seed that is prepared for planting, for example, in farms for growing.

[0088] An "endophyte" or "endophytic entity" or "endophytic microbe" is an organism capable of living within a plant or is otherwise associated therewith, and does not cause disease or harm the plant otherwise. Endophytes can occupy the intracellular or extracellular spaces of plant tissue, including the leaves, stems, flowers, fruits, seeds, or roots. An endophyte can be for example a bacterial or fungal organism, and can confer a beneficial property to the host plant such as an increase in yield, biomass, resistance, or fitness. An endophyte can be a fungus, or a bacterium. As used herein, the term "microbe" is sometimes used to describe an endophyte. Further, "endophyte" means a microbe (typically a fungus or a bacterium) that is associated with a plant tissue and is in a symbiotic or other beneficial relationship with said plant tissue. As used herein, an "endophytic component" refers to a composition or structure that is part of the endophyte.

[0089] As used herein, the term "bacteria" or "bacterium" refers in general to any prokaryotic organism, and may reference an organism from either Kingdom Eubacteria (Bacteria), Kingdom Archaebacteria (Archae), or both.

[0090] "Internal Transcribed Spacer" (ITS) refers to the spacer DNA (non-coding DNA) situated between the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and large-subunit rRNA genes in the chromosome or the corresponding transcribed region in the polycistronic rRNA precursor transcript.

[0091] A "complex network" means a plurality of endophyte entities (e.g., simple bacteria or simple fungi, complex fungi, or combinations thereof) co-localized in an environment, such as on or within an agricultural plant. Preferably, a complex network includes two or more types of endophyte entities that synergistically interact, such synergistic endophytic populations capable of providing a benefit to the agricultural seed, seedling, or plant derived thereby.

[0092] A "population" of endophytes refers to the presence of more than one endophyte in a particular environment. The population may comprise more than one individual of the same taxonomy or more than one taxonomy of individuals. For example, a population may comprise 10^2 colonies of Cladosporium. In another example, a population may comprise 10^2 colonies of Cladosporium and 10^3 colonies of Penicillium. A population may in general, but not be limited to, comprises individuals that are related by some feature, such as being in the same environment at the same time, or by virtue of sharing some phenotype such as ability to metabolize a particular substrate.

[0093] The terms "pathogen" and "pathogenic" in reference to a bacterium or fungus includes any such organism that is capable of causing or affecting a disease, disorder or condition of a host comprising the organism.

[0094] A "spore" or a population of "spores" refers to bacteria or fungi that are generally viable, more resistant to environmental influences such as heat and bactericidal or fungicidal agents than other forms of the same bacteria or fungi, and typically capable of germination and out-growth. Bacteria and fungi that are "capable of forming spores" are those bacteria and fungi comprising the genes and other necessary abilities to produce spores under suitable environmental conditions.

[0095] As used herein, a "colony-forming unit" ("CFU") is used as a measure of viable microorganisms in a sample. A CFU is an individual viable cell capable of forming on a solid medium a visible colony whose individual cells are derived by cell division from one parental cell.

[0096] The term "isolated" is intended to specifically reference an organism, cell, tissue, polynucleotide, or polypeptide that is removed from its original source and purified from additional components with which it was originally associated. For example, an endophyte may be considered isolated from a seed if it is removed from that seed source and purified so that it is isolated from any additional components with which it was originally associated. Similarly, an endophyte may be removed and purified from a plant or plant element so that it is isolated and no longer associated with its source plant or plant element.

[0097] A "plant element" is intended to generically reference either a whole plant or a plant component, including but not limited to plant tissues, parts, and cell types. A plant element is preferably one of the following: whole plant, seedling, meristematic tissue, ground tissue, vascular tissue, dermal tissue, seed, leaf, root, shoot, stem, flower, fruit, stolon, bulb, tuber, corm, kelkis, shoot, bud. As used herein, a "plant element" is synonymous to a "portion" of a plant, and refers to any part of the plant, and can include distinct tissues and/or organs, and may be used interchangeably with the term "tissue" throughout.

[0098] Similarly, a "plant reproductive element" is intended to generically reference any part of a plant that is able to initiate other plants via either sexual or asexual reproduction of that plant, for example but not limited to: seed, seedling, root, shoot, stolon, bulb, tuber, corm, keikis, or bud.

[0099] A "population" of plants, as used herein, can refer to a plurality of plants that were subjected to the same inoculation methods described herein, or a plurality of plants that are progeny of a plant or group of plants that were subjected to the inoculation methods. In addition, a population of plants can be a group of plants that are grown from coated seeds. The plants within a population will typically be of the same species, and will also typically share a common genetic derivation.

[0100] As used herein, an "agricultural seed" is a seed used to grow a plant typically used in agriculture (an "agricultural plant"). The seed may be of a monocot or dicot plant, and may be planted for the production of an agricultural product, for example feed, food, fiber, fuel, etc. As used herein, an agricultural seed is a seed that is prepared for planting, for example, in farms for growing.

[0101] "Agricultural plants", or "plants of agronomic importance", include plants that are cultivated by humans for food, feed, fiber, and fuel purposes. Agricultural plants include monocotyledonous species such as: maize (Zea mays), common wheat (Triticum aestivum), spelt (Triticum spelta), einkom wheat (Triticum monococcum), emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum), durum wheat (Triticum durum), Asian rice (Oryza sativa), African rice (Oryza glabaerreima), wild rice (Zizania aquatica, Zizania latifolia, Zizania palustris, Zizania texana), barley (Hordeum vulgare), Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Finger millet (Eleusine coracana), Proso millet (Panicum miliaceum), Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), Foxtail millet (Setaria italica), Oat (Avena sativa), Triticale (Triticosecale), rye (Secale cereal), Russian wild rye (Psathyrostachys juncea), bamboo (Bambuseae), or sugarcane (e.g., Saccharum arundinaceum, Saccharum barberi, Saccharum bengalense, Saccharum edule, Saccharum munja, Saccharum officinarum, Saccharum procerum, Saccharum ravennae, Saccharum robustum, Saccharum sinense, or Saccharum spontaneum); as well as dicotyledonous species such as: soybean (Glycine max), canola and rapeseed cultivars (Brassica napus), cotton (genus Gossypium), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), cassava (genus Manihot), potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pea (Pisum sativum), chick pea (Cicer arietinum), lentil (Lens culinaris), flax (Linum usitatissimum) and many varieties of vegetables.

[0102] A "host plant" includes any plant, particularly a plant of agronomic importance, which an endophytic entity such as an endophyte can colonize. As used herein, an endophyte is said to "colonize" a plant or seed when it can be stably detected within the plant or seed over a period time, such as one or more days, weeks, months or years, in other words, a colonizing entity is not transiently associated with the plant or seed. Such host plants are preferably plants of agronomic importance. It is contemplated that any element, or more than one element, of the host plant may be colonized with an endophyte to thus confer a host status to the plant. The intial inoculated element may additionally be different than the element to which the endophyte localizes. An endophyte may localize to different elements of the same plant in a spatial or temporal manner. For example, a seed may be inoculated with an endophyte, and upon germination, the endophyte may localize to root tissue.

[0103] A "non-host target" means an organism or chemical compound that is altered in some way after contacting a host plant or host fungus that comprises an endophyte, as a result of a property conferred to the host plant or host fungus by the endophyte.

[0104] As used herein, an "ancestral" variety of a plant refers generally to a variety or species of a plant that is either a wild ancestor or undomesticated species of agricultural plants. Such ancestral varieties are generally distinguished from agricultural plants used in large-scale agricultural practices in use today in that the ancestral varieties were not extensively bred, and are generally open-pollinated. As used herein, ancestral varieties include landrace varieties, heirloom varieties, and progenitor species.

[0105] A "modern" variety of a plant refers to a non-ancestral variety of a plant.

[0106] As used herein, a "hybrid plant" refers generally refers to a plant that is the product of a cross between two genetically different parental plants. A hybrid plant is generated by either a natural or artificial process of hybridization whereby the entire genome of one species, variety cultivar, breeding line or individual plant is combined intra- or interspecifically into the genome of species, variety or cultivar or line, breeding line or individual plant by crossing.

[0107] An "inbred plant", as used herein, refers to a plant or plant line that has been repeatedly crossed or inbred to achieve a high degree of genetic uniformity, and low heterozygosity, as is known in the art.

[0108] The term "isoline" is a comparative term, and references organisms that are genetically identical, but may differ in treatment. In one example, two genetically identical maize plant embryos may be separated into two different groups, one receiving a treatment (such as transformation with a heterologous polynucleotide, to create a genetically modified plant) and one control that does not receive such treatment. Any phenotypic differences between the two groups may thus be attributed solely to the treatment and not to any inherency of the plant's genetic makeup. In another example, two genetically identical seeds may be treated with a formulation that introduces an endophyte composition. Any phenotypic differences between the plants grown from those seeds may be attributed to the treatment, thus forming an isoline comparison.

[0109] Similarly, by the term "reference agricultural plant", it is meant an agricultural plant of the same species, strain, or cultivar to which a treatment, formulation, composition or endophyte preparation as described herein is not administered/contacted. A reference agricultural plant, therefore, is identical to the treated plant with the exception of the presence of the endophyte and can serve as a control for detecting the effects of the endophyte that is conferred to the plant.

[0110] A "reference environment" refers to the environment, treatment or condition of the plant in which a measurement is made. For example, production of a compound in a plant associated with an endophyte can be measured in a reference environment of drought stress, and compared with the levels of the compound in a reference agricultural plant under the same conditions of drought stress. Alternatively, the levels of a compound in plant associated with an endophyte and reference agricultural plant can be measured under identical conditions of no stress.

[0111] In some embodiments, the invention contemplates the use of microbes that are "exogenous" to a seed or plant. As used herein, a microbe is considered exogenous to the seed or plant if the seed or seedling that is unmodified (e.g., a seed or seedling that is not treated with the endophytic microbial population descried herein) does not contain the microbe.

[0112] In some embodiments, a microbe can be "endogenous" to a seed or plant. As used herein, a microbe is considered "endogenous" to a plant or seed, if the endophyte or endophyte component is derived from, or is otherwise found in, a plant element of the plant specimen from which it is sourced. In embodiments in which an endogenous endophyte is applied, the endogenous microbe is applied in an amount that differs from the levels typically found in the plant.

[0113] In some embodiments, the invention uses endophytes that are heterologous to a plant element, for example in making synthetic combinations or agricultural formulations. A microbe is considered heterologous to the seed or plant if the seed or seedling that is unmodified (e.g., a seed or seedling that is not treated with an endophyte population described herein) does not contain detectable levels of the microbe. For example, the invention contemplates the synthetic combinations of seeds or seedlings of agricultural plants and an endophytic microbe population (e.g., an isolated bacterium), in which the microbe population is "heterologously disposed" on the exterior surface of or within a tissue of the agricultural seed or seedling in an amount effective to colonize the plant. A microbe is considered "heterologously disposed" on the surface or within a plant (or tissue) when the microbe is applied or disposed on the plant in a number that is not found on that plant before application of the microbe. For example, an endophyte population that is disposed on an exterior surface or within the seed can be an endophytic bacterium that may be associated with the mature plant, but is not found on the surface of or within the seed. As such, a microbe is deemed heterologously disposed when applied on the plant that either does not naturally have the microbe on its surface or within the particular tissue to which the microbe is disposed, or does not naturally have the microbe on its surface or within the particular tissue in the number that is being applied. The term "exogenous" can be used interchangeably with "heterologous." For example, a fungal endophyte that is normally associated with leaf tissue of a cupressaceous tree sample would be considered heterologous to leaf tissue of a maize plant. In another example, an endophyte that is normally associated with leaf tissue of a maize plant is considered heterologous to a leaf tissue of another maize plant that naturally lacks said endophyte. In another example, a fungal endophyte that is normally associated at low levels in a plant is considered heterologous to that plant if a higher concentration of that endophyte is introduced into the plant. In another example, an endophyte that is comprised within one fungus would be considered heterologous if placed in a different fungus. In yet another example, an endophyte that is associated with a tropical grass species would be considered heterologous to a wheat plant.

[0114] For the avoidance of doubt, "heterologously disposed" contemplates use of microbes that are "exogenous" to a seed or plant.

[0115] In some cases, the present invention contemplates the use of microbes that are "compatible" with agricultural chemicals, for example, a fungicide, an anti-bacterial compound, or any other agent widely used in agricultural which has the effect of interfering with optimal growth of microbes. As used herein, a microbe is "compatible" with an agricultural chemical, when the microbe is modified or otherwise adapted to grow in, or otherwise survive, the concentration of the agricultural chemical used in agriculture. For example, a microbe disposed on the surface of a seed is compatible with the fungicide metalaxyl if it is able to survive the concentrations that are applied on the seed surface.

[0116] "Biomass" means the total mass or weight (fresh or dry), at a given time, of a plant tissue, plant tissues, an entire plant, or population of plants, usually given as weight per unit area. The term may also refer to all the plants or species in the community (community biomass).

[0117] Some of the compositions and methods described herein involve endophytic microbes in an amount effective to colonize a plant. As used herein, a microbe is said to "colonize" a plant or seed when it can exist in an endophytic relationship with the plant in the plant environment, for example inside the plant or a part or tissue thereof, including the seed.

[0118] The compositions and methods herein may provide for an improved "agronomic trait" or "trait of agronomic importance" to a host plant, which may include, but not be limited to, the following: altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, and a detectable modulation in the proteome, compared to an isoline plant grown from a seed without said seed treatment formulation.

[0119] As used herein, the terms "water-limited condition" and "drought condition", or "water-limited" and "drought", may be used interchangeably. For example, a method or composition for improving a plant's ability to grown under drought conditions means the same as the ability to grow under water-limited conditions. In such cases, the plant can be further said to display improved drought tolerance.

[0120] Additionally, "altered metabolic function" or "altered enzymatic function" may include, but not be limited to, the following: altered production of an auxin, altered nitrogen fixation, altered production of an antimicrobial compound, altered production of a siderophore, altered mineral phosphate solubilization, altered production of a cellulase, altered production of a chitinase, altered production of a xylanase, altered production of acetoin.

[0121] An "increased yield" can refer to any increase in biomass or seed or fruit weight, seed size, seed number per plant, seed number per unit area, bushels per acre, tons per acre, kilo per hectare, or carbohydrate yield. Typically, the particular characteristic is designated when referring to increased yield, e.g., increased grain yield or increased seed size.

[0122] "Agronomic trait potential" is intended to mean a capability of a plant element for exhibiting a phenotype, preferably an improved agronomic trait, at some point during its life cycle, or conveying said phenotype to another plant element with which it is associated in the same plant. For example, a seed may comprise an endophyte that will provide benefit to leaf tissue of a plant from which the seed is grown; in such case, the seed comprising such endophyte has the agronomic trait potential for a particular phenotype (for example, increased biomass in the plant) even if the seed itself does not display said phenotype.

[0123] By the term "capable of metabolizing" a particular carbon substrate, it is meant that the endophyte is able to utilize that carbon substrate as an energy source.

[0124] The term "synthetic combination" means a plurality of elements associated by human endeavor, in which said association is not found in nature. In the present invention, "synthetic combination" is used to refer to a treatment formulation associated with a plant element.

[0125] A "treatment formulation" refers to a mixture of chemicals that facilitate the stability, storage, and/or application of the endophyte composition(s). In some embodiments, an agriculturally compatible carrier can be used to formulate an agricultural formulation or other composition that includes a purified endophyte preparation. As used herein an "agriculturally compatible carrier" refers to any material, other than water, that can be added to a plant element without causing or having an adverse effect on the plant element (e.g., reducing seed germination) or the plant that grows from the plant element, or the like.

[0126] In some cases, the present invention contemplates the use of compositions that are "compatible" with agricultural chemicals, for example, a fungicide, an anti-complex compound, or any other agent widely used in agricultural which has the effect of killing or otherwise interfering with optimal growth of another organism. As used herein, a composition is "compatible" with an agricultural chemical when the organism is modified, such as by genetic modification, e.g., contains a transgene that confers resistance to an herbicide, or is adapted to grow in, or otherwise survive, the concentration of the agricultural chemical used in agriculture. For example, an endophyte disposed on the surface of a seed is compatible with the fungicide metalaxyl if it is able to survive the concentrations that are applied on the seed surface.

[0127] Some compositions described herein contemplate the use of an agriculturally compatible carrier. As used herein an "agriculturally compatible carrier" is intended to refer to any material, other than water, which can be added to a seed or a seedling without causing/having an adverse effect on the seed, the plant that grows from the seed, seed germination, or the like.

[0128] A "transgenic plant" includes a plant or progeny plant of any subsequent generation derived therefrom, wherein the DNA of the plant or progeny thereof contains an introduced exogenous DNA segment not naturally present in a non-transgenic plant of the same strain. The transgenic plant may additionally contain sequences that are native to the plant being transformed, but wherein the "exogenous" gene has been altered in order to alter the level or pattern of expression of the gene, for example, by use of one or more heterologous regulatory or other elements.

[0129] As used herein, a nucleic acid has "homology" or is "homologous" to a second nucleic acid if the nucleic acid sequence has a similar sequence to the second nucleic acid sequence. The terms "identity", "percent sequence identity" or "identical" in the context of nucleic acid sequences refer to the residues in the two sequences that are the same when aligned for maximum correspondence. There are a number of different algorithms known in the art that can be used to measure nucleotide sequence identity. For instance, polynucleotide sequences can be compared using FASTA, Gap or Bestfit, which are programs in Wisconsin Package Version 10.0, Genetics Computer Group (GCG), Madison, Wis. FASTA provides alignments and percent sequence identity of the regions of the best overlap between the query and search sequences. Pearson, Methods Enzymol. 183:63-98 (1990). The term "substantial homology" or "substantial similarity," when referring to a nucleic acid or fragment thereof, indicates that, when optimally aligned with appropriate nucleotide insertions or deletions with another nucleic acid (or its complementary strand), there is nucleotide sequence identity in at least about 76%, 80%, 85%, or at least about 90%, or at least about 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% of the nucleotide bases, as measured by any well-known algorithm of sequence identity, such as FASTA, BLAST or Gap, as discussed above.

[0130] As used herein, the terms "operational taxonomic unit," "OTU," "taxon," "hierarchical cluster," and "cluster" are used interchangeably. An operational taxon unit (OTU) refers to a group of one or more organisms that comprises a node in a clustering tree. The level of a cluster is determined by its hierarchical order. In one embodiment, an OTU is a group tentatively assumed to be a valid taxon for purposes of phylogenetic analysis. In another embodiment, an OTU is any of the extant taxonomic units under study. In yet another embodiment, an OTU is given a name and a rank. For example, an OTU can represent a domain, a sub-domain, a kingdom, a sub-kingdom, a phylum, a sub-phylum, a class, a subclass, an order, a sub-order, a family, a subfamily, a genus, a subgenus, or a species. In some embodiments, OTUs can represent one or more organisms from the kingdoms eubacteria, protista, or fungi at any level of a hierarchal order. In some embodiments, an OTU represents a prokaryotic or fungal order.

[0131] The terms "decreased", "fewer", "slower" and "increased" "faster" "enhanced" "greater" as used herein refers to a decrease or increase in a characteristic of the endophyte treated seed or resulting plant compared to an untreated seed or resulting plant. For example, a decrease in a characteristic may be at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 25%, at least 30%, at least 35%, at least 40%, at least 45%, at least 50%, at least about 60%, at least 75%, at least about 80%, at least about 90%, at least 100%, at least 200%, at least about 300%, at least about 400% or more lower than the untreated control and an increase may be at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 25%, at least 30%, at least 35%, at least 40%, at least 45%, at least 50%, at least about 60%, at least 75%, at least about 80%, at least about 90%, at least 100%, at least 200%, at least about 300%, at least about 400% or more higher than the untreated control.

[0132] The present invention is directed to methods and compositions of endophytes, and plant-endophyte combinations that confer a agronomic benefit in agricultural plants.

Endophytic Microbes



[0133] In part, the present invention describes preparations of novel seed- or plant-derived endophytes, including those that are conserved across diverse species and/or cultivars of agricultural plants, and the creation of synthetic combinations of agricultural seeds and/or seedlings with heterologous seed- or plant-derived endophytes and formulations containing the synthetic combinations, as well as the recognition that such synthetic combinations display a diversity of beneficial properties present in the agricultural plants and the associated endophyte populations newly created by the present inventors. Such beneficial properties include metabolism, transcript expression, proteome alterations, morphology, and the resilience to a variety of environmental stresses, and the combination of a plurality of such properties.

[0134] In a second aspect, the inventors have undertaken a systematic comparison of the microbial communities that reside within ancestral and closely related modern varieties of agricultural plants. The present invention is based on the striking differences the microbial composition between the ancestral and modern varieties, and the identification of bacterial and fungal species that are absent or vastly underrepresented in modern varieties. As such, the endophytic microbes useful for the invention generally relate to endophytic microbes that are present in ancestral varieties of plants.

[0135] Currently, the generally accepted view of plant endophytic communities focuses on their homologous derivation, predominantly from the soil communities in which the plants are grown (Hallman, J., et al., (1997) Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 43(10): 895-914). Upon observing taxonomic overlap between the endophytic and soil microbiota in A. thaliana, it was stated, "Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plant-microbe interactions derived from complex soil communities" (Lundberg et al., (2012) Nature. 488, 86-90). There is strong support in the art for soil representing the repository from which plant endophytes are derived. New Phytologist (2010) 185: 554-567. Notable plant-microbe interactions such as mycorrhyzal fungi and bacterial rhizobia fit the paradigm of soil-based colonization of plant hosts and appear to primarily establish themselves independently of seed. As a result of focusing attention on the derivation of endophytes from the soil in which the target agricultural plant is currently growing, there has been an inability to achieve commercially significant improvements in plant yields and other plant characteristics such as: altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, or a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant.

[0136] Little attention has been provided in the art to understand the role of seeds as reservoirs for microbes that can efficiently populate the endosphere of agricultural plants. While the concept that seeds may harbor plant pathogens was promoted by Baker and Smith (Annu Rev Phytopathol 14: 311-334(1966)), and the understanding that bacterial and fungal pathogens are known to be able to infect seed, the ability to harness endophytes derived from a broad spectrum of seeds to heterologously confer single or multiple advantages to agricultural crops was previously unrecognized. As the presence of detectable pathogens in a seed lot can necessitate destruction of vast numbers of agricultural germplasm (Gitaitis, R. and Walcott, R. (2007) Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 45:371-97), safety concerns have surrounded the consideration of seed-associated microbes or non-soil endophytes. Moreover, when seed pathogens are detected, their transfer to the growing plant can be highly inefficient. For example, a study of seed-based transmission of the seed pathogen, Pantoea stewartii, found that seed produced from a population of pathogen-infected plants gave rise to infected seedlings in only 0.0029% of cases (1 of 34,924 plants) and artificially infected kernels only gave rise to infected seedlings in 0.022% of cases (Block, C. C., el al., (1998). Plant disease. 82(7). 775-780). Thus, the efficiency with which plants introduce microbes into their seeds, and with which microbes within seeds propagate within the resulting plant tissues, has been previously thought to be low and often substantially variable. Thus, the potential for microbial content within seeds to populate the resulting plant has been unclear.

[0137] The potential for agricultural seeds to serve as reservoirs for non-pathogenic microbes also remains controversial (Hallman, J., et al., (1997) Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 43(10): 895-914). Sato, et al., did not detect any bacteria inside rice seeds ((2003) In. Morishima, H. (ed.) The Natural History of Wild Rice - Evolution Ecology of Crop. p.91-106) and Mundt and Hinkle only obtained endophytes from seed samples where seed coats had been broken or fractured in 29 kinds of plant seed (Appl Environ Microbiol. (1976) 32(5):694-8). Another group detected simply bacterial populations inside rice seeds ranging in population size from 10^2 to 10^6 CFU/g fresh weight (Okunishi, S., et al., (2005) Microbes and Environment. 20:168-177). Rosenblueth et al described seeds to harbor very simple microbial communities with significant variability of the microbial communities between individual maize seeds, including substantial variability between seeds taken from the same cob (Rosenblueth, M. et al, Seed Bacterial Endophytes: Common Genera, Seed-to-Seed Variability and Their Possible Role in Plants; Proc. XXVIIIth IHC - IS on Envtl., Edaphic & Gen. Factors; Affecting Plants, Seeds and Turf; Eds.: G.E. Welbaum et al. Acta Hort. 938, ISHS 2012).

[0138] These findings demonstrate limitations recognized in the art regarding the attempted use of endophytes derived from seeds; i.e., maize seeds appear to contain limited taxonomic diversity, and that the microbiota of individual seeds produced by plants is often distinct, indicating that there may not be single seed- or plant-derived symbionts capable of providing benefits across a large population of agricultural plants and in specific, the utilization of endophytes on seed. For example, characterization of ∼15 pooled seeds from within various cultivars from the genus Zea showed that populations of maize seeds tend to harbor a very limited number of taxa that appear to be conserved across modern and ancestral variants, and that the maize seed content of such taxa is low and substantially variable. It is unclear whether the presence of such limited taxa resulted from common storage conditions, environmental contamination, or a potential vertical transmission of microbes via seeds, and also uncertain was the applicability of such limited taxa in increasing agricultural yield. Notably, 99% of these strains were shown to provide detrimental or to lack beneficial effects on agricultural plants, e.g., when tested in a potato growth assay (Johnston-Monje D, Raizada MN (2011) Conservation and Diversity of Seed Associated Endophytes in Zea across Boundaries of Evolution, Ethnography and Ecology. PLoS ONE 6(6): e20396. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0020396). Further, some of the microbes isolated bear close evolutionary relation to plant pathogens, making it possible that such microbes represent a latent reservoir of pathogens, rather than potentially beneficial constituents.

[0139] We discovered here that seed- or plant-derived endophytes can confer significant advantages to agricultural crops, spanning growth under normal and stressed conditions, altered expression of key plant hormones, altered expression of key transcripts in the plant, and other desirable features. Provided are novel compositions, methods, and products related our invention's ability to overcome the limitations of the prior art in order to provide reliable increases in crop yield, biomass, germination, vigor, stress resilience, and other properties to agricultural crops.

[0140] Our invention is surprising for multiple reasons based on the previous demonstrations in the art. Notably, there is a lack of clarity related to whether endophytes are associated with healthy seeds, whether microbes isolated from seeds could efficiently colonize the host if disposed on the exterior of a seed or seedling, and whether such microbes would confer a beneficial or detrimental effects on hosts. It is further unclear whether the heterologous application of such microbes to distinct seeds from which they were derived could provide beneficial effects.

[0141] We find that beneficial microbes can be robustly derived from agricultural seeds, optionally cultured, administered heterologously to agricultural seeds or seedlings, and colonize the resulting plant tissues with high efficiency to confer multiple beneficial properties. This is surprising given the variability observed in the art in microbe isolation from healthy seeds and the previous observations of inefficient seed pathogen colonization of plant host's tissues. Further, the ability of heterologously disposed seed- or plant-derived endophytes to colonize seeds and seedlings from the exterior of seeds is surprising, given that such endophytes can be isolated from within internal seed tissues and therefore do not natively need the capacity to externally penetrate and invade into host tissues.

[0142] Prior characterization of microbial content of seeds has indicated that microbial concentrations in seeds can be variable and are generally very low (ie, less than 10, 100, 10^3, 10^4, 10^5 CFUs/seed). As such, it is unclear whether altered or increased concentrations of microbes associated with seeds could be beneficial. We find that microbes can confer beneficial properties across a range of concentrations.

[0143] We find that seed- or plant-derived endophytes can be heterologously disposed onto seedlings of a distinct cultivar, species, or crop type and confer benefits to those new recipients. For example, seed- or plant-derived endophytes from corn cultivars are heterologously provided to wheat cultivars to confer a benefit. This is surprising given the observations of distinct microbiome preferences in distinct plant and mammalian hosts and, in particular, the likelihood that microbes derived from seeds have been co-evolved to be specialized to a particular host.

[0144] As used herein, endophytes can be isolated from seeds of many distinct plants. In one embodiment, the endophyte can be isolated from the seed of the same crop, and can be from the same cultivar or variety as the seed onto which it is to be coated. For example, seed endophytes from a particular corn variety can be isolated and coated onto the surface of a corn seed of the same variety. In one particular embodiment, the seed of the first plant that is to be coated with the endophyte can comprise a detectable amount of the same endophyte in the interior of the seed. In another embodiment, the seed of the first plant that is to be coated with the endophyte can comprise a detectable amount of the same endophyte in the exterior of the seed. For example, an uncoated reference seed may contain a detectable amount of the same endophyte within its seed. In yet another embodiment, the endophyte to be coated onto the seed of the plant is a microbe that is detectably present in the interior and exterior of the seed from which the endophyte is derived.

[0145] In another embodiment, the endophyte can be isolated from a related species (e.g., an endophyte isolated from Triticum monococcum (einkorn wheat) can be coated onto the surface of a T. aestivum (common wheat) seed; or, an endophyte from Hordeum vulgare (barley) can be isolated and coated onto the seed of another member of the Triticeae family, for example, seeds of the rye plant, Secale cereale). In still another embodiment, the endophyte can be isolated from the seed of a plant that is distantly related to the seed onto which the endophyte is to be coated. For example, a tomato-derived endophyte is isolated and coated onto a rice seed.

[0146] In one embodiment, the endophyte is an endophytic microbe that was isolated from a different plant than the inoculated plant. For example, in one embodiment, the endophyte can be an endophyte isolated from a different plant of the same species as the inoculated plant. In some cases, the endophyte can be isolated from a species related to the inoculated plant.

[0147] We further find that combinations of heterologously disposed seed- or plant-derived endophytes confer additive advantages to plants, including multiple functional properties and resulting in seed, seedling, and plant hosts that display single or multiple improved agronomic properties.

[0148] In another embodiment, the endophytic microbe is absent in a seed of a modern variety of a plant. In still another embodiment, the endophytic microbe is detectably underrepresented in the seed of a modern variety of a plant when compared with a related ancestral variety.

[0149] According to the present invention, the endophytic microbe can be a bacterium. In some embodiments of the present invention, the endophyte is a member of one of the following taxa: Achromobacter, Acidithiobacillus, Acidovorax, Acidovoraz, Acinetobacter, Actinoplanes, Adlercreutzia, Aerococcus, Aeromonas, Afipia, Agromyces, Ancylobacter, Arthrobacter, Atopostipes, Azospirillum, Bacillus, Bdellovibrio, Beijerinckia, Bosea, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Brevundimonas, Burkholderia, Candidatus Haloredivivus, Caulobacter, Cellulomonas, Cellvibrio, Chryseobacterium, Citrobacter, Clostridium, Coraliomargarita, Corynebacterium, Cupriavidus, Curtobacterium, Curvibacter, Deinococcus, Delftia, Desemzia, Devosia, Dokdonella, Dyella, Enhydrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Erwinia, Escherichia, Escherichia/Shigella, Exiguobacterium, Ferroglobus, Filimonas, Finegoldia, Flavisolibacter, Flavobacterium, Frigoribacterium, Gluconacetobacter, Hafnia, Halobaculum, Halomonas, Halosimplex, Herbaspirillum, Hymenobacter, Klebsiella, Kocuria, Kosakonia, Lactobacillus, Leclercia, Lentzea, Luteibacter, Luteimonas, Massilia, Mesorhizobium, Methylobacterium, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Microvirga, Mycobacterium, Neisseria, Nocardia, Oceanibaculum, Ochrobactrum, Okibacterium, Oligotropha, Oryzihumus, Oxalophagus, Paenibacillus, Panteoa, Pantoea, Pelomonas, Perlucidibaca, Plantibacter, Polynucleobacter, Propionibacterium, Propioniciclava, Pseudoclavibacter, Pseudomonas, Pseudonocardia, Pseudoxanthomonas, Psychrobacter, Ralstonia, Rheinheimera, Rhizobium, Rhodococcus, Rhodopseudomonas, Roseateles, Ruminococcus, Sebaldella, Sediminibacillus, Sediminibacterium, Serratia, Shigella, Shinella, Sinorhizobium, Sinosporangium, Sphingobacterium, Sphingomonas, Sphingopyxis, Sphingosinicella, Staphylococcus, Stenotrophomonas, Strenotrophomonas, Streptococcus, Streptomyces, Stygiolobus, Sulfurisphaera, Tatumella, Tepidimonas, Thermomonas, Thiobacillus, Variovorax, WPS-2_genera_incertae_sedis, Xanthomonas, Zimmermannella.

[0150] In one embodiment, the endophytic bacterium is of a family selected from the group consisting of: Bacillaceae, Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Methylobacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Paenibacillileae, Pseudomonnaceae, Rhizobiaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae.

[0151] In one embodiment, the endophytic bacterium is of a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Chryseobacterium, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Saccharibacillus, Sphingomonas, and Stenotrophomonas.

[0152] In one embodiment, the endophytic bacterium comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671.

[0153] In one embodiment, the endophytic bacterium comprises in its genome a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671.

[0154] In another embodiment, the endophytic microbe is a fungus. In some embodiments of the present invention, the endophyte is a member of one the following taxa: Acidomyces acidophilus, Acremonium alternatum, Acremonium pteridii, Acremonium strictum, Acrodictys elaeidicola, Acrostalagmus luteoalbus, Albatrellus higanensis, Albonectria rigidiuscula, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria arborescens, Alternaria conjuncta, Alternaria helianthi, Alternaria longipes, Alternaria malorum, Alternaria metachromatica, Alternaria oregonensis, Alternaria photistica, Alternaria protenta, Alternaria tenuissima, Alternaria triticina, Alternaria zinniae, Amorphotheca resinae, Ampelomyces humuli , Anthostomella proteae, Apiognomonia errabunda, Aposphaeria populina, Arthrinium sacchari, Aspergillus aculeatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus versicolor, Athelia bombacina, Aureobasidium pullulans, Bartalinia laurinia, Bartalinia pondoensis, Bartalinia robillardoides, Beauveria bassiana, Bionectria ochroleuca, Bipolaris papendorfii, Boeremia exigua var. exigua, Botryosphaeria rhodina, Botrytis cinerea, Brachysporium nigrum, Cadophora (Phialophora) finlandica, Camarosporium palliatum, Camarosporium propinquum, Candida tropicalis, Capnodium coffeae, Ceratobasidium cornigerum, Ceratobasidium obscurum, Cercophora terricola, Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium sphaerale, Chaetosphaeria endophytica, Chaetosphaeria ovoidea, Chaunopycnis alba, Chaunopycnis pustulata, Chloridium phaeosporum, Chloridium preussii, Chromelosporium fulvum, Cladorrhinum bulbillosum, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Cladosporium edgeworthrae, Cladosporium herbarum, Cladosporium orchidis, Cladosporium oxysporum, Cladosporium tenuissimum, Clonostachys rosea, Clonostachys rosea f catenulate, Cochliobolus australiensis, Cochliobolus geniculatus, Cochliobolus hawaiiensis, Cochliobolus lunatus, Cochliobolus tuberculatus, Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum capsici, Colletotrichum crassipes, Colletotrichum dematium, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Colletotrichum magna, Colletotrichum musae, Colletotrichum orbiculare, Colletotrichum truncatum, Coniella minima, Coniochaeta tetraspora, Coniochaeta velutina, Coniophora puteana, Coprinellus disseminates, Coprinellys radians, Cordyceps sinensis, Corynascus kuwaitiensis, Corynespora cassiicola, Crinipellis roreri, Cryphonectria parasitica, Cryptococcus victoriae, Curvularia affinis, Curvularia oryzae, Curvularia senegalensis, Curvularia sichuanensis, Cytosphaera mangiferae, Cytospora eucalypticola, Daldinia eschscholzi., Davidiella tassiana, Debaryomyces hansenii, Deightoniella torulosa, Diaporthe cynaroidis, Diaporthe eres, Diaporthe helianthi, Diaporthe phaseolorum, Dictyochaeta triseptata, Dothiorella aromatica, Dothiorella dominicana, Drechslera ellisii, Elsinoe veneta, Embellisia eureka, Emericella nidulans, Engyodontium album, Epicoccum nigrum, Epulorhiza anaticula, Epulorhiza repens, Eurotium amstelodami, Exserohilum rostratum, Fasciatispora petrakii, Fimetariella rabenhorstii, Fomes fomentarius, Fomes fomentarius, Fomitopsis ostreiformis, Fomitopsis pinicola, Fusarium anthophilum, Fusarium aquaeductuum, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium bulbicola, Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium incarnatum, Fusarium lichenicola, Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium poae, Fusarium polyphialidicum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium pulverosum, Fusarium semitectum var. majus, Fusarium solani, Fusarium sporotrichioides, Fusarium tricinctum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusicladium britannicum, Ganoderma tsugae, Geomyces vinaceus, Gibberella avenacea, Gibberella baccata, Gibberella fujikuroi, Gibberella moniliformis, Gibberella zeae, Gliomastix murorum, Glomerella cingulata, Glomerella cingulate, Guignardi bidwelli, Guignardia camelliae, Guignardia citricarpa, Guignardia cocoicola, Guignardia mangiferae, Guignardia manqiferae, Guignardia vaccinii, Haematonectria haematococca, Haplotrichum minitissimum, Helgardia anguioides, Helminthosporium chlorophorae, Hypocrea virens, Hypoxylon fragiforme, Hypoxylon serpens, Hypoxylon stygium, Idriella amazonica, Idriella asaicola, Idriella euterpes, Idriella licualae, Ilyonectria radicicola, Kabatiella caulivora, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kretzschmaria deusta, Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Laspora coronate, Leiosphaerella cocoes, Lentinus squarrosulus, Lepteutypa cupressi, Leptosphaeria coniothyrium, Leptosphaerulina trifolii, Letendraeopsis palmarum, Leucostoma niveum, Lewia eureka, Lewia eureka, Lunulospora curvula, Macrophomina phaseolina, Malbranchea circinata, Massarina arundinariae, Melanospora zamiae, Melanotus subcuneiformis, Melanotus subcuneiformis, Microascus cinereus, Minimidochium setosum, Moniliopsis anomala, Monodictys levis, Morchella elata, Mortierella alpine, Mucor fragilis, Mucor racemosus, Muscodor albus, Mycena murina, Mycocentrospora acerina, Myriangium duriaei, Nectria haematococca, Nemania aenea, Nemania bipapillata, Nemania serpens, Neofusicoccum mangiferae, Neotyphodium lolii, Neurospora crassa, Nigrospora oryzae, Nigrospora sphaerica, Nodulisporium anamorph of Hypoxylon fragiforme, Nodulisporium anamorph of Hypoxylon fuscum, Nodulisporium gregarium, Ochrocladosporium elatum, Ophiocordyceps sobolifera, Ophiostoma stenoceras, Oxydothis poliothea, Paecilomyces formosus, Papulosa amerospora, Paraconiothyrium minitans, Paraphaeosphaeria quadriseptata, Penicillium biourgeianum, Penicillium brevicompactum, Peniophora cinerea, Periconia anamorph of Didymosphaeria igniaria, Periconia digitata, Periconia hispidula, Periconia prolifica, Pestalotiopsis adusta, Pestalotiopsis caudata, Pestalotiopsis guepinii, Pestalotiopsis maculiformans, Pestalotiopsis microspora, Pestalotiopsis palmarum, Pestalotiopsis versicolor, Petriella sordida, Peziza varia, Peziza vesiculosa, Phaeangium lefebvrei, Phaedothis winteri, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, Phaeotrichoconis crotalariae, Phanerochaete affinis, Phanerochaete sordida, Phialemonium dimorphosporum, Phlebia radiate, Phlogicylindrium eucalypti, Phoma glomerata, Phoma herbarum, Phoma leveillei, Phoma moricola, Phoma radicina, Phoma sorghina, Phoma subglomerata, Phoma tracheiphila, Phoma tropica, Phomatospora bellaminuta, Phomatospora berkeleyi, Phomopsis anacardii, Phomopsis casuarinae, Phomopsis leptostromiformis, Phomopsis mangiferae, Phomopsis manilkarae, Phomopsis orchidophila, Phyllosticta capitalensis, Phyllosticta colocasiicola, Phyllosticta minima, Phyllosticta sapotae, Piptarthron macrosporum, Piricauda pelagica, Piriformospora indica, Plagiostoma euphorbiae, Plenodomus fuscomaculans, Pleurophoma cava, Pleurotus ostreatus, Podospora fimbriata, Porosphaerella borinquensis, Preussia mediterranea, Preussia minima, Pseudocercospora punicae, Pseudocochliobolus pallescens, Pycnoporus cinnabarinus, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Pyriculariopsis parasitica, Ramichloridium apiculatum, Ramichloridium biverticillatum, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizopycnis vagum, Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii, Rhodotorula minuta, Schizophyllum commune, Scolecobasidium terreum, Scolicotrichum musae, Scopuloides hydnoides, Scytalidium lignicola, Sebacina vermifera, Septoria anacardii, Setosphaeria rostrata, Sordaria fimicola, Sordaria tomento-alba, Sporormiella minima, Stagonosporopsis dorenboschii, Stemphylium botryosum, Stemphylium solani, Stilbohypoxylon quisquiliarum var. quisquiliarum, Streptomyces albosporus, Streptomyces aureus, Streptomyces cinereus, Streptomyces glaucus, Streptomyces globisporus, Streptomyces griseofuscus, Streptomyces griseorubroviolaceus, Streptomyces hygroscopicus , Streptomyces roseosporus, Sydowia polyspora, Talaromyces flavus, Talaromyces ohiensis, Talaromyces ohiensis, Tetracladium furcatum, Thanatephorus cucumeris, Thanatephorus pennatus, Thermomyces lanuginosus, Thumenella cubispora, Torula herbarum f. quaternella, Trametes hirsuta, Trematosphaeria pertusa, Trichoderma hamatum, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Trichoderma viride, Trichothecium roseum, Triscelophorus acuminatus, Triscelophorus konajensis, Triscelophorus monosporus, Truncatella angustata, Truncatella conorum-piceae, Tulasnella calospora, Ulocladium atrum, Ulocladium cucurbitae, Ustilago williamsii, Valsa ceratosperma, Verruculina enalia, Verticillium lecanii, Wiesneriomyces laurinus, Wrightoporia tropicalis, Xylaria acuta, Xylaria adscendens, Xylaria allantoidea, Xylaria anisopleura, Xylaria arbuscula, Xylaria castorea Berk., Xylaria coccophora, Xylaria cubensis, Xylaria curta, Xylaria hypoxylon, Xylaria microceras, Xylaria multiplex, Xylaria obovata, Xylaria palmicola, Xylaria telfairii, Zalerion maritimum, Zygosporium echinosporum, Zygosporium gibbum.

[0155] In one embodiment, the endophytic fungus is of a family selected from the group consisting of: Cladosporiaceae, Gnomoniaceae, Incertae sedis, Lasiosphaeriaceae, Netriaceae, Pleosporaceae.

[0156] In one embodiment, the endophytic fungus is of a genus selected from the group consisting of: Acremonium, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Cochliobolus, Embellisia, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Nigrospora, Phoma, and Podospora. In some embodiments, the endophytic fungus is of species Acremonium strictum, Acremonium zeae, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria epidermidis, Alternaria infectoria, Alternaria tenuissima, Cladosporium tenuissimum, Epicoccum nigrum, Epicoccum sorghinum, Fusarium nigrum, Fusarium udum, Fusarium verticillioides, and Nigrospora oryza.

[0157] In one embodiment, the endophytic bacterium comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0158] In one embodiment, the endophytic fungus comprises in its genome a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0159] In one embodiment, the endophyte comprises comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 90% identical, for example, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical or 100% identical, to a nucleic acid sequences found among the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1 - 3700.

[0160] In some aspects, the endophyte of any method or composition of the present invention comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 90% identical, for example, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical or 100% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 and 12-19.

[0161] Exogenous Endophytes. In one embodiment, the endophyte is an endophytic microbe that was isolated from a different plant than the inoculated plant. For example, in one embodiment, the endophyte can be an endophyte isolated from a different plant of the same species as the inoculated plant. In some cases, the endophyte can be isolated from a species related to the inoculated plant.

[0162] The breeding of plants for agriculture, their propagation in altered environments, as well as cultural practices used to combat microbial pathogens, may have resulted in the loss in modern cultivars of the endophytes present in their wild ancestors, or such practices may have inadvertently promoted other novel or rare plant-endophyte interactions, or otherwise altered the microbial population. The former is the case in maize and its phylogenetically confirmed, direct wild ancestor, Parviglumis teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis). It is possible that this higher diversity and titer of endophytes in the ancestor is correlated with an equally wide range of physiological responses derived from the symbiosis that allow the plant to better adapt to the environment and tolerate stress. In order to survey plant groups for potentially useful endophytes, seeds of their wild ancestors, wild relatives, primitive landraces, modern landraces, modern breeding lines, and elite modern agronomic varieties can be screened for microbial endophytes by culture and culture independent methods as described herein.

[0163] In some cases, plants are inoculated with endophytes that are exogenous to the seed of the inoculated plant. In one embodiment, the endophyte is derived from a plant of another species. For example, an endophyte that is normally found in dicots is applied to a monocot plant (e.g., inoculating corn with a soy bean-derived endophyte), or vice versa. In other cases, the endophyte to be inoculated onto a plant can be derived from a related species of the plant that is being inoculated. In one embodiment, the endophyte can be derived from a related taxon, for example, from a related species. The plant of another species can be an agricultural plant. For example, an endophyte derived from Hordeum irregulare can be used to inoculate a Hordeum vulgare L., plant. Alternatively, it can be derived from a 'wild' plant (i.e., a non-agricultural plant). For example, endophytes normally associated with the wild cotton Gossypium klotzschianum can be used to inoculate commercial varieties of Gossypium hirsutum plants. As an alternative example of deriving an endophyte from a 'wild' plant, endophytic bacteria isolated from the South East Asian jungle orchid, Cymbidium ebumeum, can be isolated and testing for their capacity to benefit seedling development and survival of agricultural crops such as wheat, maize, soy and others [Faria, D.C., et al., (2013) World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. 29(2). pp. 217-221]. In other cases, the endophyte can be isolated from an ancestral species of the inoculated plant. For example, an endophyte derived from Zea diploperennis can be used to inoculate a commercial variety of modern corn, or Zea mays.

[0164] Relocalization of Endophytes. While the endophyte that is coated onto the surface of the seed of the first plant is isolated from inside the seed of the second plant, the endophyte can relocalize to other tissues or plant parts once the seed of the first plant germinates. As such, in one embodiment, the seed endophyte which is coated onto the seed of a plant is capable, upon germination of the seed into a vegetative state, of localizing to a different tissue of the plant. For example, the endophyte can be capable of localizing to any one of the tissues in the plant, including: the root, adventitious root, seminal root, root hair, shoot, leaf, flower, bud, tassel, meristem, pollen, pistil, ovaries, stamen, fruit, stolon, rhizome, nodule, tuber, trichome, guard cells, hydathode, petal, sepal, glume, rachis, vascular cambium, phloem, and xylem. In one embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the root and/or the root hair of the plant. In another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the photosynthetic tissues, for example, leaves and shoots of the plant. In other cases, the endophyte is localized to the vascular tissues of the plant, for example, in the xylem and phloem. In still another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the reproductive tissues (flower, pollen, pistil, ovaries, stamen, fruit) of the plant. In another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the root, shoots, leaves and reproductive tissues of the plant. In still another embodiment, the endophyte colonizes a fruit or seed tissue of the plant. In still another embodiment, the endophyte is able to colonize the plant such that it is present in the surface of the plant (i.e., its presence is detectably present on the plant exterior, or the episphere of the plant). In still other embodiments, the endophyte is capable of localizing to substantially all, or all, tissues of the plant. In certain embodiments, the endophyte is not localized to the root of a plant. In other cases, the endophyte is not localized to the photosynthetic tissues of the plant.

Compositions comprising endophytes



[0165] In some embodiments, the endophyte is capable of metabolizing D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-threonine, glycyl-L-aspartic acid, glycyl-L-glutamic acid, glycyl-L-proline, glyoxylic acid, inosine, L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, L-arabinose, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, tyramine, uridine, proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, and salicin. In one embodiment, the endophyte comprises in its genome a nucleic acid sequence encoding a protein allowing it to metabolize arabinose. In one embodiment, the protein is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 3701-3813.

[0166] In some embodiments, the plant or plant element experiences an improved ability to grow in water-limited conditions, as a result of being associated with the endophyte or endophyte combinations.

[0167] In still another embodiment, the plant element of the first plant can be from a genetically modified plant. In another embodiment, the plant element of the first plant can be a hybrid plant element.

[0168] The synthetic combination can comprise a plant element of the first plant which is surface-sterilized prior to combining with the endophytes.

[0169] As stated above, the endophyte used in the synthetic combination is derived from a plant element of a second plant. In one embodiment, the second plant is a monocotyledonous plant or tissue thereof. In a particular embodiment, the second plant is a cereal plant or tissue thereof. In yet another embodiment, the second plant is selected from the group consisting of a maize plant, a barley plant, a wheat plant, a sugarcane plant, or a rice plant. In one embodiment, the plant element is a naked grain (i.e., without hulls or fruit cases). In an alternative embodiment, the second plant is a dicotyledonous plant. For example, the second plant can be selected from the group consisting of a cotton plant, a tomato plant, a pepper plant, or a soybean plant.

[0170] The synthetic combination can additionally comprise a seed coating composition, a root treatment, or a foliar application composition. The seed coating composition, or the root treatment, or the foliar application composition can comprise an agent selected from the group consisting of: a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide and a nutrient, or a combination thereof. The seed coating composition, or the root treatment, or the foliar application composition can further comprise an agent selected from the group consisting of an agriculturally acceptable carrier, a tackifier, a microbial stabilizer, or a combination thereof. In still another embodiment, the seed coating composition, or the root treatment, or the foliar application composition composition can contain a second microbial preparation, including but not limited to a rhizobial bacterial preparation.

[0171] The present invention contemplates the use of endophytes that are unmodified, as well as those that are modified. In one embodiment, the endophyte is a recombinant endophyte. In one particular embodiment, the endophyte is modified prior to coating onto the surface of the plant element such that it has enhanced compatibility with an antimicrobial agent when compared with the unmodified. For example, the endophyte can be modified such that it has enhanced compatibility with an antibacterial agent. In an alternative embodiment, the endophyte has enhanced compatibility with an antifungal agent. The endophyte can be modified such that it exhibits at least 3 fold greater, for example, at least 5 fold greater, at least 10 fold greater, at least 20 fold greater, at least 30 fold greater or more resistance to an antimicrobial agent when compared with the unmodified endophyte.

[0172] The present invention also contemplates the use of multiple endophytes. For example, in one embodiment, the synthetic combination described above can comprise a plurality of purified endophytes, for example, 2, 3, 4 or more different types of endophytes.

[0173] In one embodiment, the formulation comprises an endophyte that comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical, for example, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical, to any nucleic acid selected from SEQ ID NOs: 1 - 3700.

[0174] In one embodiment, the formulation comprises at least two endophytic microbial entities that separately comprise a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 97% identical, for example, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical, to any nucleic acid selected from SEQ ID NOs: 1 - 3700.

[0175] In one embodiment, the agronomic trait is selected from the group consisting of altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant. In another embodiment, at least two agronomic traits are improved in the agricultural plant.

[0176] In another embodiment, the formulation comprising the endophyte is disposed in an amount effective to detectably increase the rate of germination of the seed. For example, the rate of germination of the seed is increased by at least 0.5%, for example, at least 1%, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100% or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0177] In another embodiment, the formulation comprising the endophyte is disposed in an amount effective to detectably increase the biomass of the plant. For example, the biomass of the plant is detectably increased by at least 1%, for example, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0178] In another embodiment, the formulation comprising the endophyte is disposed in an amount effective to increase the biomass or yield of a fruit or seed of the plant. For example, the biomass of the fruit or seed of the plant is detectably increased by at least 1%, for example, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with the fruit or seed of a reference agricultural plant.

[0179] In still another embodiment, the formulation comprising the endophyte is disposed in an amount effective to increase the height of the plant. The height of the plant, in some embodiments, is detectably increased by at least 1%, for example, at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 5%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with the height of a reference agricultural plant.

Combinations of Endophytes



[0180] In another embodiment, the present invention contemplates methods of associating a plurality of endophytes with one or more plant elements, such as a seed, a leaf, or a root, in order to confer an improved agronomic trait or improved agronomic trait potential to said plant element or host plant.

[0181] In some embodiments, the invention contemplates coating the seed of a plant with a plurality of endophytes, as well as seed compositions comprising a plurality of endophytes on and/or in the seed. The methods according to this embodiment can be performed in a manner similar to those described herein for single endophyte coating. In one example, multiple endophytes can be prepared in a single preparation that is coated onto the seed. The endophytes can be from a common origin (i.e., a same plant). Alternatively, the endophytes can be from different plants. Thus, the present invention provides for combinations comprising at least two endophytic microbial populations with an agricultural plant. The endophytic populations are heterologously disposed on an exterior surface of or within the plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant. The combination can further comprise a formulation that comprises at least one member selected from the group consisting of an agriculturally compatible carrier, a tackifier, a microbial stabilizer, a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide, and a nutrient.

[0182] Where multiple endophytes are coated onto the seed of the plant, each endophyte can be a bacterium. In the alternative, each endophyte can be a fungus. In still another embodiment, a mixture of bacterial and fungal endophytes can be coated onto the surface of a seed.

[0183] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a bacterium selected from one of the following genera: Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Chryseobacterium, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Saccharibacillus, Sphingomonas, and Stenotrophomonas.

[0184] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a fungus selected from one of the following genera: Acremonium, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Cochliobolus, Embellisia, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Nigrospora, Phoma, and Podospora.

[0185] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a bacterium selected from one of the following families: Bacillaceae, Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Methylobacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Paenibacillileae, Pseudomonnaceae, Rhizobiaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae.

[0186] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a fungus selected from one of the following families: Cladosporiaceae, Gnomoniaceae, Incertae sedis, Lasiosphaeriaceae, Netriaceae, Pleosporaceae.

[0187] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination are selected from one of the following genera: Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Chryseobacterium, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Saccharibacillus, Sphingomonas, and Stenotrophomonas, Acremonium, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Cochliobolus, Embellisia, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Nigrospora, Phoma, and Podospora.

[0188] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination are selected from one of the following families: Bacillaceae, Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Methylobacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Paenibacillileae, Pseudomonnaceae, Rhizobiaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Cladosporiaceae, Gnomoniaceae, Incertae sedis, Lasiosphaeriaceae, Netriaceae, Pleosporaceae.

[0189] In one embodiment, at least one of the endophytic populations comprise a nucleic acid that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 1 - 3700.

[0190] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, or greater than five, endophytes, each comprising a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1-3700.

[0191] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, or greater than five, endophytes, each comprising a nucleic acid sequence at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100% identical from a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1-3700.

[0192] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a bacterium comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence selected from SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671. In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a fungus comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence selected from SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700. In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination are endophytes each comprising in its genome a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671, 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0193] In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a bacterium comprising in its genome a nucleic acid that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671. In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination is a fungus comprising in its genome a nucleic acid that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700. In one embodiment, at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least night, or at least ten or more endophytes of an endophytic combination are endophytes each comprising in its genome a nucleic acid that is at least 90% identical, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical, or 100% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of: SEQ ID NOs: 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3598, 3599, 3600, 3601, 3603, 3604, 3606, 3607, 3608, 3609, 3619, 3620, 3621, 3622, 3623, 3624, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3629, 3630, 3631, 3632, 3633, 3634, 3635, 3636, 3637, 3638, 3639, 3641, 3645, 3646, 3648, 3649, 3651, 3652, 3653, 3656, 3663, 3664, 3665, 3666, 3667, 3668, 3669, 3670, 3671, 3597, 3602, 3605, 3610, 3611, 3612, 3613, 3614, 3615, 3616, 3617, 3618, 3640, 3642, 3643, 3644, 3647, 3650, 3654, 3655, 3657, 3658, 3659, 3660, 3661, 3662, 3672, 3673, 3674, 3675, 3676, 3677, 3678, 3679, 3680, 3681, 3682, 3683, 3684, 3685, 3686, 3687, 3688, 3689, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3695, 3696, 3697, 3698, 3699, 3700.

[0194] In some aspects, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two endophytes that each comprise at least one nucleic acid sequence that is at least 90% identical, for example, at least 91% identical, at least 92% identical, at least 93% identical, at least 94% identical, at least 95% identical, at least 96% identical, at least 97% identical, at least 98% identical, at least 99% identical, at least 99.5% identical or 100% identical to any nucleic acid provided in Tables 1-10 and 12-19.

[0195] In some aspects, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two endophytes provided in Table 11.

[0196] Where multiple endophytes are coated onto the seed, any or all of the endophytes may be capable of conferring a beneficial trait onto the host plant. In some cases, all of the endophytes are capable of conferring a beneficial trait onto the host plant. The trait conferred by each of the endophytes may be the same (e.g., both improve the host plant's tolerance to a particular biotic stress), or may be distinct (e.g., one improves the host plant's tolerance to drought, while another improves phosphate utilization). In other cases the conferred trait may be the result of interactions between the endophytes.

[0197] Combinations of endophytes can be selected by any one or more of several criteria. In one embodiment, compatible endophytes are selected. As used herein, "compatibility" refers to endophyte populations that do not significantly interfere with the growth, propagation, and/or production of beneficial substances of the other. Incompatible endophyte populations can arise, for example, where one of the populations produces or secrets a compound that is toxic or deleterious to the growth of the other population(s). Incompatibility arising from production of deleterious compounds/agents can be detected using methods known in the art, and as described herein elsewhere. Similarly, the distinct populations can compete for limited resources in a way that makes co-existence difficult.

[0198] In another embodiment, combinations are selected on the basis of compounds produced by each population of endophytes. For example, the first population is capable of producing siderophores, and another population is capable of producing anti-fungal compounds. In one embodiment, the first population of endophytes or endophytic components is capable of a function selected from the group consisting of auxin production, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial compound, siderophore production, mineral phosphate solubilization, cellulase production, chitinase production, xylanase production, and acetoin production. In another embodiment, the second population of endophytes or endophytic component is capable of a function selected from the group consisting of auxin production, nitrogen fixation, production of an antimicrobial compound, siderophore production, mineral phosphate solubilization, cellulase production, chitinase production, xylanase production, and acetoin production. In still another embodiment, the first and second populations are capable of at least one different function.

[0199] In another embodiment, combinations are selected on the basis of carbon sources they metabolize. In some aspects, an endophyte may be capable of using any one or more of the following: 1,2-Propanediol, 2-Aminoethanol, 2-Deoxy adenosine, Acetic acid, Acetoacetic acid, Adenosine, Adonitol, Bromo succinic acid, Citric acid, D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Cellobiose, D-Fructose, D-Fructose-6-Phosphate, D-Galactonic acid-γ-lactone, D-Galactose, D-Galacturonic acid, D-Gluconic acid, D-Glucosaminic acid, D-Glucose-1-Phosphate, D-Glucose-6-Phosphate, D-Glucuronic acid, D-L-Malic acid, D-L-α-Glycerol phosphate, D-Malic acid, D-Mannitol, D-Mannose, D-Melibiose, D-Psicose, D-Ribose, D-Saccharic acid, D-Serine, D-Sorbitol, D-Threonine, D-Trehalose, Dulcitol, D-Xylose, Formic acid, Fumaric acid, Glucuronamide, Glycerol, Glycolic acid, Glycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, Lactulose, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Fucose, L-Galactonic-acid-γ-lactone, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Lactic acid, L-Lyxose, L-Malic acid, L-Proline, L-Rhamnose, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Maltose, Maltotriose, Methyl Pyruvate, m-Hydroxy Phenyl Acetic acid, m-Inositol, Mono Methyl Succinate, m-Tartaric acid, Mucic acid, N-acetyl- β-D-Mannosamine, N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine, Phenylethyl-amine, p-Hydroxy Phenyl acetic acid, Propionic acid, Pyruvic acid, Succinic acid, Sucrose, Thymidine, Tricarballylic acid, Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 80, Tyramine, Uridine, α-D-Glucose, α-D-Lactose, α-Hydroxy Butyric acid, α-Hydroxy Glutaric acid- γ-lactone, α-Keto-Butyric acid, α-Keto-Glutaric acid, α-Methyl-D-Galactoside, β-Methyl-D-glucoside. In preferred embodiments, at least one population is capable of metabolizing any one or more of the following: D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Serine, D-ThreonineGlycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Proline, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Tyramine, Uridine, Proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, salicin.

[0200] In another aspect, the combination of endophytes comprises at least one endophyte that is capable of metabolizing any one or more of the following: D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Serine, D-ThreonineGlycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Proline, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Tyramine, Uridine, Proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, salicin.

[0201] For example, one endophyte may be capable of utilizing oxalic acid and a second endophyte may be capable of using arabinose. For example, at least one endophyte may be capable of metabolizing proline, at least one endophyte may be capable of metabolizing mannose. It is contemplated that combinations of endophytes may be selected based on complementary metabolic capabilities: for example, one may be capable of utilizing mannose but not sucrose, and a second may be capable of utilizing sucrose but not mannose. In another aspect, it is contemplated that combinations of endophytes may be selected based on mutual metabolic capabilities: for example, two endophytes that both are able to utilize mannose. In another aspect, it is contemplated that combinations of endophytes are selected based on the synergistic effects of carbon source utilization: for example, one endophyte may have the capability of utilizing mannose but not proline but when in combination with a second endophyte may then display the ability to utilize proline. In other words, one endophyte may be able to promote the ability of another endophyte to utilize a particular carbon source. In another aspect, one endophyte may reduce the ability of another endophyte to utilize a particular carbon source. In another aspect of synergism, two endophytes that are themselves each capable of utilizing one type of carbon source, for example, maltose, may enhance each others' abilities to utilize said carbon source at a greater efficiacy. It is contemplated that any combination (mutual, complementary, additive, synergistic) of substrate utilization capabilities may be used as criteria of selection of endophytes of the present invention. It is further contemplated that such combinations of carbon substrate sources for endophyte utilization may include at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, at least six, at least seven, at least eight, at least nine, at least ten, and even greater than ten different carbon sources.

[0202] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, or greater than five, endophytes wherein at least one of said endophytes comprises a gene in its genome that encodes a protein selected from the group consisting of: arabinose ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, arabinose ABC transporter permease, arabinose ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, arabinose import ATP-binding protein AraG, arabinose isomerase, arabinose-proton symporter, L-arabinose ABC transporter periplasmic L-arabinose-binding protein, L-arabinose isomerase, L-arabinose transport ATP-binding protein araG, L-arabinose transporter ATP-binding protein, L-arabinose transporter ATP-binding protein (plasmid), L-arabinose transporter permease, L-arabinose transporter permease (plasmid), L-arabinose transporter permease protein, L-arabinose-binding protein, arabinose-proton symporter.

[0203] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, or greater than five, endophytes wherein each endophyte comprises a gene in its genome that encodes a protein selected from SEQ ID NO: 3701-3913.

[0204] In some embodiments, the first endophyte comprises in its genome a gene that encodes a protein with at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100% identical from a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 3701-3913

[0205] In some embodiments, the first endophyte comprises in its genome a gene that encodes a protein with at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100% identical from a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 3701-3913, and the second endophyte comprises in its genome a gene that encodes a protein with at least 80% identity to a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 3701-3913.

[0206] In some embodiments, the first population comprises in its genome a gene that encodes a protein with at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, or at least 99% identity to a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 3701-3913. In some embodiments, the second population comprises in its genome a gene that encodes a protein with at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, or at least 99% identity to a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 3701-3913.

[0207] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least two, at least three, at least four, at least five, or greater than five, endophytes capable of metabolizing at least one of the following: D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Serine, D-ThreonineGlycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Proline, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Tyramine, Uridine, Proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, salicin.

[0208] In some embodiments, the combination of endophytes comprises at least one endophyte comprising a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1-3700, and at least one endophyte that is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Serine, D-ThreonineGlycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Proline, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Tyramine, Uridine, Proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, salicin.

[0209] In another embodiment, the combination of endophytes comprises at least one endophyte comprising a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1-3700, and at least one endophyte that comprises a gene in its genome a gene that encodes a protein selected from SEQ ID NO: 3701-3913.

[0210] In another embodiment, the combination of endophytes comprises at least one endophyte that is capable of metabolizing at least one of D-Alanine, D-Aspartic acid, D-Serine, D-ThreonineGlycyl-L-Aspartic acid, Glycyl-L-Glutamic acid, Glycyl-L-Proline, Glyoxylic acid, Inosine, L-Alanine, L-Alanyl-Glycine, L-Arabinose, L-Asparagine, L-Aspartic acid, L-Glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-Proline, L-Serine, L-Threonine, Tyramine, Uridine, Proline, arabinose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, D-glucosamine, trehalose, oxalic acid, salicin, and at least one endophyte that comprises a gene in its genome a gene that encodes a protein selected from SEQ ID NO: 3701-3913.

[0211] It is contemplated that each endophyte in the combination of endophytes may comprise different characteristics, for example comprise genes with different percent identities to any of the sequences of SEQS ID Nos: 1-3913.

[0212] In still another embodiment, the combinations of endophytes are selected for their distinct localization in the plant after colonization. For example, the first population of endophytes or endophytic components can colonize, and in some cases preferentially colonize, the root tissue, while a second population can be selected on the basis of its preferential colonization of the aerial parts of the agricultural plant. Therefore, in one embodiment, the first population is capable of colonizing one or more of the tissues selected from the group consisting of a root, shoot, leaf, flower, and seed. In another embodiment, the second population is capable of colonizing one or more tissues selected from the group consisting of root, shoot, leaf, flower, and seed. In still another embodiment, the first and second populations are capable of colonizing a different tissue within the agricultural plant.

[0213] In still another embodiment, combinations of endophytes are selected for their ability to confer one or more distinct agronomic traits on the inoculated agricultural plant, either individually or in synergistic association with other endophytes. Alternatively, two or more endophytes induce the colonization of a third endophyte. For example, the first population of endophytes or endophytic components is selected on the basis that it confers significant increase in biomass, while the second population promotes increased drought tolerance on the inoculated agricultural plant. Therefore, in one embodiment, the first population is capable of conferring at least one trait selected from the group consisting of thermal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, drought resistance, insect resistance, fungus resistance, virus resistance, bacteria resistance, male sterility, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, increased yield, enhanced nutrient use efficiency, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased tolerance to nitrogen stress, increased fermentable carbohydrate content, reduced lignin content, increased antioxidant content, enhanced water use efficiency, increased vigor, increased germination efficiency, earlier or increased flowering, increased biomass, altered root-to-shoot biomass ratio, enhanced soil water retention, or a combination thereof. In another embodiment, the second population is capable of conferring a trait selected from the group consisting of thermal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, drought resistance, insect resistance, fungus resistance, virus resistance, bacteria resistance, male sterility, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, increased yield, enhanced nutrient use efficiency, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased fermentable carbohydrate content, reduced lignin content, increased antioxidant content, enhanced water use efficiency, increased vigor, increased germination efficiency, earlier or increased flowering, increased biomass, altered root-to-shoot biomass ratio, and enhanced soil water retention. In still another embodiment, each of the first and second population is capable of conferring a different trait selected from the group consisting of thermal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, drought resistance, insect resistance, fungus resistance, virus resistance, bacteria resistance, male sterility, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, increased yield, enhanced nutrient use efficiency, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased fermentable carbohydrate content, reduced lignin content, increased antioxidant content, enhanced water use efficiency, increased vigor, increased germination efficiency, earlier or increased flowering, increased biomass, altered root-to-shoot biomass ratio, and enhanced soil water retention. In any combination of endophytes, any of the following traits of agronomic importance may be modulated due to the association of one or more of the endophytes in the combination with a plant or plant element: altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, or a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant..

[0214] The combinations of endophytes can also be selected based on combinations of the above criteria. For example, the first population of endophytes can be selected on the basis of the compound it produces (e.g., its ability to fix nitrogen, thus providing a potential nitrogen source to the plant), while the second population can be selected on the basis of its ability to confer increased resistance of the plant to a pathogen (e.g., a fungal pathogen).

[0215] In some aspects of the present invention, it is contemplated that combinations of endophytes can provide an increased benefit to the host plant, as compared to that conferred by a single endophyte, by virtue of additive effects. For example, one endophyte strain that induces a benefit in the host plant may induce such benefit equally well in a plant that is also colonized with a different endophyte strain that also induces the same benefit in the host plant. The host plant thus exhibits the same total benefit from the plurality of different endophyte strains as the additive benefit to individual plants colonized with each individual endophyte of the plurality. In one example, a plant is colonized with two different endophyte strains: one provides a 1X increase in biomass when associated with the plant, and the other provides a 2X increase in biomass when associated with a different plant. When both endophyte strains are associated with the same plant, that plant would experience a 3X (additive of 1X + 2X single effects) increase in auxin biomass. Additive effects are a surprising aspect of the present invention, as non-compatibility of endophytes may result in a cancelation of the beneficial effects of both endophytes.

[0216] In some aspects of the present invention, it is contemplated that a combination of endophytes can provide an increased benefit to the host plant, as compared to that conferred by a single endophyte, by virtue of synergistic effects. For example, one endophyte strain that induces a benefit in the host plant may induce such benefit beyond additive effects in a plant that is also colonized with a different endophyte strain that also induces that benefit in the host plant. The host plant thus exhibits the greater total benefit from the plurality of different endophyte strains than would be expected from the additive benefit of individual plants colonized with each individual endophyte of the plurality. In one example, a plant is colonized with two different endophyte strains: one provides a 1X increase in biomass when associated with a plant, and the other provides a 2X increase in biomass when associated with a different plant. When both endophyte strains are associated with the same plant, that plant would experience a 5X (greater than an additive of 1X + 2X single effects) increase in biomass. Synergistic effects are a surprising aspect of the present invention.

[0217] Selection of endophytes conferring beneficial traits. The present invention contemplates inoculation of plants with microbes. As described earlier, the microbes can be derived from many different plants species, from different parts of the plants, and from plants isolated across different environments. Once a microbe is isolated, it can be tested for its ability to confer a beneficial trait. Numerous tests can be performed both in vitro and in vivo to assess what benefits, if any, are conferred upon the plant. In one embodiment, a microbe is tested in vitro for an activity selected from the group consisting of: liberation of complexed phosphates, liberation of complexed iron (e.g., through secretion of siderophores), production of phytohormones, production of antibacterial compounds, production of antifungal compounds, production of insecticidal compounds, production of nematicidal compounds, production and/or secretion of ACC deaminase, production and/or secretion of acetoin, production and/or secretion of pectinase, production and/or secretion of cellulase, and production and/or secretion of RNAse. Exemplary in vitro methods for the above can be found in the Examples sections below.

[0218] It is noted that the initial test for the activities listed above can also be performed using a mixture of microbes, for example, a community of microbes isolated from a single plant. A positive activity readout using such mixture can be followed with the isolation of individual microbes within that population and repeating the in vitro tests for the activities to isolate the microbe responsible for the particular activity. Once validated using a single microbe isolate, then the plant can be inoculated with a microbe, and the test performed in vivo, either in growth chamber or greenhouse conditions, and comparing with a control plant that was not inoculated with the microbe.

[0219] It is contemplated that each endophyte in the combination of endophytes may comprise different characteristics, for example but not limited to: comprise genes with different percent identities to any of the sequences of SEQS ID Nos: 1-3913, different phenotypic characteristics, different abilities to utilize various carbon sources, different abilities to confer agronomic trait potentials or improved agronomic traits to a host seed or plant to which it may become associated, different localization in plant elements.

Plants Useful for the Present Invention



[0220] The methods and compositions according to the present invention can be deployed for any seed plant species. Thus, the invention has use over a broad range of plants, preferably higher plants pertaining to the classes of Angiospermae and Gymnospermae.

[0221] In one embodiment, a monocotyledonous plant is used. Monocotyledonous plants belong to the orders of the Alismatales, Arales, Arecales, Bromeliales, Commelinales, Cyclanthales, Cyperales, Eriocaulales, Hydrocharitales, Juncales, Lilliales, Najadales, Orchidales, Pandanales, Poales, Restionales, Triuridales, Typhales, and Zingiberales. Plants belonging to the class of the Gymnospermae are Cycadales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales, and Pinales. In a particular embodiment, the monocotyledonous plant can be selected from the group consisting of a maize, rice, wheat, barley, and sugarcane.

[0222] In another embodiment, a dicotyledonous plant is used, including those belonging to the orders of the Aristochiales, Asterales, Batales, Campanulales, Capparales, Caryophyllales, Casuarinales, Celastrales, Cornales, Diapensales, Dilleniales, Dipsacales, Ebenales, Ericales, Eucomiales, Euphorbiales, Fabales, Fagales, Gentianales, Geraniales, Haloragales, Hamamelidales, Middles, Juglandales, Lamiales, Laurales, Lecythidales, Leitneriales, Magniolales, Malvales, Myricales, Myrtales, Nymphaeales, Papeverales, Piperales, Plantaginales, Plumb aginales, Podostemales, Polemoniales, Polygalales, Polygonales, Primulales, Proteales, Rafflesiales, Ranunculales, Rhamnales, Rosales, Rubiales, Salicales, Santales, Sapindales, Sarraceniaceae, Scrophulariales, Theales, Trochodendrales, Umbellales, Urticales, and Violates. In a particular embodiment, the dicotyledonous plant can be selected from the group consisting of cotton, soybean, pepper, and tomato.

[0223] The present invention contemplates the use of endophytic microbial entities derived from plants. It is contemplated that the plants may be agricultural plants. In some embodiments, a cultivar or variety that is of the same family as the plant from which the endophyte is derived is used. In some embodiments, a cultivar or variety that is of the same genus as the plant from which the endophyte is derived is used. In some embodiments, a cultivar or variety that is of the same species as the ancestral plant from which the endophyte is derived is used. In some embodiments, a modern cultivar or variety that is of the same family as the ancestral plant from which the endophyte is derived is used. In another embodiment, a modern cultivar or variety that is of the same genus as the ancestral plant from which the endophyte is used. In still another embodiment, a modern cultivar or variety that is of the same species as the ancestral plant from which the endophyte is used.

[0224] The methods and compositions of the present invention are preferably used in plants that are important or interesting for agriculture, horticulture, biomass for the production of biofuel molecules and other chemicals, and/or forestry. Non-limiting examples include, for instance, Panicum virgatum (switch), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum, sudan), Miscanthus giganteus (miscanthus), Saccharum sp. (energycane), Populus balsamifera (poplar), Zea mays (corn), Glycine max (soybean), Brassica napus (canola), Triticum aestivum (wheat), Gossypium hirsutum (cotton), Oryza sativa (rice), Helianthus annuus (sunflower), Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Beta vulgaris (sugarbeet), Pennisetum glaucum (pearl millet), Panicum spp., Sorghum spp., Miscanthus spp., Saccharum spp., Erianthus spp., Populus spp., Secale cereale (rye), Salix spp. (willow), Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus), Triticosecale spp. (triticum-wheat X rye), Bamboo, Carthamus tinctorius (saffiower), Jatropha curcas (Jatropha), Ricinus communis (castor), Elaeis guineensis (oil palm), Phoenix dactylifera (date palm), Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (king palm), Syagrus romanzoffiana (queen palm), Linum usitatissimum (flax), Brassica juncea, Manihot esculenta (cassaya), Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), Lactuca saliva (lettuce), Musa paradisiaca (banana), Solanum tuberosum (potato), Brassica oleracea (broccoli, cauliflower, brusselsprouts), Camellia sinensis (tea), Fragaria ananassa (strawberry), Theobroma cacao (cocoa), Coffea arabica (coffee), Vitis vinifera (grape), Ananas comosus (pineapple), Capsicum annum (hot & sweet pepper), Allium cepa (onion), Cucumis melo (melon), Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cucurbita maxima (squash), Cucurbita moschata (squash), Spinacea oleracea (spinach), Citrullus lanatus (watermelon), Abelmoschus esculentus (okra), Solanum melongena (eggplant), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Papaver orientale, Taxus baccata, Taxus brevifolia, Artemisia annua, Cannabis saliva, Camptotheca acuminate, Catharanthus roseus, Vinca rosea, Cinchona officinalis, Coichicum autumnale, Veratrum californica, Digitalis lanata, Digitalis purpurea, Dioscorea spp., Andrographis paniculata, Atropa belladonna, Datura stomonium, Berberis spp., Cephalotaxus spp., Ephedra sinica, Ephedra spp., Erythroxylum coca, Galanthus wornorii, Scopolia spp., Lycopodium serratum (Huperzia serrata), Lycopodium spp., Rauwolfia serpentina, Rauwolfia spp., Sanguinaria canadensis, Hyoscyamus spp., Calendula officinalis, Chrysanthemum parthenium, Coleus forskohlii, Tanacetum parthenium, Parthenium argentatum (guayule), Hevea spp. (rubber), Mentha spicata (mint), Mentha piperita (mint), Bixa orellana, Alstroemeria spp., Rosa spp. (rose), Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation), Petunia spp. (petunia), Poinsettia pulcherrima (poinsettia), Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco), Lupinus albus (lupin), Uniola paniculata (oats), Hordeum vulgare (barley), and Lolium spp. (rye).

[0225] The present invention contemplates improving an agronomic trait in an agricultural plant by contacting a modern agricultural plant with a formulation comprising an endophyte derived from a plant or an endophyte conserved across diverse species and/or cultivars of agricultural plants. In one embodiment, the modern agricultural plant is a hybrid plant. In another embodiment, the modern agricultural plant is an inbred plant. Non-limiting examples of such hybrid, inbred and genetically modified plants are described below. In still another embodiment the modern agricultural plant is a genetically modified plant. The methods described herein can also be used with genetically modified plants, for example, to yield additional trait benefits to a plant. In one embodiment, the modern agricultural plant is a genetically modified plant that comprises a transgene that confers in the plant a phenotype selected from the group consisting of: altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant, or any combination thereof.

Plant Element and Endophyte Combinations



[0226] It is contemplated that the methods and compositions of the present invention may be used to improve any characteristic of any agricultural plant. The methods described herein can also be used with transgenic plants comprising one or more exogenous transgenes, for example, to yield additional trait benefits conferred by the newly introduced endophytic microbes. Therefore, in one embodiment, a plant element of a transgenic maize, wheat, rice, cotton, canola, alfalfa, or barley plant is contacted with an endophytic microbe.

[0227] The presence of the endophyte or other microbes can be detected and its localization in or on the host plant (including a plant element thereof) can be determined using a number of different methodologies. The presence of the microbe in the embryo or endosperm, as well as its localization with respect to the plant cells, can be determined using methods known in the art, including immunofluorescence microscopy using microbe specific antibodies, or fluorescence in situ hybridization (see, for example, Amann et al. (2001) Current Opinion in Biotechnology 12:231-236, incorporated herein by reference). The presence and quantity of other microbes can be established by the FISH, immunofluorescence and PCR methods using probes that are specific for the microbe. Alternatively, degenerate probes recognizing conserved sequences from many bacteria and/or fungi can be employed to amplify a region, after which the identity of the microbes present in the tested tissue/cell can be determined by sequencing.

[0228] In some embodiments, the present invention contemplates the use of endophytes that can confer a beneficial agronomic trait upon the plant element or resulting plant with which it is associated.

[0229] In some cases, the endophytes described herein are capable of moving from one tissue type to another. For example, the present invention's detection and isolation of endophytes within the mature tissues of plants after coating on the exterior of a seed demonstrates their ability to move from seed exterior into the vegetative tissues of a maturing plant. Therefore, in one embodiment, the population of endophytes is capable of moving from the seed exterior into the vegetative tissues of a plant. In one embodiment, the endophyte that is coated onto the seed of a plant is capable, upon germination of the seed into a vegetative state, of localizing to a different tissue of the plant. For example, endophytes can be capable of localizing to any one of the tissues in the plant, including: the root, adventitious root, seminal root, root hair, shoot, leaf, flower, bud, tassel, meristem, pollen, pistil, ovaries, stamen, fruit, stolon, rhizome, nodule, tuber, trichome, guard cells, hydathode, petal, sepal, glume, rachis, vascular cambium, phloem, and xylem. In one embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the root and/or the root hair of the plant. In another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the photosynthetic tissues, for example, leaves and shoots of the plant. In other cases, the endophyte is localized to the vascular tissues of the plant, for example, in the xylem and phloem. In still another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the reproductive tissues (flower, pollen, pistil, ovaries, stamen, fruit) of the plant. In another embodiment, the endophyte is capable of localizing to the root, shoots, leaves and reproductive tissues of the plant. In still another embodiment, the endophyte colonizes a fruit or seed tissue of the plant. In still another embodiment, the endophyte is able to colonize the plant such that it is present in the surface of the plant (i.e., its presence is detectably present on the plant exterior, or the episphere of the plant). In still other embodiments, the endophyte is capable of localizing to substantially all, or all, tissues of the plant. In certain embodiments, the endophyte is not localized to the root of a plant. In other cases, the endophyte is not localized to the photosynthetic tissues of the plant.

[0230] In some cases, endophytes are capable of replicating within the host plant and colonizing the plant.

[0231] In another aspect, the present invention provides for combinations of endophytic microbial entities and plants. The endophytic microbial entities described herein are unique in that they have been isolated from seeds of plants (e.g., an agricultural plant, for example a seed or seedling or an agricultural plant, comprising a population of endophytic microbial entities that is heterologously disposed on an exterior surface of or within the seed or seedling in an amount effective to colonize the plant). The combination can further comprise a formulation that comprises at least one member selected from the group consisting of an agriculturally compatible carrier, a tackifier, a microbial stabilizer, a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide, and a nutrient. In some embodiments, the population of endophytic bacteria are present in an amount effective to provide a benefit to an agricultural plant derived from an agricultural seed or seedling to which the formulation is administered.

[0232] The population of endophytic microbial entities comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97% identical, for example, at least 98%, at least 99%, at least 99.5% identical, 99.8% identical, or 100% identical, to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700. In another embodiment, the endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is at least 99% identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700. In still another embodiment, the endophyte comprises a nucleic acid sequence that is identical to a nucleic acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1-3700.

[0233] In some embodiments, disclosed is a seed of an agricultural plant comprising an exogenous population of an endophyte that is disposed on an exterior surface of or within the plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant. The population is considered exogenous to the seed if that particular seed does not inherently contain the population of endophytic microbial entities.

[0234] In other cases, the present invention discloses a seed of an agricultural plant comprising a population of endophytic microbial entities that is heterologously disposed on an exterior surface of or within the plant in an amount effective to colonize the plant. For example, the population of endophytic microbial entities that is disposed on an exterior surface or within the seed can be an endophyte that may be associated with the mature plant, but is not found on the surface of or within the seed. Alternatively, the population can be found in the surface of, or within the seed, but at a much lower number than is disposed.

[0235] As shown in the Examples section below, the endophytic populations described herein are capable of colonizing the host plant. In certain cases, the endophytic population can be applied to the plant, for example the plant seed, or by foliar application, and successful colonization can be confirmed by detecting the presence of the endophytic microbial population within the plant. For example, after applying the endophyte to the seeds, high titers of the endophyte can be detected in the roots and shoots of the plants that germinate from the seeds. In addition, significant quantities of the endophyte can be detected in the rhizosphere of the plants. Therefore, in one embodiment, the endophytic microbe population is disposed in an amount effective to colonize the plant. Colonization of the plant can be detected, for example, by detecting the presence of the endophytic microbe inside the plant. This can be accomplished by measuring the viability of the microbe after surface sterilization of the seed or the plant: endophytic colonization results in an internal localization of the microbe, rendering it resistant to conditions of surface sterilization. The presence and quantity of the microbe can also be established using other means known in the art, for example, immunofluorescence microscopy using microbe specific antibodies, or fluorescence in situ hybridization (see, for example, Amann et al. (2001) Current Opinion in Biotechnology 12:231-236, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). Alternatively, specific nucleic acid probes recognizing conserved sequences from the endophytic bacterium can be employed to amplify a region, for example by quantitative PCR, and correlated to CFUs by means of a standard curve.

[0236] In another embodiment, the endophytic microbe is disposed, for example, on the surface of a seed of an agricultural plant, in an amount effective to be detectable in the mature agricultural plant. In one embodiment, the endophytic microbe is disposed in an amount effective to be detectable in an amount of at least about 100 CFU or spores, at least about 200 CFU or spores, at least about 300 CFU or spores, at least about 500 CFU or spores, at least about 1,000 CFU or spores, at least about 3,000 CFU or spores, at least about 10,000 CFU or spores, at least about 30,000 CFU or spores, at least about 100,000 CFU or spores, at least about 10^6 CFU or spores or more in the mature agricultural plant.

[0237] In some cases, the endophytic microbe is capable of colonizing particular tissue types of the plant. In one embodiment, the endophytic microbe is disposed on the seed or seedling in an amount effective to be detectable within a target tissue of the mature agricultural plant selected from a fruit, a seed, a leaf, or a root, or portion thereof. For example, the endophytic microbe can be detected in an amount of at least about 100 CFU or spores, at least about 200 CFU or spores, at least about 300 CFU or spores, at least about 500 CFU or spores, at least about 1,000 CFU or spores, at least about 3,000 CFU or spores, at least about 10,000 CFU or spores, at least about 30,000 CFU or spores, at least about 100,000 CFU or spores, at least about 10^6 CFU or spores or more, in the target tissue of the mature agricultural plant.

[0238] In some cases, the microbes disposed on the seed or seedling can be detected in the rhizosphere. This may be due to successful colonization by the endophytic microbe, where certain quantities of the microbe is shed from the root, thereby colonizing the rhizosphere. In some cases, the rhizosphere-localized microbe can secrete compounds (such as siderophores or organic acids) which assist with nutrient acquisition by the plant. Therefore, in another embodiment, the endophytic microbe is disposed on the surface of the seed in an amount effective to detectably colonize the soil environment surrounding the mature agricultural plant when compared with a reference agricultural plant. For example, the microbe can be detected in an amount of at least 100 CFU or spores/g DW, for example, at least 200 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 500 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 1,000 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 3,000 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 10,000 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 30,000 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 100,000 CFU or spores/g DW, at least 300,000 CFU or spores/g DW, or more, in the rhizosphere.

[0239] The populations of endophytic microbial entities described herein are also capable of providing many agronomic benefits to the host plant. As shown in the Examples section, endophyte-inoculated plants display increased seed germination, increased vigor, increased biomass (e.g., increased root or shoot biomass). Therefore, in one embodiment, the population is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the biomass of the plant, or a part or tissue of the plant grown from the seed or seedling.

[0240] The increased biomass is useful in the production of commodity products derived from the plant. Such commodity products include an animal feed, a fish fodder, a cereal product, a processed human-food product, a sugar or an alcohol. Such products may be a fermentation product or a fermentable product, one such exemplary product is a biofuel. The increase in biomass can occur in a part of the plant (e.g., the root tissue, shoots, leaves, etc.), or can be an increase in overall biomass. Increased biomass production, such an increase meaning at least about 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 100%, or greater than 100% when compared with a reference agricultural plant. Such increase in overall biomass can be under relatively stress-free conditions. In other cases, the increase in biomass can be in plants grown under any number of abiotic or biotic stresses, including drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, bacterial pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress. In one particular embodiment, the endophytic microbial population is disposed in an amount effective to increase root biomass by at least 10%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 75%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0241] In another embodiment, the endophytic microbial population is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the rate of seed germination when compared with a reference agricultural plant. For example, the increase in seed germination can be at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 6%, at least 7%, at least 8%, at least 9%, at least 10%, at least 15%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 75%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0242] In other cases, the endophytic microbe is disposed on the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the average biomass of the fruit or cob from the resulting plant by at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 6%, at least 7%, at least 8%, at least 9%, at least 10%, at least 15%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 75%, at least 100% or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0243] In some cases, plants are inoculated with endophytes that are isolated from the same species of plant as the plant element of the inoculated plant. For example, an endophyte that is normally found in one variety of Zea mays (corn) is associated with a plant element of a plant of another variety of Zea mays that in its natural state lacks said endophyte. In one embodiment, the endophyte is derived from a plant of a related species of plant as the plant element of the inoculated plant. For example, an endophyte that is normally found in Zea diploperennis Iltis et al., (diploperennial teosinte) is applied to a Zea mays (corn), or vice versa. In some cases, plants are inoculated with endophytes that are heterologous to the plant element of the inoculated plant. In one embodiment, the endophyte is derived from a plant of another species. For example, an endophyte that is normally found in dicots is applied to a monocot plant (e.g., inoculating corn with a soybean-derived endophyte), or vice versa. In other cases, the endophyte to be inoculated onto a plant is derived from a related species of the plant that is being inoculated. In one embodiment, the endophyte is derived from a related taxon, for example, from a related species. The plant of another species can be an agricultural plant. In another embodiment, the endophyte is part of a designed composition inoculated into any host plant element.

[0244] As highlighted in the Examples section, plants inoculated with the endophytic microbial population also show an increase in overall plant height. Therefore, in one embodiment, the present invention provides for a seed comprising an endophytic microbial population which is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the height of the plant. For example, the endophytic microbial population is disposed in an amount effective to result in an increase in height of the agricultural plant such that is at least 10% greater, for example, at least 20% greater, at least 30% greater, at least 40% greater, at least 50% greater, at least 60% greater, at least 70% greater, at least 80% greater, at least 90% greater, at least 100% greater, at least 125% greater, at least 150% greater or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant, the plant. Such increase in height can be under relatively stress-free conditions. In other cases, the increase in height can be in plants grown under any number of abiotic or biotic stresses, including drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, bacterial pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress.

[0245] The host plants inoculated with the endophytic microbial population also show dramatic improvements in their ability to utilize water more efficiently. Water use efficiency is a parameter often correlated with drought tolerance. Water use efficiency (WUE) is a parameter often correlated with drought tolerance, and is the CO2 assimilation rate per water transpired by the plant. An increase in biomass at low water availability may be due to relatively improved efficiency of growth or reduced water consumption. In selecting traits for improving crops, a decrease in water use, without a change in growth would have particular merit in an irrigated agricultural system where the water input costs were high. An increase in growth without a corresponding jump in water use would have applicability to all agricultural systems. In many agricultural systems where water supply is not limiting, an increase in growth, even if it came at the expense of an increase in water use also increases yield.

[0246] When soil water is depleted or if water is not available during periods of drought, crop yields are restricted. Plant water deficit develops if transpiration from leaves exceeds the supply of water from the roots. The available water supply is related to the amount of water held in the soil and the ability of the plant to reach that water with its root system. Transpiration of water from leaves is linked to the fixation of carbon dioxide by photosynthesis through the stomata. The two processes are positively correlated so that high carbon dioxide influx through photosynthesis is closely linked to water loss by transpiration. As water transpires from the leaf, leaf water potential is reduced and the stomata tend to close in a hydraulic process limiting the amount of photosynthesis. Since crop yield is dependent on the fixation of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis, water uptake and transpiration are contributing factors to crop yield. Plants which are able to use less water to fix the same amount of carbon dioxide or which are able to function normally at a lower water potential have the potential to conduct more photosynthesis and thereby to produce more biomass and economic yield in many agricultural systems. An increased water use efficiency of the plant relates in some cases to an increased fruit/kernel size or number.

[0247] Therefore, in one embodiment, the plants described herein exhibit an increased water use efficiency when compared with a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. For example, the plants grown from the seeds comprising the endophytic microbial population can have at least 5% higher WUE, for example, at least 10% higher, at least 20% higher, at least 30% higher, at least 40% higher, at least 50% higher, at least 60% higher, at least 70% higher, at least 80% higher, at least 90% higher, at least 100% higher WUE than a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. Such an increase in WUE can occur under conditions without water deficit, or under conditions of water deficit, for example, when the soil water content is less than or equal to 60% of water saturated soil, for example, less than or equal to 50%, less than or equal to 40%, less than or equal to 30%, less than or equal to 20%, less than or equal to 10% of water saturated soil on a weight basis.

[0248] In a related embodiment, the plant comprising the endophytic microbial population can have at least 10% higher relative water content (RWC), for example, at least least 20% higher, at least 30% higher, at least 40% higher, at least 50% higher, at least 60% higher, at least 70% higher, at least 80% higher, at least 90% higher, at least 100% higher RWC than a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions.

[0249] Many of the microbes described herein are capable of producing the plant hormone auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when grown in culture. Auxin may play a key role in altering the physiology of the plant, including the extent of root growth. Therefore, in another embodiment, the endophytic microbial population is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to detectably induce production of auxin in the agricultural plant. For example, the increase in auxin production can be at least 2%, at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 6%, at least 7%, at least 8%, at least 9%, at least 10%, at least 15%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 75%, at least 100%, or more, when compared with a reference agricultural plant. In one embodiment, the increased auxin production can be detected in a tissue type selected from the group consisting of the root, shoot, leaves, and flowers.

[0250] In another embodiment, the endophytic population of the present invention can cause a detectable modulation in the amount of a metabolite in the plant or part of the plant. Such modulation can be detected, for example, by measuring the levels of a given metabolite and comparing with the levels of the metabolite in a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions.

Formulations for Agricultural Use



[0251] The present invention contemplates a synthetic combination of a plant element that is associated with an endophyte to confer an improved trait of agronomic importance to the host plant, or an improved agronomic trait potential to a plant element associated with the endophyte, that upon and after germination will confer said benefit to the resultant host plant.

[0252] In some embodiments, the plant element is associated with an endophyte on its surface. Such association is contemplated to be via a mechanism selected from the group consisting of: spraying, immersion, coating, encapsulating, dusting, dripping, aerosolizing.

[0253] In some embodiments, the plant element is a leaf, and the synthetic combination is formulated for application as a foliar treatment.

[0254] In some embodiments, the plant element is a seed, and the synthetic combination is formulated for application as a seed coating.

[0255] In some embodiments, the plant element is a root, and the synthetic combination is formulated for application as a root treatment.

[0256] In certain embodiments, the plant element becomes associated with the endophyte(s) through delayed exposure. For example, the soil in which a plant element is to be introduced is first treated with a composition comprising the endophyte or combination of endophytes. In another example, the area around the plant or plant element is exposed to a formulation comprising the endophyte(s), and the plant element becomes subsequently associated with the endophyte(s) due to movement of soil, air, water, insects, mammals, human intervention, or other methods.

[0257] The plant element can be obtained from any agricultural plant. In one embodiment, the plant element of the first plant is from a monocotyledonous plant. For example, the plant element of the first plant is from a cereal plant. The plant element of the first plant can be selected from the group consisting of a maize seed, a wheat seed, a barley seed, a rice seed, a sugarcane seed, a maize root, a wheat root, a barley root, a sugarcane root, a rice root, a maize leaf, a wheat leaf, a barley leaf, a sugarcane leaf, or a rice leaf. In an alternative embodiment, the plant element of the first plant is from a dicotyledonous plant. The plant element of the first plant can be selected from the group consisting of a cotton seed, a tomato seed, a canola seed, a pepper seed, a soybean seed, a cotton root, a tomato root, a canola root, a pepper root, a soybean root, a cotton leaf, a tomato leaf, a canola leaf, a pepper leaf, or a soybean leaf. In still another embodiment, the plant element of the first plant can be from a genetically modified plant. In another embodiment, the plant element of the first plant can be a hybrid plant element.

[0258] The synthetic combination can comprise a plant element of the first plant which is surface-sterilized prior to combining with the endophytes. Such pre-treatment prior to coating the seed with endophytes removes the presence of other microbes which may interfere with the optimal colonization, growth and/or function of the endophyte. Surface sterilization of seeds can be accomplished without killing the seeds as described herein.

[0259] The endophyte populations described herein are intended to be useful in the improvement of agricultural plants, and as such, may be formulated with other compositions as part of an agriculturally compatible carrier. It is contemplated that such carriers can include, but not be limited to: seed treatment, root treatment, foliar treatment, soil treatment. The carrier composition with the endophyte populations, may be prepared for agricultural application as a liquid, a solid, or a gas formulation. Application to the plant may be achieved, for example, as a powder for surface deposition onto plant leaves, as a spray to the whole plant or selected plant element, as part of a drip to the soil or the roots, or as a coating onto the seed prior to planting. Such examples are meant to be illustrative and not limiting to the scope of the invention.

[0260] In some embodiments, the present invention contemplates plant elements comprising a endophytic microbial population, and further comprising a formulation. The formulation useful for these embodiments generally comprises at least one member selected from the group consisting of an agriculturally compatible carrier, a tackifier, a microbial stabilizer, a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide, and a nutrient.

[0261] In some cases, the endophytic population is mixed with an agriculturally compatible carrier. The carrier can be a solid carrier or liquid carrier. The carrier may be any one or more of a number of carriers that confer a variety of properties, such as increased stability, wettability, or dispersability. Wetting agents such as natural or synthetic surfactants, which can be nonionic or ionic surfactants, or a combination thereof can be included in a composition of the invention. Water-in-oil emulsions can also be used to formulate a composition that includes the endophytic population of the present invention (see, for example, U.S. Patent No. 7,485,451, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). Suitable formulations that may be prepared include wettable powders, granules, gels, agar strips or pellets, thickeners, and the like, microencapsulated particles, and the like, liquids such as aqueous flowables, aqueous suspensions, water-in-oil emulsions, etc. The formulation may include grain or legume products, for example, ground grain or beans, broth or flour derived from grain or beans, starch, sugar, or oil.

[0262] In some embodiments, the agricultural carrier may be soil or plant growth medium. Other agricultural carriers that may be used include fertilizers, plant-based oils, humectants, or combinations thereof. Alternatively, the agricultural carrier may be a solid, such as diatomaceous earth, loam, silica, alginate, clay, bentonite, vermiculite, seed cases, other plant and animal products, or combinations, including granules, pellets, or suspensions. Mixtures of any of the aforementioned ingredients are also contemplated as carriers, such as but not limited to, pesta (flour and kaolin clay), agar or flour-based pellets in loam, sand, or clay, etc. Formulations may include food sources for the cultured organisms, such as barley, rice, or other biological materials such as seed, leaf, root, plant elements, sugar cane bagasse, hulls or stalks from grain processing, ground plant material or wood from building site refuse, sawdust or small fibers from recycling of paper, fabric, or wood. Other suitable formulations will be known to those skilled in the art.

[0263] In one embodiment, the formulation can comprise a tackifier or adherent. Such agents are useful for combining the microbial population of the invention with carriers that can contain other compounds (e.g., control agents that are not biologic), to yield a coating composition. Such compositions help create coatings around the plant or plant element to maintain contact between the microbe and other agents with the plant or plant part. In one embodiment, adherents are selected from the group consisting of: alginate, gums, starches, lecithins, formononetin, polyvinyl alcohol, alkali formononetinate, hesperetin, polyvinyl acetate, cephalins, Gum Arabic, Xanthan Gum, Mineral Oil, Polyethylene Glycol (PEG), Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Arabino-galactan, Methyl Cellulose, PEG 400, Chitosan, Polyacrylamide, Polyacrylate, Polyacrylonitrile, Glycerol, Triethylene glycol, Vinyl Acetate, Gellan Gum, Polystyrene, Polyvinyl, Carboxymethyl cellulose, Gum Ghatti, and polyoxyethylene-polyoxybutylene block copolymers. Other examples of adherent compositions that can be used in the synthetic preparation include those described in EP 0818135, CA 1229497, WO 2013090628, EP 0192342, WO 2008103422 and CA 1041788, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

[0264] The formulation can also contain a surfactant. Non-limiting examples of surfactants include nitrogen-surfactant blends such as Prefer 28 (Cenex), Surf-N(US), Inhance (Brandt), P-28 (Wilfarm) and Patrol (Helena); esterified seed oils include Sun-It II (AmCy), MSO (UAP), Scoil (Agsco), Hasten (Wilfarm) and Mes-100 (Drexel); and organo-silicone surfactants include Silwet L77 (UAP), Silikin (Terra), Dyne-Amic (Helena), Kinetic (Helena), Sylgard 309 (Wilbur-Ellis) and Century (Precision). In one embodiment, the surfactant is present at a concentration of between 0.01% v/v to 10% v/v. In another embodiment, the surfactant is present at a concentration of between 0.1% v/v to 1% v/v.

[0265] In certain cases, the formulation includes a microbial stabilizer. Such an agent can include a desiccant. As used herein, a "desiccant" can include any compound or mixture of compounds that can be classified as a desiccant regardless of whether the compound or compounds are used in such concentrations that they in fact have a desiccating effect on the liquid inoculant. Such desiccants are ideally compatible with the endophytic population used, and should promote the ability of the microbial population to survive application on the plant elements and to survive desiccation. Examples of suitable desiccants include one or more of trehalose, sucrose, glycerol, and Methylene glycol. Other suitable desiccants include, but are not limited to, non-reducing sugars and sugar alcohols (e.g., mannitol or sorbitol). The amount of desiccant introduced into the formulation can range from about 5% to about 50% by weight/volume, for example, between about 10% to about 40%, between about 15% and about 35%, or between about 20% and about 30%.

[0266] In some cases, it is advantageous for the formulation to contain agents such as a fungicide, an antibacterial agent, an herbicide, a nematicide, an insecticide, a plant growth regulator, a rodenticide, and a nutrient. Such agents are ideally compatible with the agricultural plant element or seedling onto which the formulation is applied (e.g., it should not be deleterious to the growth or health of the plant). Furthermore, the agent is ideally one which does not cause safety concerns for human, animal or industrial use (e.g., no safety issues, or the compound is sufficiently labile that the commodity plant product derived from the plant contains negligible amounts of the compound).

[0267] In the liquid form, for example, solutions or suspensions, the endophytic microbial populations of the present invention can be mixed or suspended in aqueous solutions. Suitable liquid diluents or carriers include aqueous solutions, petroleum distillates, or other liquid carriers.

[0268] Solid compositions can be prepared by dispersing the endophytic microbial populations of the invention in and on an appropriately divided solid carrier, such as peat, wheat, bran, vermiculite, clay, talc, bentonite, diatomaceous earth, fuller's earth, pasteurized soil, and the like. When such formulations are used as wettable powders, biologically compatible dispersing agents such as non-ionic, anionic, amphoteric, or cationic dispersing and emulsifying agents can be used.

[0269] The solid carriers used upon formulation include, for example, mineral carriers such as kaolin clay, pyrophyllite, bentonite, montmorillonite, diatomaceous earth, acid white soil, vermiculite, and pearlite, and inorganic salts such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, ammonium nitrate, urea, ammonium chloride, and calcium carbonate. Also, organic fine powders such as wheat flour, wheat bran, and rice bran may be used. The liquid carriers include vegetable oils such as soybean oil and cottonseed oil, glycerol, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, etc.

[0270] In one particular embodiment, the formulation is ideally suited for coating of the endophytic microbial population onto plant elements. The endophytic microbial populations described in the present invention are capable of conferring many agronomic benefits to the host plants. The ability to confer such benefits by coating the endophytic microbial populations on the surface of plant elements has many potential advantages, particularly when used in a commercial (agricultural) scale.

[0271] The endophytic microbial populations herein can be combined with one or more of the agents described above to yield a formulation suitable for combining with an agricultural plant element or seedling. The endophytic microbial population can be obtained from growth in culture, for example, using a synthetic growth medium. In addition, the microbe can be cultured on solid media, for example on petri dishes, scraped off and suspended into the preparation. Microbes at different growth phases can be used. For example, microbes at lag phase, early-log phase, mid-log phase, late-log phase, stationary phase, early death phase, or death phase can be used.

[0272] The formulations comprising the endophytic microbial population of the present invention typically contains between about 0.1 to 95% by weight, for example, between about 1% and 90%, between about 3% and 75%, between about 5% and 60%, between about 10% and 50% in wet weight of the endophytic population of the present invention. It is preferred that the formulation contains at least about 10^2 per ml of formulation, at least about 10^3 per ml of formulation, for example, at least about 10^4, at least about 10^5, at least about 10^6, at least about 10^7 CFU or spores, at least about 10^8 CFU or spores per ml of formulation.

[0273] As described above, in certain embodiments, the present invention contemplates the use of endophytic bacteria and/or fungi that are heterologously disposed on the plant, for example, the plant element. In certain cases, the agricultural plant may contain bacteria that are substantially similar to, or even genetically indistinguishable from, the bacteria that are being applied to the plant. It is noted that, in many cases, the bacteria that are being applied is substantially different from the bacteria already present in several significant ways. First, the bacteria that are being applied to the agricultural plant have been adapted to culture, or adapted to be able to grow on growth media in isolation from the plant. Second, in many cases, the bacteria that are being applied are derived from a clonal origin, rather than from a heterologous origin and, as such, can be distinguished from the bacteria that are already present in the agricultural plant by the clonal similarity. For example, where a microbe that has been inoculated by a plant is also present in the plant (for example, in a different tissue or portion of the plant), or where the introduced microbe is sufficiently similar to a microbe that is present in some of the plants (or portion of the plant, including plant elements), it is still possible to distinguish between the inoculated microbe and the native microbe by distinguishing between the two microbe types on the basis of their epigenetic status (e.g., the bacteria that are applied, as well as their progeny, would be expected to have a much more uniform and similar pattern of cytosine methylation of its genome, with respect to the extent and/or location of methylation).

Endophytes compatible with agrichemicals



[0274] In certain embodiments, the endophyte is selected on the basis of its compatibility with commonly used agrichemicals. As mentioned earlier, plants, particularly agricultural plants, can be treated with a vast array of agrichemicals, including fungicides, biocides (anticomplex agents), herbicides, insecticides, nematicides, rodenticides, fertilizers, and other agents.

[0275] In some cases, it can be important for the endophyte to be compatible with agrichemicals, particularly those with anticomplex properties, in order to persist in the plant although, as mentioned earlier, there are many such anticomplex agents that do not penetrate the plant, at least at a concentration sufficient to interfere with the endophyte. Therefore, where a systemic anticomplex agent is used in the plant, compatibility of the endophyte to be inoculated with such agents will be an important criterion.

[0276] Fungicides. In one embodiment, the control agent is a fungicide. As used herein, a fungicide is any compound or agent (whether chemical or biological) that can either inhibit the growth of a fungus or kill a fungus. In that sense, a "fungicide", as used herein, encompasses compounds that may be fungistatic or fungicidal. As used herein, the fungicide can be a protectant, or agents that are effective predominantly on the seed surface, providing protection against seed surface-borne pathogens and providing some level of control of soil-borne pathogens. Non-limiting examples of protectant fungicides include captan, maneb, thiram, or fludioxonil.

[0277] The fungicide can be a systemic fungicide, which can be absorbed into the emerging seedling and inhibit or kill the fungus inside host plant tissues. Systemic fungicides used for seed treatment include, but are not limited to the following: azoxystrobin, carboxin, mefenoxam, metalaxyl, thiabendazole, trifloxystrobin, and various triazole fungicides, including difenoconazole, ipconazole, tebuconazole, and triticonazole. Mefenoxam and metalaxyl are primarily used to target the water mold fungi Pythium and Phytophthora. Some fungicides are preferred over others, depending on the plant species, either because of subtle differences in sensitivity of the pathogenic fungal species, or because of the differences in the fungicide distribution or sensitivity of the plants.

[0278] A fungicide can be a biological control agent, such as a bacterium or fungus. Such organisms may be parasitic to the pathogenic fungi, or secrete toxins or other substances which can kill or otherwise prevent the growth of fungi. Any type of fungicide, particularly ones that are commonly used on plants, can be used as a control agent in a seed composition.

[0279] Antibacterial agents. In some cases, the seed coating composition comprises a control agent which has antibacterial properties. In one embodiment, the control agent with antibacterial properties is selected from the compounds described herein elsewhere. In another embodiment, the compound is Streptomycin, oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid, or gentamicin.

[0280] Plant growth regulators. The seed coat composition can further comprise a plant growth regulator. In one embodiment, the plant growth regulator is selected from the group consisting of: Abscisic acid, amidochlor, ancymidol, 6-benzylaminopurine, brassinolide, butralin, chlormequat (chlormequat chloride), choline chloride, cyclanilide, daminozide, dikegulac, dimethipin, 2,6-dimethylpuridine, ethephon, flumetralin, flurprimidol, fluthiacet, forchlorfenuron, gibberellic acid, inabenfide, indole-3-acetic acid, maleic hydrazide, mefluidide, mepiquat (mepiquat chloride), naphthaleneacetic acid, N-6-benzyladenine, paclobutrazol, prohexadione (prohexadione- calcium), prohydrojasmon, thidiazuron, triapenthenol, tributyl phosphorotrithioate, 2,3,5-tri-iodobenzoic acid, trinexapac-ethyl and uniconazole. Other examples of antibacterial compounds which can be used as part of a seed coating composition include those based on dichlorophene and benzylalcohol hemi formal (Proxel® from ICI or Acticide® RS from Thor Chemie and Kathon® MK from Rohm & Haas) and isothiazolinone derivatives such as alkylisothiazolinones and benzisothiazolinones (Acticide® MBS from Thor Chemie). Other plant growth regulators that can be incorporated seed coating compositions are described in US 2012/0108431, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

[0281] Nematicides. Preferred nematode-antagonistic biocontrol agents include ARF18; Arthrobotrys spp.; Chaetomium spp.; Cylindrocarpon spp.; Exophilia spp.; Fusarium spp.; Gliocladium spp.; Hirsutella spp.; Lecanicillium spp.; Monacrosporium spp.; Myrothecium spp.; Neocosmospora spp.; Paecilomyces spp.; Pochonia spp.; Stagonospora spp.; vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Burkholderia spp.; Pasteuria spp., Brevibacillus spp.; Pseudomonas spp.; and Rhizobacteria. Particularly preferred nematode-antagonistic biocontrol agents include ARF18, Arthrobotrys oligospora, Arthrobotrys dactyloides, Chaetomium globosum, Cylindrocarpon heteronema, Exophilia jeanselmei, Exophilia pisciphila, Fusarium aspergilus, Fusarium solani, Gliocladium catenulatum, Gliocladium roseum, Gliocladium virens, Hirsutella rhossiliensis, Hirsutella minnesotensis, Lecanicillium lecanii, Monacrosporium drechsleri, Monacrosporium gephyropagum, Myrotehcium verrucaria, Neocosmospora vasinfecta, Paecilomyces lilacinus, Pochonia chlamydosporia, Stagonospora heteroderae, Stagonospora phaseoli, vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Burkholderia cepacia, Pasteuria penetrans, Pasteuria thornei, Pasteuria nishizawae, Pasteuria ramosa, Pastrueia usage, Brevibacillus laterosporus strain G4, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhizobacteria.

[0282] Nutrients. In another embodiment, the seed coating composition can comprise a nutrient. The nutrient can be selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen fertilizer including, but not limited to Urea, Ammonium nitrate, Ammonium sulfate, Non-pressure nitrogen solutions, Aqua ammonia, Anhydrous ammonia, Ammonium thiosulfate, Sulfur-coated urea, Urea-formaldehydes, IBDU, Polymer-coated urea, Calcium nitrate, Ureaform, and Methylene urea, phosphorous fertilizers such as Diammonium phosphate, Monoammonium phosphate, Ammonium polyphosphate, Concentrated superphosphate and Triple superphosphate, and potassium fertilizers such as Potassium chloride, Potassium sulfate, Potassium-magnesium sulfate, Potassium nitrate. Such compositions can exist as free salts or ions within the seed coat composition. Alternatively, nutrients/fertilizers can be complexed or chelated to provide sustained release over time.

[0283] Rodenticides. Rodents such as mice and rats cause considerable economical damage by eating and soiling planted or stored seeds. Moreover, mice and rats transmit a large number of infectious diseases such as plague, typhoid, leptospirosis, trichinosis and salmonellosis. Anticoagulants such as coumarin and indandione derivatives play an important role in the control of rodents. These active ingredients are simple to handle, relatively harmless to humans and have the advantage that, as the result of the delayed onset of the activity, the animals being controlled identify no connection with the bait that they have ingested, therefore do not avoid it. This is an important aspect in particular in social animals such as rats, where individuals act as tasters. In one embodiment, the seed coating composition comprises a rodenticide selected from the group of substances consisting of 2-isovalerylindan- 1,3-dione, 4-(quinoxalin-2-ylamino)benzenesulfonamide, alpha-chlorohydrin, aluminum phosphide, antu, arsenous oxide, barium carbonate, bisthiosemi, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, bromethalin, calcium cyanide, chloralose, chlorophacinone, cholecalciferol, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, crimidine, difenacoum, difethialone, diphacinone, ergocalciferol, flocoumafen, fluoroacetamide, flupropadine, flupropadine hydrochloride, hydrogen cyanide, iodomethane, lindane, magnesium phosphide, methyl bromide, norbormide, phosacetim, phosphine, phosphorus, pindone, potassium arsenite, pyrinuron, scilliroside, sodium arsenite, sodium cyanide, sodium fluoroacetate, strychnine, thallium sulfate, warfarin and zinc phosphide.

Compatibility



[0284] In one embodiment, natural isolates of endophytes that are compatible with agrichemicals can be used to inoculate the plants according to the methods described herein. For example, endophytes that are compatible with agriculturally employed anticomplex agents can be isolated by plating a culture of endophytes on a petri dish comprising an effective concentration of the anticomplex agent, and isolating colonies of endophytes that are compatible with the anticomplex agent. In another embodiment, an endophyte that is compatible with an anticomplex agent is used for the methods described herein.

[0285] Bactericide-compatible endophyte can also be isolated by selection on liquid medium. The culture of endophytes can be plated on petri dishes without any forms of mutagenesis; alternatively, endophytes can be mutagenized using any means known in the art. For example, endophyte cultures can be exposed to UV light, gamma-irradiation, or chemical mutagens such as ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) prior to selection on fungicide comprising media. Finally, where the mechanism of action of a particular bactericide is known, the target gene can be specifically mutated (either by gene deletion, gene replacement, site-directed mutagenesis, etc.) to generate an endophyte that is resilient against that particular chemical. It is noted that the above-described methods can be used to isolate endophytes that are compatible with both bacteriostatic and bactericidal compounds.

[0286] It will also be appreciated by one skilled in the art that a plant may be exposed to multiple types of anticomplex compounds, either simultaneously or in succession, for example at different stages of plant growth. Where the target plant is likely to be exposed to multiple anticomplex agents, an endophyte that is compatible with many or all of these agrichemicals can be used to inoculate the plant. An endophyte that is compatible with several agents can be isolated, for example, by serial selection. An endophyte that is compatible with the first agent can be isolated as described above (with or without prior mutagenesis). A culture of the resulting endophyte can then be selected for the ability to grow on liquid or solid media comprising the second agent (again, with or without prior mutagenesis). Colonies isolated from the second selection are then tested to confirm its compatibility to both agents.

[0287] Likewise, endophytes that are compatible to biocides (including herbicides such as glyphosate or anticomplex compounds, whether bacteriostatic or bactericidal) that are agriculturally employed can be isolated using methods similar to those described for isolating compatible endophytes. In one embodiment, mutagenesis of the endophyte population can be performed prior to selection with an anticomplex agent. In another embodiment, selection is performed on the endophyte population without prior mutagenesis. In still another embodiment, serial selection is performed on an endophyte: the endophyte is first selected for compatibility to a first anticomplex agent. The isolated compatible endophyte is then cultured and selected for compatibility to the second anticomplex agent. Any colony thus isolated is tested for compatibility to each, or both anticomplex agents to confirm compatibility with these two agents.

[0288] Compatibility with an antimicrobial agent can be determined by a number of means known in the art, including the comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the unmodified and modified endophytes. Therefore, in one embodiment, the present invention discloses an isolated modified endophyte, wherein the endophyte is modified such that it exhibits at least 3 fold greater, for example, at least 5 fold greater, at least 10 fold greater, at least 20 fold greater, at least 30 fold greater or more MIC to an antimicrobial agent when compared with the unmodified endophyte.

[0289] In one particular aspect, disclosed herein are endophytes with enhanced compatibility to the herbicide glyphosate. In one embodiment, the endophyte has a doubling time in growth medium comprising at least 1 mM glyphosate, for example, at least 2 mM glyphosate, at least 5mM glyphosate, at least 10mM glyphosate, at least 15mM glyphosate or more, that is no more than 250%, for example, no more than 200%, no more than 175%, no more than 150%, or no more than 125%, of the doubling time of the endophyte in the same growth medium comprising no glyphosate. In one particular embodiment, the endophyte has a doubling time in growth medium comprising 5mM glyphosate that is no more than 150% the doubling time of the endophyte in the same growth medium comprising no glyphosate.

[0290] In another embodiment, the endophyte has a doubling time in a plant tissue comprising at least 10 ppm glyphosate, for example, at least 15 ppm glyphosate, at least 20 ppm glyphosate, at least 30 ppm glyphosate, at least 40 ppm glyphosate or more, that is no more than 250%, for example, no more than 200%, no more than 175%, no more than 150%, or no more than 125%, of the doubling time of the endophyte in a reference plant tissue comprising no glyphosate. In one particular embodiment, the endophyte has a doubling time in a plant tissue comprising 40 ppm glyphosate that is no more than 150% the doubling time of the endophyte in a reference plant tissue comprising no glyphosate.

[0291] The selection process described above can be repeated to identify isolates of endophytes that are compatible with a multitude of agents.

[0292] Candidate isolates can be tested to ensure that the selection for agrichemical compatibility did not result in loss of a desired bioactivity. Isolates of endophytes that are compatible with commonly employed agents can be selected as described above. The resulting compatible endophyte can be compared with the parental endophyte on plants in its ability to promote germination.

[0293] The agrichemical compatible endophytes generated as described above can be detected in samples. For example, where a transgene was introduced to render the endophyte compatible with the agrichemical(s), the transgene can be used as a target gene for amplification and detection by PCR. In addition, where point mutations or deletions to a portion of a specific gene or a number of genes results in compatibility with the agrichemical(s), the unique point mutations can likewise be detected by PCR or other means known in the art. Such methods allow the detection of the endophyte even if it is no longer viable. Thus, commodity plant products produced using the agrichemical compatible endophytes described herein can readily be identified by employing these and related methods of nucleic acid detection.

Beneficial Attributes of Synthetic Combinations of Plant Elements and Endophytes



[0294] Improved attributes conferred by endophytes. The present invention contemplates the establishment of a symbiont in a plant element. In one embodiment, endophyte association results in a detectable change to the plant element, in particular the seed or the whole plant. The detectable change can be an improvement in a number of agronomic traits (e.g., improved general health, increased response to biotic or abiotic stresses, or enhanced properties of the plant or a plant element, including fruits and grains). Alternatively, the detectable change can be a physiological or biological change that can be measured by methods known in the art. The detectable changes are described in more detail in the sections below. As used herein, an endophyte is considered to have conferred an improved agricultural trait whether or not the improved trait arose from the plant, the endophyte, or the concerted action between the plant and endophyte. Therefore, for example, whether a beneficial hormone or chemical is produced by the plant or the endophyte, for purposes of the present invention, the endophyte will be considered to have conferred an improved agronomic trait upon the host plant.

[0295] In some aspects, provided herein, are methods for producing a seed of a plant with a heritably altered trait. The trait of the plant can be altered without known genetic modification of the plant genome, and comprises the following steps. First, a preparation of an isolated endophyte that is heterologous to the seed of the plant is provided, and optionally processed to produce an endophyte formulation. The endophyte formulation is then contacted with the plant. The plants are then allowed to go to seed, and the seeds are collected.

[0296] Improved general health. Also described herein are plants, and fields of plants, that are associated with beneficial endophytes, such that the overall fitness, productivity or health of the plant or a portion thereof, is maintained, increased and/or improved over a period of time. Improvement in overall plant health can be assessed using numerous physiological parameters including, but not limited to, height, overall biomass, root and/or shoot biomass, seed germination, seedling survival, photosynthetic efficiency, transpiration rate, seed/fruit number or mass, plant grain or fruit yield, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, root length, or any combination thereof. Improved plant health, or improved field health, can also be demonstrated through improved resistance or response to a given stress, either biotic or abiotic stress, or a combination of one or more abiotic stresses, as provided herein.

[0297] Other abiotic stresses. Disclosed herein are endophyte-associated plants with increased resistance to an abiotic stress. Exemplary abiotic stresses include, but are not limited to:
Drought and heat tolerance. In some cases, a plant resulting from seeds or other plant components treated with an endophyte can exhibit a physiological change, such as a compensation of the stress-induced reduction in photosynthetic activity (expressed, for example, as ΔFv/Fm) after exposure to heat shock or drought conditions as compared to a corresponding control, genetically identical plant that does not contain the endophytes grown in the same conditions. In some cases, the endophyte-associated plant as disclosed herein can exhibit an increased change in photosynthetic activity ΔFv(ΔFv/Fm) after heat-shock or drought stress treatment, for example 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 days or more after the heat-shock or drought stress treatment, or until photosynthesis ceases, as compared with corresponding control plant of similar developmental stage but not comprising endophytes. For example, a plant having an endophyte able to confer heat and/or drought-tolerance can exhibit a ΔFv/Fm of from about 0.1 to about 0.8 after exposure to heat-shock or drought stress or a ΔFv/Fm range of from about 0.03 to about 0.8 under one day, or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or over 7 days post heat-shock or drought stress treatment, or until photosynthesis ceases. In some embodiments, stress-induced reductions in photosynthetic activity can be compensated by at least about 0.25% (for example, at least about 0.5%, at least about 1%, at least about 2%, at least about 3, at least about 5%, at least about 8%, at least about 10%, at least about 15%, at least about 20%, at least about 25%, at least about 30%, at least about 40%, at least about 50%, at least about 60%, at least about 75%, at least about 80%, at least about 80%, at least about 90%, at least about 95%, at least about 99% or at least 100%) as compared to the photosynthetic activity decrease in a corresponding reference agricultural plant following heat shock conditions. Significance of the difference between endophyte-associated and reference agricultural plants can be established upon demonstrating statistical significance, for example at p<0.05 with an appropriate parametric or non-parametric statistic, e.g., Chi-square test, Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney test, or F-test based on the assumption or known facts that the endophyte-associated plant and reference agricultural plant have identical or near identical genomes (isoline comparison).

[0298] In some embodiments, the plants comprise endophytes able to increase heat and/or drought-tolerance in sufficient quantity, such that increased growth or improved recovery from wilting under conditions of heat or drought stress is observed. For example, an endophyte population described herein can be present in sufficient quantity in a plant, resulting in increased growth as compared to a plant that does not contain endophytes, when grown under drought conditions or heat shock conditions, or following such conditions. Increased heat and/or drought tolerance can be assessed with physiological parameters including, but not limited to, increased height, overall biomass, root and/or shoot biomass, seed germination, seedling survival, photosynthetic efficiency, transpiration rate, seed/fruit number or mass, plant grain or fruit yield, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, root length, wilt recovery, turgor pressure, or any combination thereof, as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under similar conditions.

[0299] In various embodiments, endophytes introduced into altered seed microbiota can confer in the resulting plant thermal tolerance, herbicide tolerance, drought resistance, insect resistance, fungus resistance, virus resistance, bacteria resistance, male sterility, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, increased yield, enhanced nutrient use efficiency, increased nitrogen use efficiency, increased protein content, increased fermentable carbohydrate content, reduced lignin content, increased antioxidant content, enhanced water use efficiency, increased vigor, increased germination efficiency, earlier or increased flowering, increased biomass, altered root-to-shoot biomass ratio, enhanced soil water retention, or a combination thereof. A difference between the endophyte-associated plant and a reference agricultural plant can also be measured using other methods known in the art (see, for example, Haake et al. (2002) Plant Physiol. 130: 639-648, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety)

[0300] Salt Stress. In other embodiments, endophytes able to confer increased tolerance to salinity stress can be introduced into plants. The resulting plants comprising endophytes can exhibit increased resistance to salt stress, whether measured in terms of survival under saline conditions, or overall growth during, or following salt stress. The physiological parameters of plant health recited above, including height, overall biomass, root and/or shoot biomass, seed germination, seedling survival, photosynthetic efficiency, transpiration rate, seed/fruit number or mass, plant grain or fruit yield, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, root length, or any combination thereof, can be used to measure growth, and compared with the growth rate of reference agricultural plants (e.g., isogenic plants without the endophytes) grown under identical conditions.

[0301] In other instances, endophyte-associated plants and reference agricultural plants can be grown in soil or growth media comprising different concentration of sodium to establish the inhibitory concentration of sodium (expressed, for example, as the concentration in which growth of the plant is inhibited by 50% when compared with plants grown under no sodium stress). Therefore, in another embodiment, a plant resulting from seeds comprising an endophyte able to confer salt tolerance described herein exhibits an increase in the inhibitory sodium concentration by at least 10 mM, for example at least 15 mM, at least 20 mM, at least 30 mM, at least 40 mM, at least 50 mM, at least 60 mM, at least 70 mM, at least 80 mM, at least 90 mM, at least 100mM or more, when compared with the reference agricultural plants.

[0302] High Metal Content. Plants are sessile organisms and therefore must contend with the environment in which they are placed. Plants have adapted many mechanisms to deal with chemicals and substances that may be deleterious to their health. Heavy metals in particular represent a class of toxins that are highly relevant for plant growth and agriculture, because many of them are associated with fertilizers and sewage sludge used to amend soils and can accumulate to toxic levels in agricultural fields (Mortvedt 1996, Fertilizer Res. 43:55-61; Kidd et al. 2007, Chemosphere 66:1458-1467, incorporated herein by reference in their entirety). Therefore, for agricultural purposes, it is important to have plants that are able to tolerate soils comprising elevated levels of toxic heavy metals. Plants cope with toxic levels of heavy metals (for example, nickel, cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, or aluminum) in the soil by excretion and internal sequestration (Choi et al. 2001, Planta 213:45-50; Kumar et al. 1995, Environ. Sci. Technol. 29:1232-1238, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety)). Endophytes that are able to confer increased heavy metal tolerance may do so by enhancing sequestration of the metal in certain compartments away from the seed or fruit and/or by supplementing other nutrients necessary to remediate the stress (Burd et al. 2000, Can. J. Microbiol. 46:237-245; Rajkumar et al. 2009, Chemosphere 77:153-160, incorporated herein by reference in their entirety). Use of such endophytes in a plant would allow the development of novel plant-endophyte combinations for purposes of environmental remediation (also known as phytoremediation). Therefore, in one embodiment, the plant comprising endophytes shows increased metal tolerance as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same heavy metal concentration in the soil.

[0303] Alternatively, the inhibitory concentration of the heavy metal can be determined for endophyte-associated plant and compared with a reference agricultural plant under the same conditions. Therefore, in one embodiment, the plants resulting from seeds comprising an endophyte able to confer heavy metal tolerance described herein exhibit an increase in the inhibitory sodium concentration by at least 0.1 mM, for example at least 0.3 mM, at least 0.5 mM, at least 1 mM, at least 2 mM, at least 5 mM, at least 10 mM, at least 15 mM, at least 20 mM, at least 30 mM, at least 50mM or more, when compared with the reference agricultural plants.

[0304] Finally, plants inoculated with endophytes that are able to confer increased metal tolerance exhibit an increase in overall metal excretion by at least 10%, for example at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 75%, at least 100%, at least 150%, at least 200%, at least 300% or more, when compared with uninoculated plants grown under the same conditions.

[0305] Low Nutrient Stress. Endophytes described herein may also confer to the plant an increased ability to grow in nutrient limiting conditions, for example by solubilizing or otherwise making available to the plants macronutrients or micronutrients that are complexed, insoluble, or otherwise in an unavailable form. In one embodiment, a plant is inoculated with an endophyte that confers increased ability to liberate and/or otherwise provide to the plant with nutrients selected from the group consisting of phosphate, nitrogen, potassium, iron, manganese, calcium, molybdenum, vitamins, or other micronutrients. Such a plant can exhibit increased growth in soil comprising limiting amounts of such nutrients when compared with reference agricultural plant. Differences between the endophyte-associated plant and reference agricultural plant can be measured by comparing the biomass of the two plant types grown under limiting conditions, or by measuring the physical parameters described above. Therefore, in one embodiment, the plant comprising endophyte shows increased tolerance to nutrient limiting conditions as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same nutrient limited concentration in the soil, as measured for example by increased biomass or seed yield of at least 10%, for example at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 75%, at least 100%, at least 150%, at least 200%, at least 300% or more, when compared with uninoculated plants grown under the same conditions. In another embodiment, the plant containing the endophyte is able to grown under nutrient stress conditions while exhibiting no difference in the physiological parameter compared to a plant that is grown without nutrient stress. In some embodiments, such a plant will exhibit no difference in the physiological parameter when grown with 2-5% less nitrogen than average cultivation practices on normal agricultural land, for example, at least 5-10% less nitrogen, at least 10-15% less nitrogen, at least 15-20% less nitrogen, at least 20-25% less nitrogen, at least 25-30% less nitrogen, at least 30-35% less nitrogen, at least 35-40% less nitrogen, at least 40-45% less nitrogen, at least 45-50% less nitrogen, at least 50-55% less nitrogen, at least 55-60% less nitrogen, at least 60-65% less nitrogen, at least 65-70% less nitrogen, at least 70-75% less nitrogen, at least 80-85% less nitrogen, at least 85-90% less nitrogen, at least 90-95% less nitrogen, or less, when compared with crop plants grown under normal conditions during an average growing season. In some embodiments, the microbe capable of providing nitrogen-stress tolerance to a plant is diazotrophic. In other embodiments, the microbe capable of providing nitrogen-stress tolerance to a plant is non-diazotrophic.

[0306] Cold Stress. In some cases, endophytes can confer to the plant the ability to tolerate cold stress. Many known methods exist for the measurement of a plant's tolerance to cold stress (as reviewed, for example, in Thomashow (2001) Plant Physiol. 125: 89-93, and Gilmour et al. (2000) Plant Physiol. 124: 1854-1865, both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety). As used herein, cold stress refers to both the stress induced by chilling (0°C - 15°C) and freezing (<0°C). Some cultivars of agricultural plants can be particularly sensitive to cold stress, but cold tolerance traits may be multigenic, making the breeding process difficult. Endophytes able to confer cold tolerance would potentially reduce the damage suffered by farmers on an annual basis Barka et al. 2006, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:7246-7252, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). Improved response to cold stress can be measured by survival of plants, production of protectant substances such as anthocyanin, the amount of necrosis of parts of the plant, or a change in crop yield loss, as well as the physiological parameters used in other examples. Therefore, in one embodiment, the plant comprising endophytes shows increased cold tolerance exhibits as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions of cold stress.

[0307] Biotic Stress. In other embodiments, the endophyte protects the plant from a biotic stress, for example, insect infestation, nematode infestation, complex infection, fungal infection, oomycete infection, protozoal infection, viral infection, and herbivore grazing, or a combination thereof.

[0308] Insect herbivory. There are an abundance of insect pest species that can infect or infest a wide variety of plants. Pest infestation can lead to significant damage. Insect pests that infest plant species are particularly problematic in agriculture as they can cause serious damage to crops and significantly reduce plant yields. A wide variety of different types of plant are susceptible to pest infestation including commercial crops such as cotton, soybean, wheat, barley, and corn.

[0309] In some cases, endophytes described herein may confer upon the host plant the ability to repel insect herbivores. In other cases, endophytes may produce, or induce the production in the plant of, compounds which are insecticidal or insect repellant. The insect may be any one of the common pathogenic insects affecting plants, particularly agricultural plants.

[0310] The endophyte-associated plant can be tested for its ability to resist, or otherwise repel, pathogenic insects by measuring, for example, insect load, overall plant biomass, biomass of the fruit or grain, percentage of intact leaves, or other physiological parameters described herein, and comparing with a reference agricultural plant. In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased biomass as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, endophyte-associated plants). In other embodiments, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased fruit or grain yield as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, endophyte-associated plants).

[0311] Nematodes. Nematodes are microscopic roundworms that feed on the roots, fluids, leaves and stems of more than 2,000 row crops, vegetables, fruits, and ornamental plants, causing an estimated $100 billion crop loss worldwide and accounting for 13% of global crop losses due to disease. A variety of parasitic nematode species infect crop plants, including root-knot nematodes (RKN), cyst- and lesion-forming nematodes. Root-knot nematodes, which are characterized by causing root gall formation at feeding sites, have a relatively broad host range and are therefore parasitic on a large number of crop species. The cyst- and lesion-forming nematode species have a more limited host range, but still cause considerable losses in susceptible crops.

[0312] Signs of nematode damage include stunting and yellowing of leaves, and wilting of the plants during hot periods. Nematode infestation, however, can cause significant yield losses without any obvious above-ground disease symptoms. The primary causes of yield reduction are due to underground root damage. Roots infected by SCN are dwarfed or stunted. Nematode infestation also can decrease the number of nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots, and may make the roots more susceptible to attacks by other soil-borne plant nematodes.

[0313] In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant has an increased resistance to a nematode when compared with a reference agricultural plant. As before with insect herbivores, biomass of the plant or a portion of the plant, or any of the other physiological parameters mentioned elsewhere, can be compared with the reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. Particularly useful measurements include overall plant biomass, biomass and/or size of the fruit or grain, and root biomass. In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased biomass as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, under conditions of nematode challenge). In another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased root biomass as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, under conditions of nematode challenge). In still another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased fruit or grain yield as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, under conditions of nematode challenge).

[0314] Fungal Pathogens. Fungal diseases are responsible for yearly losses of over $10 Billion on agricultural crops in the US, represent 42% of global crop losses due to disease, and are caused by a large variety of biologically diverse pathogens. Different strategies have traditionally been used to control them. Resistance traits have been bred into agriculturally important varieties, thus providing various levels of resistance against either a narrow range of pathogen isolates or races, or against a broader range. However, this involves the long and labor intensive process of introducing desirable traits into commercial lines by genetic crosses and, due to the risk of pests evolving to overcome natural plant resistance, a constant effort to breed new resistance traits into commercial lines is required. Alternatively, fungal diseases have been controlled by the application of chemical fungicides. This strategy usually results in efficient control, but is also associated with the possible development of resistant pathogens and can be associated with a negative impact on the environment. Moreover, in certain crops, such as barley and wheat, the control of fungal pathogens by chemical fungicides is difficult or impractical.

[0315] The present invention contemplates the use of endophytes that are able to confer resistance to fungal pathogens to the host plant. Increased resistance to fungal inoculation can be measured, for example, using any of the physiological parameters presented above, by comparing with reference agricultural plants. In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased biomass and/or less pronounced disease symptoms as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, infected with the fungal pathogen). In still another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits increased fruit or grain yield as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, infected with the fungal pathogen). In another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits decreased hyphal growth as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions (e.g., grown side-by-side, or adjacent to, the endophyte-associated plants, infected with the fungal pathogen).

[0316] Viral Pathogens. Plant viruses are estimated to account for 18% of global crop losses due to disease. There are numerous examples of viral pathogens affecting agricultural productivity. In one embodiment, the endophyte provides protection against viral pathogens such that the plant has increased biomass as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. In still another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits greater fruit or grain yield, when challenged with a virus, as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. In yet another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits lower viral titer, when challenged with a virus, as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions.

[0317] Complex Pathogens. Likewise, endofungal bacterial pathogens are a significant problem negatively affecting agricultural productivity and accounting for 27% of global crop losses due to plant disease. In one embodiment, the endophyte described herein provides protection against endofungal bacterial pathogens such that the plant has greater biomass as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. In still another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits greater fruit or grain yield, when challenged with a complex pathogen, as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. In yet another embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant exhibits lower complex count, when challenged with a bacterium, as compared to a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions.

[0318] Improvement of other traits. In other embodiments, the endophyte can confer other beneficial traits to the plant. Improved traits can include an improved nutritional content of the plant or plant element used for human consumption. In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant is able to produce a detectable change in the content of at least one nutrient. Examples of such nutrients include amino acid, protein, oil (including any one of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid, Alpha-linoleic acid, Saturated fatty acids, Palmitic acid, Stearic acid and Trans fats), carbohydrate (including sugars such as sucrose, glucose and fructose, starch, or dietary fiber), Vitamin A, Thiamine (vit. B1), Riboflavin (vit. B2), Niacin (vit. B3), Pantothenic acid (B5), Vitamin B6, Folate (vit. B9), Choline, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Zinc. In one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant or part thereof contains at least one increased nutrient when compared with reference agricultural plants.

[0319] In other cases, the improved trait can include reduced content of a harmful or undesirable substance when compared with reference agricultural plants. Such compounds include those which are harmful when ingested in large quantities or are bitter tasting (for example, oxalic acid, amygdalin, certain alkaloids such as solanine, caffeine, nicotine, quinine and morphine, tannins, cyanide). As such, in one embodiment, the endophyte-associated plant or part thereof contains less of the undesirable substance when compared with reference agricultural plant. In a related embodiment, the improved trait can include improved taste of the plant or a part of the plant, including the fruit or seed. In a related embodiment, the improved trait can include reduction of undesirable compounds produced by other endophytes in plants, such as degradation of Fusarium-produced deoxynivalenol (also known as vomitoxin and a virulence factor involved in Fusarium head blight of maize and wheat) in a part of the plant, including the fruit or seed.

[0320] In other cases, the improved trait can be an increase in overall biomass of the plant or a part of the plant, including its fruit or seed.

[0321] The endophyte-associated plant can also have an altered hormone status or altered levels of hormone production when compared with a reference agricultural plant. An alteration in hormonal status may affect many physiological parameters, including flowering time, water efficiency, apical dominance and/or lateral shoot branching, increase in root hair, and alteration in fruit ripening.

[0322] The association between the endophyte and the plant can also be detected using other methods known in the art. For example, the biochemical, metabolomics, proteomic, genomic, epigenomic and/or transcriptomic profiles of endophyte-associated plants can be compared with reference agricultural plants under the same conditions.

[0323] Metabolomic differences between the plants can be detected using methods known in the art. For example, a biological sample (whole tissue, exudate, phloem sap, xylem sap, root exudate, etc.) from endophyte-associated and reference agricultural plants can be analyzed essentially as described in Fiehn et al., (2000) Nature Biotechnol., 18, 1157-1161, or Roessner et al., (2001) Plant Cell, 13, 11-29, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Such metabolomic methods can be used to detect differences in levels in hormone, nutrients, secondary metabolites, root exudates, phloem sap content, xylem sap content, heavy metal content, and the like. Such methods are also useful for detecting alterations in endophyte content and status; for example, the presence and levels of signaling molecules (e.g., autoinducers and pheromones), which can indicate the status of group-based behavior of endophytes based on, for example, population density (see, for example Daniels et al., 2006, PNAS 103: 14965-14970; Eberhard et al. 1981, Biochemistry 20: 2444-2449, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). Transcriptome analysis (reviewed, for example, in Usadel & Fernie, 2013, Front. Plant Sci. 4:48, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety) of endophyte-associated and reference agricultural plants can also be performed to detect changes in expression of at least one transcript, or a set or network of genes upon endophyte association. Similarly, epigenetic changes can be detected using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (Vining et al. 2013, BMC Plant Biol. 13:92, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety).

Populations of Plant Elements



[0324] In another aspect, the invention provides for a substantially uniform population of plant elements comprising a plurality of plant elements comprising the endophytic microbial population, as described herein above. Substantial uniformity can be determined in many ways. In some cases, at least 10%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 75%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95% or more of the plant elements in the population, contains the endophytic microbial population in an amount effective to colonize the plant disposed on the surface of the plant elements. In other cases, at least 10%, for example, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 75%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95% or more of the plant elements in the population, contains at least 100 CFU or spores on its surface, for example, at least 200 CFU or spores, at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores, at least 300,000 CFU or spores, or at least 1,000,000 CFU or spores per plant element or more.

[0325] The synthetic combinations of the present invention may be confined within an object selected from the group consisting of: bottle, jar, ampule, package, vessel, bag, box, bin, envelope, carton, container, silo, shipping container, truck bed, and case. In a particular embodiment, the population of plant elements is packaged in a bag or container suitable for commercial sale. For example, a bag contains a unit weight or count of the plant elements comprising the endophytic microbial population as described herein, and further comprises a label. In one embodiment, the bag or container contains at least 1,000 plant elements, for example, at least 5,000 plant elements, at least 10,000 plant elements, at least 20,000 plant elements, at least 30,000 plant elements, at least 50,000 plant elements, at least 70,000 plant elements, at least 80,000 plant elements, at least 90,000 plant elements or more. In another embodiment, the bag or container can comprise a discrete weight of plant elements, for example, at least 1 lb, at least 2 lbs, at least 5 lbs, at least 10 lbs, at least 30 lbs, at least 50 lbs, at least 70 lbs or more. The bag or container comprises a label describing the plant elements and/or said endophytic microbial population. The label can contain additional information, for example, the information selected from the group consisting of: net weight, lot number, geographic origin of the plant elements, test date, germination rate, inert matter content, and the amount of noxious weeds, if any. Suitable containers or packages include those traditionally used in plant plant element commercialization. The invention also contemplates other containers with more sophisticated storage capabilities (e.g., with microbiologically tight wrappings or with gas-or water-proof containments).

[0326] In some cases, a sub-population of plant elements comprising the endophytic microbial population is further selected on the basis of increased uniformity, for example, on the basis of uniformity of microbial population. For example, individual plant elements of pools collected from individual cobs, individual plants, individual plots (representing plants inoculated on the same day) or individual fields can be tested for uniformity of microbial density, and only those pools meeting specifications (e.g., at least 80% of tested plant elements have minimum density, as determined by quantitative methods described elsewhere) are combined to provide the agricultural plant element sub-population.

[0327] The methods described herein can also comprise a validating step. The validating step can entail, for example, growing some plant elements collected from the inoculated plants into mature agricultural plants, and testing those individual plants for uniformity. Such validating step can be performed on individual plant elements collected from cobs, individual plants, individual plots (representing plants inoculated on the same day) or individual fields, and tested as described above to identify pools meeting the required specifications.

Populations of Plants, Agricultural Fields



[0328] A major focus of crop improvement efforts has been to select varieties with traits that give, in addition to the highest return, the greatest homogeneity and uniformity. While inbreeding can yield plants with substantial genetic identity, heterogeneity with respect to plant height, flowering time, and time to seed, remain impediments to obtaining a homogeneous field of plants. The inevitable plant-to-plant variability are caused by a multitude of factors, including uneven environmental conditions and management practices. Another possible source of variability can, in some cases, be due to the heterogeneity of the microbial population inhabit the plants. By providing endophytic microbial populations onto seeds and seedlings, the resulting plants generated by germinating the seeds and seedlings have a more consistent microbial composition, and thus are expected to yield a more uniform population of plants.

[0329] Therefore, in another aspect, the invention provides a substantially uniform population of plants. The population comprises at least 100 plants, for example, at least 300 plants, at least 1,000 plants, at least 3,000 plants, at least 10,000 plants, at least 30,000 plants, at least 100,000 plants or more. The plants are grown from the seeds comprising the endophytic microbial population as described herein. The increased uniformity of the plants can be measured in a number of different ways.

[0330] In one embodiment, there is an increased uniformity with respect to the microbes within the plant population. For example, in one embodiment, a substantial portion of the population of plants, for example at least 10%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 75%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95% or more of the seeds or plants in a population, contains a threshold number of the endophytic microbial population. The threshold number can be at least 100 CFU or spores, for example at least 300 CFU or spores, at least 1,000 CFU or spores, at least 3,000 CFU or spores, at least 10,000 CFU or spores, at least 30,000 CFU or spores, at least 100,000 CFU or spores or more, in the plant or a part of the plant. Alternatively, in a substantial portion of the population of plants, for example, in at least 1%, at least 10%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 75%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95% or more of the plants in the population, the endophytic microbial population that is provided to the seed or seedling represents at least 10%, least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95%, at least 99%, or 100% of the total microbe population in the plant/seed.

[0331] In another embodiment, there is an increased uniformity with respect to a physiological parameter of the plants within the population. In some cases, there can be an increased uniformity in the height of the plants when compared with a population of reference agricultural plants grown under the same conditions. For example, there can be a reduction in the standard deviation in the height of the plants in the population of at least 2%, for example at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 6%, at least 7%, at least 8%, at least 9%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60% or more, when compared with a population of reference agricultural plants grown under the same conditions. In other cases, there can be a reduction in the standard deviation in the flowering time of the plants in the population of at least 2%, for example at least 3%, at least 4%, at least 5%, at least 6%, at least 7%, at least 8%, at least 9%, at least 10%, at least 15%, at least 20%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 60% or more, when compared with a population of reference agricultural plants grown under the same conditions.

Commodity Plant Product



[0332] The present invention provides a commodity plant product, as well as methods for producing a commodity plant product, that is derived from a plant of the present invention. As used herein, a "commodity plant product" refers to any composition or product that is comprised of material derived from a plant, seed, plant cell, or plant part of the present invention. Commodity plant products may be sold to consumers and can be viable or nonviable. Nonviable commodity products include but are not limited to nonviable seeds and grains; processed seeds, seed parts, and plant parts; dehydrated plant tissue, frozen plant tissue, and processed plant tissue; seeds and plant parts processed for animal feed for terrestrial and/or aquatic animal consumption, oil, meal, flour, flakes, bran, fiber, paper, tea, coffee, silage, crushed of whole grain, and any other food for human or animal consumption; and biomasses and fuel products; and raw material in industry. Industrial uses of oils derived from the agricultural plants described herein include ingredients for paints, plastics, fibers, detergents, cosmetics, lubricants, and biodiesel fuel. Soybean oil may be split, inter-esterified, sulfurized, epoxidized, polymerized, ethoxylated, or cleaved. Designing and producing soybean oil derivatives with improved functionality and improved oliochemistry is a rapidly growing field. The typical mixture of triglycerides is usually split and separated into pure fatty acids, which are then combined with petroleum-derived alcohols or acids, nitrogen, sulfonates, chlorine, or with fatty alcohols derived from fats and oils to produce the desired type of oil or fat. Commodity plant products also include industrial compounds, such as a wide variety of resins used in the formulation of adhesives, films, plastics, paints, coatings and foams.

[0333] In some cases, commodity plant products derived from the plants, or using the methods of the present invention can be identified readily. In some cases, for example, the presence of viable endophytic microbes can be detected using the methods described herein elsewhere. In other cases, particularly where there are no viable endophytic microbes, the commodity plant product may still contain at least a detectable amount of the specific and unique DNA corresponding to the microbes described herein. Any standard method of detection for polynucleotide molecules may be used, including methods of detection disclosed herein.

[0334] Throughout the specification, the word "comprise," or variations such as "comprises" or "comprising," will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated integer or group of integers but not the exclusion of any other integer or group of integers.

Methods of Using Endophytes and Synthetic Compositions Comprising Endophytes



[0335] As described herein, purified endophyte populations and compositions comprising the same (e.g., formulations) can be used to confer beneficial traits to the host plant including, for example, one or more of the following: altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant. For example, in some embodiments, a purified endophyte population can improve two or more such beneficial traits, e.g., water use efficiency and increased tolerance to drought. Such traits can be heritable by progeny of the agricultural plant to which endophyte was applied or by progeny of the agricultural plant that was grown from the seed associated with endophyte.

[0336] In one aspect of the invention, the endophytes impart to the host plant an improved ability to cope with water-limited conditions.

[0337] In some cases, the endophyte may produce one or more compounds and/or have one or more activities, e.g., one or more of the following: production of a metabolite, production of a phytohormone such as auxin, production of acetoin, production of an antimicrobial compound, production of a siderophore, production of a cellulase, production of a pectinase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, nitrogen fixation, or mineral phosphate solubilization. For example, an endophyte can produce a phytohormone selected from the group consisting of an auxin, a cytokinin, a gibberellin, ethylene, a brassinosteroid, and abscisic acid. In one particular embodiment, the endophyte produces auxin (e.g., indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)). Production of auxin can be assayed as described herein. Many of the microbes described herein are capable of producing the plant hormone auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when grown in culture. Auxin plays a key role in altering the physiology of the plant, including the extent of root growth. Therefore, in another embodiment, the endofungal endophytic population is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to detectably increase production of auxin in the agricultural plant when compared with a reference agricultural plant. In one embodiment, the increased auxin production can be detected in a tissue type selected from the group consisting of the root, shoot, leaves, and flowers.

[0338] In some embodiments, the endophyte can produce a compound with antimicrobial properties. For example, the compound can have antibacterial properties, as determined by the growth assays provided herein. In one embodiment, the compound with antibacterial properties shows bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity against E. coli and/or Bacillus sp. In another embodiment, the endophyte produces a compound with antifungal properties, for example, fungicidal or fungistatic activity against S. cerevisiae and/or Rhizoctonia.

[0339] In some embodiments, the endophyte is a fungus capable of nitrogen fixation, and is thus capable of producing ammonium from atmospheric nitrogen. The ability of a fungus to fix nitrogen can be confirmed by testing for growth of the fungus in nitrogen-free growth media, for example, LGI media, as described herein.

[0340] In some embodiments, the endophyte can produce a compound that increases the solubility of mineral phosphate in the medium, i.e., mineral phosphate solubilization, for example, using the growth assays described herein. In one embodiment, the endophyte produces a compound that allows the bacterium to grow in growth media comprising Ca3HPO4 as the sole phosphate source.

[0341] In some embodiments, the endophyte can produce a siderophore. Siderophores are small high-affinity iron chelating agents secreted by microorganisms that increase the bioavailability of iron. Siderophore production by the endophyte can be detected, for example, using the methods described herein, as well as elsewhere (Perez-Miranda et al., 2007, J Microbiol Methods. 70:127-31, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety).

[0342] In some embodiments, the endophyte can produce a hydrolytic enzyme. For example, in one embodiment, an endophyte can produce a hydrolytic enzyme selected from the group consisting of a cellulase, a pectinase, a chitinase and a xylanase,. Hydrolytic enzymes can be detectedusing the methods described herein (see also, cellulase: Quadt-Hallmann et al., (1997) Can. J. Microbiol., 43: 577-582; pectinase: Soares et al. (1999). Revista de Microbiolgia 30(4): 299-303; chitinase: Li et al., (2004) Mycologia 96: 526-536; and xylanase: Suto et al., (2002) J Biosci Bioeng. 93:88-90, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety).

[0343] In some embodiment, synthetic combinations comprise synergistic endofungal endophytic populations. As used herein, the term "synergistic endophytic populations" refers to two or more endophyte populations that produce one or more effects (e.g., two or more or three or more effects) that are greater than the sum of their individual effects. For example, in some embodiments, a purified endophyte population contains two or more different endophytes that are capable of synergistically increasing at least one of e.g., production of a phytohormone such as auxin, production of acetoin, production of an antimicrobial compound, production of a siderophore, production of a cellulase, production of a pectinase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, nitrogen fixation, or mineral phosphate solubilization in an agricultural plant. Synergistically increasing one or more of such properties can increase a beneficial trait in an agricultural plant, such as an increase in drought tolerance.

[0344] In some embodiments, a purified endofungal population comprising one or more endophytes can increase one or more properties such as production of a phytohormone such as auxin, production of acetoin, production of an antimicrobial compound, production of a siderophore, production of a cellulase, production of a pectinase, production of a chitinase, production of a xylanase, or mineral phosphate solubilization in an agricultural plant, without increasing nitrogen fixation in the agricultural plant.

[0345] In some embodiments, metabolites in plants can be modulated by making synthetic combinations of purified endophytic populations. For example, an endophyte described herein can cause a detectable modulation (e.g., an increase or decrease) in the level of various metabolites, e.g., indole-3-carboxylic acid, trans-zeatin, abscisic acid, phaseic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acrylic acid, jasmonic acid, jasmonic acid methyl ester, dihydrophaseic acid, gibberellin A3, salicylic acid, upon colonization of a plant.

[0346] In some embodiments, the endophyte modulates the level of the metabolite directly (e.g., the microbe itself produces the metabolite, resulting in an overall increase in the level of the metabolite found in the plant). In other cases, the agricultural plant, as a result of the association with the endophytic microbe (e.g., an endophyte), exhibits a modulated level of the metabolite (e.g., the plant reduces the expression of a biosynthetic enzyme responsible for production of the metabolite as a result of the microbe inoculation). In still other cases, the modulation in the level of the metabolite is a consequence of the activity of both the microbe and the plant (e.g., the plant produces increased amounts of the metabolite when compared with a reference agricultural plant, and the endophytic microbe also produces the metabolite). Therefore, as used herein, a modulation in the level of a metabolite can be an alteration in the metabolite level through the actions of the microbe and/or the inoculated plant.

[0347] The levels of a metabolite can be measured in an agricultural plant, and compared with the levels of the metabolite in a reference agricultural plant, and grown under the same conditions as the inoculated plant. The uninoculated plant that is used as a reference agricultural plant is a plant that has not been applied with a formulation with the endophytic microbe (e.g., a formulation comprising a population of purified endophytes). The uninoculated plant used as the reference agricultural plant is generally the same species and cultivar as, and is isogenic to, the inoculated plant.

[0348] The metabolite whose levels are modulated (e.g., increased or decreased) in the endophyte-associated plant may serve as a primary nutrient (i.e., it provides nutrition for the humans and/or animals who consume the plant, plant tissue, or the commodity plant product derived therefrom, including, but not limited to, a sugar, a starch, a carbohydrate, a protein, an oil, a fatty acid, or a vitamin). The metabolite can be a compound that is important for plant growth, development or homeostasis (for example, a phytohormone such as an auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, a brassinosteroid, ethylene, or abscisic acid, a signaling molecule, or an antioxidant). In other embodiments, the metabolite can have other functions. For example, in one embodiment, a metabolite can have bacteriostatic, bactericidal, fungistatic, fungicidal or antiviral properties. In other embodiments, the metabolite can have insect-repelling, insecticidal, nematode-repelling, or nematicidal properties. In still other embodiments, the metabolite can serve a role in protecting the plant from stresses, may help improve plant vigor or the general health of the plant. In yet another embodiment, the metabolite can be a useful compound for industrial production. For example, the metabolite may itself be a useful compound that is extracted for industrial use, or serve as an intermediate for the synthesis of other compounds used in industry. In a particular embodiment, the level of the metabolite is increased within the agricultural plant or a portion thereof such that it is present at a concentration of at least 0.1 ug/g dry weight, for example, at least 0.3 ug/g dry weight, 1.0 ug/g dry weight, 3.0 ug/g dry weight, 10 ug/g dry weight, 30 ug/g dry weight, 100 ug/g dry weight, 300 ug/g dry weight, 1 mg/g dry weight, 3 mg/g dry weight, 10 mg/g dry weight, 30 mg/g dry weight, 100 mg/g dry weight or more, of the plant or portion thereof.

[0349] Likewise, the modulation can be a decrease in the level of a metabolite. The reduction can be in a metabolite affecting the taste of a plant or a commodity plant product derived from a plant (for example, a bitter tasting compound), or in a metabolite which makes a plant or the resulting commodity plant product otherwise less valuable (for example, reduction of oxalate content in certain plants, or compounds which are deleterious to human and/or animal health). The metabolite whose level is to be reduced can be a compound that affects quality of a commodity plant product (e.g., reduction of lignin levels).

[0350] In some embodiments, the endophyte is capable of generating a complex network in the plant or surrounding environment of the plant, which network is capable of causing a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite in the host plant.

[0351] In a particular embodiment, the metabolite can serve as a signaling or regulatory molecule. The signaling pathway can be associated with a response to a stress, for example, one of the stress conditions selected from the group consisting of drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, complex pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress.

[0352] The inoculated agricultural plant is grown under conditions such that the level of one or more metabolites is modulated in the plant, wherein the modulation is indicative of increased resistance to a stress selected from the group consisting of drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, complex pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress. The increased resistance can be measured at about 10 minutes after applying the stress, for example about

[0353] 20 minutes, 30 minutes, about 45 minutes, about 1 hour, about 2 hours, about 4hours, about 8 hours, about 12 hours, about 16 hours, about 20 hours, about 24 hours, about 36 hours, about 48 hours, about 72 hours, about 96 hours, about 120 hours, or about a week after applying the stress.

[0354] The metabolites or other compounds described herein can be detected using any suitable method including, but not limited to gel electrophoresis, liquid and gas phase chromatography, either alone or coupled to mass spectrometry (See, for example, the Examples sections below), NMR (See e.g., U.S. patent publication 20070055456, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety), immunoassays (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA)), chemical assays, spectroscopy and the like. In some embodiments, commercial systems for chromatography and NMR analysis are utilized.

[0355] In other embodiments, metabolites or other compounds are detected using optical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CAT scans, ultra sound, MS-based tissue imaging or X-ray detection methods (e.g., energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detection).

[0356] Any suitable method may be used to analyze the biological sample (e.g., seed or plant tissue) in order to determine the presence, absence or level(s) of the one or more metabolites or other compounds in the sample. Suitable methods include chromatography (e.g., HPLC, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography), mass spectrometry (e.g., MS, MS-MS), LC-MS, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), antibody linkage, other immunochemical techniques, biochemical or enzymatic reactions or assays, and combinations thereof. The levels of one or more of the recited metabolites or compounds may be determined in the methods of the present invention. For example, the level(s) of one metabolites or compounds, two or more metabolites, three or more metabolites, four or more metabolites, five or more metabolites, six or more metabolites, seven or more metabolites, eight or more metabolites, nine or more metabolites, ten or more metabolites, or compounds etc., including a combination of some or all of the metabolites or compounds including, but not limited to those disclosed herein may be determined and used in such methods.

[0357] As shown in the Examples and otherwise herein, endophyte-inoculated plants display altered oil content, altered protein content, altered seed carbohydrate composition, altered seed oil composition, and altered seed protein composition, chemical tolerance, cold tolerance, delayed senescence, disease resistance, drought tolerance, ear weight, growth improvement, health enhancement, heat tolerance, herbicide tolerance, herbivore resistance, improved nitrogen fixation, improved nitrogen utilization, improved root architecture, improved water use efficiency, increased biomass, increased root length, increased seed weight, increased shoot length, increased yield, increased yield under water-limited conditions, kernel mass, kernel moisture content, metal tolerance, number of ears, number of kernels per ear, number of pods, nutrition enhancement, pathogen resistance, pest resistance, photosynthetic capability improvement, salinity tolerance, stay-green, vigor improvement,increased dry weight of mature seeds, increased fresh weight of mature seeds, increased number of mature seeds per plant, increased chlorophyll content, increased number of pods per plant, increased length of pods per plant, reduced number of wilted leaves per plant, reduced number of severely wilted leaves per plant, and increased number of non-wilted leaves per plant, a detectable modulation in the level of a metabolite, a detectable modulation in the level of a transcript, and a detectable modulation in the proteome relative to a reference plant, or a combination thereof. Therefore, in one embodiment, the endofungal endophytic population is disposed on the surface or on or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the biomass of the plant, or a part or tissue of the plant grown from the seed or seedling. The increased biomass is useful in the production of commodity products derived from the plant. Such commodity products include an animal feed, a fish fodder, a cereal product, a processed human-food product, a sugar or an alcohol. Such products may be a fermentation product or a fermentable product, one such exemplary product is a biofuel. The increase in biomass can occur in a part of the plant (e.g., the root tissue, shoots, leaves, etc.), or can be an increase in overall biomass when compared with a reference agricultural plant. Such increase in overall biomass can be under relatively stress-free conditions. In other cases, the increase in biomass can be in plants grown under any number of abiotic or biotic stresses, including drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, complex pathogen stress, and viral pathogen stress.

[0358] In another embodiment, the endofungal endophytic population is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the rate of seed germination when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0359] In other cases, the endofungal microbe is disposed on the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the average biomass of the fruit or cob from the resulting plant when compared with a reference agricultural plant.

[0360] Plants inoculated with an endofungal endophytic population may also show an increase in overall plant height. Therefore, in one embodiment, the present invention provides for a seed comprising an endofungal endophytic population that is disposed on the surface or within a tissue of the seed or seedling in an amount effective to increase the height of the plant. For example, the endofungal endophytic population is disposed in an amount effective to result in an increase in height of the agricultural plant when compared with a reference agricultural plant. Such an increase in height can be under relatively stress-free conditions. In other cases, the increase in height can be in plants grown under any number of abiotic or biotic stresses, including drought stress, salt stress, heat stress, cold stress, low nutrient stress, nematode stress, insect herbivory stress, fungal pathogen stress, complex pathogen stress, or viral pathogen stress.

[0361] The host plants inoculated with the endofungal endophytic population may also show dramatic improvements in their ability to utilize water more efficiently. Water use efficiency is a parameter often correlated with drought tolerance. Water use efficiency (WUE) is a parameter often correlated with drought tolerance, and is the CO2 assimilation rate per amount of water transpired by the plant. An increase in biomass at low water availability may be due to relatively improved efficiency of growth or reduced water consumption. In selecting traits for improving crops, a decrease in water use, without a change in growth would have particular merit in an irrigated agricultural system where the water input costs were high. An increase in growth without a corresponding jump in water use would have applicability to all agricultural systems. In many agricultural systems where water supply is not limiting, an increase in growth, even if it came at the expense of an increase in water use also increases yield.

[0362] When soil water is depleted or if water is not available during periods of drought, crop yields are restricted. Plant water deficit develops if transpiration from leaves exceeds the supply of water from the roots. The available water supply is related to the amount of water held in the soil and the ability of the plant to reach that water with its root system. Transpiration of water from leaves is linked to the fixation of carbon dioxide by photosynthesis through the stomata. The two processes are positively correlated so that high carbon dioxide influx through photosynthesis is closely linked to water loss by transpiration. As water transpires from the leaf, leaf water potential is reduced and the stomata tend to close in a hydraulic process limiting the amount of photosynthesis. Since crop yield is dependent on the fixation of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis, water uptake and transpiration are contributing factors to crop yield. Plants which are able to use less water to fix the same amount of carbon dioxide or which are able to function normally at a low water potential, are more efficient and thereby are able to produce more biomass and economic yield in many agricultural systems. An increased water use efficiency of the plant relates in some cases to an increased fruit/kernel size or number.

[0363] Therefore, in one embodiment, the plants described herein exhibit an increased water use efficiency (WUE) when compared with a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions. Such an increase in WUE can occur under conditions without water deficit, or under conditions of water deficit, for example, when the soil water content is less than or equal to 60% of water saturated soil, for example, less than or equal to 50%, less than or equal to 40%, less than or equal to 30%, less than or equal to 20%, less than or equal to 10% of water saturated soil on a weight basis. In some embodiments, the plants inoculated with the endofungal endophytic population show increased yield under non-irrigated conditions, as compared to reference agricultural plants grown under the same conditions.

[0364] In a related embodiment, the plant comprising endophyte can have a higher relative water content (RWC), than a reference agricultural plant grown under the same conditions.

[0365] Although the present invention has been described in detail with reference to examples below, it is understood that various modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. For instance, while the particular examples below may illustrate the methods and embodiments described herein using a specific plant, the principles in these examples may be applied to any agricultural crop. Therefore, it will be appreciated that the scope of this invention is encompassed by the embodiments of the inventions recited herein and the specification rather than the specific examples that are exemplified below. All cited patents and publications referred to in this application are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety.

EXAMPLES


Example 1. Cultivation-independent analysis of microbial taxa in agriculturally relevant seed communities based on marker gene high-throughput sequencing


Example Description



[0366] Microbial taxa found in agriculturally relevant communities were identified using high-throughput marker gene sequencing across several crops and numerous varieties of seeds.

Experimental description



[0367] We employed high-throughput sequencing of marker genes for bacteria, archaea, and fungi on seeds of 50 commercial, 22 wild, and 33 landrace cultivars of corn; 40 commercial, 13 wild, and 23 landrace cultivars of wheat; 13 cotton seeds; and 24 soybean seeds. Non-commercial varieties were obtained from USDA GRIN through their National Plant Germplasm system (http://www.ars-grin.gov/npgs/). Accessions were categorized into landrace, wild, and inbred varieties based on the assessment of improvement status. In order to extract microbial DNA, the seeds were first soaked in sterile, DNA-free water for 48 h to soften them, and they were surface sterilized using 95% ethanol to reduce superficial contaminant microbes. The seeds were then ground using a mortar and pestle treated with 95% ethanol and RNAse Away (Life Technologies, Inc., Grand Island, NY) to remove contaminant DNA. DNA was extracted from the ground seeds using the PowerPlant Pro DNA extraction kit (Mo Bio Laboratories, Inc., Carlsbad, CA) according to the manufacturer's instructions.

[0368] Marker genes were amplified and sequenced from the extracted DNA using a high-throughput protocol similar to (Fierer et al. 2012, McGuire et al. 2013). For the bacterial and archaeal analyses, the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was targeted (primers 515f/806r), and for fungi, the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of the rRNA operon (primers ITS1f/ITS2r) was targeted. The two marker genes were PCR amplified separately using 35 cycles, and error-correcting 12-bp barcoded primers specific to each sample were used to faciliate combining of samples. To reduce the amplification of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, we used PNA clamps specific to the rRNA genes in these organelles (Lundberg et al. 2013). PCR reactions to amplify 16S rRNA genes followed the protocol of (Lundberg et al. 2013), and those to amplify ITS regions followed the protocol of (Fierer et al. 2012). PCR products were quantified using the PicoGreen assay (Life Technologies, Inc., Grand Island, NY), pooled in equimolar concentrations, and cleaned using the UltraClean kit (Mo Bio Laboratories, Inc., Carlsbad, CA). Cleaned DNA pools were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq instrument at the University of Colorado Next Generation Sequencing Facility.

Old OTU assignment



[0369] The raw sequence data were reassigned to distinct samples using a custom Python script, and quality filtering and OTU (operational taxonomic unit) clustering was conducted using the UPARSE pipeline (Edgar 2013). Briefly, a de novo sequence database with representative sequences for each OTU was created using a 97% similarity threshold, and raw reads were mapped to this database to calculate sequence counts per OTU per sample. Prior to creating the database, sequences were quality filtered using an expected error frequency threshold of 0.5 errors per sequence. In addition, sequences were dereplicated and singletons were removed prior to creating the database. OTUs were provided taxonomic classifications using the RDP classifier (Wang et al. 2007) trained with the Greengenes (McDonald et al. 2012) or UNITE (Abarenkov et al. 2010) databases for 16S rRNA and ITS sequences, respectively. To account for differences in the number of sequences per sample, each sample was rarefied to 1,000 and 6,500 sequences per sample for 16S rRNA and ITS datasets. This resulted in samples with fewer sequences than the rarefaction depth to be discarded from downstream analyses. OTUs classified as chloroplasts or mitochondria were discarded prior to rarefaction.

New OTU assignment



[0370] For both 16S rRNA and ITS1 sequences, we used barcoded primers unique to each sample to combine multiple samples in an Illumina MiSeq run. The resulting reads were separated back into their respective samples based on the barcodes using a custom Python script. We performed quality filtering following the UPARSE pipeline (Edgar, 2013), including merging paired end reads, setting a maximum expected error rate of <= 1 error per merged sequence, and removing singletons (reads occurring only one across all samples in a run).

[0371] The original de novo OTU (operational taxonomic units) clustering was performed at 97% sequence similarity, again following the UPARSE pipeline. Subsequent New OTU (new OTU) clustering (Rideout et al, 2014) was performed using a cascading approach, comparing the sequences against the Greengenes (McDonald et al, 2012) and UNITE (Abardenkov et al, 2010) databases, which are provided with full-length clustering at various widths. Bacterial sequences were first compared to the Greengenes 99% OTU representative sequences. Sequences without a 99% match to the 99% OTUs were then compared to the Greengenes 97% OTUs at 97%. Fungal sequences were first compared to the UNITE Dynamic OTU representative sequences, where dynamic represents values between 97% and 99% depending on the OTU. Sequences that did not match the UNITE Dynamic OTUs at the appropriate clustering level, were compared to the UNITE 97% OTUs at 97%. The remaining sequences that did not match either Greengenes or UNITE, and were present at a level of at least 10 reads across the samples, were clustered using the de novo method above (independently for the bacterial and fungal sequences). The original sequences were mapped to the New OTUs using the same cascading approach, and any sequences that did not match an OTU, but did match a sequence with fewer than 10 copies were designated with the read ID representing that unique sequence.

[0372] The original de novo OTUs were provided taxonomic classifications using the RDP classifier (Wang et al. 2007) trained with the Greengenes (McDonald et al. 2012) and UNITE (Abarenkov et al. 2010) databases for 16S rRNA and ITS sequences, respectively. To account for differences in the variable number of sequences per sample, each sample was rarefied to 1000 16S rRNA and 1000 ITS sequences per sample. OTUs classified as chloroplasts or mitochondria were discarded prior to rarefaction.

[0373] Overall differences in bacterial community composition between the control and inoculated plants were evaluated using non-metric multidimensional scaling based on Bray-Curtis dissimilarities in order to visualize pairwise differences between sample communities. Permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) was used to statistically test the significance of these differences. Analyses were conducted using the vegan package in R (R Core Team 2013). To determine the OTUs contributing to overall differences among crop types, mean relative abundances were calculated for each OTU within each crop type. Only OTUs with a mean relative abundance of 0.1% in either group were included in this analysis. The tables demonstrating presence absence were constructed using the New OTUs, assessing the presence of each OTU in any of the sample replicates, and reporting only the OTUs matching the relevant sequences.

Example Results: Core Taxa



[0374] OTUs were determined to be core taxa based on detection across a variety of seed types. For example, taxa core across crops were those present in seeds from ≥ 2 crops. Similarly, taxa core to an individual crop were those present in seeds from ≥ 2 cultivar categories (i.e. wild, landrace, inbred, or modern) within that crop. In an effort to conservatively select extant core taxa, OTUs where at least class level taxonomy could be resolved were discarded. Representative strains from our strain collection for each OTU were determined when possible using 16S rRNA gene clustering at the 97% similarity threshold in USEARCH (Edgar 2010).

[0375] Across seeds from all crops (corn, wheat, cotton, and soybean), 2,697 bacterial and 415 fungal OTUs were detected and evaluated following our stringent sequence quality filtering approach. Fungal sequences were not detectable in soybean samples, and thus, analyses across fungal taxa were conducted within the 3 remaining crops.

[0376] Within cotton, 176 bacterial and 68 fungal OTUs were found. Among these, 50 taxa, consisting of 25 bacterial and 25 fungal OTUs, were found only in cotton seeds, and not in seeds of corn, wheat, or soybean.

[0377] Within corn, 2351 OTUs were found, including 2169 bacterial OTUs and 182 fungal OTUs. Among these, 1964 OTUs, including 1853 bacterial OTUs and 111 fungal OTUs, were found only in corn, and not in seeds of wheat, soybean, or cotton seeds tested.

[0378] Within soybeans, 1097 bacterial OTUs were found. Among these, 367 bacterial taxa were found only in soybean, and not in seeds of corn, wheat, or cotton seeds tested.

[0379] Within wheat, 557 OTUs were found, including 354 bacterial OTUs and 203 fungal OTUs. Among these, 226 OTUs, including 85 bacterial OTUs and 149 fungal OTUs, were found only in wheat, and not in seeds of corn, soybean, or cotton seeds tested.

Example Results: Ancestral vs. modern taxa



[0380] Overall bacterial and fungal community compositions were compared between ancestral and modern seeds by first visualizing differences using non-metric multidimensional scaling based on Bray-Curtis dissimilarities. Statistical significance of differences was tested using permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) with the vegan package in R (R Core Team 2013 R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria ISBN: 3-900051-07-0. Available online at http://www.R-project.org/). The Shannon-Wiener diversity index was also calculated with the vegan package in R. OTUs having greater associations with ancestral seed types compared to modern seeds were identified using comparisons of the relative abundances of OTUs. Specifically, sequence counts per OTU were converted to relative abundances and median relative abundances were calculated for each seed type. We assessed differences between ancestral and modern seeds when median relative abundances were ≥ 0.1%. OTUs without taxonomy resolved to at least class level were removed from analysis. Representative strains from the current strain collection were found fNew OTUs when possible using 16S rRNA sequence clustering at the 97% threshold in USEARCH v7.0 [Edgar (2010) Nature methods 10:996-8, incorporated herein by reference].

[0381] Bacterial community composition significantly differed between wild and modern seeds for both corn (P < 0.001; Fig. 1A) and wheat (P < 0.001; Fig. 1B). This was also the case when landrace and modern seeds were compared (P < 0.05).

[0382] Among corn seeds, 14 bacterial OTUs were overrepresented in wild compared to modern seed varieties. These taxa included several members of the Enterobacteriaceae family as well as Paenibacillaceae, Planococcaceae, and Oxalobacteraceae (Table 12). Similarly, six OTUs were overrepresented in landrace compared to modern corn seeds. These also included several Enterobacteriaceae as well as one Xanthomonadaceae (Table 13). All these differences in composition were translated into differences in diversity, with modern corn being significantly more diverse than Teosinte and the Landrace (Fig. 3).

[0383] Among wheat seeds, 5 bacterial OTUs were overrepresented in wild compared to modern seed varieties (Table 14). 3 OTUs were overrepresented in landrace compared to modern wheat seeds. There taxa were members of the Enterobacteriaceae (OTU_3078, OTU_2, and OTU_2912). (Table 15). The diversity of the bacterial community was higher in modern wheat than in the Landrace (Fig. 4).

[0384] Seed fungal communities were also diverse, although less so than bacterial communities (Figs. 5 and 6). The pattern of diversity was opposite to that observed among the bacterial communities, with the modern varieties containing the least diverse fungal communities. Over 500 unique OTUs were observed across all samples. Fungal community composition significantly differed between wild and modern seeds from wheat P < 0.001. This was also the case for landrace and modern seeds from wheat. Differences between wild and modern seeds were not significantly different for corn (P > 0.01), but this was likely due to insufficient replication.

[0385] Among corn seeds, 1 fungal OTU was overrepresented in wild compared to modern seed varieties. This OTU was classified as an Acremonium species (Table 16). 2 fungal OTUs were overrepresented in landrace compared to modern seed varieties. Both OTUs were members of the Sordariomycetes and one was the same Acremonium species as that overrepresented in wild compared to modern seeds (Table 17).

[0386] Among wheat seeds, 7 fungal OTUs were overrepresented in wild compared to modern seed varieties. These OTUs were all members of the Dothideomycetes and included 3 taxa identified as Cladosporium (Table 18). Two of these OTUs were also overrepresented in landrace compared to modern seed varieties (Table 19).

[0387] Figures 3 and 4 show the Shannon Diversity indices of bacterial communities found in Wild, Landrace, and modern cultivars of corn and wheat, respectively. Figures 5 and 6 show the Shannon Diversity indices of fungal communities found in Teosinte, Landrace, Inbred, and modern cultivars of corn and wheat, respectively. Modern corn and wheat each had a lower diversity of fungal communities.

[0388] In conclusion, we have identified a number of bacterial and fungal microbes present in ancestral and landrace cultivars of wheat and corn that are underrepresented in modern cultivars. Our analysis elucidated several bacterial and fungal OTUs that were overrepresented in ancestral seeds compared to modern seeds.

Example 2. Identification of root endophytes belonging to OTUs identified in seeds



[0389] In the above examples, microbial taxa core to agriculturally relevant seeds were identified. In this example, seeds from several crops and numerous varieties were grown in the greenhouse or the field, and community sequencing was performed on root samples to identify taxa corresponding to core seed taxa.

Experimental description



[0390] The crops used in this experiment were designated: Modern Maize 1, Modern Maize 2, Landrace Maize, Wild Maize, Modern Wheat 1, Modern Wheat 2, Landrace Wheat, Wild Wheat, Modern Soy 1, Modern Soy 2, Wild Soy 1, Wild Soy 2, Modern Cotton 1, Modern Cotton 2, Landrace Cotton, and Wild Cotton.

[0391] The purpose of this work was to use Illumina sequencing to define the bacterial and fungal endophyte populations residing in the roots of wild, landrace, and modern varieties of maize, wheat, soybean, and cotton when grown in two different greenhouses (designated as "Massachusetts" or "Texas") or in three geographically different field locations (Minnesota and Idaho). As a negative control to promote enrichment for seed transmitted endophytes, plants were grown in autoclaved (sterile) sand under controlled conditions in the Massachusetts greenhouse. To see if seed transmitted endophytes might persist in roots grown in soil, all the above listed genotypes of plant were grown in the Massachusetts greenhouse planted with commercial nursery soil from Massachusetts. To see if some of these modern varieties would maintain seed transmitted endophytes in roots when grown in a different greenhouse, Modern Cotton 1 and 2, Modern Soy 1 and 2, Modern Maize 1 and 2, and Modern Wheat 1 and 2 were planted in clean containers filled with wheat field soil from Texas, in a greenhouse in Texas. To see if some of these modern varieties would maintain seed transmitted endophytes in roots when grown in geographically different field locations, Modern Cotton 1 and 2, Modern Soy 1 and 2, Modern Maize 1 and 2, and Modern Wheat 1 and 2 were planted in wheat fields in Minnesota and Idaho.

[0392] New, plastic conetainers were filled with heat sterilized quartz sand prior to each seed being per accession being planted. For soil treatments in Massachusetts, heat sterilized quartz sand was mixed with soil in a ratio of 3:1. For soil treatments in Texas, containers were filled with unmixed wheat field soil. To pre-germinate seedlings in Massachusetts, unsterilized seeds of each accession were placed on sterile sand or pure soil in a Petri dish, then watered with sterile water. One seedling of each seedling of each accession was planted in each of 4 sterile sand filled conetainers, 4 sand:soil filled conetainers or 4 soil filled containers. In the Texas greenhouse, seeds were placed directly into the soil in cups, without pre-germination. Likewise at the Minnesota and Idaho field locations, seeds were placed into the ground without pregermination. Greenhouse grown seedlings were watered with 25 mL of sterile water every two days, while field grown plants were only watered once with tap water right after planting. Plants were grown for 21 days in Massachusetts and then harvested, while in Texas, Minnesota and Idaho they were grown for 14 days then harvested.

[0393] Harvesting involved shaking plants free of as much soil/debris as possible, cutting plants into shoot and root, placing them into 15 mL conical tubes along with 10 mL of distilled water, shaken vigourously, then decanting off the dirty water. This washing step was repeated with sterile water until wash water was no longer cloudy (the last rinse coming off of every root was clear). The washed root material in 15 mL conical tube then had added to it two sterile carbide beads and 5 mL of sterile water before homogenizing in the Fastprep24 machine for 1 minute at 6M vibrations per second.

[0394] DNA was extracted from this material using a PowerPlant® Pro-htp 96 DNA extraction kit (Mo Bio Laboratories, Inc., Carlsbad, CA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Microbial composition was assessed in each sample using the methods described in Example 1.

[0395] The original de novo OTU (operational taxonomic units) clustering was performed at 97% sequence similarity, again following the UPARSE pipeline. Subsequent "New OTU" clustering (Rideout et al, 2014) was performed using a cascading approach, comparing the sequences against the Greengenes (McDonald et al, 2012) and UNITE (Abardenkov et al, 2010) databases, which are provided with full-length clustering at various widths. Bacterial sequences were first compared to the Greengenes 99% OTU representative sequences. Sequences without a 99% match to the 99% OTUs were then compared to the Greengenes 97% OTUs at 97%. Fungal sequences were first compared to the UNITE Dynamic OTU representative sequences, where dynamic represents values between 97% and 99% depending on the OTU. Sequences that did not match the UNITE Dynamic OTUs at the appropriate clustering level, were compared to the UNITE 97% OTUs at 97%. The remaining sequences that did not match either Greengenes or UNITE, and were present at a level of at least 10 reads across the samples, were clustered using the de novo method above (independently for the bacterial and fungal sequences). The original sequences were mapped to the New OTUs using the same cascading approach, and any sequences that did not match an OTU, but did match a sequence with fewer than 10 copies were designated with the read ID representing that unique sequence.

[0396] The original de novo OTUs were provided taxonomic classifications using the RDP classifier (Wang et al. 2007) trained with the Greengenes (McDonald et al. 2012) and UNITE (Abarenkov et al. 2010) databases for 16S rRNA and ITS sequences, respectively. To account for differences in the variable number of sequences per sample, each sample was rarefied to 1000 16S rRNA and 1000 ITS sequences per sample. OTUs classified as chloroplasts or mitochondria were discarded prior to rarefaction.

[0397] Overall differences in bacterial community composition between the control and inoculated plants were evaluated using non-metric multidimensional scaling based on Bray-Curtis dissimilarities in order to visualize pairwise differences between sample communities. Permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) was used to statistically test the significance of these differences. Analyses were conducted using the vegan package in R (R Core Team 2013). To determine the OTUs contributing to overall differences among crop types, mean relative abundances were calculated for each OTU within each crop type. Only OTUs with a mean relative abundance of 0.1% in either group were included in this analysis. The tables demonstrating presence absence were constructed using the New OTUs, assessing the presence of each OTU in any of the sample replicates, and reporting only the OTUs matching the relevant sequences.

Example Results



[0398] Experiments previously detected 2,697 bacterial and 415 fungal OTUs in seeds of corn, wheat, cotton, and soybean. Bacterial taxa represented 218 families and 334 genera. Fungal taxa represented 48 families and 87 genera highlighting the broad diversity of endophytic microbes within seeds. Searching for these same OTUs in washed roots of corn, wheat, cotton, and soybeans grown in either Massachusetts or Texas greenhouse and Idaho or Minnesota field, 624 (23%) of the bacterial and 48 (12%) of the fungal OTUs were observed in seeds. Searching for these only in roots of plants grown in the Massachusetts greenhouse (Tables 21, 22), 176 (7%) of these bacterial and 33 (8%) of these fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Texas greenhouse (Tables 23, 24), 395 (15%) of these bacterial and 21 (5%) of these fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Idaho field (Tables 25, 26), 364 (13%) of these bacterial and 14 (3%) of these fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Minnesota field (Tables 27, 28), 335 (12%) of these bacterial and 13 (3%) of these fungal OTUs were detected.

[0399] Among all the previously detected seed OTUs, 68 bacterial OTUs and 27 fungal OTUs were found to be core taxa across crops (Tables 9, 10 Searching for these core OTUs in roots of plants grown in the Massachusetts greenhouse (Tables 21, 22), 27 (40%) of the bacterial and 6 (22%) of the fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Texas greenhouse (Tables 23, 24), 38 (56%) of these core bacterial and 5 (19%) of these core fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Idaho field (Tables 25, 26), 24 (35%) of these core bacterial and 5 (19%) of these core fungal OTUs were detected. In roots of plants grown in the Minnesota field (Tables 27, 28), 36 (53%) of these core bacterial and 6 (22%) of these core fungal OTUs were detected. Searching for core seed OTUs that occurred in at least one root sample of the greenhouses and fields, 49 (72%) of bacterial and 7 (26%) of fungal OTUs were detected. Among these, the most common bacterial seed OTUs also observed in roots were B0.9|GG99|128181 (observed in 100% of all samples), B0.9|GG99|73880 (observed in 96% of all samples) B0.9|GG99|25580 (observed in 90% of all samples) and B0.9|GG99|132333 (observed in 84% of all samples). Among fungal OTUs from seeds, the most commonly observed in roots were F0.9|UDYN|206476 (observed in 76% of all samples), F0.9|UDYN|212600 (observed in 46% of all samples) F0.9|UDYN|216250 (observed in 42% of all samples) and F0.9|UDYN|215392 (observed in 42% of all samples). The fungal SYM Strains 15926, 15928, 00120, 00880, 01325, 01326, 01328, and 15811 all have greater than 97% identity to OTU F0.9|UDYN|206476 and were assayed on seedlings. The fungal SYM Strains 00741b, 01315, 01327, and 15890 all have greater than 97% identity to OTU F0.9|UDYN|212600 and were assayed on seedlings. The fungal SYM Strains 00154, 15825, 15828, 15837, 15839, 15870, 15872, 15901, 15920, 15932, and 15939 all have greater than 97% identity to F0.9|UDYN|215392 and were assayed on seedlings. The core seed and root bacteria observed in these experiments belong to the Phyla Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Tenericutes, while the fungal belong to the Phyla Ascomycota and to the of the Classes Dothideomycetes and Sordariomycetes, which means these groups poses the capacity to be seed transmitted and to colonize different life stages of a plant (both seeds and roots), as well as having a broad host range and flexibility allowing them to exist within different species of plant.

[0400] 29 seed bacterial OTUs were observed in roots of plants grown on sterile sand, while 43 seed bacterial OTUs were observed in roots of plants grown in soil; 23 of the same seed OTUs were observed in both conditions (Tables 21, 22). This pattern means that the soil condition enhances colonization of seed transmitted bacteria into the root. A contrasting trend was observed for fungi, where 28 seed bacterial OTUs were observed in roots of plants grown on sterile sand, while 19 seed bacterial OTUs were observed in roots of plants grown in soil; 15 of the same seed OTUs were observed in both conditions. Unlike bacteria, seed transmitted fungi attempting to colonize roots growing in non-sterile soil face greater competition for the root niche as soil transmitted fungi attempt to colonize the root.

[0401] Some seed endophytes are especially robust and able to colonize roots of plants growing in different field and greenhouse environments. By counting OTUs of microbes occurring in at least one plant variety in each field and the Texas greenhouse, 163 bacterial OTUs (out of a total of 583 bacterial seed OTUs detected in field grown roots) and 8 fungal OTUs (out of a total of 28 fungal seed OTUs detected in roots) were observed occurring in roots of these plants in all three environments; these sequences represent robust root colonizers which persist in roots despite different environmental conditions.

[0402] Root microbiomes in both environments shared 45% of their bacterial seed OTUs (216 OTUs) and 50% of their fungal seed OTUs (9 OTUs). As these plants were harvested when they were two weeks old, approximately half the diversity of seed transmitted microbiomes in maize, wheat and soy seeds are able to colonize and persist in seedlings under agronomically relevant conditions for at least two weeks.

[0403] Among all the previously detected seed OTUs found in corn seeds, 20 bacterial OTUs and 3 fungal OTUs were found to be present only seeds of wild and ancient landraces, but not modern varieties of corn. Searching for these in roots of ancestral maize varieties grown on sterile sand in the Massachusetts greenhouse, bacterial OTUs B0.9|GG99|813062, B0.9|GG99|9943, and B0.9|GG99|4327501 (but no fungal OTUs) were detected in wild maize, and bacterial OTU B0.9|GG99|9943 and fungal OTU F0.9|UDYN|210204 was detected in ancient landrace maize (Tables 25, 26). No ancestral seed bacterial OTU was observed in roots of wild or landrace maize plants grown on soil in the Massachusetts greenhouse, however fungal OTU F0.9|UDYN|210204 was observed in the roots of the ancient landrace maize growing on soil (Tables 21, 22).

Example 3. Isolation of bacterial endophytes from ancestral seeds



[0404] In order to better understand the role played by seed-derived endophytic microbes from ancestral species of plants in improving the vigor, general health and stress resilience of modern host plants, we initiated a systematic screen to isolate and characterize endophytic microbes from seeds of commercially significant grass plants.

[0405] Diverse types of wild relatives or ancestral landraces of maize, wheat, rice, and other seeds were acquired and screened for cultivatable microbes.

[0406] Pools of 5 seeds were soaked in 10 mL of sterile water contained in sterile 15 mL conical tubes for 24 hours. Some maize and rice accessions were sampled for seed surface microbes. In these cases, after 24 hours of soaking, 50 µL aliquots of undiluted, 100X dilute and 10000X dilute soaking water was plated onto R2A agar [Proteose peptone (0.5 g/L), Casamino acids (0.5 g/L), Yeast extract (0.5 g/L), Dextrose (0.5 g/L) Soluble starch (0.5 g/L), Dipotassium phosphate (0.3 g/L), Magnesium sulfate 7H2O (0.05 g/L), Sodium pyruvate (0.3 g/L), Agar (15 g/L), Final pH 7 ± 0.2 @ 25 °C] to culture oligotrophic bacteria, while the same volumes and dilutions were also plated onto potato dextrose agar (PDA) [Potato Infusion from 200 g/L, Dextrose 20 g/L, Agar 15 g/L, Final pH: 5.6 ± 0.2 at 25°C] to culture copiotrophic bacteria and fungi. All seeds in the study were sampled for endophytes by surface sterilization, trituration, and culturing of the mash. Seeds were surface sterilized by washing with 70% EtOH, rinsing with water, then washing with a 3% solution of sodium hypochlorite followed by 3 rinses in sterile water. All wash and rinse steps were 5 minutes with constant shaking at 130rpm. Seeds were then blotted on R2A agar which was incubated at 30°C for 7 days in order to confirm successful surface sterilization. Following the sterilization process, batches of seeds were ground with a sterile mortar and pestle in sterile R2A broth, while a select number of surface sterilized maize, rice and soy seeds were grown in sterile conditions and the roots or shoots of seedlings (without further sterilization) were crushed by bead beating in a Fastprep24 machine with 3 carbide beads, 1 mL of R2A in a 15 mL Falcon tube shaking at 6M/s for 60 seconds. Extracts of surface washes, crushed seed, or macerated seedling tissue were serially diluted by factors of 1 to 10-3 and spread onto quadrants on R2A and PDA agar in order to isolate cultivable seed-borne microorganisms. Plates were incubated at 28°C for 7 days, monitoring for the appearance of colonies daily. After a week, plates were photographed and different morphotypes of colonies were identified and labeled. These were then selected for identification by sequencing, backing up as glycerol stock, and assaying for beneficial functions as described herein.

Plating and scoring of microbes



[0407] After 7 days of growth, most microbial colonies had grown large and distinct enough to allow differentiation based on colony size, shape, color and texture. Photographs of each plate were taken, and on the basis of color and morphotype, different colonies were identified by number for later reference. These strains were also streaked out onto either R2A or PDA to check for purity, and clean cultures were then scraped with a loop off the plate, resuspended in a mixture of R2A and glycerol, and frozen away in quadruplicate at -80°C for later.

Sequence analysis & phylogenetic assignment of microbes isolated from ancestral seeds



[0408] To accurately characterize the isolated microbial endophytes, colonies were submitted for marker gene sequencing, and the sequences were analyzed to provide taxonomic classifications. Colonies were subjected to 16S rRNA gene PCR amplification using the 27f/1492r primer set, and Sanger sequencing of paired ends was performed at Genewiz (South Plainfield, NJ). Raw chromatograms were converted to sequences, and corresponding quality scores were assigned using TraceTuner v3.0.6beta (US 6,681,186, incorporated herein by reference). These sequences were quality filtered using PRINSEQ v0.20.3 [Schmieder and Edwards (2011) Bioinformatics. 2011;27:863-864, incorporated herein by reference] with left and right trim quality score thresholds of 30 and a quality window of 20bp. Sequences without paired reads were discarded from further processing. Paired end quality filtered sequences were merged using USEARCH v7.0 [Edgar (2010) Nature methods 10:996-8]. Taxonomic classifications were assigned to the sequences using the RDP classifier [Wang et al., (2007) Applied and environmental microbiology 73:5261-7, incorporated herein by reference] trained on the Greengenes database [McDonald et al. (2012), ISME journal 6:610-8, incorporated herein by reference]. The resulting 253 microbes, derived from ancestral (wild or ancient landraces) representing over 41 distinct OTUs (using a 97% similarity threshold) are provided in Table 20.

Example 4. Characterization of bacterial endophytes isolated from ancestral seeds



[0409] A total of 140 seed-origin bacterial endophytes were seeded onto 96 well plates and tested for various activities and/or production of compounds, as described below. The results of these in vitro assays are summarized in Table 27.










Production of auxin



[0410] Indole containing IAA is able to generate a pinkish chromophore under acidic conditions in the presence of ferric chloride. Microbial strains were inoculated into R2A both supplemented with with L-TRP (5 mM) in 2 mL 96 well culture plates (1 mL). The plate was sealed with a breathable membrane and incubated at 23°C under static conditions for 5 days. After 5 days, 150 µL of each culture was transferred to a 96 well plate and the OD600 measured. After measuring the OD600, the plate was centrifuged, and 50 µL of supernatant was transferred to a new 96 well plate, mixed with 100 µL of Salkowski reagent (1 mL of FeCl3 0.5 M solution to 50 mL of 35% HClO4) and incubated in the dark for 30 minutes and OD530nm measured to detect the pink/red color.

[0411] Auxin is an important plant hormone, which can promote cell enlargement and inhibit branch development (meristem activity) in above ground plant tissues, while below ground it has the opposite effect, promoting root branching and growth. Interestingly, plant auxin is manufactured above ground and transported to the roots. It thus follows that plant and especially root inhabiting microbes which produce significant amounts of auxin will be able to promote root branching and development even under conditions where the plant reduces its own production of auxin. Such conditions can exist for example when soil is flooded and roots encounter an anoxic environment.

[0412] We screened seed derived bacteria for their ability to produce auxins as possible root growth promoting agents. A very large proportion of the bacteria tested, approximately 103 out of 140, or 73% of the total strains, showed a detectable level of pink or red colour development (the diagnostic feature of the assay suggesting auxin or indolic compound production). 63 strains (45% of total) had particularly strong production of auxin or indole compounds.

Mineral Phosphate Solubilization



[0413] Microbes were plated on tricalcium phosphate media as described in Rodriguez et al., (2001) J Biotechnol 84: 155-161 (incorporated herein by reference). This was prepared as follows: 10 g/L glucose, 0.373 g/L NH4NO3, 0.41 g/L MgSO4, 0.295 g/L NaCl, 0.003 FeCl3, 0.7 g/L Ca3HPO4, 100 mM Tris and 20 g/L Agar, pH 7, then autoclaved and poured into square Petri plates. After 3 days of growth at 28°C in darkness, clear halos were measured around colonies able to solubilize the tricalcium phosphate.

[0414] Approximately 50 strains (36% of the strains), showed some ability to solubilize mineral phosphate, with 15 strains (11%) producing strong levels of mineral phosphate solubilization.

Growth on nitrogen free LGI media



[0415] All glassware was cleaned with 6 M HCl before media preparation. A new 96 well plate (300 ul well volume) was filled with 250 ul/well of sterile LGI broth [per L, 50 g Sucrose, 0.01 g FeCl3-6H2O, 0.02 g CaCl2, 0.8 g K3PO4, 0.2 g CaCl2, 0.2 g MgSO4-7H2O, 0.002 g Na2MoO4-2H2O, pH 7.5]. Microbes were inoculated into the 96 wells simultaneously with a flame-sterilized 96 pin replicator. The plate was sealed with a breathable membrane, incubated at 28°C without shaking for 3 days, and OD600 readings taken with a 96 well plate reader.

[0416] A nitrogen fixing plant associated bacterium is able theoretically to add to the host's nitrogen metabolism, and the most famous beneficial plant associated bacteria, rhizobia, are able to do this within specially adapted organs leguminous plant grows for them to be able to do this. These seed associated bacteria may be able to fix nitrogen in association with the developing seedling, whether they colonize the plant's surfaces or interior and thereby add to the plant's nitrogen nutrition.
In total, of the 140 isolates there were 15 (10% of strains tested) which had detectable growth under nitrogen limiting conditions (Table 27).

ACC Deaminase Activity



[0417] Microbes were assayed for growth with ACC as their sole source of nitrogen. Prior to media preparation all glassware was cleaned with 6 M HCl. A 2 M filter sterilized solution of ACC (#1373A, Research Organics, USA) was prepared in water. 2 µl/mL of this was added to autoclaved LGI broth (see above), and 250 uL aliquots were placed in a brand new (clean) 96 well plate. The plate was inoculated with a 96 pin library replicator, sealed with a breathable membrane, incubated at 28°C without 3 days, and OD600 readings taken. Only wells that were significantly more turbid than their corresponding nitrogen free LGI wells were considered to display ACC deaminase activity.

[0418] Plant stress reactions are strongly impacted by the plant's own production and overproduction of the gaseous hormone ethylene. Ethylene is metabolized from its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) which can be diverted from ethylene metabolism by microbial and plant enzymes having ACC deaminase activity. As the name implies, ACC deaminase removes molecular nitrogen from the ethylene precursor, removing it as a substrate for production of the plant stress hormone and providing for the microbe a source of valuable nitrogen nutrition. It is somewhat surprising, but this microbially mediated biochemical ability to reduce plant stress is very important as damage to plant growth under various stress conditions is believed to result from over production of ethylene (Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology, October 2007, Volume 34, Issue 10, pp 635-648).

[0419] In total, of the 140 isolates there were 28 strains (20%) which had greater growth on nitrogen free LGI media supplemented with ACC, than in nitrogen free LGI. Of these, 14 strains (10%) had very high ACC deaminase activity.

Acetoin and diacetyl production



[0420] The method was adapted from Phalip et al., (1994) J Basic Microbiol 34: 277-280. (incorporated herein by reference). 250 ml of autoclaved R2A broth supplemented with 0.5% glucose was aliquoted into a 96 well plate (#07-200-700, Fisher). The microbial endophytes from a glycerol stock plate were inoculated using a flame-sterilized 96 pin replicator, sealed with a breathable membrane, then incubated for 3 days without shaking at 28°C. At day 3, 50 µl/well was added of freshly blended Barritt's Reagents A and B [5 g/L creatine mixed 3:1 (v/v) with freshly prepared α-naphthol (75 g/L in 2.5 M sodium hydroxide)]. After 15 minutes, plates were scored for red or pink colouration relative to a copper coloured negative control (measured as 525 nm absorption on a plate reader).

[0421] A very high proportion of the stains tested were found to produce acetoin: 76 strains of the 140 tested, or 54%, produced at least some detectable level of acetoin, with 40 strains (28%) producing moderate to high levels (Table 27).

Siderophore production



[0422] To ensure no contaminating iron was carried over from previous experiments, all glassware was deferrated with 6 M HCl and water prior to media preparation [Cox (1994) Methods Enzymol 235: 315-329, incorporated herein by reference]. In this cleaned glassware, R2A broth media, which is iron limited, was prepared and poured (250 ul/well) into 96 well plates and the plate then inoculated with microbes using a 96 pin plate replicator. After 3 days of incubation at 28°C without shaking, to each well was added 100 ul of O-CAS preparation without gelling agent [Perez-Miranda et al. (2007), J Microbiol Methods 70: 127-131, incorporated herein by reference]. Again using the cleaned glassware, 1 liter of O-CAS overlay was made by mixing 60.5 mg of Chrome azurol S (CAS), 72.9 mg of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA), 30.24 g of finely crushed Piperazine-1,4-bis-2-ethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) with 10 ml of 1 mM FeCl3·6H2O in 10 mM HCl solvent. The PIPES had to be finely powdered and mixed gently with stirring (not shaking) to avoid producing bubbles, until a dark blue colour was achieved. 15 minutes after adding the reagent to each well, colour change was scored by looking for purple halos (catechol type siderophores) or orange colonies (hydroxamate siderophores) relative to the deep blue of the O-Cas.

[0423] In many environments, iron is a limiting nutrient for growth. A coping mechanism which many microbes have developed is to produce and secrete iron chelating compounds called siderophores which often only that particular species or strain has the means to re-uptake and interact with to release the bound iron, making it available for metabolism. A fringe effect of siderophore production and secretion is that a siderophore secreting microbes can remove all the bio-available iron in its environment, making it difficult for a competing species to invade and grow in that micro-environment.

[0424] Siderophore production by microbes on a plant surface or inside a plant may both show that a microbe is equipped to grow in a nutrient limited environment, and perhaps protect the plant environment from invasion by other, perhaps undesirable microbes. Siderophore production was detectable in 45 strains (32%), with 18 strains producing significant amounts.

Cellulase activity



[0425] Iodine reacts with cellulose to form a dark blue-colored complex, leaving clear halos as evidence of extracellular enzyme activity. Adapting a previous protocol [Kasana et al. (2008), Curr Microbiol 57: 503-507, incorporated herein by reference] 0.2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sodium salt (#C5678, Sigma) and 0.1% triton X-100 were added to R2A media, autoclaved and poured into 150 mm plates. Microbes were inoculated using a 96 pin plate replicator. After 3 days of culturing in the darkness at 25°C, cellulose activity was visualized by flooding the plate with Gram's iodine. Positive colonies were surrounded by clear halos. 47 strains, or approximately 33%, were found to produce cellulase activity. Interestingly, 11 strains produced high levels of cellulase activity (Table 27).

Antibiosis



[0426] Production of antimicrobial compounds from endophytes was tested essentially as described in Johnston-Monje et al., (2012) PLoS ONE 6(6): e20396, which is incorporated herein by reference. Briefly, colonies of either E. coli DH5α (gram negative tester), Bacillus subtillus ssp. subtilis (gram positive tester), or yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH109 (fungal tester) were resuspended in 1 mL LB to an OD600 of 0.2, and 30 µL of this was mixed with 30 mL of warm LB agar. Serial dilutions were made and plates poured. Microbes were inoculated onto rectangular plates containing R2A agar using a 96 pin plate replicator, incubated for one day at 28C and one day at 23C. Antibiosis was scored by observing clear halos around endophyte colonies. 30 strains were found to produce E. coli-antagonistic activity, while 39 strains had activity against S. cerevisiae.

Example 5. Testing of ancestral seed-origin bacterial endophyte populations on plants


Experimental Aim



[0427] The results shown above demonstrate that many of the endophytic bacteria derived from ancestral relatives of modern agricultural plants possess activities that could impart beneficial traits to a plant upon colonization. First, many of the bacteria described here are capable of producing compounds that could be beneficial to the plant, as detected using the in vitro assays described above. In addition, several representative bacteria were tested and found to successfully colonize corn plants as demonstrated in the example above. The aim of the experiments in this section addresses the ability of the bacterial endophytes to confer beneficial traits on a host plant. Several different methods were used to ascertain this. First, plants inoculated with bacteria were tested under conditions without any stress to determine whether the microbe confers an increase in vigor. Second, endophyte-inoculated plants were tested under specific stress conditions (e.g., salt stress, heat stress, water stress, and combinations thereof) to test whether the bacteria confer an increase in tolerance to these stresses. These growth tests were performed using two different means: using growth assays on water-agar plates, and using growth assays on sterile filter papers.

Experimental Description


Surface sterilization of seeds



[0428] Un-treated maize seeds and wheat seeds were sterilized overnight with chlorine gas as follows: 200g of seeds were weighed and placed in a 250mL glass bottle. The opened bottle and its cap were placed in a dessicator jar in a fume hood. A beaker containing 100mL of commercial bleach (8.25% sodium hypochlorite) was placed in the dessicator jar. Immediately prior to sealing the jar, 3mL of concentrated hydrochloric acid (34-37.5%) were carefully added to the bleach. The sterilization was left to proceed for 18-24h. After sterilization, the bottle was closed with its sterilized cap, and reopened in a sterile flow hood. The opened bottle was left in the sterile hood for a couple hours to air out the seeds and remove chlorine gas leftover. The bottle was then closed and the seeds stored at room temperature in the dark until use.

Water agar assays



[0429] Bacterial endophytes isolated from seeds as described herein were tested for their ability to promote plant growth under normal and stressed conditions by inoculating maize and wheat seeds with those endophytes and germinating them on water agar. For each bacterial endophyte tested, 5mL of liquid R2A medium was inoculated with a single colony and the culture grown at room temperature on a shaker to an OD (600nm) of between 0.8 and 1.2.

[0430] Sterilized maize and wheat seeds were placed on water agar plates (1.3% bacto agar) in a laminar flow hood, using forceps previously flamed. A drop of inoculum with an OD comprised between 0.8 and 1.2 (corresponding to about 108 CFU/mL) was placed on each seed (50uL for maize, 30uL for wheat, representing approximately 5.106 and 3.106 CFUs for maize and wheat, respectively). For each treatment, 3 plates were prepared with 12 seeds each. Plates were sealed with surgical tape, randomized to avoid position effects and placed in a growth chamber set at 22°C, 60% relative humidity, in the dark for four days. After four days, a picture of each plate was taken and the root length of each seedling was measured using the imaging software ImageJ. The percentage difference between the treated plants and the mock-treated (R2A control) was then calculated. For growth under salt stress, the water agar plates were supplemented with 100mM NaCl. For growth under heat stress, the plates were placed at 40 °C, 60% humidity after two days of growth, and left for an additional two days.

Filter Paper Growth Assay



[0431] Filter papers were autoclaved and placed into Petri dishes, and then presoaked with treatment solutions. To simulate normal conditions, 3-4 mL sterile water was added to the filters. Water and saline stresses were induced by adding 3-4mL 8% PEG 6000 solution or 50 or 100mM NaCl to the filter papers. Surface sterilized seeds were incubated in bacterial inocula for at least one hour prior to plating. Nine seeds were plated in triplicate for each condition tested, including room temperature and heat stress (40°C) for both normal and saline conditions. During initial stages of the experiment, plates were sealed with parafilm to inhibit evaporative water loss and premature drying of the filter papers. Plates were incubated in the dark at room temperature for two days following which heat treatment plates were shifted to 40°C for 4-6 days. Parafilm was removed from all plates after 3-5 days. After 5-8 days, seedlings were scored by manually measuring root length for corn and shoot length for wheat and recording the mass of pooled seedlings from individual replicates.

Experimental Results



[0432] Plant vigor and improved stress resilience are important components of providing fitness to a plant in an agricultural setting. These can be measured in germination assays to test the improvement on the plant phenotype as conferred by microbial inoculation. The collection of seed-derived endophytes produced a measurable response in corn and wheat when inoculated as compared to non-inoculated controls, as shown in Tables 28A-28D. For example, most of the strains tested were found to produce a favorable phenotype in any of the measured multiple parameters such as root length, weight, or shoot length in wheat, suggesting that the strains play an intimate role modulating and improving plant vigor and conferring stress resilience to the host plant. In wheat under normal conditions (vigor), 78% of the strains tested showed some level of effect and 63% a strong plant response suggesting the physiology and ecological niches of the strain collection can be associated to a beneficial plant role. The stress responses in the strain collection can be seen by the ability of a subgroup to confer a beneficial response under different conditions such as heat and salt and water stress. These can be applicable to products for arid and marginal lands. In a large proportion of cases for the tested strains, the beneficial effect was measurable in both crops indicating that the strains are capable of colonizing multiple varieties and plant species. This can play a role in their mechanisms for dispersal and colonization from one seed into a mature plant but also as part of the life cycle to establish an ample distribution range and ecological persistence in nature.
Table 28A (ancestral seed-origin bacterial endophyte populations on plants in corn assays)
      Root length 
    WeightRoot lengthCorn-variety 3 water-agar
StrainSourceOld OTU#NEW OTU#Corn Variety 1Corn Variety 2NormalSalt
SYM00002 Wild relative 66 3119 N/A N/A 2 2
SYM00011 Wild relative 2 3123 N/A N/A - 1
SYM00012 Wild relative 55 3121 N/A N/A 2 2
SYM00028 Ancient Landrace 18 3115 N/A N/A 2 N/A
SYM00049 Ancient Landrace 7 3116 2 1 3 1
SYM00052 Wild relative 18 3133 N/A N/A 1 -
SYM00057b Ancient Landrace 37 3113 N/A N/A 3 2
SYM00060 Ancient Landrace 67 3137 N/A N/A 1 N/A
SYM00064a Wild relative 10 3142 N/A N/A 2 2
SYM00071 Wild relative 76 3120 N/A N/A 1  
SYM00090 Ancient Landrace 62 3122 N/A N/A - 1
Table 28B (Root length and weight of ancestral seed-origin bacterial endophyte populations on plants)
StrainRoot lengthWeight
NormalHeatSaltHeat-saltWater stressNormalHeatSaltHeat-saltWater stress
SYM00002 1 3 - - 3 2 3 1 - 1
SYM00011 N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 - - - - 2
SYM00012 - 1 - - - 2 2 - 2 -
SYM00021 - - 3 1 - - - - - -
SYM00028 - - - - 3 1 - 2 3 -
SYM00033 - 1 3 2 2 1 3 - 2 -
SYM00049 1 3 1 2 1 - - - 1 -
SYM00052 N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 - - - - 1
SYM00057b 1 1 - 1 1 1 3 1 1 1
SYM00060 3 2 1 - - - 2 - - -
SYM00063 - - - - - 1 - - - -
SYM00071 - 1 2 3 - 2 1 2 3 -
SYM00075 N/A N/A N/A N/A - - - - - 3
SYM00090 2 2 2 - 1 3 3 1 1 -
SYM00102 - 2 3 3 - - 1 - 3 -
SYM00107 - 1 - - - 1 - - 3 1
SYM00508 - - - - - 1 - - - -
SYM00538A 1 1 3 - - - - - 1 -
SYM00547 2 1 3 - 1 1 - - - 1
SYM00554 - 3 - 3 - - 2 - 3 -
SYM00589 - 2 3 3 - 1 3 1 3 -
SYM00595 1 3 2 2 - 1 3 1 3 -
SYM00596 1 3 3 3 1 - 3 - 3 -
SYM00660 - 2 1 1 2 - 2 - - 2
SYM00967 - - 3 - 3 1 1 1 - 1
SYM00975 2 - 3 - 3 1 1 - - 2
SYM00992 1 - - - 3 - - - - -
Table 28C (Root length in normal, heat, and salt stress modes)
StrainRoot Length
NormalHeatSalt
SYM00028 3 - 2
SYM00046 3 N/A N/A
SYM00049 3 2 2
SYM00057b 3 3 3
SYM00060 2 N/A N/A
SYM00090 3 2 1
SYM00102 2 - -
SYM00107 2 3 -
SYM00508 3 3 1
SYM00538A 1 - 1
SYM00547 2 3 2
SYM00589 - 3 1
SYM00595 - 3 -
SYM00596 1 3 1
SYM00965 2 - 1
SYM00967 2 3 3
SYM00975 1 - 2
SYM00002 3 - 3
SYM00011 3 3 3
SYM00012 3 1 3
SYM00021 3 - -
SYM00033 3 - 3
SYM00052 1 - 3
SYM00063 1 - -
SYM00064a 3 - -
SYM00071 3 - -
SYM00075 3 - -
SYM00183 3 - -
SYM00660 - - 2
SYM00992 - - 3
Table 28D (Root length and weight in normal, salt, and water stresses)
StrainShoot lengthWeight
NormalSaltWater stressNormalSaltWater stress
SYM00002 - 1 - - 2 -
SYM00011 3 1 3 3 - 2
SYM00012 - 2 3 2 - 1
SYM00028 - 3 3 - 3 3
SYM00033 3 1 2 - - 1
SYM00049 3 - 3 2 - 2
SYM00052 1 - 1 3 - -
SYM00057b 3 3 1 2 - 3
SYM00064a - 2 2 - - -
SYM00071 2 3 3 - 3 1
SYM00075 - 1 3 - - 3
SYM00090 - - 3 - - 3
SYM00102 - 3 3 2 3 -
SYM00107 1 3 3 2 3 3
SYM00508 - 3 - - 2 -
SYM00547 N/A N/A 1 N/A N/A -
SYM00554 - 3 - - 3 -
SYM00595 1 3 3 2 3 -
SYM00596 1 3 3 1 3 2
SYM00660 N/A N/A 3 N/A N/A -

Example 6: Idenfication and characterization of culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that have been lost in modern corn and wheat seeds


Isolation and identification of culturable microbes



[0433] In order to better understand the role played by landrace and wild seed-derived endophytic microbes in improving the vigor, general health and stress resilience of modern agricultural plants, we identified culturable microbes that belong to the same OTUs as certain microbes of Tables 12-19 that were present in landrace and wild seeds but were present at much lower levels in modern wheat or corn. Using the same methods as in Example 3 and other techniques known in the art, bacterial endophytes were cultured from a variety of plant parts and a variety of plants. To accurately characterize the isolated microbial endophytes, colonies were submitted for marker gene sequencing, and the sequences were analyzed to provide taxonomic classifications. Among the cultured microbes, those with at least 97% 16S or ITS sequence similarity to certain microbes of Tables 12-15 were identified. Those microbes are listed in Table 29A.
Table 29A: Cultured bacterial isolates belonging to the same OTUs as certain bacteria of Tables 12-15 that were present in landrace and wild seeds but were present at much lower levels in modern wheat or corn.
Cultured bacterial isolateSEQ ID NO of cultured bacterial isolateNew SEQ ID NO of bacterial taxa from wild or landrace seedOld OTU of bacterial taxa from wild or landrace seedNEW OTU of bacterial taxa from wild or landrace seed
SYM00013 3590 33 OTU_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00018   30,31 OTU_2, B0.9|GG99|9943,
  3592   OTU_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263
SYM00021b 3594 27 OTU_35 B0.9|GG99|370327
SYM00025   30,31 OTU_2, B0.9|GG99|9943,
  3595   OTU_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263
SYM00028   27 OTU_35 B0.9|GG99|370327
SYM00043   30,31 OTU_2, B0.9|GG99|9943,
  3598   OTU_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263
SYM00044 3599 27 OTU_35 B0.9|GG99|370327
SYM00050   26, 28, OTU_3592, B0.9|GG97|816702,
    24, 25, OTU_1384, B0.9|GG99|218527,
    1939, OTU_3629, B0.9|GG97|639627,
  3600 1548 OTU_2970, B0.9|GG97|253061,
      OTU_3153, B0.9|GG97|4374146,
      OTU_115 B0.9|GG99|625742
SYM00068 3606 33 OTU_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00074   26, 28, OTU_3592, B0.9|GG97|816702,
    24, 25, OTU_1384, B0.9|GG99|218527,
    1939, OTU_3629, B0.9|GG97|639627,
    1548 OTU_2970, B0.9|GG97|253061,
      OTU_3153, B0.9|GG97|4374146,
  3608   OTU_115 B0.9|GG99|625742
SYM00183 3620 37 OTU_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407
SYM00184 3621 37 OTU_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407
SYM00219 3624 18 OTU_38 B0.9|GG99|29974
SYM00506c 3629 16 OTU_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649
SYM00508 3631 25 OTU_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061
SYM00545 3637 16 OTU_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649
SYM00549 3638 16 OTU_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649
SYM00617 3645 18 OTU_38 B0.9|GG99|29974
SYM00620   26, 28, OTU_3592, B0.9|GG97|816702,
    24, 25, OTU_1384, B0.9|GG99|218527,
    1939, OTU_3629, B0.9|GG97|639627,
    1548 OTU_2970, B0.9|GG97|253061,
      OTU_3153, B0.9|GG97|4374146,
  3646   OTU_115 B0.9|GG99|625742
SYM00646 3651 33 OTU_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00662 3653 2005 OTU_11 B0.9|GG99|560886
SYM00905 3663 37 OTU_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407

Characterization of culturable microbes: auxin, acetoin and siderophore production



[0434] The culturable microbes belonging to the same OTUs as certain microbes of Tables 12-15 that were present in landrace and wild seeds but were present at much lower levels in modern wheat or corn were then seeded onto 96 well plants and tested for auxin, acetoin and siderophore production, using the methods described in Example 5 with minor modifications. For auxin measurement, 1 µl of overnight-grown cultures of endophytic bacterial strains were inoculated into 750 µl of R2A broth supplemented with L-TRP (5 mM) in 2-mL 96 well culture plates. The plates were sealed with a breathable membrane and incubated at 23°C with constant shaking at 200 rpm for 4 days. To measure anxin production by fungal strains, 3 µl of 5-day old liquid fujgal cultures were inoculated into 1 ml R2A broth supplemeted with L-TRP (5 mM) in 24-well culture plates. The plates were sealed with breathable tape and incubated at 23°C with constant shaking at 130 rpm for 4 days. After 4 days, 100 µL of each culture was transferred to a 96 well plate. 25 µL of Salkowski reagent (1 mL of FeCl3 0.5 M solution to 50 mL of 35% HClO4) was added into each well and the plates were incubated in the dark for 30 minutes before taking picture and measuring 540 nm obsorption using the SpectraMax M5 plate reader (Molecular Devices). For acetoin measurements, microbial strains were cultured as described above in R2A broth supplemented with 5% glucose. After 4 days, 100 µL of each culture was transferred to a 96 well plate and mixed with 25 µL Barritt's Reagents (See Example 4) and 525 nm absorption was measured. For siderophore measurements, microbial strains were cultured as described above in R2A broth. The results are presented in Tables 29B.
Table 29B: Auxin, siderophore, and acetoin production by culturable bacteria belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that are present in lower levels in modern corn and wheat seeds
StrainSEQ ID NO.Secretes siderophoresProduces Auxin/IndolesProduces Acetoin
SYM00013 3590 0 1 0
SYM00018 3592 0 3 2
SYM00021b 3594 0 2 3
SYM00025 3595 1 3 2
SYM00043 3598 1 3 2
SYM00044 3599 1 1 3
SYM00050 3600 1 2 3
SYM00068 3606 2 2 0
SYM00074 3608 2 3 0
SYM00183 3620 0 2 1
SYM00184 3621 0 2 0
SYM00219 3624 3 2 3
SYM00506c 3629 0 2 2
SYM00508 3631 0 3 2
SYM00545 3637 2 2 2
SYM00549 3638 2 2 2
SYM00617 3645 1 3 1
SYM00620 3646 1 3 0
SYM00646 3651 3 2 3
SYM00662 3653 1 1 1
SYM00905 3663 3 2 2


[0435] In total, a very large proportion of the bacteria strains, 18 out of 21 strains tested, were able to utilize Tryptophan supplemented in the medium and showed a detectable level of pink or red color development (the diagnostic feature of the assay suggesting auxin or indolic compound production). 7 strains (33% of total) had particularly strong production of auxin or indole compounds. As for acetoin production, 13 out of 21 strains tested showed a detectable level of pink or red color (a proxy of acetoin production). Particularly, 5 of these 13 strains had strong production of acetoin. 7 out of 21 strains tested showed a detectable level of siderophore accumulation. Among these 7 strains, 3 strains showed very strong accumulation of siderophore.

Characterization of culturable microbes: substrate use



[0436] In addition to determining whether the strains produce auxin, acetoin, and siderophores, the ability of these strains to grow on a variety of substrates was determined. Liquid cultures of microbe were first sonicated to achieve homogeneity. 1 mL culture of each strain was harvested by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 4500 RPM and subsequently washed three times with sterile distilled water to remove any traces of residual media. Microbial samples were resuspended in sterile distilled water to a final OD590 of 0.2. Measurements of absorbance were taken using a SpectraMax M microplate reader (Molecular Devices, Sunnyvale, CA).

[0437] Sole carbon substrate assays were done using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray (PM) 1 and 2A MicroPlates (Hayward, CA). An aliquot of each bacterial cell culture (2.32 mL) were inoculated into 20 mL sterile IF-0a GN/GP Base inoculating fluid (IF-0), 0.24 mL 100X Dye F obtained from BIOLOG, and brought to a final volume of 24 mL with sterile distilled water. Negative control PM1 and PM2A assays were also made similarly minus bacterial cells to detect abiotic reactions. An aliquot of fungal culture (0.05 mL) of each strain were inoculated into 23.95 mL FF-IF medium obtained from BIOLOG. Microbial cell suspensions were stirred in order to achieve uniformity. One hundred microliters of the microbial cell suspension was added per well using a multichannel pipettor to the 96-well BIOLOG PM1 and PM2A MicroPlates that each contained 95 carbon sources and one water-only (negative control) well.

[0438] MicroPlates were sealed in paper surgical tape (Dynarex, Orangeburg, NY) to prevent plate edge effects, and incubated stationary at 24°C in an enclosed container for 70 hours. Absorbance at 590 nm was measured for all MicroPlates at the end of the incubation period to determine carbon substrate utilization for each strain and normalized relative to the negative control (water only) well of each plate (Garland and Mills, 1991; Barua et al., 2010; Siemens et al., 2012; Blumenstein et al., 2015). The bacterial assays were also calibrated against the negative control (no cells) PM1 and PM2A MicroPlates data to correct for any biases introduced by media on the colorimetric analysis (Borglin et al., 2012). Corrected absorbance values that were negative were considered as zero for subsequent analysis (Garland and Mills, 1991; Blumenstein et al., 2015) and a threshold value of 0.1 and above was used to indicate the ability of a particular microbial strain to use a given carbon substrate (Barua et al., 2010; Blumenstein et al., 2015). Additionally, bacterial MicroPlates were visually examined for the irreversible formation of violet color in wells indicating the reduction of the tetrazolium redox dye to formazan that result from cell respiration (Garland and Mills, 1991). Fungal PM tests were measured as growth assays and visual observation of mycelial growth in each well was made.





Table 29D: Substrate utilization as determined by BIOLOG PM2A MicroPlates by culturable bacteria belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that are present in lower levels in modern corn and wheat seeds.
Strain/SubstrateSYM 13SYM 18SYM 183SYM 184SYM2 19SYM 43SYM 50SYM50 8SYM 617SYM 620SYM 68SYM 905
N-acetyl-D-Galactosamine NO NO YES YES NO NO YES NO NO NO NO YES
Gentiobiose NO YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES NO YES
D-Raffinose NO NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO YES NO NO
Capric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-lactic acid methyl ester NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO
Acetamide NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO
L-Ornithine YES YES NO YES YES NO YES NO NO NO YES NO
Chondrointin sulfate C NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
N-acetyl-neuraminic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO
L-glucose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Salicin NO NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO YES
Caproic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
Malonic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Alaninamide NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES
L-Phenylalanine YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO
a-Cyclodextrin NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
β-D-allose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Lactitol NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES
Sedoheptulosan NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Citraconic acid YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO
Melibionic acid NO NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO YES YES NO
N-Acetyl-L-Glutamic acid NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO
L-Pyroglutamic acid YES YES YES YES YES NO NO YES NO NO YES NO
β-Cyclodextrin NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Amygdalin NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO
D-Melezitose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO
L-Sorbose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Citramalic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Oxalic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Arginine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Valine YES YES NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO YES NO
γ-Cyclodextrin NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-arabinose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
Maltitol NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES
Stachyose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-Glucosamine YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES NO YES YES
Oxalomalic acid YES YES YES YES NO YES NO NO YES NO YES YES
Glycine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D,L-Carnitine YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Dextrin NO NO NO YES YES NO NO YES YES YES NO NO
D-arabitol NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
a-Methyl-D-Glucoside NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-Tagatose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
2-Hydroxy benzoic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Quinic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Histidine NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO YES NO NO
Sec-Butytamine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Gelatin NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES
L-arabitol NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
β-Methyl-D-Galactoside NO NO NO YES NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO
Turanose NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
4-Hydroxy benzoic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-Ribono-1,4-Lactone NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Homoserine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D,L-Octopamine YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES YES
Glycogen NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
Arbutin NO NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO YES
3-Methyl Glucose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
Xylitol NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
β-Hydroxy butyric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO
Sebacic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Hydroxy-L-Proline NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO
Putrescine NO YES NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO
Inulin NO NO YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO
2-Deoxy-D-Ribose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO
β-Methyl-D-Glucuronic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
N-Acetyl-D-glucosaminitol NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
γ-Hydroxy butyric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Sorbic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Isoleucine YES NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO
Dihydroxy acetone NO NO NO YES NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO
Laminarin NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
i-Erythritol NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
a-Methyl-D-Mannoside NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
γ-amino butyric acid YES YES NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO
a-Keto-valeric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Succinamic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Leucine YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
2,3-Butanediol YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Mannan NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
D-Fucose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
β-Methyl-D-Xyloside NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
d-amino valeric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Itaconic acid NO NO NO NO NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO
D-Tartaric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
L-Lysine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
2,3-Butanone NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Pectin NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO
3-0-β-D-Galactopyranosyl-D-arabinose NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Palatinose NO NO YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO YES
Butyric acid NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
5-Keto-D-Gluconic acid NO YES NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO NO NO
L-Tartaric acid YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO NO NO
L-Methionine NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
3-Hydroxy 2-Butanone NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO








[0439] Twelve SYM strains of culturable bacteria belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that are present in lower levels in modern corn and wheat seeds were tested for sole carbon substrate utilization using BIOLOG PM1 and PM2A MicroPlates. The most utilized substrates by these strains are L-alanine, L-galactonic-acid- γ-lactone, maltose, maltotriose, D-cellobiose, gentiobiose, and D-glucosamine. The least utilized substrates by L-asparagine, L-glutamine, D-aspartic acid, tricarballylic acid, L-serine, L-fucose, 1,2-propanediol, D-threonine, L-threonine, succinic acid, fumaric acid, bromo succinic acid, D-L-a-glycerol phosphate, a-keto-butyric acid, a-hydroxy butyric acid, acetoacetic acid, glucuronamide, glycolic acid, mono methyl succinate, glyoxylic acid, phenylethyl-amine, and L-malic acid.

[0440] The substrates most utilized by a large number of the culturable bacteria belonging to core OTUs are mucic acid, L-arabinose, L-galactonic-acid- y -lactone, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltose, maltotriose, and D-cellobiose. These core bacteria did not utilize sedoheptulosan, oxalic acid, 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, quinic acid, mannan, L-methionine, N-acetyl-D-glucosaminitol, sorbic acid, 2,3-butanone, succinic acid, phenylethyl-amine, and 3-hydroxy 2-butanone as sole carbon sources. Results for the culturable fungi belonging to core OTUs indicate that D-sorbitol, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, glycerol, tween 40, tween 80, D-gluconic acid, L-proline, a-D-glucose, D-trehalose, maltose, lactulose, D-mannose, D-mannitol, sucrose, D-cellobiose, L-glutamic acid, L-ornithine, and L-pyroglutamic acid are carbon substrates that are utilized by a large number of the endophyte strains examined here. The carbon substrate that seemed to be not utilized by fungi in these assays is 2-deoxy-D-ribose. All other substrates could be utilized as a sole carbon nutrient by at least one fungi SYM strain.

Example 6: Testing of culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that have been lost in modern corn and wheat seeds



[0441] The results shown above demonstrate that culturable microbes belonging to the same OTUs present in landrace and wild corn and wheat seeds that have been lost in modern corn and wheat seeds possess activities that could impart beneficial traits to a plant upon colonization. The aim of the experiments in this section addresses the ability of these culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes to confer beneficial traits on a host plant. Several different methods were used to ascertain this. First, plants inoculated with bacteria or fungi were tested under conditions without any stress to determine whether the microbe confers an increase in vigor. Second, endophyte-inoculated plants were tested under water stress conditions to test whether the microbes confer an increase in tolerance to this stress. These growth tests were performed using growth assays on filter paper.

Seeds, seed sterilization and seed inoculation



[0442] Corn seeds were surface-sterilized with chlorine gas as described for Example 5. Inocula were also prepared and seeds inoculated as described in Example 5.

Filter Paper Growth Assay



[0443] Bacterial endophytes isolated from seeds as described herein were tested for their ability to promote plant growth under normal and stressed conditions by inoculating maize seeds with those endophytes and germinating them on filter paper. Each bacterial endophyte to be tested was streaked out onto 20% Tryptic Soy Agar, forming a lawn on regular Petri dishes (9 cm in diameter). Once the bacteria grew to high density, which happened after one or two days depending on the bacterial growth rate, a plate per bacterial strain was scraped with the aid of a sterile loop (filling the entire hole of the loop and producing a droplet of bacterial biomass of about 20 mg). The bacteria collected in this way were transferred into 1 ml of sterile 50mM Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) in a microcentrifuge tube and fully resuspended by vortexing for -20 sec at maximum speed. This method achieves highly concentrated (∼0.5-1 optical density, corresponding to about 108 CFU/mL) and viable bacteria pre-adapted to live coating a surface.

[0444] Inoculation of seeds was performed by aliquoting ∼100 seeds into a 50 ml sterile test tube with conical bottom. Sodium Alginate (SA) was used as a sticker and added to the seeds in a proportion of 8.4 ml/kg of seed. After applying the appropriate volume of SA with the aid of an automated pipette, the seeds were shook to ensure homogeneous coating. Inmediately after adding the SA, an equal volume of the bacterial suspension was added to the seeds and these were gently shooked to ensure homogeneous coating.

[0445] Filter papers were autoclaved and placed into Petri dishes, and then presoaked with treatment solutions. To simulate normal conditions, 4 mL sterile water was added to the filters. Drought and saline stresses were induced by adding 4mL 8% PEG 6000 solution or 100mM NaCl to the filter papers. Eight seeds were plated in triplicate for each condition tested. The Petri dishes were sealed with surgical tape to avoid evaporative water loss and premature drying of the filter papers, randomized inside cardboard boxes to avoid position effects and placed in a growth chamber set at 22°C, 60% relative humidity, in the dark for five days.

Scoring of results and data analysis



[0446] Once the seedlings had been growing for the prescribed period of time, they were removed from petri dishes, mounted on black cardboard backing, and photographed. After the seedlings were photographed, the images were processed to recover phenotypic measurements for further statistical analysis. The image-processing pipeline consisted of a cropping method that isolated the seedling assay from the peripheral metadata, a segmentation method that isolated individual seedlings from the background, and a rapid phenotyping tool that measured features of isolated seedling root morphologies.

[0447] Raw images were cropped using matrix rotation and subsampling methods included in the numpy python package. (van Rossum 2006, van der Walt 2011) Further segmentation on the cropped images was performed differently depending on crop genotype: soy seedlings were segmented using a watershed algorithm on the discreet Sobel gradient of the grayscale cropped image, while wheat and corn seedlings were segmented using Otsu's binary thresholding algorithm on the discreet Laplacian gradient of a Gaussian kernel convolved with the greyscale cropped image (Ando 2000, Otsu 1979). Image processing was performed using tools included in the Scikit-Image python package (vanderWalt, et al., 2014). Finally, the whole seedling biomass (root and shoot) of each treatment was determined using our own image processing metric.

Experimental Results



[0448] The effects of bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild seeds, and combinations of bacterial endophytes or fungal endophytes, on the growth of corn seeds in a filter paper assay is shown in Table 30A and 30B.

[0449] Table 30A: Growth of corn seeds treated with bacterial endophytes belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild seeds that are found at lower levels in modern seeds. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Water stressBiological Effect?Salt stressBiological Effect?
SYM00013 3590 1 no 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00018 3592 1 no 0 no 2 yes
SYM00021b 3594 1 no 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00025 3595 2 yes 0 no 1 yes
SYM00043 3598 0 yes 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00044 3599 1 no 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00074 3608 1 no 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00184 3621 1 yes 2 yes 0 no
SYM00219 3624 0 yes 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00545 3637 0 yes 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00549 3638 0 yes 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00617 3645 1 no 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00620 3646 1 yes 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00646 3651 0 yes 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00662 3653 1 yes 0 yes 1 no
SYM00905 3663 1 yes 0 no 1 yes


[0450] In the salt stress, 12.5% of the microbial inoculants elicited >40% improvement on plant phenotype compared to seeds that were treated with the formulation suggesting a role in improving plant vigor under a salt stress condition. One of the two top performers is Pantoea sp. (SYM00018) and these strains were among the highest auxin producers tested which may indicate important beneficial traits for the plant associated with this genus. Under water stress, 25% of the microbial inoculants elicited >40% improvement on plant phenotype suggesting a role in improving plant vigor under a water stress condition. The four strains which provided the largest improvement to plant phenotype came from different genera, and two of them, SYM00013 and SYM00184, showed the ability to utilize a number of different carbon substrates including: L-Arabinose, N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine, L-Alanine, D-Galactose, a-Hydroxy Glutaric acid- ?-lactone, L-Alanyl-Glycine, D-Xylose, Mucic acid, D-Alanine and Uridine. This suggests that they may have similar roles in providing water stress protection for the plant. Under normal condition, 6.25% of the microbial inoculants elicited >40% improvement on plant phenotype compared to seeds that were treated with the formulation suggesting a role in improving plant vigor under a salt stress condition. The top performer under normal condition is Pantoea sp. (SYM00018) and these strains were among the highest auxin producers tested which may indicate important beneficial traits for the plant associated with this genus.
Table 30B: Growth of corn seeds treated with combinations of bacterial endophytes belonging to OTUs present in landrace and wild seeds that are found at lower levels in modern seeds. *Any symbol to the left of the "/" pertains to primary radicle length with +, 0, - denoting an increase, no change, or decrease relative to control seedling radicles, respectively. The scale (a-e) to the right of the "/" pertains to relative increases or decreases in secondary characteristics of the seedlings as follows: a) root hair development, b) lateral root number, c) lateral root size, d) shoot length, and e) root thickness.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.Normal *Water stress
SYM00025 3595 SYM00044 3599 0 0/a
SYM00043 3598 SYM00018 3592 - 0
SYM00074 3608 SYM00184 3621 0 -
SYM00549 3638 SYM00617 3645 0/-b 0/a
SYM00646 3651 SYM00662 3653   +/a,b,c
SYM00662 3653 SYM00025 3595 -/-b +/a
SYM00905 3663 SYM00043 3598 -/-b 0


[0451] A beneficial plant microbiome is likely made up of multiple strains that occupy stress protection niches within the plant. These particular bacterial endophyte combinations were evaluated in a germination assays to test the improvement on the plant phenotype conferred by inoculation with multiple bacterial strains. In water stressed plants the combination SYM00646/SYM00662 and SYM00662/SYM00025 provided improvement in plant phenotype compared to the formulation control.

Example 8: Identification and characterization of culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to core OTUs


Isolation and identification of culturable microbes



[0452] In order to better understand the role played by core seed-derived endophytic microbes in improving the vigor, general health and stress resilience of agricultural plants, we identified culturable microbes that belong to the same OTUs as the core OTUs of Tables 9 and 10. Using the same methods as in Example 3 and other techniques known in the art, bacterial and fungal endophytes were cultured were from a variety of plant parts and a variety of plants. To accurately characterize the isolated microbial endophytes, colonies were submitted for marker gene sequencing, and the sequences were analyzed to provide taxonomic classifications. Among the cultured microbes, those with at least 97% 16S or ITS sequence similarity to certain microbes of Tables 9 and 10 were identified. Those microbes are listed in Tables 31A and 31B.
Table 31A: Cultured bacterial isolates belonging to the same OTUs as certain bacteria of Table 9.
Cultured bacterial isolateSEQ ID NO of cultured bacterial isolateSEQ ID NO of core bacterial taxaOld OTU of core bacterial taxaNew OTU of core bacterial taxa
SYM00003 3588 20 58 B0.9|GG99|238752
SYM00009 3589 20 58 B0.9|GG99|238752
SYM00013 3590 33 7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00017A 3591 803 54 B0.9|GG99|5409
SYM00018 3592 31 3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263
SYM00020 3593 32 1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263
SYM00033 3596 1953 2912 B0.9|GG97|253061
SYM00050 3600 26, 28, 24, 25, OTU_3592, B0.9|GG97|816702,
    1939, 1548 OTU_1384, B0.9|GG99|218527,
      OTU_3629, B0.9|GG97|639627,
      OTU_2970, B0.9|GG97|253061,
      OTU_3153, B0.9|GG97|4374146,
      OTU_115 B0.9|GG99|625742
SYM00053 3601 25, 27, 28, 29, 32, 1953 2970, X, 1384, X, X, 2912  
SYM00062C 3603 15 62 B0.9|GG99|685917
SYM00065 3604 11, 891, 892, 23, 3209, 3351, B0.9|GG99|2929397,
    895 568 B0.9|GG99|4450360,
        B0.9|GG97|158370,
        B0.9|GG99|2185530
SYM00068 3606 33 7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00070 3607 30 2 B0.9|GG99|9943
SYM00103 3609 20 58 B0.9|GG99|238752
SYM00170 3619 1023 10 B0.9|GG99|1082594
SYM00183 3620 37 83 B0.9|GG99|4102407
SYM00184 3621 37 83 B0.9|GG99|4102407
SYM00207 3622 12 131 B0.9|GG99|4298641
SYM00212 3623 18 38 B0.9|GG99|29974
SYM00219 3624 18,981,988 38, 3473, 106 B0.9|GG99|29974,
        B0.9|GG99|156425,
        B0.9|GG99|277294
SYM00234 3625 1023 10 B0.9|GG99|1082594
SYM00236 3626 9 69 B0.9|GG99|175931
SYM00248 3627 30 2 B0.9|GG99|9943
SYM00249 3628 12, 1047 131,212 B0.9|GG99|4298641, B0.9|GG99|14492
SYM00507 3630 12, 1047 131,212 B0.9|GG99|4298641,
        B0.9|GG99|14492
SYM00508 3631 25 2970 B0.9|GG97|253061
SYM00525 3632 3 28 B0.9|GG99|813062
SYM00538A 3633 891, 892 3209,3351 B0.9|GG99|4450360,
        B0.9|GG97|158370
SYM00538B 3634 1023 10 B0.9|GG99|1082594
SYM00538i 3635 22 60 B0.9|GG99|105406
SYM00543 3636 14 59 B0.9|GG99|144390
SYM00563 3639 988 106 B0.9|GG99|277294
SYM00617 3645 988 106 B0.9|GG99|277294
SYM00620 3646 26, 28, 24, 25, OTU_3592, B0.9|GG97|816702,
    1939, 1548 OTU_1384, B0.9|GG99|218527,B0.9|
      OTU_3629, GG97|639627,
      OTU_2970, B0.9|GG97|253061,
      OTU_3153, B0.9|GG97|4374146,
      OTU_115 B0.9|GG99|625742
SYM00627 3648 27 35 B0.9|GG99|370327
SYM00628 3649 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 1953    
SYM00650 3652 33 7 B0.9|GG99|4327501
SYM00714 3656 803 54 B0.9|GG99|5409
SYM00905 3663 37 83 B0.9|GG99|4102407
SYM00924 3664 9 69 B0.9|GG99|175931
SYM00963 3665 29 319 B0.9|GG99|295383
SYM00978 3668 29, 30, 31, 32, 1953    
SYM00982 3666 22 60 B0.9|GG99|105406
SYM00987 3667 29 319 B0.9|GG99|295383
SYM00991 3669 1139, 1164 81,64 B0.9|GG99|988067,
        B0.9|GG99|4426695
SYM00999 3670 9 69 B0.9|GG99|175931
SYM01049 3671 25, 27, 28, 30, 1953    
Table 31B: Cultured fungal isolates belonging to the same OTUs as certain fungi of Table 10.
StrainSEQ ID NO.SEQ ID NO of core fungal taxaOld OTU of core fungal taxaNEW OTU of core fungal taxa
SYM00034 3597 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00061A 3602 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00066 3605 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00120 3610 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM00122 3611 2701 45 F0.9|U97|025461
SYM00123 3612 2701 45 F0.9|U97|025461
SYM00124 3613 2968 8 F0.9|UDYN|220700
SYM00129 3614 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM00135 3615 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM00136 3616 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM00151 3617 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM00154 3618 2966, 2983, 3, 351, 728, 766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM00566 B 3640 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00577 3642 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00590 3643 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00603 3644 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00622 3647 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00629 3650 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00663 3654 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM00696 3655 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM00741a 3657 2741 10 F0.9|UDYN|186595
SYM00741b 3658 2733, 2751, 5, 883, 974 F0.9|UDYN|212600;
    2799   F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:18309:4041;
SYM00793 3659 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM00795 3660 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM00854 3661 2741 10 F0.9|UDYN|186595
SYM00880 3662 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM01300 3672 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM01303 3673 2968 8 F0.9|UDYN|220700
SYM01310 3674 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM01311 3675 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM01314 3676 2965 7 F0.9|UDYN|210204
SYM01315 3677 2733, 2751, 5,883,974 F0.9|UDYN|212600;
    2799   F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:18309:4041;
SYM01325 3678 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM01326 3679 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM01327 3680 2733, 2751, 5,883,974 F0.9|UDYN|212600;
    2799   F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:18309:4041;
SYM01328 3681 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM01333 3682 2737 4 F0.9|SF97|43
SYM15811 3683 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM15820 3684 2980 50 F0.9|UDYN|177637
SYM15821 3685 2980 50 F0.9|UDYN|177637
SYM15825 3686 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15828 3687 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15831 3688 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM15837 3689 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15839 3690 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15847 3691 2698 1 F0.9|UDYN|424875
SYM15870 3692 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15872 3693 2966, 2983 3,351 F0.9|UDYN|215392; F0.9|U97|020374
SYM15890 3694 2733, 2751, 5, 883, 974 F0.9|UDYN|212600;
    2799   F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:1830 9:4041;
SYM15901 3695 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15920 3696 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468
SYM15926 3697 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM 15928 3698 2699 2 F0.9|UDYN|206476
SYM15932 3699 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:2134 0:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:1110 6:24468
SYM15939 3700 2966, 2983, 3,351,728,766 F0.9|UDYN|215392;
    2987, 3002   F0.9|U97|020374;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509;
        F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468

Characterization of culturable microbes: auxin, acetoin and siderophore production



[0453] The culturable microbes belonging to the same OTUs as certain microbes of Tables 9 or Table 10 were then seeded onto 96 well plants and tested for auxin, acetoin and siderophore production, using the methods described in Example 4. The results are presented in Tables 32A and 32B.
Table 32A: Auxin, siderophore, and acetoin production by culturable bacteria belonging to core OTUs
StrainSEQ ID NO.Secretes siderophoresProduces Auxin/IndolesProduces Acetoin
SYM00003 3588 2 1 0
SYM00009 3589 1 1 0
SYM00013 3590 0 1 0
SYM00017A 3591 1 3 0
SYM00018 3592 0 3 2
SYM00020 3593 0 2 2
SYM00021b 3594 0 2 3
SYM00025 3595 1 3 2
SYM00043 3598 1 3 2
SYM00044 3599 1 1 3
SYM00050 3600 1 2 3
SYM00053 3601 1 1 2
SYM00062C 3603 1 2 1
SYM00068 3606 2 2 0
SYM00070 3607 2 2 0
SYM00074 3608 2 3 0
SYM00103 3609 2 2 2
SYM00183 3620 0 2 1
SYM00184 3621 0 2 0
SYM00207 3622 1 2 2
SYM00212 3623 2 2 3
SYM00219 3624 3 2 3
SYM00234 3625 2 2 2
SYM00236 3626 0 2 0
SYM00248 3627 1 2 0
SYM00249 3628 2 2 2
SYM00506c 3629 0 2 2
SYM00507 3630 1 2 2
SYM00508 3631 0 3 2
SYM00525 3632 2 2 3
SYM00538A 3633 3 2 3
SYM00538B 3634 2 2 2
SYM00538i 3635 0 1 0
SYM00543 3636 0 3 1
SYM00545 3637 2 2 2
SYM00549 3638 2 2 2
SYM00563 3639 2 2 1
SYM00574 3641 3 1 0
SYM00617 3645 1 3 1
SYM00620 3646 1 3 0
SYM00627 3648 0 1 3
SYM00628 3649 2 2 3
SYM00646 3651 3 2 3
SYM00650 3652 2 2 0
SYM00662 3653 1 1 1
SYM00714 3656 1 2 2
SYM00905 3663 3 2 2
SYM00924 3664 2 2 2
SYM00963 3665 2 2 1
SYM00978 3668 2 2 1
SYM00982 3666 0 2 3
SYM00987 3667 1 3 2
SYM00991 3669 1 2 2
SYM00999 3670 1 1 3
SYM01049 3671 1 1 0


[0454] In total, a very large proportion of the bacteria strains, 44 out of 55 strains (80% of total) tested, were able to utilize Tryptophan supplemented in the medium and showed a detectable level of pink or red color development (the diagnostic feature of the assay suggesting auxin or indolic compound production). These include 8 Bacillus spp., 5 Paenibacillus spp., 6 Pantoea spp., and 5 Enterobacter spp. 10 strains (18% of total) had particularly strong production of auxin or indole compounds. As for acetoin production, 32 out of 21 strains (58% of total) tested showed a detectable level of pink or red color (a proxy of acetoin production). These include 6 Enterobacter spp., 5 Paenibacillus spp., and 4 Bacillus spp. Particularly, 12 of these 32 strains had strong production of acetoin. 23 out of 55 strains (42% of total) tested showed a detectable level of siderophore accumulation. These include 4 Bacillus spp., 4 Paenibacillus spp., 4 Enterobacter spp., and 3 Pseudomonas spp. Among these 23 strains, 5 strains showed very strong accumulation of siderophore.
Table 32B: Auxin, siderophore, and acetoin production by culturable fungi belonging to core OTUs
StrainSEQ ID NO.Secretes siderophoresProduces Auxin/IndolesProduces Acetoin
SYM00034 3597 1 0 0
SYM00061A 3602 1 0 2
SYM00066 3605 1 0 0
SYM00120 3610 1 0 0
SYM00122 3611 0 0 0
SYM00123 3612 1 0 3
SYM00124 3613 1 1 0
SYM00129 3614 0 1 0
SYM00135 3615 0 1 0
SYM00136 3616 0 0 1
SYM00151 3617 1 1 0
SYM00154 3618 0 0 0
SYM00566B 3640 3 0 0
SYM00577 3642 0 0 1
SYM00590 3643 0 1 2
SYM00603 3644 2 1 0
SYM00622 3647 1 0 2
SYM00629 3650 0 1 2
SYM00663 3654 2 1 2
SYM00696 3655 2 0 0
SYM00741b 3658 0 0 0
SYM00793 3659 1 0 0
SYM00795 3660 1 0 1
SYM00854 3661 2 0 2
SYM00880 3662 2 1 2
SYM01300 3672 2 1 0
SYM01303 3673 - - -
SYM01310 3674 0 2 0
SYM01311 3675 0 0 0
SYM01314 3676 2 1 0
SYM01315 3677 0 0 0
SYM01325 3678 0 0 2
SYM01326 3679 0 0 2
SYM01327 3680 2 1 2
SYM01328 3681 1 0 0
SYM01333 3682 0 0 0
SYM15811 3683 3 1 0
SYM15820 3684 1 0 0
SYM15821 3685 1 0 0
SYM15825 3686 0 0 2
SYM15828 3687 0 0 2
SYM15831 3688 2 1 2
SYM15837 3689 1 0 0
SYM15839 3690 2 0 0
SYM15847 3691 0 0 0
SYM15870 3692 0 0 0
SYM15872 3693 0 0 1
SYM15890 3694 0 0 2
SYM 15901 3695 0 0 2
SYM15920 3696 2 0 2
SYM15926 3697 1 2 0
SYM15928 3698 0 0 0
SYM15932 3699 0 0 0
SYM15939 3700 0 1 0


[0455] In total, most fungi were not able to utilize L-Tryptophan supplemented in the medium. 17 out of 51 strains tested (31% of total) showed a detectable level of pink or red color development (the diagnostic feature of the assay suggesting auxin or indolic compound production). These include 5 Acremonium spp., 4 Alternaria spp., and 3 Fusariam spp. Only 2 strains (4% of total) had particularly strong production of auxin or indole compounds. As for acetoin production, 17 out of 54 strains (31% of total) tested showed a detectable level of pink or red color (a proxy of acetoin production). These include 5 Fusarium spp., 4 Alternaria spp., and 4 Acremonim spp. Particularly, only 1 of these 17 strains had strong production of acetoin. 13 out of 21 strains (24% of total) tested showed a detectable level of siderophore accumulation. These include 4 Alternaria spp., 4 Acremonium spp., and 3 Fusarium spp. Among these 13 strains, 2 strains showed very strong accumulation of siderophore.

Characterization of culturable microbes: substrate use



[0456] The BIOLOG protocol was conducted in the same manner as described previously. The ability of a strain to utilize a specific carbon substrate in the BIOLOG PM1 or PM2A MicroPlates could be determined by colorimetric assay and increased turbidity due to cell growth in that particular well (Tables 32C, 32D, 32E and 32F).
















































































Example 9. Testing of culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to core OTUs on plants



[0457] The results shown above demonstrate that culturable microbes belonging to the same OTUs as microbes core to wheat, soy, cotton, and corn (bacteria) or wheat, cotton, and corn (fungi) possess activities that could impart beneficial traits to a plant upon colonization. The aim of the experiments in this section addresses the ability of these culturable bacterial and fungal endophytes to confer beneficial traits on a host plant. Several different methods were used to ascertain this. First, plants inoculated with bacteria or fungi were tested under conditions without any stress to determine whether the microbe confers an increase in vigor. Second, endophyte-inoculated plants were tested under specific stress conditions (e.g., salt stress or drought stress) to test whether the bacteria confer an increase in tolerance to these stresses. These growth tests were performed using three different means: using growth assays on water-agar plates; using growth assays on sterile filter papers; and growth assays in seed germination (rolling) paper. Seeds were treated either with a single bacterial or fungal strain, or with a combination of two bacterial or two fungal strains.

Seeds and seed sterilization



[0458] Seeds from soy, corn or wheat were surface-sterilized with chlorine gas and hydrochloric acid as described in Example 5. The seeds were then coated with bacterial or fungal endophytes as described in Example 5. However, the amount of Sodium Alginate and bacterial suspension or fungal inoculum was adjusted for wheat to 15 ml/kg to account for the larger surface to volume ratio of these small seeds.

Growth & scale-up of fungi for inoculation



[0459] Fungal isolates were grown from a frozen stock on Petri dishes containing potato dextrose agar and the plates were incubated at room temperature for about a week. After mycelia and spore development, four agar plugs (1 cm in diameter) were used to inoculate erlenmeyers containing 150 ml of potato dextrose broth. Liquid cultures were grown at room temperature and agitation on an orbital shaker at 115 rpm for 4 days. Then, the cultures were transferred to 50 ml sterile test tubes with conical bottoms. Mycelium mats were disrupted by pulse sonication at 75% setting and 3 pulses of 20 seconds each, using a Fisher Scientific sonicator (Model FB120) with a manual probe (CL-18). The sonicated cultures were used in the same manner as the bacterial suspensions for seed inoculation.

Water agar assays



[0460] Bacterial or fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs of core microbes were tested for their ability to promote plant growth under normal and salt-stressed or drought-stressed conditions by inoculating wheat and soy seeds with those endophytes and germinating them on filter paper and/or water agar

[0461] For testing the effect of the endophytes on soy under salt stress, treated soy seeds were placed on Petri dishes (15 cm in diameter) filled with 50 ml of water agar (1.3% bacto agar) for the normal condition and filled with 50 ml of water agar with 100 mM NaCl for salt stress. Three Petri dishes per treatment (each bacterial strain, formulation control or non treated seeds) and 8 seeds per Petri dish were used. The seeds were placed on the Petri dishes inside a laminar or biosafety hood using forceps previously flamed. The Petri dishes were sealed with surgical tape, randomized to avoid position effects and placed in a growth chamber set at 22°C, 60% relative humidity, in the dark for five days.

[0462] For testing the effect of salt stress on wheat, a water agar assay was performed using square plates 245 mm long on each side (Corning). Each plate contained 100 ml of water agar (1.3%) for the normal condition and supplemented with 100 mM NaCl for the salt stress. Two plates were used per treatment and the seeds were arranged in two rows of 6 seeds each along the middle of the plate, with the embryos facing outwardly so that the roots would grow from the middle of the plate outwardly and in opposite directions, minimizing roots crossing over among seedlings.

[0463] After 5 days of growth, digital images of the seedlings were obtained and the data scored and analyzed as indicated in Example 6. The effects of core bacterial and fungal endophytes, alone or in combination, on soy seedlings are shown in Tables 33A and B and 34A and B. The effects of core bacterial and fungal endophytes, alone or in combination, on wheat seedlings are shown in Tables 35A and B and 36A and B.
Table 33A: Assay for soy seedling growth in water agar conditions, where soy seeds were treated with core bacterial endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?SaltBiological Effect?
SYM00009 3589 1 yes 0 no
SYM00013 3590 0 no - -
SYM00018 3592 0 yes - -
SYM00020 3593 1 yes - -
SYM00053 3601 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00062C 3603 0 yes - -
SYM00070 3607 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00103 3609 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00184 3621 0 no 1 no
SYM00212 3623 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00234 3625 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00249 3628 0 no 0 no
SYM00506c 3629 1 no 0 yes
SYM00507 3630 1 yes 0 no
SYM00508 3631 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00525 3632 1 no 0 yes
SYM00538A 3633 0 no 0 no
SYM00538B 3634 0 yes 0 no
SYM00538i 3635 1 no 0 yes
SYM00617 3645 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00620 3646 0 yes 1 yes
SYM00628 3649 0 yes - -
SYM00650 3652 0 yes 0 no
SYM00714 3656 0 yes 1 no
SYM00905 3663 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00924 3664 0 no 0 yes
SYM00963 3665 1 yes 0 no
SYM00982 3666 1 yes 0 no
SYM00987 3667 0 yes 0 no


[0464] Soy seedlings treated with SYM00009, SYM00020, SYM00212, SYM00234, SYM00506c, SYM00507, SYM00525, SYM00538i, SYM00963, and SYM00982 showed overall better performance relative to formulation only treated plants. These strains performed up to 40% improvement in normal conditions. Under salt stress conditions, four SYM strains performed up to 20% better relative to formulation only. These data is indicative of the beneficial effects of the many core bacterial SYM strains on soy under both normal and biotic stressed conditions.

[0465] Based on BIOLOG carbon source assays, SYM00212 that is one of the strains that conferred beneficial effects on soy are also able to use L-proline as a single source of carbon. It is well established that endogenous proline level is elevated in plants undergoing drought and salt stresses (Chen and Murata, 2002). This phenomenon may facilitate more nutrients to become available for endophytes living symbiotically with plant hosts exposed to abiotic stresses. Therefore it could be possible that the ability for endophytes like SYM00212 to scavenge and utilize accumulated amino acids such as proline is associated with its ability to confer beneficial effects on the plant host.
Table 33B: Assay for soy seedling growth in water agar conditions, where soy seeds were treated with combinations of core bacterial endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Salt stressBiological Effect?
SYM00050 3600 SYM00053 3601 2 yes 1 no
SYM00050 3600 SYM00207 3622 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00248 3627 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00508 3631 1 yes - -
SYM00050 3600 SYM00574 3641 1 no 1 no
SYM00050 3600 SYM00978 3668 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00991 3669 1 yes 0 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00207 3622 1 yes 1 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00248 3627 0 no 0 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00508 3631 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00574 3641 0 yes 0 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00628 3649 1 yes 1 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00978 3668 - - 0 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM00991 3669 2 yes 0 no
SYM00053 3601 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 1 no
SYM00207 3622 SYM00248 3627 1 yes 0 no
SYM00207 3622 SYM00508 3631 1 yes 0 no
SYM00207 3622 SYM00628 3649 2 yes 1 no
SYM00207 3622 SYM00978 3668 1 no - -
SYM00207 3622 SYM00991 3669 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 1 no
SYM00248 3627 SYM00574 3641 0 yes - -
SYM00248 3627 SYM00628 3649 1 yes 1 no
SYM00248 3627 SYM00991 3669 0 no 1 no
SYM00248 3627 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 0 no
SYM00508 3631 SYM00574 3641 0 no 0 no
SYM00508 3631 SYM00991 3669 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM01049 3671 - - 1 yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00628 3649 1 yes 1 no
SYM00574 3641 SYM00978 3668 1 yes 0 no
SYM00574 3641 SYM00991 3669 1 no 0 no
SYM00574 3641 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 0 no
SYM00628 3649 SYM00978 3668 0 yes 1 no
SYM00628 3649 SYM00991 3669 2 yes 0 no
SYM00991 3669 SYM00978 3668 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00991 3669 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 0 no
SYM01049 3671 SYM00978 3668 0 yes 0 yes


[0466] Under normal conditions, 12.8% of core bacteria combinations applied to soy seeds resulted in >20% improvement in overall seedling phenotype compared to the formulation-only treatment. In particular, core bacterial strains SYM00053, SYM00207, and SYM00628 each provided two combinations with other strains that improved the measured phenotype by >20% as compared to the formulation-only treatment. In combination, these strains seem to synergistically confer benefits towards plant development. 46.8% of core bacteria combinations resulted in a >5% positive biological effect, and 29.8% of core bacteria combinations resulted in a >5% negative biological effect as compared to formulation-only treatment, indicating activity of the bacterial strains in the seed's early developmental stages.

[0467] Under salt stress, 14.9% of core bacteria combinations applied to soy seeds resulted in a >5% positive biological effect, and 14.9% of core bacteria combinations resulted in a >5% negative biological effect as compared to formulation-only treatment, indicating activity of the bacterial strains in the seed's early developmental stages.
Table 34A: Assay for soy seedling growth in water agar conditions, where soy seeds were treated with core fungal endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?SaltBiological Effect?
SYM00034 3597 0 yes 1 no
SYM00061A 3602 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00066 3605 3 yes 1 yes
SYM00120 3610 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00122 3611 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00123 3612 0 yes - -
SYM00124 3613 0 no 1 no
SYM00129 3614 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00135 3615 3 yes 1 yes
SYM00136 3616 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00151 3617 1 yes 1 no
SYM00154 3618 1 yes 1 no
SYM00566B 3640 0 yes 2 yes
SYM00603 3644 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00622 3647 0 no 0 yes
SYM00629 3650 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00663 3654 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00696 3655 0 no 1 yes
SYM00741a 3657 0 no 1 yes
SYM00741b 3658 2 yes 1 no
SYM00793 3659 0 yes 1 no
SYM00577 3642 1 yes 1 no
SYM00590 3643 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00854 3661 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00880 3662 3 yes 1 no
SYM01300 3672 1 no 1 no
SYM01310 3674 1 yes 1 yes
SYM01311 3675 2 yes 1 no
SYM01314 3676 1 no 1 yes
SYM01315 3677 3 yes 0 yes
SYM01325 3678 0 no 0 no
SYM01326 3679 1 yes 1 yes
SYM01327 3680 3 yes 2 yes
SYM01328 3681 0 yes 0 yes
SYM01333 3682 3 yes 0 yes
SYM15811 3683 3 yes 0 yes
SYM15820 3684 3 yes 1 no
SYM15821 3685 3 yes 1 yes
SYM15825 3686 2 yes 2 yes
SYM15828 3687 2 yes 1 yes
SYM15831 3688 1 yes - -
SYM15837 3689 1 yes 1 yes
SYM15839 3690 2 yes 1 yes
SYM15847 3691 - - 1 yes
SYM15870 3692 3 yes 1 no
SYM15872 3693 3 yes 2 yes
SYM15890 3694 3 yes 0 no
SYM15901 3695 3 yes 1 yes
SYM15920 3696 3 yes 1 yes
SYM15926 3697 0 yes 1 yes
SYM15928 3698 0 yes 2 yes
SYM15932 3699 3 yes 1 no
SYM15939 3700 3 yes 1 yes


[0468] Of the 53 strains of seed core fungi tested in soybean bioassays, 26 (50%) had growth enhancing effects (>20% growth enhancement) on seedlings under normal conditions, while 6 (12%) had growth enhancing effects under salt conditions.

[0469] Fungi SYM00066, SYM00122, SYM00135, SYM00880, SYM01315, SYM01327, SYM01333, SYM15811, SYM15820, SYM15821, SYM15870, SYM15872, SYM15890, SYM15901, SYM15920, SYM15932, and SYM15939 all had strong effects on seedling growth of above 40% under normal conditions. 71% of these strains are able to metabolize L-arabinose and Sucrose, while 64% are able to metabolize L-Proline, D-Trehalose and D-Mannose which are compatible osmolytes produced by plants and microbes under conditions of water stress. Under conditions of salt stress, no strain improved seedling growth more than 40% relative to control, however SYM15872 and SYM01327 which had strong effects under normal conditions had moderate effects. While not able to dramatically enhance seedling growth under normal conditions, SYM15932, SYM15825, SYM00629, and SYM00566B were able to moderately enhance plant growth under conditions of salt stress (20-40%).
Table 34B: Assay for soy seedling growth in water agar conditions, where soy seeds were treated with combinations of core fungal endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Salt stressBiological Effect?
SYM15901 3695 SYM00124 3613 0 yes 1 yes
SYM15901 3695 SYM15821 3685 0 yes 0 no
SYM15901 3695 SYM15870 3692 0 yes 1 no
SYM15890 3694 SYM01333 3682 0 yes 0 no
SYM15890 3694 SYM00741a 3657 0 yes 0 yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM00066 3605 0 yes 0 no
SYM15890 3694 SYM15901 3695 2 yes 1 no
SYM15890 3694 SYM00124 3613 0 yes 0 yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM15821 3685 2 yes 0 yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM15870 3692 3 yes 1 no
SYM15821 3685 SYM15870 3692 3 yes 0 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM00122 3611 0 yes 1 no
SYM15811 3683 SYM15890 3694 2 yes 0 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM01333 3682 0 yes 1 no
SYM15811 3683 SYM00741a 3657 0 yes 0 no
SYM15811 3683 SYM00066 3605 0 yes 1 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM15901 3695 0 yes 0 no
SYM15811 3683 SYM00124 3613 0 yes 0 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM15821 3685 0 yes 1 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM15870 3692 1 yes 1 no
SYM01333 3682 SYM00741a 3657 0 yes 0 yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM00066 3605 0 yes 1 no
SYM01333 3682 SYM15901 3695 0 no 1 yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM00124 3613 0 yes 0 yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM15821 3685 0 no 1 yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM15870 3692 0 yes 1 yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM15811 3683 0 yes 1 no
SYM00135 3615 SYM00122 3611 0 yes 1 yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM15890 3694 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM01333 3682 0 yes 1 no
SYM00135 3615 SYM00741a 3657 0 yes 0 no
SYM00135 3615 SYM00066 3605 0 yes 1 no
SYM00135 3615 SYM15901 3695 0 yes 1 yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM00124 3613 0 yes 0 no
SYM00135 3615 SYM15821 3685 0 yes 1 yes


[0470] Under normal conditions 5 out of 51 strains (10% of total) conferred beneficial effect with greater than 20% of growth enhancement including two combinations (SYM15890 + SYM15870 and SYM15821 + SYM15870) that had greater than 40% enhancement in growth. Under salt stress 11 out of 51 strains (22 % of total) showed significance enhancement (higher than 5%) in growth compared to formulation.
Table 35A: Assay for wheat seedling growth in water agar conditions, where wheat seeds were treated with core bacterial endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Salt stressBiological Effect?
SYM00003 3588 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00009 3589 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00013 3590 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00017A 3591 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00018 3592 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00020 3593 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00062C 3603 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00068 3606 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00070 3607 0 no 0 yes
SYM00103 3609 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00183 3620 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00184 3621 2 yes 2 yes
SYM00207 3622 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00212 3623 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00219 3624 0 no 0 yes
SYM00234 3625 1 yes 0 no
SYM00236 3626 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00248 3627 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00249 3628 2 yes 3 yes
SYM00506c 3629 1 yes 3 yes
SYM00507 3630 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00525 3632 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00538A 3633 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00538B 3634 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00538i 3635 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00543 3636 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00563 3639 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00574 3641 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00617 3645 1 yes 3 yes
SYM00620 3646 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00627 3648 2 yes 0 no
SYM00628 3649 3 yes 2 yes
SYM00650 3652 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00714 3656 1 yes 3 yes
SYM00905 3663 1 yes 3 yes
SYM00924 3664 1 no 0 yes
SYM00963 3665 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00978 3668 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00982 3666 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00987 3667 1 yes 3 yes
SYM00991 3669 1 no 0 yes
SYM00999 3670 1 yes 0 yes
SYM01049 3671 1 yes 0 yes


[0471] In general, bacterial endophyte-coated wheat seedlings performed well compared to formulation control under normal conditions, i.e., water agar. 17 out 47 strains tested (36% of total) exhibited move than 20% of the enhancement in growth and conferred a significantly noticeable beneficial effect to wheat seedlings. Under the saline stress condition (water agar supplemented with 100 mM NaCl), 12 out of 44 strains tested (25% of total) exhibited more than 20% of the enhancement in growth, while 6 out of the 47 strains (12% of total) exhibited greater than 40% of the enhancement in growth. Particularly, 3 strains, SYM00184, SYM00249, and SYM00628 conferred a beneficial effect to wheat seedlings in both normal and saline stress conditions.
Table 35B: Assay for wheat seedling growth in water agar conditions, where wheat seeds were treated with combinations of core bacterial endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Salt stressBiological Effect?
SYM00050 3600 SYM00053 3601 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00207 3622 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00248 3627 0 no 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00508 3631 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00574 3641 3 yes 2 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00978 3668 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00050 3600 SYM00991 3669 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00207 3622 0 no 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00248 3627 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00508 3631 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00574 3641 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00628 3649 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00978 3668 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM00991 3669 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00053 3601 SYM01049 3671 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00248 3627 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00508 3631 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00574 3641 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00628 3649 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00978 3668 0 no 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00991 3669 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM01049 3671 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM00574 3641 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM00628 3649 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM00991 3669 0 no 0 yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00574 3641 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00628 3649 3 yes 1 yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00991 3669 3 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM01049 3671 1 no 0 yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00628 3649 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00978 3668 0 no 0 yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00991 3669 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM01049 3671 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00628 3649 SYM00978 3668 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00628 3649 SYM00991 3669 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00991 3669 SYM00978 3668 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00991 3669 SYM01049 3671 0 yes 0 yes
SYM01049 3671 SYM00978 3668 3 yes 0 yes


[0472] Under normal condition (water agar), 16 out of 39 (41% of total) combinations of bacterial endophytes conferred a noticeable beneficial effect with a greater than 20% of growth enhancement. Similarly, under saline stress condition (water agar supplemented with 100 mM NaCl), 2 out of 39 (5% of total) combinations tested conferred a noticeable beneficial effect with a greater than 20% of growth enhancement. Collectively, there are 3 combinations that conferred an effect in all experimental conditions. Among the 6 strains in these combinations (3 combinations x2), SYM00050, SYM00053, SYM00508, SYM00574, SYM0628 and SYM01049 conferred a beneficial effect to wheat seedlings in both normal and saline stress conditions.
Table 36A: Assay for wheat seedling growth in water agar conditions, where wheat seeds were treated with core fungal endophytes. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.Normal
SYM00034 3597 2
SYM00061A 3602 2
SYM00066 3605 2
SYM00120 3610 2
SYM00122 3611 3
SYM00123 3612 1
SYM00124 3613 3
SYM00129 3614 3
SYM00135 3615 2
SYM00136 3616 3
SYM00151 3617 3
SYM00154 3618 3
SYM00566B 3640 2
SYM00577 3642 2
SYM00590 3643 3
SYM00603 3644 3
SYM00622 3647 3
SYM00629 3650 2
SYM00663 3654 3
SYM00696 3655 2
SYM00741a 3657 3
SYM00741b 3658 3
SYM00793 3659 0
SYM00854 3661 2
SYM00880 3662 2
SYM01300 3672 2
SYM01310 3674 2
SYM01311 3675 2
SYM01314 3676 3
SYM01315 3677 3
SYM01325 3678 2
SYM01326 3679 2
SYM01327 3680 3
SYM01328 3681 3
SYM01333 3682 3
SYM15811 3683 2
SYM15820 3684 2
SYM15821 3685 3
SYM15825 3686 2
SYM15828 3687 2
SYM15831 3688 2
SYM15837 3689 0
SYM15839 3690 3
SYM15847 3691 3
SYM15870 3692 3
SYM15872 3693 3
SYM15890 3694 3
SYM15901 3695 3
SYM15920 3696 3
SYM15926 3697 3
SYM15928 3698 2
SYM15932 3699 2
SYM15939 3700 1


[0473] Under the normal condition (water agar), out of the 53 fungal endophytes tested, 26 (∼50% of total) conferred a beneficial effect to wheat with greater than 50% of growth enhancement. These include 7 Fusarium spp., 4 Acremonium spp., 4 Alternaria spp., and 4 Cladosporium. Interestingly, these 4 groups of fungi are also top hits in auxin and indolic compound production, acetoin accumulation, and siderophore accumulation (Example 5, Table 36B). This suggests a correlation of between the accumulation of auxin, indolic compound, acetoin, and siderophore and the beneficial effect. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any fungal strains that confer a beneficial effect to wheat in saline stress condition (water agar supplemented with 100 mM NaCl).
Table 36B: Assay for wheat seedling growth in water agar conditions, where wheat seeds were treated with combinations of core fungal endophytes. *Any symbol to the left of the "/" pertains to primary radicle length with +, 0, - denoting an increase, no change, or decrease relative to control seedling radicles, respectively. The scale (a-e) to the right of the "/" pertains to relative increases or decreases in secondary characteristics of the seedlings as follows: a) root hair development, b) lateral root number, c) lateral root size, d) shoot length, and e) root thickness.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.Normal*Salt stress
SYM15901 3695 SYM00124 3613 0 -
SYM15901 3695 SYM15821 3685 N/A -
SYM15890 3694 SYM01333 3682 + N/A
SYM15890 3694 SYM00741a 3657 N/A 0
SYM15890 3694 SYM01315 3677 0 0
SYM15890 3694 SYM15901 3695 0 -
SYM15890 3694 SYM00124 3613 N/A -
SYM15890 3694 SYM15870 3692 0 0
SYM15821 3685 SYM15870 3692 N/A -
SYM15811 3683 SYM00122 3611 -/-c +
SYM15811 3683 SYM15890 3694 - +
SYM15811 3683 SYM00741a 3657 N/A 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM01315 3677 - -
SYM15811 3683 SYM00066 3605 0/-c 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM15901 3695 +/c -
SYM15811 3683 SYM15821 3685 +/c +
SYM15811 3683 SYM15870 3692 0 +
SYM01315 3677 SYM00066 3605 -/-c N/A
SYM01315 3677 SYM15901 3695 N/A 0
SYM01315 3677 SYM15821 3685 -/-c N/A
SYM01315 3677 SYM15870 3692 -/-c 0
SYM01333 3682 SYM00741a 3657 -/-d 0
SYM01333 3682 SYM01315 3677 -/-c N/A
SYM01333 3682 SYM15901 3695 0/-d -
SYM01333 3682 SYM00124 3613 -/ -c,-d N/A
SYM01333 3682 SYM15821 3685 -/ -d +
SYM01333 3682 SYM15870 3692 N/A 0
SYM00741a 3657 SYM00066 3605 -/-c 0
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15901 3695 -/-c,-d -
SYM00741a 3657 SYM00124 3613 N/A -
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15821 3685 -/-c 0
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15870 3692 -/-c,-d N/A
SYM00135 3615 SYM15811 3683 +/d 0
SYM00135 3615 SYM00122 3611 -/-e 0
SYM00135 3615 SYM15890 3694 -/d N/A
SYM00135 3615 SYM01333 3682 -/-c,-d N/A
SYM00135 3615 SYM00741a 3657 0/-c N/A
SYM00135 3615 SYM01315 3677 0 +
SYM00135 3615 SYM00124 3613 - -
SYM00135 3615 SYM15821 3685 -/c,d +


[0474] Under normal condition (water agar), four combinations of core fungi endophytes conferred a noticeable beneficial effect with longer root growth relative to formulation only treated seeds. Under saline stress condition (water agar supplemented with 100 mM NaCl), seven combinations that were tested conferred noticeable beneficial effect with a greater root length in comparison with formulation only treated wheat seeds.

Filter Paper Growth Assay



[0475] Wheat seeds were sterilized and coated with the appropriate endophyte as described in Example 7. They were then placed in filter paper growth assays as described in Example 6. After 5-8 days of growth, a picture of each plate was taken and analyzed as described in Example 6.

[0476] The effects of bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to core OTUs on the growth of wheat seeds in a filter paper assay is shown in Tables 37A and B and 38A and B.
Table 37A: Growth of wheat seeds treated with bacterial endophytes belonging to OTUs present in corn, wheat, cotton and soy seeds. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalBiological Effect?Water stressBiological Effect?
SYM00003 3588 1 yes - -
SYM00009 3589 1 no 1 yes
SYM00013 3590 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00017A 3591 0 no 1 yes
SYM00018 3592 0 yes 1 no
SYM00020 3593 1 yes 1 no
SYM00050 3600 0 no 0 no
SYM00053 3601 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00062C 3603 0 yes 2 yes
SYM00068 3606 2 yes 0 no
SYM00070 3607 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00103 3609 0 no 1 yes
SYM00183 3620 1 no 1 yes
SYM00184 3621 1 yes 0 no
SYM00207 3622 0 no 1 no
SYM00212 3623 0 yes 2 yes
SYM00219 3624 0 no 0 yes
SYM00234 3625 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00236 3626 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00248 3627 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00249 3628 2 yes 0 no
SYM00506c 3629 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00507 3630 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00508 3631 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00525 3632 1 yes 1 yes
SYM00538A 3633 2 yes 0 no
SYM00538B 3634 0 no 2 yes
SYM00538i 3635 0 yes 2 yes
SYM00543 3636 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00563 3639 1 yes 1 no
SYM00574 3641 0 yes 0 no
SYM00617 3645 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00620 3646 2 yes 1 yes
SYM00627 3648 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00628 3649 1 yes 2 yes
SYM00650 3652 1 yes 0 yes
SYM00714 3656 0 yes 1 yes
SYM00905 3663 2 yes 3 yes
SYM00924 3664 2 yes 0 yes
SYM00963 3665 1 yes 0 no
SYM00978 3668 3 yes 0 no
SYM00982 3666 0 yes 0 yes
SYM00987 3667 1 yes 0 no
SYM00991 3669 1 no 1 yes
SYM00999 3670 1 yes 1 yes
SYM01049 3671 0 no 1 yes


[0477] Under the normal condition (filter paper soaked with sterile water), 12 out of 32 tested strains (38% of total) conferred beneficial effect to wheat with greater than 20% of growth enhancement, whereas 6 out of 43 strains (14% of total) tested showed beneficial effect under water stress condition (filter paper soaked with 8% PEG 6000). The bacterial endophytes treated on wheat seeds and tested in filter paper assays that produced beneficial effects belong to a great diversity of genera: Pseudomonas, Curtobacterium, Paenibacillus, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Agrobacterium, Chrysobacterium, Escherichia and Methylobacterium. We have not observed over-representation of certain taxonomic groups of bacteria. All of these bacteria produced intermediate to high levels of auxin, acetoin and siderophore production (Example 5, Table 34A) and are able to metabolize intermediate to large numbers of substrates (Table 31B). The exceptions to this were SYM00982 that had low levels of siderophore production and only metabolized 3 substrates and SYM00999 that had low levels of both siderophore and auxin production and metabolized 6 substrates.
Table 37B: Growth of wheat seeds treated with combinations of bacterial endophytes, belonging to OTUs present in corn, wheat, cotton and soy seeds.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.NormalBiological effect?Water stressBiological effect?
SYM00053 3601 SYM01049 3671 1 No 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00248 3627 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00508 3631 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00574 3641 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00628 3649 1 Yes 1 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00978 3668 1 yes 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM00991 3669 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00207 3622 SYM01049 3671 2 Yes 1 No
SYM00248 3627 SYM00574 3641 0 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM00628 3649 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00248 3627 SYM00991 3669 2 Yes 1 No
SYM00248 3627 SYM01049 3671 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00574 3641 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00628 3649 0 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM00991 3669 0 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00508 3631 SYM01049 3671 1 No 0 Yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00628 3649 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00978 3668 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM00991 3669 0 No 0 Yes
SYM00574 3641 SYM01049 3671 1 yes 0 Yes
SYM00628 3649 SYM00978 3668 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00628 3649 SYM00991 3669 3 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00991 3669 SYM00978 3668 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00991 3669 SYM01049 3671 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM01049 3671 SYM00978 3668 1 No 0 Yes


[0478] A variety of binary combinations of bacterial endophytes conferred a benefit under non-stress and/or water stress conditions. SYM00207, for instance, is present in several combinations that provide a benefit under normal conditions, including in tandem with SYM00574 or SYM01049. None of these strains alone confer a benefit to normal condition plants. SYM00628 provides an observable benefit under both normal and water-limited conditions. The benefit under normal conditions is increased when SYM00628 is combined with SYM00991, which itself also provides a relatively lower benefit under the normal condition. SYM00628 belongs to the genus Enterobacter, while SYM00991 belongs to the genus Acidovorax.
Table 38A: Growth of wheat seeds treated with fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs present in corn, wheat, and cotton seeds
StrainSEQ ID NO.NormalWater stress
SYM00034 3597 1 0
SYM00061A 3602 1 0
SYM00066 3605 2 0
SYM00120 3610 1 1
SYM00122 3611 0 0
SYM00123 3612 0 0
SYM00124 3613 2 0
SYM00129 3614 0 0
SYM00135 3615 2 1
SYM00136 3616 2 0
SYM00151 3617 2 2
SYM00154 3618 2 2
SYM00566B 3640 1 0
SYM00603 3644 1 0
SYM00622 3647 2 3
SYM00629 3650 0 0
SYM00663 3654 0 0
SYM00696 3655 0 0
SYM00741a 3657 1 0
SYM00741b 3658 0 0
SYM00793 3659 1 0
SYM00577 3642 1 0
SYM00590 3643 1 0
SYM00854 3661 2 0
SYM00880 3662 2 0
SYM01300 3672 0 0
SYM01310 3674 1 0
SYM01311 3675 0 0
SYM01314 3676 2 0
SYM01315 3677 1 0
SYM01325 3678 2 0
SYM01326 3679 2 1
SYM01327 3680 2 2
SYM01328 3681 2 0
SYM01333 3682 1 0
SYM15811 3683 0 2
SYM15820 3684 2 2
SYM15821 3685 2 0
SYM15825 3686 2 1
SYM15828 3687 2 0
SYM15831 3688 2 0
SYM15837 3689 0 0
SYM15839 3690 2 0
SYM15847 3691 2 0
SYM15870 3692 2 0
SYM15872 3693 2 0
SYM15890 3694 3 0
SYM15901 3695 2 2
SYM15920 3696 2 0
SYM15926 3697 2 2
SYM15928 3698 0 0
SYM15932 3699 2 0
SYM15939 3700 1 0


[0479] Under the normal condition (filter paper with sterile water), out of the 53 fungal endophytes tested, 34 (∼61% of total) conferred a beneficial effect to wheat with greater than 20% of growth enhancement. Several taxonomic groups of fungi, including Fusarium, Acremonium, Alternaria, and Cladosporium, are over-represented. Interestingly, these 4 groups of fungi are also top hits in auxin and indolic compound production, acetoin accumulation, and siderophore accumulation (Example 5, Table 32B). This suggests a correlation of between the accumulation of auxin, indolic compound, acetoin, and siderophore and the beneficial effect. Under the water stress condition (filter paper with 8% PEG 6000), 8 out of 53 strains tested (15% of total) conferred a beneficial effect to wheat with greater than 20% of growth enhancement. Similarly, the top hits belong to the genera of Fusarium, Alternaria, Acremonium, and Cladosporium. However, not over-representation of these taxonomic groups has been observed. Of all strains tested, 9 strains, including 3 Alternaria spp. and 2 Fusarium spp., conferred a beneficial effect to wheat in both normal and water stress conditions.
Table 38B: Growth of wheat seeds treated with combinations of fungal endophytes belonging to OTUs present in corn, wheat, and cotton seeds. Legend: 0 indicates <0% effect, 1 indicates <20% effect, 2 indicates <40% effect, 3 indicates >40% effect. For Biological Effect: yes indicates >5% or <-5% effect, no indicates effect between -5% and +5%.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.NormalBiological effect?Water stressBiological effect?
SYM15901 3695 SYM00124 3613 1 No 0 yes
SYM15901 3695 SYM15821 3685 0 Yes 0 No
SYM15901 3695 SYM15870 3692 2 Yes 1 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM01333 3682 1 Yes 1 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM00741a 3657 1 Yes 0 No
SYM15890 3694 SYM01315 3677 1 Yes 1 no
SYM15890 3694 SYM00066 3605 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM15901 3695 1 Yes 2 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM00124 3613 0 No 2 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM15821 3685 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM15890 3694 SYM15870 3692 0 Yes 0 Yes
SYM15821 3685 SYM15870 3692 2 yes 0 Yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM00122 3611 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM15890 3694 1 Yes 0 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM01333 3682 2 Yes 1 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM00741a 3657 1 Yes 1 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM01315 3677 1 Yes 0 yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM00066 3605 1 Yes 0 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM15901 3695 1 No 0 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM00124 3613 0 No 1 No
SYM15811 3683 SYM15821 3685 1 Yes 1 Yes
SYM15811 3683 SYM15870 3692 1 No 1 Yes
SYM01315 3677 SYM00066 3605 2 Yes 1 Yes
SYM01315 3677 SYM15901 3695 2 Yes 2 Yes
SYM01315 3677 SYM00124 3613 1 Yes 0 yes
SYM01315 3677 SYM15821 3685 2 Yes 2 yes
SYM01315 3677 SYM15870 3692 0 No 1 No
SYM01333 3682 SYM00741a 3657 1 No 0 Yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM01315 3677 1 Yes 0 yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM00066 3605 0 Yes 1 Yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM15901 3695 0 Yes 1 Yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM00124 3613 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM15821 3685 0 Yes 0 Yes
SYM01333 3682 SYM15870 3692 1 No 0 Yes
SYM00741a 3657 SYM01315 3677 0 No 1 no
SYM00741a 3657 SYM00066 3605 1 Yes 0 No
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15901 3695 1 Yes 2 Yes
SYM00741a 3657 SYM00124 3613 0 No 0 Yes
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15821 3685 1 No 2 Yes
SYM00741a 3657 SYM15870 3692 2 Yes 1 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM15811 3683 1 Yes 0 No
SYM00135 3615 SYM00122 3611 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM15890 3694 1 Yes 2 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM01333 3682 1 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM00741a 3657 2 Yes 0 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM01315 3677 1 Yes 0 yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM00066 3605 2 Yes 1 No
SYM00135 3615 SYM15901 3695 1 Yes 1 Yes
SYM00135 3615 SYM00124 3613 2 Yes 0 No
SYM00135 3615 SYM15821 3685 0 No 1 Yes


[0480] Several core combinations of fungal SYM strains showed beneficial effects on wheat both under normal and water stress conditions. The combinatory effect of these beneficial strains was indicative of overall synergistic underlying mechanisms that drive beneficial effect on the seedlings treated with those strains. In particular, the combination of SYM01315+SYM15901 showed up to 40% beneficial effect on wheat plants in both normal and water stressed conditions relative to formulation only treated wheat seedlings. SYM01315 is able to utilize L-proline as a sole carbon substrate based on BIOLOG assays. Similarly, proline was also a sole carbon source for SYM15901. Taken together, it is highly suggestive that the SYM strains' ability to efficiently utilize proline that gets elevated under biotic stresses as water and salt is a potential key component in conferring water stress plant protection.

Rolling paper assay for evaluating seed germination and seedling drought tolerance



[0481] Soy seeds were sterilized and coated with the appropriate endophyte as described in Example 5. Regular weight seed germination paper (Anchor Paper Co.) was used for testing the effect of the endophytes on soy under water limiting stress. Briefly, the paper was custom cut to 60cm X 15cm and soaked in sterile water. Sixteen seeds were placed along the middle (7.5 cm from the edge) of longest axis of a piece of paper, equidistant from one another. A second pre-soaked piece of paper was layered on top of the seeds and the "sandwich" created in this way was rolled from one end, being careful to maintain the seeds in position, to form a tube 15 cm tall and approximately 5 cm in diameter. Each paper roll was placed vertically inside a sterile glass jar with a lid to hold water absorbed in rolling paper, and was then incubated in a growth chamber set at 22°C, 60% relative humidity, in the dark for two days. Then, the jars were opened and incubated for two more days with the conditions changed to 12 hours daylight (300-350 micro Einstein) 12 hours dark and 70% relative humidity.

[0482] Data scoring and analyzes were taken by hand, and the data are showed in a binning of % increase in root length vs fungal formulation control: >0% = 0, 0-5% = 1, 5-10% = 2, 10-15% = 3.

[0483] The effects of bacterial and fungal endophytes belonging to core OTUs, and combinations of bacterial and fungal endophytes, on the growth of soy seeds in a rolling paper assay is shown in Tables 39 and 40A and B.

[0484] Table 39: Assay for soy seedling growth in rolling paper assay, where soy seeds were treated with core bacterial endophytes. Measurements for manual scoring of rolling paper soy water stress assay for core fungal strains were done according to the scale established previously. Briefly the score that was used was: <0% = 0; >0% = 1; >5% = 2, and >10%=3. The percentage indicates percent change of treatments relative to formulation. The mean root lengths of the SYM treated biological replicates of soy seedlings were divided relative the mean root lengths of the fungal formulation.
StrainSEQ ID NO.Water stress
SYM00003 3588 0
SYM00013 3590 3
SYM00017A 3591 3
SYM00018 3592 2
SYM00020 3593 2
SYM00050 3600 1
SYM00070 3607 3
SYM00219 3624 2
SYM00525 3632 3
SYM00538A 3633 3
SYM00538i 3635 3
SYM00627 3648 3
SYM00987 3667 3
SYM00991 3669 1
SYM00628 3649 1


[0485] Under water stress, 73% of bacterial strains showed beneficial effect compared to control higher than 20% including SYM00018, SYM00020 and SYM00219. Strains SYM00013, SYM00017A, SYM00070, SYM00525, SYM00538A, SYM00538i, SYM00627, SYM00987 (53.3% of total) showed beneficial effect higher than 40%.

[0486] Table 40A: Assay for soy seedling growth in rolling paper assay, where soy seeds were treated with core fungal endophytes. Measurements for manual scoring of rolling paper soy water stress assay for core fungal strains were done according to the scale established previously. Briefly the score that was used was: <0% = 0; >0% = 1; >5% = 2, and >10%=3. The percentage indicates percent change of treatments relative to formulation. The mean root lengths of the SYM treated biological replicates of soy seedlings were divided relative the mean root lengths of the fungal formulation.
StrainSEQ ID NO.Water stress
SYM00066 3605 0
SYM00122 3611 3
SYM00123 3612 2
SYM00124 3613 3
SYM00135 3615 3
SYM00741a 3657 0
SYM00741b 3658 3
SYM00795 3660 -
SYM00854 3661 0
SYM00880 3662 1
SYM01303 3673 0
SYM01315 3677 3
SYM01327 3680 2
SYM01333 3682 3
SYM15811 3683 3
SYM15820 3684 1
SYM15821 3685 2
SYM15831 3688 3
SYM15870 3692 1
SYM15872 3693 0
SYM15890 3694 3
SYM15901 3695 3
SYM15920 3696 0
SYM15932 3699 3
SYM15939 3700 0


[0487] Water stress experiments examining the effect of core fungal SYM strains on soy plants revealed several very promising strains that that exhibited over 10% improved seedling root length relative to formulation only treated seedlings. These were SYM00122, SYM00124, SYM00135, SYM00741b, SYM01315, SYM01333, SYM15811, SYM15831, SYM15890, SYM15901, and SYM15932. Three strains had >5% improved root length, while three showed >0% increased root length compared to formulation only treated plants.

[0488] Eight of these eleven had the ability to utilize L-proline as a sole carbon nutrient in BIOLOG substrate tests. It is well established that proline level is elevated in plants exposed to salt and water stresses. This data may indicate that although the SYM strains originated from different genera, they may share similar underlying mechanisms when it comes to affecting the plants phenotype in mitigating plant drought stress.

[0489] Table 40B: Assay for soy seedling growth in rolling paper assay, where soy seeds were treated with combinations of core fungal endophytes. Measurements for manual scoring of rolling paper soy water stress assay for core fungal strains were done according to the scale established previously. Briefly the score that was used was: <0% = 0; >0% = 1; >5% = 2, and >10%=3. The percentage indicates percent change of treatments relative to formulation. The mean root lengths of the SYM treated biological replicates of soy seedlings were divided relative the mean root lengths of the fungal formulation.
Strain 1SEQ ID NO.Strain 2SEQ ID NO.Water stress
SYM15901 3695 SYM15821 3685 1
SYM15890 3694 SYM01333 3682 0
SYM15890 3694 SYM00741a 3657 1
SYM15890 3694 SYM01315 3677 2
SYM15890 3694 SYM15901 3695 3
SYM15890 3694 SYM15870 3692 2
SYM15821 3685 SYM15870 3692 2
SYM15811 3683 SYM00122 3611 3
SYM15811 3683 SYM15890 3694 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM01333 3682 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM01315 3677 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM00066 3605 0
SYM15811 3683 SYM15870 3692 0
SYM01315 3677 SYM15901 3695 0
SYM01315 3677 SYM00124 3613 3


[0490] A beneficial plant microbiome is likely made up of multiple strains that occupy stress protection niches within the plant. This was evaluated in the rolling paper assay to test the improvement on the plant phenotype conferred by inoculation with multiple fungal strains. The top three performers all utilize α-Cyclodextrin, which is a trait shared by all of the single fungi treatments which incurred the largest positive plant phenotypic change. The majority of the strains that are party of the combos also show similar patterns when it comes to siderophore and auxin production. This may indicate that although they come from different genera, they may occupy similar niches when it comes to affecting the plants phenotype when helping the plant deal with drought stress.

Example 10: Trials to full plant maturity to demonstrate performance in commercial field setting



[0491] Corn was grown at two locations in the United States. Six replicate plots were sown for each treatment and variety combination. Control plots were planted for formulation treated seeds. Seeds were sown in an irrigated field in plots of 10 by 40 ft arranged in a randomized complete block design. Four rows were planted per plot with a row spacing of 30 inches. Seeding density at Location 1 was 576 g per acre. Seeding density at Location was 35,000 seeds per acre. SPAD readings were taken at Location 2 only for 10 plants per plot on three months after planting (one month before harvest) to measure chlorophyll content of leaves. The interior 2 rows were harvested by combine. Grain yield per plot, grain moisture, and test weight were assessed. Yield was adjusted for grain moisture content to a storage moisture of 14% (i.e. dry bushels per acre for combine harvest). Data shown for both locations are shown in Tables 41A and 41B.
Table 41A Rainfed trial in Location 1.
TreatmentCombine yield (dry bu/ac)
Bacterial formulation control 101.77
SYM00033 119.96
Table 41B Rainfed trial in Location 2.
TreatmentSPADCombine yield (dry bu/ac)
Fungal formulation control 53.72 88.78
SYM00066i 54.54 95.17
Bacterial formulation control 54.35 91.76
SYM00074ii 55.95 85.54
i Compare to fungal formulation control
ii Compare to bacterial formulation control


[0492] For combine yield, SYM00033 showed a substantial increase in dry bushels per acre compared to formulation treated controls. As an indicator of leaf chlorophyll content, SYM00066 showed a slight increase in SPAD readings compared to the fungal formulation control. For combine yield, SYM00066 showed a substantial increase in dry bushels per acre compared to the fungal formulation control. As an indicator of leaf chlorophyll content, SYM00074 showed a slight increase in SPAD readings compared to the bacterial formulation control.

[0493] Other embodiments will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice of the embodiments. Consider the specification and examples as exemplary only, with a true scope and spirit being indicated by the following claims.

TABLES AND FIGURES



[0494] 
Table 1. Taxa present in both corn and soy sequencing (710 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_309 B0.9|GG99|1127240 2 Actinobacteria; Dermabacteraceae; Brachybacterium
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_302 B0.9|GG99|12160 4 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3495 B0.9|GG97|1123167 5 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae; Microbacterium
B_2968 B0.9|GG99|1012260 6 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Micrococcus
B_100 B0.9|GG99|221835 7 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Aeromicrobium
B_88 B0.9|GG99|245191 8 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_174 B0.9|GG99|5364 10 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas yabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_3 B0.9|GG99|836094 13 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus firmus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649 16 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_140 B0.9|GG97|141688 17 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_112 B0.9|GG99|1118793 21 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_444 B0.9|GG99|4373836 23 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_138 B0.9|GG99|4046685 35 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_2829 B0.9|GG97|593848 36 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_980 B0.9|GG99|536008 38 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_792 B0.9|GG99|4458218 42 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_3053 B0.9|GG99|811318 43 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_636 B0.9|GG99|4446003 45 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_807 B0.9|GG99|245951 46 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_3674 B0.9|GG97|619848 49 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_1504 B0.9|GG99|648195 50 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_3831 B0.9|GG99|4410609 54 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_219 B0.9|GG99|832301 56 [Chloracidobacteria]; Ellin6075;
B_640 B0.9|GG99|2248452 65 [Chloracidobacteria]; Ellin6075;
B_994 B0.9|CH97|98 70 [Fimbriimonadia]; [Fimbriimonadaceae]; Fimbriimonas
B_334 B0.9|GG99|4017244 77 [Leptospirae]; Leptospiraceae; Turneriella
B_419 B0.9|SB97|416 84 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_606 B0.9|GG99|218032 86 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_424 B0.9|GG97|156353 89 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_1547 B0.9|GG99|217883 92 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_1986 B0.9|SB97|1765 93 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_214 B0.9|GG99|1054055 102 [Pedosphaerae]; auto67 4W;
B_1346 B0.9|GG99|217739 109 [Pedosphaerae]; Ellin515;
B_1234 B0.9|GG99|4308576 111 [Pedosphaerae]; Ellin517;
B_545 B0.9|SB97|336 113 [Pedosphaerae]; Ellin517;
B_2432 B0.9|GG99|4451926 114 [Pedosphaerae]; Ellin517;
B_1372 B0.9|GG97|4405640 115 [Pedosphaerae]; Ellin517;
B_3644 B0.9|GG99|250093 129 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_1367 B0.9|GG97|801578 131 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_389 B0.9|GG99|4445358 134 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_213 B0.9|GG99|584473 135 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_362 B0.9|GG99|1143958 137 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_348 B0.9|GG99|500937 139 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_229 B0.9|GG97|887484 140 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_769 B0.9|GG99|395698 144 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_310 B0.9|GG97|4373079 145 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_208 B0.9|GG99|939101 148 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_595 B0.9|GG97|854930 150 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_237 B0.9|GG99|78422 152 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_2310 B0.9|SB97|1305 155 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_356 B0.9|GG99|4384523 156 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3878 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2114:4535:11567 161 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3121 B0.9|GG97|510452 166 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_1043 B0.9|GG97|590319 168 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_838 B0.9|GG99|1108751 170 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_2598 B0.9|GG99|938039 171 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_266 B0.9|GG97|854930 173 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_452 B0.9|GG97|510452 178 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_537 B0.9|GG99|1057750 179 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3388 B0.9|GG97|945733 189 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_1992 B0.9|GG97|347661 196 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_402 B0.9|GG99|1689895 217 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Chitinophaga
B_1606 B0.9|GG99|550271 222 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Chitinophaga
B_1050 B0.9|GG97|225377 231 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_586 B0.9|GG99|890429 232 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_3645 B0.9|GG97|954992 240 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_218 B0.9|GG97|3509162 244 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Lacibacter cauensis
B_3282 B0.9|GG97|242645 245 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Lacibacter cauensis
B_429 B0.9|GG99|4394918 247 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Niabella
B_482 B0.9|GG97|358280 249 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Niabella
B_2015 B0.9|GG99|250223 250 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Niastella
B_829 B0.9|GG99|619163 254 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_959 B0.9|GG99|236636 257 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Segetibacter
B_801 B0.9|GG99|588130 263 [Saprospirae]; Saprospiraceae;
B_1653 B0.9|GG99|829802 270 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae];
B_1313 B0.9|GG97|239152 277 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae];
B_634 B0.9|GG99|578268 280 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Candidatus Xiphinematobacter
B_773 B0.9|GG97|630306 281 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Candidatus Xiphinematobacter
B_625 B0.9|GG99|579954 287 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Chthoniobacter
B_1814 B0.9|GG97|213249 289 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; DA101
B_3543 B0.9|GG97|206827 291 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; DA101
B_1369 B0.9|GG97|227202 293 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; DA101
B_2238 B0.9|GG99|1012889 299 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; OR-59
B_1822 B0.9|GG99|335478 307 0319-6E2; ;
B_404 B0.9|SB97|400 309 4C0d-2; ;
B_1413 B0.9|GG97|88989 311 4C0d-2; ;
B_1024 B0.9|GG99|4328472 320 Acidimicrobiia; ;
B_1118 B0.9|GG99|593462 338 Acidimicrobiia; Iamiaceae; lamia
B_585 B0.9|GG99|794046 343 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_445 B0.9|GG99|4373464 345 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_2498 B0.9|GG99|203701 347 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1254 B0.9|GG99|1144316 351 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1374 B0.9|GG99|4024064 354 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1171 B0.9|GG97|4024062 358 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1356 B0.9|GG99|215477 359 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1058 B0.9|GG99|1638798 360 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_337 B0.9|GG99|1135983 375 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_298 B0.9|GG97|1110562 376 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_173 B0.9|GG99|670247 377 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_669 B0.9|GG99|2764308 379 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_2054 B0.9|GG97|612405 380 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_896 B0.9|GG99|566947 385 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_3648 B0.9|GG99|736895 388 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_2365 B0.9|GG99|809850 390 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae; Granulicella paludicola
B_3763 B0.9|GG97|618396 394 Acidobacteriia; Koribacteraceae;
B_311 B0.9|GG99|215113 395 Acidobacteriia; Koribacteraceae;
B_365 B0.9|GG99|224638 397 Acidobacteriia; Koribacteraceae;
B_973 B0.9|GG99|4332586 405 Acidobacteriia; Koribacteraceae; Candidatus Koribacter
B_882 B0.9|SB97|756 413 Actinobacteria; ;
B_2175 B0.9|GG99|4366345 426 Actinobacteria; ;
B_657 B0.9|GG99|148806 427 Actinobacteria; ;
B 400 B0.9|GG99|45427 434 Actinobacteria; Actinomycetaceae; Actinomyces
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_255 B0.9|GG99|4383386 443 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_3714 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1110:19170:11161 446 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea albidocapillata
B_85 B0.9|GG99|149955 448 Actinobacteria; Brevibacteriaceae; Brevibacterium
B_3745 B0.9|GG99|12333 450 Actinobacteria; Cellulomonadaceae; Cellulomonas xylanilytica
B_205 B0.9|GG99|467198 452 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_3095 B0.9|GG99|4322169 454 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_3074 B0.9|GG99|459031 456 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_1016 B0.9|GG99|440142 457 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_2848 B0.9|GG99|13454 463 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_230 B0.9|GG99|1145616 473 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_3801 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2110:15234:24521 475 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_2752 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2103:2682:11196 479 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae; Modestobacter
B_1584 B0.9|SB97|1358 480 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae; Modestobacter
B_132 B0.9|GG99|207893 481 Actinobacteria; Glycomycetaceae; Glycomyces
B_1588 B0.9|GG99|1138326 484 Actinobacteria; Intrasporangiaceae; Phycicoccus
B_1587 B0.9|GG99|4465540 486 Actinobacteria; Intrasporangiaceae; Terracoccus
B_161 B0.9|GG99|915240 487 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae;
B_1207 B0.9|GG97|190663 488 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_226 B0.9|GG99|4373091 490 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Quadrisphaera granulorum
B_3391 B0.9|GG97|587616 491 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3428 B0.9|GG97|538790 493 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3313 B0.9|GG99|981177 494 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3086 B0.9|GG99|12174 495 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae; Agromyces
B_162 B0.9|GG99|318726 497 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae; Rathayibacter
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_94 B0.9|GG99|132333 501 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Arthrobacter psychrolactophilus
B_1709 B0.9|GG99|899777 503 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Nesterenkonia
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_1116 B0.9|GG99|101379 506 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_3101 B0.9|GG99|239455 507 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_1455 B0.9|GG99|554677 523 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium celatum
B_730 B0.9|GG99|324217 532 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae;
B_1009 B0.9|GG99|224809 536 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae;
B_3177 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1106:14101:7502 542 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Aeromicrobium
B_1142 B0.9|GG97|247758 543 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_904 B0.9|GG99|961338 548 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Nocardioides plantarum
B_1481 B0.9|GG99|169872 553 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Pimelobacter
B_392 B0.9|GG99|333124 556 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Cellulosimicrobium
B_91 B0.9|GG99|626582 557 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Promicromonospora
B_935 B0.9|GG99|506006 560 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Actinomycetospora
B_3017 B0.9|GG97|3043332 561 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Amycolatopsis
B_246 B0.9|GG99|713912 562 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Amycolatopsis
B_504 B0.9|GG99|114587 564 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Pseudonocardia
B_1317 B0.9|GG97|257520 566 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Saccharopolyspora
B_525 B0.9|GG99|1039041 567 Actinobacteria; Sporichthyaceae;
B_409 B0.9|GG99|272199 570 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_3556 B0.9|GG97|39463 571 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_296 B0.9|GG99|229058 572 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_3092 B0.9|GG97|188942 573 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_1835 B0.9|GG97|4467439 574 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_573 B0.9|GG99|1866998 575 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_3617 B0.9|GG99|4001087 576 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_578 B0.9|GG97|353728 577 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_709 B0.9|GG97|4467439 578 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_3152 B0.9|GG97|523593 580 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_417 B0.9|GG99|1145689 593 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_341 B0.9|GG97|209577 595 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_387 B0.9|GG99|4307209 596 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_242 B0.9|GG97|233724 598 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_691 B0.9|GG97|1109445 606 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3490 B0.9|GG97|156886 607 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_536 B0.9|GG99|834403 608 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3889 B0.9|GG97|4435199 609 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1093 B0.9|GG97|206404 613 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3083 B0.9|GG97|211231 617 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1020 B0.9|GG97|156886 620 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1345 B0.9|GG97|4327067 628 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_2367 B0.9|GG97|156154 646 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_2065 B0.9|GG99|550725 647 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_2644 B0.9|GG97|253735 658 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae;
B_1279 B0.9|GG99|836736 662 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae;
B_1215 B0.9|GG99|328033 663 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae;
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_250 B0.9|GG99|111252 706 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Balneimonas
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_3841 B0.9|GG97|740317 713 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_260 B0.9|GG99|576765 717 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_307 B0.9|GG97|673010 718 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_1605 B0.9|GG99|981168 719 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_158 B0.9|GG99|25580 723 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Asticcacaulis biprosthecium
B_340 B0.9|GG99|541299 729 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Caulobacter
B_157 B0.9|GG99|811257 730 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Caulobacter
B_243 B0.9|GG99|1126850 731 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Mycoplana
B_1176 B0.9|GG99|1108246 732 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Mycoplana
B_292 B0.9|GG99|60548 733 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Phenylobacterium
B_185 B0.9|GG99|3949027 740 Alphaproteobacteria; Erythrobacteraceae;
B_1077 B0.9|GG99|1083099 741 Alphaproteobacteria; Erythrobacteraceae;
B_517 B0.9|GG99|1048018 747 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_111 B0.9|GG99|686615 748 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_3089 B0.9|GG97|1053775 751 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_1266 B0.9|GG99|575419 752 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_3360 B0.9|GG97|278399 753 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_968 B0.9|GG97|1119668 754 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_3631 B0.9|GG97|4378776 755 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_3721 B0.9|GG99|4319475 757 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_3398 B0.9|GG97|674370 760 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_764 B0.9|GG99|4387434 767 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_3329 B0.9|GG97|101542 768 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_420 B0.9|GG99|1138841 769 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_3106 B0.9|GG97|4475802 770 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_1199 B0.9|GG99|677952 771 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_3380 B0.9|GG99|3148884 772 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae;
      Rhodoplanes
B_777 B0.9|GG99|2701319 773 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_396 B0.9|GG99|222792 776 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_160 B0.9|GG99|4319095 785 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium adhaesivum
B_1656 B0.9|GG99|99694 788 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylocystaceae;
B_149 B0.9|GG99|81838 797 Alphaproteobacteria; Phyllobacteriaceae; Mesorhizobium
B_2353 B0.9|GG99|4341586 800 Alphaproteobacteria; Phyllobacteriaceae; Thermovum composti
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_3633 B0.9|GG99|5419 804 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_3736 B0.9|GG97|158565 805 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_966 B0.9|GG99|4401048 815 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Paracoccus aminovorans
B_397 B0.9|GG99|642805 817 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rhodobacter
B_3354 B0.9|GG99|807329 819 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rhodobacter
B_245 B0.9|GG99|363728 823 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_289 B0.9|GG99|240866 825 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_1583 B0.9|GG97|4305436 829 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_1693 B0.9|GG99|615569 834 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_926 B0.9|GG99|568382 839 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_1233 B0.9|SB97|1053 842 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_1567 B0.9|GG99|4358886 845 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_2163 B0.9|GG97|109469 856 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Azospirillum
B_550 B0.9|GG99|1138442 862 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Phaeospirillum fulvum
B_239 B0.9|GG99|143931 864 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Skermanella
B_461 B0.9|GG99|650619 865 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Skermanella
B_3518 B0.9|GG97|819027 866 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Skermanella
B_981 B0.9|GG99|1048987 873 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
B_2929 B0.9|GG97|243129 874 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
B_1086 B0.9|GG97|824146 878 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
      Kaistobacter
B_184 B0.9|GG99|3179031 879 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_183 B0.9|GG99|767841 880 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_304 B0.9|GG99|2947338 881 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_3809 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1111:17289:13295 882 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_3716 B0.9|GG97|2294362 883 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_1011 B0.9|GG99|137881 884 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_3027 B0.9|GG99|513305 885 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Kaistobacter
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_338 B0.9|GG99|525932 888 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_383 B0.9|GG99|812277 893 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_2388 B0.9|GG97|99326 896 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_78 B0.9|GG99|4365882 897 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3637 B0.9|GG97|3490230 900 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_439 B0.9|GG99|689448 903 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3548 B0.9|GG97|282561 908 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas azotifigens
B_2959 B0.9|GG99|1009882 909 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_566 B0.9|GG99|1138512 910 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas wittichii
B_93 B0.9|GG99|2174317 917 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingopyxis alaskensis
B_3525 B0.9|GG97|4393056 919 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
      Sphingopyxis
B_2185 B0.9|GG99|4410158 920 Alphaproteobacteria; Xanthobacteraceae; Labrys
B_790 B0.9|GG99|207355 926 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_1107 B0.9|SB97|701 928 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_186 B0.9|GG99|113210 929 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_508 B0.9|GG97|4311512 930 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_401 B0.9|SB97|410 932 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_498 B0.9|GG97|114049 934 Anaerolineae; A4b;
B_470 B0.9|SB97|467 957 Anaerolineae; SJA-101;
B_667 B0.9|GG99|1124271 965 Bacilli; ;
B_763 B0.9|GG99|1104891 966 Bacilli; ;
B_43 B0.9|GG99|1108343 969 Bacilli; [Exiguobacteraceae]; Exiguobacterium
B_167 B0.9|GG99|805754 974 Bacilli; Alicyclobacillaceae; Alicyclobacillus
B_2034 B0.9|GG99|901807 976 Bacilli; Alicyclobacillaceae; Alicyclobacillus
B_1320 B0.9|GG99|1134008 977 Bacilli; Bacillaceae;
B_27 B0.9|GG99|656443 980 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus flexus
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_2118 B0.9|GG99|1117218 982 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus ginsengihumi
B_3244 B0.9|GG97|781407 983 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus muralis
B_467 B0.9|GG99|14601 984 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus coagulans
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_1477 B0.9|GG99|808202 992 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Virgibacillus
B_2784 B0.9|GG99|137557 996 Bacilli; Enterococcaceae; Vagococcus
B_932 B0.9|GG99|4318084 997 Bacilli; Gemellaceae;
B_539 B0.9|GG97|131921 999 Bacilli; Lactobacillaceae; Lactobacillus
B_515 B0.9|GG97|292057 1000 Bacilli; Lactobacillaceae; Lactobacillus
B_39 B0.9|GG99|4446524 1011 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_3236 B0.9|GG97|540940 1012 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_701 B0.9|GG99|936776 1021 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Brevibacillus
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_119 B0.9|GG99|143280 1025 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_593 B0.9|GG99|4315079 1029 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_3287 B0.9|GG97|157532 1032 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_951 B0.9|GG99|14554 1042 Bacilli; Planococcaceae; Bacillus thermoalkalophilus
B_729 B0.9|GG97|211120 1043 Bacilli; Planococcaceae; Lysinibacillus massiliensis
B_1297 B0.9|GG99|290588 1044 Bacilli; Planococcaceae; Solibacillus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_1131 B0.9|GG97|269392 1048 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Sporolactobacillus
B_1846 B0.9|GG97|4400926 1049 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Sporolactobacillus
B_3772 B0.9|GG97|164904 1055 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus sciuri
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_3031 B0.9|GG97|802262 1060 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_796 B0.9|GG99|550372 1088 Bacteroidia; Prevotellaceae; Prevotella copri
B_507 B0.9|GG99|1552836 1096 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_756 B0.9|GG97|2641606 1098 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_575 B0.9|GG97|1114669 1103 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_299 B0.9|GG99|4482838 1114 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_1486 B0.9|GG99|558494 1116 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_2584 B0.9|GG99|3984836 1117 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_3269 B0.9|GG99|819893 1123 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_199 B0.9|GG99|144670 1130 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Achromobacter
B_639 B0.9|GG99|4358960 1132 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_18 B0.9|GG99|132704 1133 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_1389 B0.9|SB97|1198 1134 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_2905 B0.9|GG99|174858 1135 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_3254 B0.9|GG97|1001908 1136 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_222 B0.9|GG99|74807 1141 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2922 B0.9|GG99|848317 1142 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_1085 B0.9|GG99|4327895 1144 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3580 B0.9|GG99|91986 1145 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2164 B0.9|GG97|211171 1146 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_443 B0.9|GG99|818509 1147 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2815 B0.9|GG97|4381109 1148 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2585 B0.9|GG99|786777 1150 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3606 B0.9|GG97|3093433 1152 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3165 B0.9|GG99|252287 1153 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_425 B0.9|GG97|783687 1154 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3449 B0.9|GG97|4470872 1156 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3886 B0.9|GG99|338597 1157 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3438 B0.9|GG97|208424 1161 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2221 B0.9|GG99|71872 1163 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Comamonas
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_1508 B0.9|GG99|4405883 1165 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hydrogenophaga
B_283 B0.9|GG99|286034 1166 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hylemonella
B_215 B0.9|GG99|870418 1168 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Methylibium
B_3641 B0.9|GG97|329664 1169 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Polaromonas
B_925 B0.9|GG99|807475 1170 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Rubrivivax
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_3420 B0.9|GG97|657631 1173 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax
B_314 B0.9|GG99|4430763 1175 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae;
B_1366 B0.9|GG99|4345365 1177 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae;
B_476 B0.9|GG99|833564 1179 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylobacillus
B_176 B0.9|GG99|532238 1180 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylotenera mobilis
B_346 B0.9|GG99|4428924 1181 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylotenera mobilis
B_3214 B0.9|GG99|556229 1182 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylotenera mobilis
B_268 B0.9|GG99|462955 1185 Betaproteobacteria; Neisseriaceae;
B_2061 B0.9|GG99|106086 1189 Betaproteobacteria; Nitrosomonadaceae; Nitrosovibrio tenuis
B_15 B0.9|GG99|100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_221 B0.9|GG99|4319211 1192 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_3740 B0.9|GG97|617340 1194 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_3711 B0.9|GG99|4296224 1196 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Collimonas
B_50 B0.9|GG99|63615 1197 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Herbaspirillum
B_3307 B0.9|GG97|81252 1198 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Herminiimonas
B_156 B0.9|GG99|146396 1199 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
      Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2033 B0.9|GG99|221910 1201 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3582 B0.9|GG97|208929 1202 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_315 B0.9|GG99|561332 1203 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2266 B0.9|GG97|207780 1204 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_631 B0.9|GG97|548434 1207 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_880 B0.9|GG99|656307 1217 Betaproteobacteria; Rhodocyclaceae; Petrobacter succinatimandens
B_952 B0.9|GG97|913399 1218 BME43; ;
B_469 B0.9|SB97|459 1223 Chlamydiia; ;
B_195 B0.9|SB97|178 1225 Chlamydiia; ;
B_901 B0.9|SB97|794 1236 Chlamydiia; ;
B_1097 B0.9|SB97|943 1249 Chlamydiia; Chlamydiaceae;
B_308 B0.9|SB97|319 1262 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae;
B_1647 B0.9|SB97|1395 1273 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae;
B_421 B0.9|SB97|423 1289 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae; Candidatus Protochlamydia
B_223 B0.9|GG97|547579 1292 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae; Candidatus Protochlamydia
B_1723 B0.9|SB97|1527 1293 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae; Candidatus Protochlamydia
B_1892 B0.9|SB97|1722 1303 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae; Parachlamydia
B_1739 B0.9|SB97|1538 1304 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae; Parachlamydia
B_1629 B0.9|GG97|1110219 1315 Chloroflexi; ;
B_500 B0.9|SB97|486 1317 Chloroflexi; ;
B_2129 B0.9|GG97|1111050 1326 Chloroflexi; ;
B_1302 B0.9|GG97|289530 1332 Chloroflexi; [Kouleothrixaceae];
B_1512 B0.9|SB97|1259 1336 Chloroflexi; Chloroflexaceae;
B_262 B0.9|GG99|4455451 1358 Clostridia; Caldicellulosiruptoraceae; Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus
B_431 B0.9|GG99|187815 1359 Clostridia; Carboxydocellaceae; Carboxydocella
B_61 B0.9|GG99|152491 1366 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium intestinale
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum
B_180 B0.9|GG99|302146 1398 Clostridia; Peptostreptococcaceae;
B_744 B0.9|GG99|180285 1407 Clostridia; Ruminococcaceae; Faecalibacterium prausnitzii
B_712 B0.9|GG99|4328011 1417 Clostridia; Veillonellaceae; Veillonella dispar
B_484 B0.9|SB97|474 1420 Cytophagia; ;
B_487 B0.9|GG97|361372 1421 Cytophagia; ;
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_294 B0.9|GG99|1135504 1427 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_259 B0.9|GG99|4377101 1428 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_2136 B0.9|GG99|4372936 1429 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_254 B0.9|GG99|254014 1430 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_210 B0.9|SB97|193 1431 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_2338 B0.9|GG97|4318357 1432 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_187 B0.9|GG99|821362 1433 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_152 B0.9|GG97|747226 1434 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1201 B0.9|SB97|880 1437 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_3189 B0.9|SB97|711 1438 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_317 B0.9|GG99|652359 1439 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1242 B0.9|GG99|594352 1441 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_377 B0.9|GG97|4379833 1444 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_2342 B0.9|GG97|532331 1445 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_782 B0.9|GG97|4303530 1446 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_264 B0.9|GG99|266549 1447 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_965 B0.9|SB97|632 1448 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_3112 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2109:15649:22530 1449 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1276 B0.9|GG99|248117 1450 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1517 B0.9|GG99|1019914 1451 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_2086 B0.9|GG97|2063454 1461 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_408 B0.9|SB97|412 1462 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_2764 B0.9|GG99|1036363 1467 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1431 B0.9|GG99|320262 1478 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Adhaeribacter
B_3361 B0.9|SB97|1851 1483 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_1100 B0.9|GG99|545721 1485 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_234 B0.9|GG99|4465256 1486 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Emticicia
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_816 B0.9|GG97|4335832 1523 Cytophagia; Flammeovirgaceae;
B_1873 B0.9|GG99|90078 1525 Cytophagia; Flammeovirgaceae;
B_511 B0.9|GG97|876412 1526 Cytophagia; Flammeovirgaceae;
B_917 B0.9|GG99|131883 1539 Deinococci; Deinococcaceae; Deinococcus geothermalis
B_115 B0.9|GG99|625742 1548 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_244 B0.9|GG99|4370738 1549 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_323 B0.9|GG99|1021984 1553 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1322 B0.9|GG99|2775219 1556 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1301 B0.9|GG97|4385959 1557 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_3227 B0.9|SB97|269 1560 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_217 B0.9|SB97|206 1561 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_953 B0.9|GG99|1141984 1562 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_253 B0.9|SB97|241 1566 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_745 B0.9|GG99|364646 1571 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1066 B0.9|SB97|919 1576 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1268 B0.9|GG99|1115805 1583 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1603 B0.9|GG99|978498 1584 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_538 B0.9|GG99|1107985 1587 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_1096 B0.9|GG97|3222178 1588 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_446 B0.9|SB97|442 1596 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_988 B0.9|GG97|254949 1607 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_623 B0.9|GG99|159853 1610 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_833 B0.9|GG97|1130026 1632 Deltaproteobacteria; [Entotheonellaceae];
B_841 B0.9|GG97|16939 1648 Deltaproteobacteria; Bdellovibrionaceae; Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus
B_856 B0.9|GG97|4312403 1653 Deltaproteobacteria; Bdellovibrionaceae; Bdellovibrio
B_422 B0.9|GG99|4302753 1661 Deltaproteobacteria; Cystobacteraceae;
B_943 B0.9|GG99|217328 1671 Deltaproteobacteria; Haliangiaceae;
B_519 B0.9|GG97|3100155 1672 Deltaproteobacteria; Haliangiaceae;
B_1901 B0.9|GG99|649722 1676 Deltaproteobacteria; Haliangiaceae;
B_2775 B0.9|GG99|113228 1679 Deltaproteobacteria; Haliangiaceae;
B_1527 B0.9|GG99|106978 1684 Deltaproteobacteria; Myxococcaceae; Corallococcus exiguus
B_2103 B0.9|GG99|326414 1694 Deltaproteobacteria; Polyangiaceae;
B_702 B0.9|GG97|808919 1695 Deltaproteobacteria; Polyangiaceae;
B_1523 B0.9|SB97|1101 1697 Deltaproteobacteria; Polyangiaceae;
B_295 B0.9|GG99|86196 1701 Deltaproteobacteria; Polyangiaceae; Sorangium cellulosum
B_165 B0.9|SB97|152 1702 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_1054 B0.9|GG97|210904 1705 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_868 B0.9|GG97|824674 1706 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_754 B0.9|GG99|4308759 1708 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_103 B0.9|GG99|1081489 1735 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_809 B0.9|GG97|1050650 1736 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_499 B0.9|SB97|440 1739 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_1858 B0.9|SB97|1624 1740 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_143 B0.9|GG99|4156364 1746 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_127 B0.9|GG99|4425400 1747 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_1907 B0.9|SB97|1692 1750 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_1509 B0.9|GG99|4154872 1752 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Cloacibacterium
B_321 B0.9|GG99|4156020 1755 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Crocinitomix
B_1277 B0.9|SB97|1084 1757 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Fluviicola
B_339 B0.9|GG97|676616 1758 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Fluviicola
B_276 B0.9|GG99|570086 1759 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Fluviicola
B_1113 B0.9|SB97|396 1760 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Fluviicola
B_1371 B0.9|SB97|1133 1764 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Aequorivita
B_1586 B0.9|GG97|896098 1769 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium
B_141 B0.9|GG99|57759 1770 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium columnare
B_148 B0.9|GG99|886096 1771 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_3528 B0.9|GG99|143127 1773 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium
B_522 B0.9|GG99|1053438 1774 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium
B_2526 B0.9|GG99|143325 1775 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_3527 B0.9|GG97|1058276 1776 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium
B_633 B0.9|GG99|542078 1777 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium
B_3571 B0.9|GG97|334370 1778 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_873 B0.9|GG99|1133512 1790 Fusobacteriia; Fusobacteriaceae; Fusobacterium
B_1273 B0.9|GG99|31235 1792 Fusobacteriia; Leptotrichiaceae; Leptotrichia
B_1443 B0.9|SB97|1231 1794 Gammaproteobacteria; ;
B_285 B0.9|SB97|298 1807 Gammaproteobacteria; ;
B_2257 B0.9|SB97|2053 1809 Gammaproteobacteria; ;
B_297 B0.9|GG99|1126147 1826 Gammaproteobacteria; [Chromatiaceae]; Rheinheimera
B_331 B0.9|GG99|931708 1828 Gammaproteobacteria; 211ds20;
B_732 B0.9|GG99|1111867 1829 Gammaproteobacteria; 211ds20;
B_2211 B0.9|GG97|983648 1830 Gammaproteobacteria; 211ds20;
B_146 B0.9|GG99|4459557 1835 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae;
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_1795 B0.9|SB97|625 1838 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_368 B0.9|SB97|366 1841 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1427 B0.9|SB97|1186 1845 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_203 B0.9|GG97|353731 1847 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_197 B0.9|GG97|850214 1849 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_715 B0.9|GG97|792045 1850 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_370 B0.9|SB97|359 1853 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1138 B0.9|GG97|514449 1855 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1032 B0.9|SB97|915 1856 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1223 B0.9|SB97|1068 1858 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_2867 B0.9|GG97|2954732 1861 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1052 B0.9|SB97|921 1864 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_1474 B0.9|SB97|1268 1872 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae;
B_145 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1886 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_818 B0.9|GG97|542155 1887 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_316 B0.9|SB97|325 1890 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_632 B0.9|SB97|581 1893 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_284 B0.9|SB97|297 1894 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_1042 B0.9|SB97|903 1896 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_1681 B0.9|GG99|133195 1898 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_1264 B0.9|SB97|725 1901 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_479 B0.9|SB97|468 1902 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_390 B0.9|SB97|399 1903 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_2866 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1101:25262:21552 1917 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_983 B0.9|SB97|858 1921 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_1030 B0.9|SB97|881 1923 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_747 B0.9|SB97|660 1924 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_3231 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2108:3218:10385 1957 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_791 B0.9|GG97|311942 1966 Gammaproteobacteria; Legionellaceae;
B_616 B0.9|SB97|574 1972 Gammaproteobacteria; Legionellaceae; Legionella
B_1692 B0.9|GG97|4362183 1973 Gammaproteobacteria; Legionellaceae; Legionella
B_155 B0.9|GG99|146876 1978 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae
B_216 B0.9|GG99|69970 1979 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter
B_2405 B0.9|GG99|512471 1981 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhydrobacter
B_3292 B0.9|GG99|4299044 1995 Gammaproteobacteria; Pasteurellaceae; Haemophilus parainfluenzae
B_363 B0.9|GG99|2598129 1996 Gammaproteobacteria; Pasteurellaceae; Haemophilus
B_1995 B0.9|GG99|1124425 1998 Gammaproteobacteria; Piscirickettsiaceae;
B_3788 B0.9|GG97|833174 2001 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae;
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2544 B0.9|GG99|1134114 2007 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas viridiflava
B_3748 B0.9|GG97|202466 2008 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3228 B0.9|GG97|926370 2009 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_1755 B0.9|GG99|2317377 2011 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas veronii
B_2653 B0.9|GG97|141365 2013 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3451 B0.9|GG97|516292 2014 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3365 B0.9|GG97|141365 2015 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3885 B0.9|GG97|516292 2017 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_166 B0.9|GG99|4329433 2023 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae;
B_881 B0.9|GG99|111642 2025 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae;
B_343 B0.9|GG99|691349 2041 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae; Steroidobacter
B_459 B0.9|GG99|824667 2043 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae; Steroidobacter
B_1530 B0.9|GG99|838297 2058 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae;
B_144 B0.9|GG99|810175 2062 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Arenimonas
B_3850 B0.9|GG97|569066 2063 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_556 B0.9|GG97|1125608 2064 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_1977 B0.9|GG99|304552 2065 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_1918 B0.9|GG97|569066 2067 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_22 B0.9|GG99|4452943 2071 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_177 B0.9|GG99|536238 2072 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteimonas
B_2312 B0.9|GG99|4308369 2073 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteimonas
B_194 B0.9|GG99|4352433 2075 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Lysobacter
B_478 B0.9|GG99|3561138 2076 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Lysobacter
B_3211 B0.9|GG97|146193 2079 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Pseudoxanthomonas indica
B_1562 B0.9|GG99|667880 2080 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana
B_159 B0.9|GG99|4358989 2081 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Pseudoxanthomonas
B_527 B0.9|GG99|4449098 2083 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Rhodanobacter
B_168 B0.9|GG99|805823 2084 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Rhodanobacter
B_3326 B0.9|GG99|1133957 2086 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Thermomonas
B_2229 B0.9|GG99|572324 2088 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Thermomonas
B_2503 B0.9|GG99|332041 2091 Gemm-1; ;
B_438 B0.9|GG99|870527 2092 Gemm-1; ;
B_1937 B0.9|GG99|314599 2097 Gemm-1; ;
B_491 B0.9|GG97|227299 2110 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_512 B0.9|GG99|161143 2112 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_2256 B0.9|GG99|156895 2117 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_1521 B0.9|GG99|839836 2118 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_1329 B0.9|GG99|113937 2121 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_1519 B0.9|GG97|4319210 2133 Gemmatimonadetes; ;
B_736 B0.9|GG99|806857 2154 Gemmatimonadetes; Ellin5301;
B_2372 B0.9|GG99|1030298 2155 Gemmatimonadetes; Ellin5301;
B_1775 B0.9|SB97|1582 2170 Ktedonobacteria; Ktedonobacteraceae;
B_787 B0.9|SB97|716 2171 Ktedonobacteria; Ktedonobacteraceae;
B_1179 B0.9|SB97|1024 2189 Mollicutes; ;
B_1520 B0.9|SB97|1320 2193 Mollicutes; Anaeroplasmataceae; Asteroleplasma
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_1522 B0.9|GG99|1106498 2204 Nitrospira; Nitrospiraceae; Nitrospira
B_279 B0.9|GG99|107299 2222 Opitutae; Opitutaceae;
B_2148 B0.9|SB97|1922 2223 Opitutae; Opitutaceae;
B_825 B0.9|SB97|733 2227 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_385 B0.9|GG99|114313 2230 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_351 B0.9|GG99|662817 2234 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_252 B0.9|SB97|254 2235 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_475 B0.9|GG97|1077190 2236 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_1006 B0.9|GG99|136998 2237 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_554 B0.9|GG99|587631 2239 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_1412 B0.9|GG97|2649117 2253 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_489 B0.9|GG97|547110 2254 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_993 B0.9|GG99|4416961 2256 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_1211 B0.9|SB97|1949 2257 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_1495 B0.9|GG97|216375 2262 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_1884 B0.9|GG99|361758 2271 Phycisphaerae; ;
B_488 B0.9|SB97|481 2293 Planctomycetia; Gemmataceae;
B_990 B0.9|SB97|870 2295 Planctomycetia; Gemmataceae;
B_1105 B0.9|GG99|529067 2326 Planctomycetia; Pirellulaceae;
B_1751 B0.9|GG99|4314419 2327 Planctomycetia; Pirellulaceae;
B_430 B0.9|GG99|2862 2353 Planctomycetia; Planctomycetaceae; Planctomyces
B_233 B0.9|GG99|137813 2367 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_1280 B0.9|GG97|4397593 2369 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_2431 B0.9|GG97|1117022 2370 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_2733 B0.9|GG99|4466061 2371 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_220 B0.9|SB97|209 2386 SJA-4; ;
B_1152 B0.9|SB97|1925 2391 SJA-4; ;
B_358 B0.9|SB97|347 2395 SJA-4; ;
B_954 B0.9|GG97|61498 2399 SJA-4; ;
B_600 B0.9|SB97|562 2402 SJA-4; ;
B_771 B0.9|SB97|704 2408 SJA-4; ;
B_720 B0.9|GG97|1123510 2409 SJA-4; ;
B_955 B0.9|SB97|853 2410 SJA-4; ;
B_1141 B0.9|SB97|979 2416 SJA-4; ;
B_1550 B0.9|SB97|1299 2417 SJA-4; ;
B_286 B0.9|GG99|818067 2422 SJA-4; ;
B_3475 B0.9|GG97|61498 2429 SJA-4; ;
B_434 B0.9|GG99|666624 2432 SJA-4; ;
B_1430 B0.9|SB97|1232 2443 SJA-4; ;
B_817 B0.9|GG99|558745 2471 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae;
B_2081 B0.9|GG97|50491 2472 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae;
B_1792 B0.9|GG99|111405 2477 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae; Candidatus Solibacter
B_614 B0.9|GG99|702015 2483 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_888 B0.9|SB97|774 2486 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_191 B0.9|GG99|2775220 2487 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_1438 B0.9|GG97|1137819 2491 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_781 B0.9|SB97|603 2492 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_591 B0.9|GG99|1114591 2493 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_1051 B0.9|SB97|912 2505 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_3687 B0.9|GG99|2453163 2515 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3184 B0.9|GG99|222163 2516 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3212 B0.9|GG99|3833747 2517 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3301 B0.9|GG97|4361153 2518 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_86 B0.9|GG99|807643 2519 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_406 B0.9|GG97|324699 2522 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3169 B0.9|GG99|3431050 2524 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_129 B0.9|GG99|1613392 2526 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_2892 B0.9|GG99|808207 2528 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_1985 B0.9|GG97|512727 2529 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3722 B0.9|GG97|1522003 2530 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3486 B0.9|GG97|1522003 2534 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3837 B0.9|GG97|534367 2535 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3522 B0.9|GG97|1135313 2538 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_1396 B0.9|GG99|4301520 2542 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_930 B0.9|GG97|546342 2544 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Mucilaginibacter ximonensis
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_2812 B0.9|GG97|4042106 2550 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_867 B0.9|GG97|838337 2572 Synechococcophycideae; Pseudanabaenaceae;
B_506 B0.9|GG99|142373 2581 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_281 B0.9|GG99|748601 2582 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_564 B0.9|GG99|780322 2586 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_724 B0.9|GG99|1144 2587 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_698 B0.9|GG99|107234 2589 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_395 B0.9|GG99|561981 2596 Thermoleophilia; ;
B_985 B0.9|GG99|4313776 2611 Thermoleophilia; Gaiellaceae;
B_1925 B0.9|GG99|257531 2613 Thermoleophilia; Gaiellaceae;
B_813 B0.9|GG99|593654 2615 Thermoleophilia; Gaiellaceae;
B_641 B0.9|GG99|220238 2620 Thermoleophilia; Gaiellaceae;
B_713 B0.9|GG97|936318 2621 Thermoleophilia; Gaiellaceae;
B_2191 B0.9|GG99|1033809 2629 Thermoleophilia; Patulibacteraceae;
B_1725 B0.9|GG97|203418 2635 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_3059 B0.9|GG97|112045 2636 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_1287 B0.9|GG99|447768 2638 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_1173 B0.9|GG99|549954 2649 Thermomicrobia; ;
B_878 B0.9|GG99|194242 2666 TM7-3; ;
B_1160 B0.9|GG99|667902 2677 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae;
B_280 B0.9|GG99|349208 2682 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteo lib acter
B_2082 B0.9|GG99|863068 2683 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteo lib acter
B_172 B0.9|GG99|974297 2685 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteo lib acter
B_3213 B0.9|GG97|255112 2686 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteo lib acter
B_946 B0.9|SB97|828 2691 ZB2; ;
Table 2. Taxa present in both corn and wheat sequences. (308 lines).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NO:Taxonomy
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_100 B0.9|GG99|221835 7 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Aeromicrobium
B_88 B0.9|GG99|245191 8 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_174 B0.9|GG99|5364 10 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas yabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_3 B0.9|GG99|836094 13 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus firmus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649 16 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_140 B0.9|GG97|141688 17 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_112 B0.9|GG99|1118793 21 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_3629 B0.9|GG97|639627 24 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3592 B0.9|GG97|816702 26 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_138 B0.9|GG99|4046685 35 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_561 B0.9|GG97|217700 71 [Fimbriimonadia]; [Fimbriimonadaceae]; Fimbriimonas
B_214 B0.9|GG99|1054055 102 [Pedosphaerae]; auto67 4W;
B_2310 B0.9|SB97|1305 155 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_1488 B0.9|GG99|912263 169 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3388 B0.9|GG97|945733 189 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_801 B0.9|GG99|588130 263 [Saprospirae]; Saprospiraceae;
B_1653 B0.9|GG99|829802 270 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae];
B_773 B0.9|GG97|630306 281 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Candidatus Xiphinematobacter
B_625 B0.9|GG99|579954 287 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Chthoniobacter
B_445 B0.9|GG99|4373464 345 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_842 B0.9|GG99|2918024 363 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_173 B0.9|GG99|670247 377 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_748 B0.9|GG99|4380351 420 Actinobacteria; ;
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_205 B0.9|GG99|467198 452 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_3133 B0.9|GG99|4461906 458 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_161 B0.9|GG99|915240 487 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_3364 B0.9|GG97|12290 492 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3428 B0.9|GG97|538790 493 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3313 B0.9|GG99|981177 494 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_94 B0.9|GG99|132333 501 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Arthrobacter psychrolactophilus
B_1709 B0.9|GG99|899777 503 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Nesterenkonia
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_2346 B0.9|GG99|534009 513 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae; Actinoplanes
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_392 B0.9|GG99|333124 556 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Cellulosimicrobium
B_246 B0.9|GG99|713912 562 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Amycolatopsis
B_409 B0.9|GG99|272199 570 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_3556 B0.9|GG97|39463 571 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_1835 B0.9|GG97|4467439 574 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_573 B0.9|GG99|1866998 575 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_242 B0.9|GG97|233724 598 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3490 B0.9|GG97|156886 607 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_536 B0.9|GG99|834403 608 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3889 B0.9|GG97|4435199 609 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1093 B0.9|GG97|206404 613 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1020 B0.9|GG97|156886 620 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_850 B0.9|GG99|768310 682 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae; Acetobacter
B_1308 B0.9|GG99|4370215 688 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae; Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_250 B0.9|GG99|111252 706 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Balneimonas
B_481 B0.9|GG99|3221707 708 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Balneimonas
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_3841 B0.9|GG97|740317 713 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_158 B0.9|GG99|25580 723 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Asticcacaulis biprosthecium
B_157 B0.9|GG99|811257 730 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Caulobacter
B_557 B0.9|GG99|1140424 742 Alphaproteobacteria; Erythrobacteraceae;
B_111 B0.9|GG99|686615 748 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_420 B0.9|GG99|1138841 769 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_950 B0.9|GG99|219092 774 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_396 B0.9|GG99|222792 776 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_160 B0.9|GG99|4319095 785 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium adhaesivum
B_375 B0.9|GG99|238693 787 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium organophilum
B_3073 B0.9|GG97|1123592 796 Alphaproteobacteria; Phyllobacteriaceae; Aminobacter
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_3354 B0.9|GG99|807329 819 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rho dobacter
B_1869 B0.9|GG99|151172 820 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rubellimicrobium
B_1567 B0.9|GG99|4358886 845 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_550 B0.9|GG99|1138442 862 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Phaeospirillum fulvum
B_1507 B0.9|GG99|151213 872 Alphaproteobacteria; Rickettsiaceae; Rickettsia
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_383 B0.9|GG99|812277 893 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2822 B0.9|GG99|4449608 894 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_78 B0.9|GG99|4365882 897 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3256 B0.9|GG99|992510 898 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3637 B0.9|GG97|3490230 900 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_439 B0.9|GG99|689448 903 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2959 B0.9|GG99|1009882 909 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2889 B0.9|GG99|729112 916 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas wittichii
B_667 B0.9|GG99|1124271 965 Bacilli; ;
B_763 B0.9|GG99|1104891 966 Bacilli; ;
B_43 B0.9|GG99|1108343 969 Bacilli; [Exiguobacteraceae]; Exiguobacterium
B_27 B0.9|GG99|656443 980 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus flexus
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_2118 B0.9|GG99|1117218 982 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus ginsengihumi
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_118 B0.9|GG99|3136117 998 Bacilli; Lactobacillaceae;
B_515 B0.9|GG97|292057 1000 Bacilli; Lactobacillaceae; Lactobacillus
B_39 B0.9|GG99|4446524 1011 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_3236 B0.9|GG97|540940 1012 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_2576 B0.9|GG99|3872653 1019 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Ammoniphilus
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_6 B0.9|GG99|839395 1024 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_119 B0.9|GG99|143280 1025 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_17 B0.9|GG99|291252 1056 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Lactococcus
B_313 B0.9|GG99|184376 1058 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_2052 B0.9|GG99|1123087 1078 Bacteroidia; Marinilabiaceae; Ruminofilibacter xylanolyticum
B_796 B0.9|GG99|550372 1088 Bacteroidia; Prevotellaceae; Prevotella copri
B_2584 B0.9|GG99|3984836 1117 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_199 B0.9|GG99|144670 1130 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Achromobacter
B_643 B0.9|GG99|4305221 1131 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Pigmentiphaga
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_222 B0.9|GG99|74807 1141 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2922 B0.9|GG99|848317 1142 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2164 B0.9|GG97|211171 1146 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2585 B0.9|GG99|786777 1150 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_1508 B0.9|GG99|4405883 1165 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hydrogenophaga
B_283 B0.9|GG99|286034 1166 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hylemonella
B_925 B0.9|GG99|807475 1170 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Rubrivivax
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_346 B0.9|GG99|4428924 1181 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylotenera mobilis
B_3002 B0.9|GG99|110675 1190 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_15 B0.9|GG99|100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_50 B0.9|GG99|63615 1197 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Herbaspirillum
B_156 B0.9|GG99|146396 1199 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2033 B0.9|GG99|221910 1201 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3582 B0.9|GG97|208929 1202 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_315 B0.9|GG99|561332 1203 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2266 B0.9|GG97|207780 1204 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_3618 B0.9|GG97|210201 1211 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia alkalitolerans
B_1092 B0.9|GG99|104987 1216 Betaproteobacteria; Rhodocyclaceae; Hydrogenophilus
B_308 B0.9|SB97|319 1262 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae;
B_1629 B0.9|GG97|1110219 1315 Chloroflexi; ;
B_262 B0.9|GG99|4455451 1358 Clostridia; Caldicellulosiruptoraceae; Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus
B_431 B0.9|GG99|187815 1359 Clostridia; Carboxydocellaceae; Carboxydocella
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_317 B0.9|GG99|652359 1439 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_377 B0.9|GG97|4379833 1444 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_120 B0.9|GG99|144384 1484 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_288 B0.9|GG99|727004 1494 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_1108 B0.9|GG99|4404139 1502 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_3561 B0.9|GG99|4047528 1504 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_99 B0.9|GG99|644644 1505 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_511 B0.9|GG97|876412 1526 Cytophagia; Flammeovirgaceae;
B_1344 B0.9|GG99|1123984 1532 DA052; ;
B_1330 B0.9|GG99|4304879 1544 Deinococci; Thermaceae; Thermus
B_253 B0.9|SB97|241 1566 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_3003 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1106:5861:21702 1567 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_165 B0.9|SB97|152 1702 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_868 B0.9|GG97|824674 1706 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_788 B0.9|GG99|547191 1719 Ellin6529; ;
B_2971 B0.9|GG99|102768 1732 Epsilonproteobacteria; Campylobacteraceae; Arcobacter cryaerophilus
B_103 B0.9|GG99|1081489 1735 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_92 B0.9|GG99|176786 1751 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_1509 B0.9|GG99|4154872 1752 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Cloacibacterium
B_3672 B0.9|GG97|1046397 1761 Flavobacteriia; Cryomorphaceae; Fluviicola
B_873 B0.9|GG99|1133512 1790 Fusobacteriia; Fusobacteriaceae; Fusobacterium
B_331 B0.9|GG99|931708 1828 Gammaproteobacteria; 211ds20;
B_2105 B0.9|GG99|4406107 1833 Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadaceae; Tolumonas
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_305 B0.9|GG99|4470104 1839 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_706 B0.9|GG99|4249229 1840 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_2313 B0.9|CH97|29 1892 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_3078 B0.9|GG99|679569 1938 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3153 B0.9|GG97|4374146 1939 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3322 B0.9|GG97|1010113 1940 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_3566 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R21 05:3437:10511 1956 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_2208 B0.9|SB97|2134 1958 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_155 B0.9|GG99|146876 1978 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae
B_2405 B0.9|GG99|512471 1981 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhydrobacter
B_3788 B0.9|GG97|833174 2001 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae;
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2544 B0.9|GG99|1134114 2007 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas viridiflava
B_3748 B0.9|GG97|202466 2008 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3228 B0.9|GG97|926370 2009 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_1755 B0.9|GG99|2317377 2011 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas veronii
B_2653 B0.9|GG97|141365 2013 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_166 B0.9|GG99|4329433 2023 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae;
B_3001 B0.9|GG99|218479 2057 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae;
B_22 B0.9|GG99|4452943 2071 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_177 B0.9|GG99|536238 2072 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteimonas
B_194 B0.9|GG99|4352433 2075 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Lysobacter
B_527 B0.9|GG99|4449098 2083 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Rhodanobacter
B_382 B0.9|GG99|7897 2089 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Xanthomonas axonopodis
B_2503 B0.9|GG99|332041 2091 Gemm-1; ;
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_825 B0.9|SB97|733 2227 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_385 B0.9|GG99|114313 2230 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_738 B0.9|GG99|160679 2366 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_233 B0.9|GG99|137813 2367 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_1280 B0.9|GG97|4397593 2369 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_2733 B0.9|GG99|4466061 2371 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_256 B0.9|SB97|262 2381 SJA-4; ;
B_220 B0.9|SB97|209 2386 SJA-4; ;
B_358 B0.9|SB97|347 2395 SJA-4; ;
B_600 B0.9|SB97|562 2402 SJA-4; ;
B_720 B0.9|GG97|1123510 2409 SJA-4; ;
B_2982 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2101:24600:7375 2428 SJA-4; ;
B_817 B0.9|GG99|558745 2471 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae;
B_614 B0.9|GG99|702015 2483 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_191 B0.9|GG99|2775220 2487 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_1984 B0.9|GG99|307869 2504 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_3687 B0.9|GG99|2453163 2515 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3486 B0.9|GG97|1522003 2534 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_564 B0.9|GG99|780322 2586 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_1725 B0.9|GG97|203418 2635 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_2672 B0.9|GG97|873887 2639 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_280 B0.9|GG99|349208 2682 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteo lib acter
F_1 F0.9|UDYN|424875 2698 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium
F_2 F0.9|UDYN|206476 2699 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_38 F0.9|UDYN|215375 2700 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Cochliobolus
F_45 F0.9|U97|025461 2701 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Epicoccum Epicoccum nigrum
F_189 F0.9|SF97|476 2703 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Aspergillus Aspergillus sp r130
F_9 F0.9|SF97|8 2704 Agaricomycetes; Ceratobasidiaceae; Ceratobasidium Ceratobasidium sp AG B(o)
F_318 Agaricomycetes; ; 2709  
F_276 F0.9|SF97|591 2710 Agaricomycetes; Ceratobasidiaceae;
F_420 Agaricomycetes; ; 2712  
F_448 F0.9|SF97|704 2713 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_386 Agaricomycetes; ; 2715  
F_347 F0.9|SF97|446 2716 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_6 F0.9|UDYN|216250 2732 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Davidiella Davidiella tassiana
F_5 F0.9|UDYN|212600 2733 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium
F_4 F0.9|SF97|43 2737 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Lewia Lewia infectoria
F_61 F0.9|SF97|30 2738 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Lewia Lewia infectoria
F_343 F0.9|SF97|24 2740 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Lewia Lewia infectoria
F_10 F0.9|UDYN|186595 2741 Dothideomycetes; Incertae sedis; Phoma Phoma sp P48E5
F_990 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1109:10322:12061 2747 Dothideomycetes; ;
F_20 F0.9|SF97|19 2748 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Cladosporium Cladosporium sp ascomyc1
F_883 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:18309:4041 2751 Dothideomycetes; ;
F_976 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011 2753  
F_49 F0.9|SF97|55 2758 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Cladosporium Cladosporium sp ascomyc1
F_103 F0.9|SF97|637 2774 Dothideomycetes; Phaeosphaeriaceae;
F_64 F0.9|SF97|70 2775 Dothideomycetes; ;
F_75 F0.9|UDYN|127902 2777 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Cladosporium Cladosporium sphaerospermum
F_846 F0.9|U97|020263 2791 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Epicoccum Epicoccum nigrum
F_874 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R21 10:6251:5086 2795 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_134 F0.9|SF97|187 2796 Dothideomycetes; Dothioraceae; Aureobasidium
F_974 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae ; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium 2799  
F_837 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011 2802
F_941 F0.9|SF0|AAG1V1102:28653:16001 2809 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_30 F0.9|SF97|31 2859 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae;
F_60 F0.9|UDYN|267337 2860 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Penicillium
F_78 F0.9|UDYN|179237 2861 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; unidentified uncultured Eurotium
F_66 F0.9|UDYN|407694 2862 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Penicillium Penicillium polonicum
F_54 F0.9|UDYN|182978 2886 Incertae sedis; Incertae sedis; Chaetosphaeronema Chaetosphaeronema sp
F_147 F0.9|UDYN|177344 2902 Leotiomycetes; Sclerotiniaceae; Botrytis Botrytis sp CID95
F_47 F0.9|U97|013735 2904 Microbotryomycetes; Incertae sedis; Sporobolomyces Sporobolomyces roseus
F_52 F0.9|UDYN|190091 2919 Saccharomycetes; Incertae sedis; Candida Candida railenensis
F_7 F0.9|UDYN|210204 2965 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Acremonium Acremonium sp 2 J12
F_3 F0.9|UDYN|215392 2966 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_8 F0.9|UDYN|220700 2968 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium Fusarium culmorum
F_1051 F0.9|SF97|243 2971 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Acremonium Acremonium sp 2 J12
F_762 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2101:5461:6159 2974 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium
F_819 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2101:15150:1495 2975 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_28 F0.9|UDYN|190975 2977 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Monographella Monographella cucumerina
F_50 F0.9|UDYN|177637 2980 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Khuskia Khuskia oryzae
F_351 F0.9|U97|020374 2983 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_728 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R21 13:21340:17509 2987 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_738 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R21 14:13692:24079 2996 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_766 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R21 02:11106:24468 3002 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_750 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R21 10:21447:18536 3013 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_216 F0.9|UDYN|207654 3024 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Trichothecium Trichothecium roseum
F_562 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R11 14:8448:26611 3032 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Cosmospora Cosmospora sp
F_12 F0.9|UDYN|192067 3052 Tremellomycetes; Cystofilobasidiaceae; Udeniomyces Udeniomyces puniceus
F_11 F0.9|SF97|2 3054 Tremellomycetes; unidentified; unidentified uncultured Cryptococcus
F_111 F0.9|UDYN|209710 3063 Tremellomycetes; Incertae sedis; Dioszegia Dioszegia fristingensis
F_42 F0.9|UDYN|216453 3110 Wallemiomycetes; Wallemiaceae; Wallemia Wallemia sebi
Table 3 Taxa present in both corn and cotton sequences. (184 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_302 B0.9|GG99|12160 4 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas vabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_3629 B0.9|GG97|639627 24 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3592 B0.9|GG97|816702 26 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2829 B0.9|GG97|593848 36 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_424 B0.9|GG97|156353 89 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_1640 B0.9|GG99|580096 91 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_769 B0.9|GG99|395698 144 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_2939 B0.9|GG99|875562 186 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_1257 B0.9|GG99|535708 199 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_218 B0.9|GG97|3509162 244 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Lacibacter cauensis
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_588 B0.9|GG99|3019868 381 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_784 B0.9|GG97|4341711 384 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_748 B0.9|GG99|4380351 420 Actinobacteria; ;
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_85 B0.9|GG99|149955 448 Actinobacteria; Brevibacteriaceae; Brevibacterium
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_226 B0.9|GG99|4373091 490 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Quadrisphaera granulorum
B_162 B0.9|GG99|318726 497 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae; Rathayibacter
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_3101 B0.9|GG99|239455 507 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_1343 B0.9|GG97|39832 515 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae; Actinoplanes
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_1009 B0.9|GG99|224809 536 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae;
B_1021 B0.9|GG97|657455 538 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae;
B_1142 B0.9|GG97|247758 543 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_91 B0.9|GG99|626582 557 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Promicromonospora
B_1778 B0.9|SB97|1549 622 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_664 B0.9|GG99|4476007 661 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae;
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_3261 B0.9|GG99|4421183 695 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_3810 B0.9|GG99|1072513 696 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_2008 B0.9|GG97|1046488 707 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Balneimonas
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradvrhizobium
B_260 B0.9|GG99|576765 717 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_1605 B0.9|GG99|981168 719 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_565 B0.9|GG99|4295043 722 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Arthrospira
B_804 B0.9|GG97|4438581 735 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Phenylobacterium
B_557 B0.9|GG99|1140424 742 Alphaproteobacteria; Erythrobacteraceae;
B_569 B0.9|GG99|1127852 750 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_1656 B0.9|GG99|99694 788 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylocystaceae;
B_448 B0.9|GG99|357993 789 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylocystaceae;
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_2475 B0.9|GG99|1051136 807 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_3823 B0.9|GG97|138528 810 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae;
B_3755 B0.9|GG97|3133081 816 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rhodobacter
B_2163 B0.9|GG97|109469 856 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Azospirillum
B_2490 B0.9|GG99|3744893 857 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Azospirillum
B_981 B0.9|GG99|1048987 873 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2822 B0.9|GG99|4449608 894 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_1492 B0.9|GG97|543139 899 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas wittichii
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3439 B0.9|GG97|259371 911 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_467 B0.9|GG99|14601 984 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus coagulans
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_6 B0.9|GG99|839395 1024 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_951 B0.9|GG99|14554 1042 Bacilli; Planococcaceae; Bacillus thermoalkalophilus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_313 B0.9|GG99|184376 1058 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_643 B0.9|GG99|4305221 1131 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Pigmentiphaga
B_639 B0.9|GG99|4358960 1132 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_18 B0.9|GG99|132704 1133 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3580 B0.9|GG99|91986 1145 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_215 B0.9|GG99|870418 1168 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Methylibium
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_3420 B0.9|GG97|657631 1173 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax
B_3002 B0.9|GG99|110675 1190 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_15 B0.9|GG99|100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_195 B0.9|SB97|178 1225 Chlamydiia; ;
B_501 B0.9|SB97|487 1233 Chlamydiia; ;
B_1727 B0.9|SB97|1503 1275 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae;
B_2195 B0.9|GG99|246201 8 1355 Clostridia; [Tissierellaceae]; Peptoniphilus
B_857 B0.9|GG99|3580423 1364 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Caloramator
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_2223 B0.9|GG97|248740 1371 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium pasteurianum
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolvticum
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_189 B0.9|SB97|173 1515 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Siphonobacter aquaeclarae
B_359 B0.9|GG97|1046254 1517 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Spirosoma
B_1496 B0.9|SB97|1161 1700 Deltaproteobacteria; Polyangiaceae; Chondromyces
B_143 B0.9|GG99|4156364 1746 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_2526 B0.9|GG99|143325 1775 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_285 B0.9|SB97|298 1807 Gammaproteobacteria; ;
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_632 B0.9|SB97|581 1893 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_3153 B0.9|GG97|4374146 1939 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3235 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R2110:3382:9198 1952 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhydrobacter
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_459 B0.9|GG99|824667 2043 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae; Steroidobacter
B_3850 B0.9|GG97|569066 2063 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_3896 B0.9|GG97|318906 2085 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_3326 B0.9|GG99|1133957 2086 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Thermomonas
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_1038 B0.9|GG99|1120733 2380 SJA-28; ;
B_778 B0.9|GG99|735444 2474 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae; Candidatus Solibacter
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_1236 B0.9|GG99|4325372 2567 Sva0725; ;
F_1 F0.9|UDYN|424875 2698 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium
F_2 F0.9|UDYN|206476 2699 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_45 F0.9|U97|025461 2701 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Epicoccum Epicoccum nigrum
F_318 Agaricomycetes; ; 2709  
F_420 Agaricomycetes; ; 2712
F_448 F0.9|SF97|704 2713 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_386 Agaricomycetes; ; 2715  
F_347 F0.9|SF97|446 2716 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_6 F0.9|UDYN|216250 2732 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Davidiella Davidiella tassiana
F_5 F0.9|UDYN|212600 2733 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium
F_4 F0.9|SF97|43 2737 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Lewia Lewia infectoria
F_10 F0.9|UDYN|186595 2741 Dothideomycetes; Incertae sedis; Phoma Phoma sp P48E5
F_88 F0.9|UDYN|278817 2746 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; Cercospora Cercospora nicotianae
F_883 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:1 8309:4041 2751 Dothideomycetes; ;
F_976 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011 2753  
F_474 F0.9|UDYN|187565 2762 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Curvularia Curvularia sp P2E2
F_974 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium 2799  
F_13 F0.9|SF97|14 2852 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Penicillium Penicillium concentricum
F_16 F0.9|UDYN|199401 2853 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Penicillium
F_44 F0.9|UDYN|358511 2856 Eurotiomycetes; Trichocomaceae; Penicillium Penicillium citrinum
F_47 F0.9|U97|013735 2904 Microbotryomycetes; Incertae sedis; Sporobolomyces Sporobolomvces roseus
F_7 F0.9|UDYN|210204 2965 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Acremonium Acremonium sp 2 J12
F_3 F0.9|UDYN|215392 2966 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_8 F0.9|UDYN|220700 2968 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium Fusarium culmorum
F_759 F0.9|SF97|243 2970 Sordariomycetes; ;
F_819 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2101:15150:1495 2975 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_53 F0.9|UDYN|210205 2978 Sordariomycetes; ;
F_1052 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2109:16773:23595 2979 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_50 F0.9|UDYN|177637 2980 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Khuskia Khuskia oryzae
F_351 F0.9|U97|020374 2983 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_728 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509 2987 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_95 F0.9|UDYN|217985 2992 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Acremonium Acremonium sp 4053
F_738 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2114:13692:24079 2996 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_766 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468 3002 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_750 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2110:21447:18536 3013 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_1049 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2110:14988:20328 3019 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium Fusarium sp 472
F_388 F0.9|SF97|896 3031 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae;
F_11 F0.9|SF97|2 3054 Tremellomycetes; unidentified; unidentified uncultured Cryptococcus
F_87 F0.9|UDYN|180500 3075 Tremellomycetes; Incertae sedis; Hannaella Hannaella luteola
Table 4. Taxa present in both wheat and soy sequencing. (207 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_100 B0.9|GG99|221835 7 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Aeromicrobium
B_88 B0.9|GG99|245191 8 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_174 B0.9|GG99|5364 10 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas vabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_3 B0.9|GG99|836094 13 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus firmus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_24 B0.9|GG99|4294649 16 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_140 B0.9|GG97|141688 17 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_112 B0.9|GG99|1118793 21 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_138 B0.9|GG99|4046685 35 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_3585 B0.9|GG97|830338 48 [Chloracidobacteria]; ;
B_1376 B0.9|GG99|279436 62 [Chloracidobacteria]; Ellin6075;
B_214 B0.9|GG99|1054055 102 [Pedosphaerae]; auto67_4W;
B_2310 B0.9|SB97|1305 155 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3698 B0.9|GG97|246243 158 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3388 B0.9|GG97|945733 189 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_3334 B0.9|GG97|204934 193 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_2323 B0.9|GG99|4373079 239 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_801 B0.9|GG99|588130 263 [Saprospirae]; Saprospiraceae;
B_1653 B0.9|GG99|829802 270 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae];
B_773 B0.9|GG97|630306 281 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Candidatus Xiphinematobacter
B_625 B0.9|GG99|579954 287 [Spartobacteria]; [Chthoniobacteraceae]; Chthoniobacter
B_445 B0.9|GG99|4373464 345 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_173 B0.9|GG99|670247 377 Acidobacteriia; Acidobacteriaceae;
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_205 B0.9|GG99|467198 452 Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriaceae; Corynebacterium
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_2696 B0.9|GG97|279515 485 Actinobacteria; Intrasporangiaceae; Phycicoccus
B_161 B0.9|GG99|915240 487 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_3428 B0.9|GG97|538790 493 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_3313 B0.9|GG99|981177 494 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_94 B0.9|GG99|132333 501 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Arthrobacter psvchrolactophilus
B_1709 B0.9|GG99|899777 503 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Nesterenkonia
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_656 B0.9|GG99|815740 525 Actinobacteria; Nakamurellaceae;
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_392 B0.9|GG99|333124 556 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Cellulosimicrobium
B_246 B0.9|GG99|713912 562 Actinobacteria; Pseudonocardiaceae; Amycolatopsis
B_409 B0.9|GG99|272199 570 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_3556 B0.9|GG97|39463 571 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces
B_1835 B0.9|GG97|4467439 574 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_573 B0.9|GG99|1866998 575 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae; Streptomyces mirabilis
B_242 B0.9|GG97|233724 598 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3490 B0.9|GG97|156886 607 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_536 B0.9|GG99|834403 608 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3889 B0.9|GG97|4435199 609 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1093 B0.9|GG97|206404 613 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_1020 B0.9|GG97|156886 620 Alphaproteobacteria; ;
B_3369 B0.9|GG99|58365 681 Alphaproteobacteria; Acetobacteraceae; Acetobacter
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_250 B0.9|GG99|111252 706 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Balneimonas
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_3841 B0.9|GG97|740317 713 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_158 B0.9|GG99|25580 723 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Asticcacaulis biprosthecium
B_157 B0.9|GG99|811257 730 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Caulobacter
B_1364 B0.9|GG99|4336274 734 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae; Phenylobacterium
B_111 B0.9|GG99|686615 748 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Devosia
B_420 B0.9|GG99|1138841 769 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_396 B0.9|GG99|222792 776 Alphaproteobacteria; Hyphomicrobiaceae; Rhodoplanes
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_160 B0.9|GG99|4319095 785 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium adhaesivum
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_3354 B0.9|GG99|807329 819 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacteraceae; Rhodobacter
B_1567 B0.9|GG99|4358886 845 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae;
B_550 B0.9|GG99|1138442 862 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Phaeospirillum fulvum
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_383 B0.9|GG99|812277 893 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_78 B0.9|GG99|4365882 897 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3637 B0.9|GG97|3490230 900 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_439 B0.9|GG99|689448 903 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2959 B0.9|GG99|1009882 909 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_667 B0.9|GG99|1124271 965 Bacilli; ;
B_763 B0.9|GG99|1104891 966 Bacilli; ;
B_43 B0.9|GG99|1108343 969 Bacilli; [Exiguobacteraceae]; Exiguobacterium
B_27 B0.9|GG99|656443 980 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus flexus
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_2118 B0.9|GG99|1117218 982 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus ginsengihumi
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_515 B0.9|GG97|292057 1000 Bacilli; Lactobacillaceae; Lactobacillus
B_39 B0.9|GG99|4446524 1011 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_3236 B0.9|GG97|540940 1012 Bacilli; Leuconostocaceae; Leuconostoc
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_119 B0.9|GG99|143280 1025 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_2094 B0.9|GG99|2936500 1026 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_796 B0.9|GG99|550372 1088 Bacteroidia; Prevotellaceae; Prevotella copri
B_2584 B0.9|GG99|3984836 1117 Betaproteobacteria; ;
B_199 B0.9|GG99|144670 1130 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Achromobacter
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_222 B0.9|GG99|74807 1141 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2922 B0.9|GG99|848317 1142 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2164 B0.9|GG97|211171 1146 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_2585 B0.9|GG99|786777 1150 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_1508 B0.9|GG99|4405883 1165 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hydrogenophaga
B_283 B0.9|GG99|286034 1166 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Hylemonella
B_925 B0.9|GG99|807475 1170 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Rubrivivax
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_346 B0.9|GG99|4428924 1181 Betaproteobacteria; Methylophilaceae; Methylotenera mobilis
B_15 BO.91GG991100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_50 B0.9|GG99|63615 1197 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Herbaspirillum
B_156 B0.9|GG99|146396 1199 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2033 B0.9|GG99|221910 1201 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_3582 B0.9|GG97|208929 1202 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_315 B0.9|GG99|561332 1203 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2266 B0.9|GG97|207780 1204 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_308 BO.9|SB97|319 1262 Chlamydiia; Parachlamydiaceae;
B_1629 B0.9|GG97|1110219 1315 Chloroflexi; ;
B_262 B0.9|GG99|4455451 1358 Clostridia; Caldicellulosiruptoraceae; Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolvticus
B_431 B0.9|GG99|187815 1359 Clostridia; Carboxydocellaceae; Carboxydocella
B_3018 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1105:28160:10735 1365 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_3071 B0.9|GG97|4380971 1369 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_2740 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1102:22975:22131 1372 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium intestinale
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolvticum
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_317 B0.9|GG99|652359 1439 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_377 B0.9|GG97|4379833 1444 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae;
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_511 B0.9|GG97|876412 1526 Cytophagia; Flammeovirgaceae;
B_253 B0.9|SB97|241 1566 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_165 B0.9|SB97|152 1702 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_868 B0.9|GG97|824674 1706 Deltaproteobacteria; Syntrophobacteraceae;
B_103 B0.9|GG99|1081489 1735 Fibrobacteria; ;
B_1509 B0.9|GG99|4154872 1752 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Cloacibacterium
B_873 B0.9|GG99|1133512 1790 Fusobacteriia; Fusobacteriaceae; Fusobacterium
B_331 B0.9|GG99|931708 1828 Gammaproteobacteria; 211ds20;
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_3419 B0.9|SB0|A8L3R1105:20247:4418 1927 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_155 B0.9|GG99|146876 1978 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae
B_2405 B0.9|GG99|512471 1981 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhvdrobacter
B_3788 B0.9|GG97|833174 2001 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae;
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2544 B0.9|GG99|1134114 2007 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas viridiflava
B_3748 B0.9|GG97|202466 2008 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_3228 B0.9|GG97|926370 2009 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_1755 B0.9|GG99|2317377 2011 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas veronii
B_2653 B0.9|GG97|141365 2013 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_166 B0.9|GG99|4329433 2023 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae;
B_1662 B0.9|GG97|3284221 2033 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae;
B_22 B0.9|GG99|4452943 2071 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteibacter rhizovicinus
B_177 B0.9|GG99|536238 2072 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Luteimonas
B_194 B0.9|GG99|4352433 2075 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Lysobacter
B_527 B0.9|GG99|4449098 2083 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Rhodanobacter
B_2503 B0.9|GG99|332041 2091 Gemm-1; ;
B_1315 B0.9|SB97|1095 2096 Gemm-1; ;
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_825 B0.9|SB97|733 2227 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_385 B0.9|GG99|114313 2230 Opitutae; Opitutaceae; Opitutus
B_1319 B0.9|GG99|963764 2359 Planctomycetia; Planctomycetaceae; Planctomyces
B_233 B0.9|GG99|137813 2367 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_1280 B0.9|GG97|4397593 2369 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_2733 B0.9|GG99|4466061 2371 Rubrobacteria; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacter
B_220 B0.9|SB97|209 2386 SJA-4; ;
B_358 B0.9|SB97|347 2395 SJA-4; ;
B_600 B0.9|SB97|562 2402 SJA-4; ;
B_720 B0.9|GG97|1123510 2409 SJA-4; ;
B_817 B0.9|GG99|558745 2471 Solibacteres; Solibacteraceae;
B_614 B0.9|GG99|702015 2483 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_191 B0.9|GG99|2775220 2487 Sphingobacteriia; ;
B_3687 B0.9|GG99|2453163 2515 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_3486 B0.9|GG97|1522003 2534 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_564 B0.9|GG99|780322 2586 Thaumarchaeota; Nitrososphaeraceae; Candidatus Nitrososphaera
B_1725 B0.9|GG97|203418 2635 Thermoleophilia; Solirubrobacteraceae;
B_280 B0.9|GG99|349208 2682 Verrucomicrobiae; Verrucomicrobiaceae; Luteolibacter
Table 5. Taxa represented in soy and cotton sequences. (104 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_302 B0.9|GG99|12160 4 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas vabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2829 B0.9|GG97|593848 36 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_424 B0.9|GG97|156353 89 [Pedosphaerae]; ;
B_769 B0.9|GG99|395698 144 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae;
B_2323 B0.9|GG99|4373079 239 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_218 B0.9|GG97|3509162 244 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Lacibacter cauensis
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_85 B0.9|GG99|149955 448 Actinobacteria; Brevibacteriaceae; Brevibacterium
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_226 B0.9|GG99|4373091 490 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Quadrisphaera granulorum
B_162 B0.9|GG99|318726 497 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae; Rathayibacter
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_3101 B0.9|GG99|239455 507 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_1009 B0.9|GG99|224809 536 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae;
B_1142 B0.9|GG97|247758 543 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_91 B0.9|GG99|626582 557 Actinobacteria; Promicromonosporaceae; Promicromonospora
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_1787 B0.9|GG99|4377099 704 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae;
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradyrhizobium
B_260 B0.9|GG99|576765 717 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_1605 B0.9|GG99|981168 719 Alphaproteobacteria; Caulobacteraceae;
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_1656 B0.9|GG99|99694 788 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylocystaceae;
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_2163 B0.9|GG97|109469 856 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillaceae; Azospirillum
B_981 B0.9|GG99|1048987 873 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae;
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_467 B0.9|GG99|14601 984 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus coagulans
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_951 B0.9|GG99|14554 1042 Bacilli; Planococcaceae; Bacillus thermoalkalophilus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_639 B0.9|GG99|4358960 1132 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_18 B0.9|GG99|132704 1133 Betaproteobacteria; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderia
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_3580 B0.9|GG99|91986 1145 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_215 B0.9|GG99|8704 18 1168 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Methylibium
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_3420 B0.9|GG97|657631 1173 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax
B_15 B0.9|GG99|100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_195 B0.9|SB97|178 1225 Chlamydiia; ;
B_2037 B0.9|GG97|112962 1323 Chloroflexi; ;
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolvticum
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_1360 B0.9|SB97|1169 1581 Deltaproteobacteria; ;
B_143 B0.9|GG99|4156364 1746 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_2526 B0.9|GG99|143325 1775 Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriaceae; Flavobacterium succinicans
B_285 B0.9|SB97|298 1807 Gammaproteobacteria; ;
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_632 B0.9|SB97|581 1893 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhydrobacter
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_459 B0.9|GG99|824667 2043 Gammaproteobacteria; Sinobacteraceae; Steroidobacter
B_3850 B0.9|GG97|569066 2063 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Dokdonella
B_3326 B0.9|GG99|1133957 2086 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Thermomonas
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
Table 6. Taxa represented in wheat and cotton sequences. (112 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methylobacterium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas vabuuchiae
B_131 B0.9|GG99|4298641 12 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_59 B0.9|GG99|144390 14 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus cereus
B_62 B0.9|GG99|685917 15 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae;
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_60 B0.9|GG99|105406 22 Flavobacteriia; [Weeksellaceae]; Chryseobacterium
B_3629 B0.9|GG97|639627 24 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_3592 B0.9|GG97|816702 26 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_1384 B0.9|GG99|218527 28 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter hormaechei
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_2323 B0.9|GG99|4373079 239 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Flavisolibacter
B_57 B0.9|GG99|333860 255 [Saprospirae]; Chitinophagaceae; Sediminibacterium
B_1126 B0.9|GG99|2733663 346 Acidobacteria-6; ;
B_748 B0.9|GG99|4380351 420 Actinobacteria; ;
B_90 B0.9|GG99|4388029 442 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae;
B_2152 B0.9|GG97|267698 444 Actinobacteria; Actinosynnemataceae; Lentzea
B_2984 B0.9|GG99|217604 476 Actinobacteria; Geodermatophilaceae;
B_135 B0.9|GG99|855519 489 Actinobacteria; Kineosporiaceae; Kineococcus
B_179 B0.9|GG99|4459730 499 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae;
B_200 B0.9|GG99|64357 505 Actinobacteria; Micromonosporaceae;
B_350 B0.9|GG99|81725 521 Actinobacteria; Mycobacteriaceae; Mycobacterium
B_238 B0.9|GG99|707161 544 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Kribbella
B_98 B0.9|GG99|2228267 694 Alphaproteobacteria; Aurantimonadaceae;
B_77 B0.9|GG99|73880 712 Alphaproteobacteria; Bradyrhizobiaceae; Bradvrhizobium
B_557 B0.9|GG99|1140424 742 Alphaproteobacteria; Erythrobacteraceae;
B_48 B0.9|GG99|698344 782 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_347 B0.9|GG99|85734 783 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae;
B_54 B0.9|GG99|5409 803 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Agrobacterium
B_198 B0.9|GG99|154189 887 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Novosphingobium
B_3209 B0.9|GG99|4450360 891 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3351 B0.9|GG97|158370 892 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_2822 B0.9|GG99|4449608 894 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_568 B0.9|GG99|2185530 895 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas echinoides
B_1638 B0.9|GG97|2406507 905 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas
B_3473 B0.9|GG99|156425 981 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus
B_106 B0.9|GG99|277294 988 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Geobacillus
B_10 B0.9|GG99|1082594 1023 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_6 B0.9|GG99|839395 1024 Bacilli; Paenibacillaceae; Paenibacillus
B_212 B0.9|GG99|14492 1047 Bacilli; Sporolactobacillaceae; Bacillus racemilacticus
B_313 B0.9|GG99|184376 1058 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_190 B0.9|GG99|986767 1059 Bacilli; Streptococcaceae; Streptococcus
B_643 B0.9|GG99|4305221 1131 Betaproteobacteria; Alcaligenaceae; Pigmentiphaga
B_236 B0.9|GG99|225259 1138 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_81 B0.9|GG99|988067 1139 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae;
B_64 B0.9|GG99|4426695 1164 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Delftia
B_3253 B0.9|GG97|208424 1172 Betaproteobacteria; Comamonadaceae; Variovorax paradoxus
B_3002 B0.9|GG99|110675 1190 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_15 B0.9|GG99|100208 1191 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae;
B_3392 B0.9|GG99|217942 1200 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Janthinobacterium lividum
B_2344 B0.9|GG99|128181 1208 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia
B_2954 B0.9|GG97|620677 1209 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Massilia haematophila
B_9 B0.9|GG99|3587419 1367 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Clostridium butyricum
B_181 B0.9|GG99|27592 1383 Clostridia; Clostridiaceae; Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum
B_163 B0.9|GG99|1143479 1424 Cytophagia; Cyclobacteriaceae; Algoriphagus terrigena
B_1460 B0.9|GG99|994849 1490 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_121 B0.9|GG99|877057 1491 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_330 B0.9|GG99|219318 1492 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Hymenobacter
B_52 B0.9|GG99|4456129 1837 Gammaproteobacteria; Alteromonadaceae; Cellvibrio
B_209 B0.9|GG97|1106379 1906 Gammaproteobacteria; Coxiellaceae; Aquicella
B_3153 B0.9|GG97|4374146 1939 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_2912 B0.9|GG97|253061 1953 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Erwinia
B_139 B0.9|GG99|8251 1986 Gammaproteobacteria; Moraxellaceae; Enhydrobacter
B_3643 B0.9|GG97|817209 2000 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae;
B_3276 B0.9|GG99|922507 2004 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_11 B0.9|GG99|560886 2005 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_204 B0.9|GG99|142534 2010 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_89 B0.9|GG99|4461490 2197 Mollicutes; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasma
B_104 B0.9|GG99|3055386 2521 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae;
B_67 B0.9|GG99|871758 2547 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
B_109 B0.9|GG99|1121909 2548 Sphingobacteriia; Sphingobacteriaceae; Pedobacter
F_1 F0.9|UDYN|424875 2698 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium
F_2 F0.9|UDYN|206476 2699 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_45 F0.9|U97|025461 2701 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Epicoccum Epicoccum nigrum
F_318   2709 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_420   2712 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_448 F0.9|SF97|704 2713 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_386   2715 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_347 F0.9|SF97|446 2716 Agaricomycetes; ;
F_6 F0.9|UDYN|216250 2732 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Davidiella Davidiella tassiana
F_5 F0.9|UDYN|212600 2733 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium
F_4 F0.9|SF97|43 2737 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Lewia Lewia infectoria
F_10 F0.9|UDYN|186595 2741 Dothideomycetes; Incertae sedis; Phoma Phoma sp P48E5
F_112 F0.9|UDYN|127903 2750 Dothideomycetes; Davidiellaceae; Cladosporium
F_883 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R1114:18309:4041 2751 Dothideomycetes; ;
F_976   2753 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_135 F0.9|U97|016817 2764 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Dendryphiella Dendryphiella arenaria
F_974   2799 Dothideomycetes; Mycosphaerellaceae; unidentified uncultured Cladosporium
F_923   2810 Dothideomycetes; Pleosporaceae; Alternaria Alternaria sp MY 2011
F_47 F0.9|U97|013735 2904 Microbotryomycetes; Incertae sedis; Sporobolomyces Sporobolomyces roseus
F_7 F0.9|UDYN|210204 2965 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Acremonium Acremonium sp 2 J12
F_3 F0.9|UDYN|215392 2966 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_1031 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2106:26792:22179 2967 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_8 F0.9|UDYN|220700 2968 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Fusarium Fusarium culmorum
F_819 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2101:15150:1495 2975 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_50 F0.9|UDYN|177637 2980 Sordariomycetes; Incertae sedis; Khuskia Khuskia oryzae
F_351 F0.9|U97|020374 2983 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_728 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2113:21340:17509 2987 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_738 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2114:13692:24079 2996 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_766 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2102:11106:24468 3002 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_750 F0.9|SF0|A8L3R2110:21447:18536 3013 Sordariomycetes; Nectriaceae; Gibberella Gibberella intricans
F_11 F0.9|SF97|2 3054 Tremellomycetes; unidentified; unidentified uncultured Cryptococcus
Table 7. Taxa present in all types of corn (ancestral, landrace, inbred and modern). (215 sequences).
De novo OTU NumberNew OTU NumberSEQ ID NOTaxonomy
B_309 B0.9|GG99|127240 2 Actinobacteria; Dermabacteraceae; Brachybacterium
B_28 B0.9|GG99|813062 3 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_302 B0.9|GG99|12160 4 Actinobacteria; Microbacteriaceae;
B_2968 B0.9|GG99|1012260 6 Actinobacteria; Micrococcaceae; Micrococcus
B_100 B0.9|GG99|221835 7 Actinobacteria; Nocardioidaceae; Aeromicrobium
B_88 B0.9|GG99|245191 8 Actinobacteria; Streptomycetaceae;
B_69 B0.9|GG99|175931 9 Alphaproteobacteria; Methylobacteriaceae; Methvlobacterium
B_174 B0.9|GG99|5364 10 Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium
B_23 B0.9|GG99|2929397 11 Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadaceae; Sphingomonas vabuuchiae
B_3 B0.9|GG99|836094 13 Bacilli; Bacillaceae; Bacillus firmus
B_38 B0.9|GG99|29974 18 Bacilli; Planococcaceae;
B_105 B0.9|GG99|529047 19 Bacilli; Staphylococcaceae; Staphylococcus
B_58 B0.9|GG99|238752 20 Betaproteobacteria; Oxalobacteraceae; Ralstonia
B_112 B0.9|GG99|1118793 21 Cytophagia; Cytophagaceae; Dyadobacter
B_2970 B0.9|GG97|253061 25 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae;
B_35 B0.9|GG99|370327 27 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacter
B_319 B0.9|GG99|295383 29 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Escherichia coli
B_2 B0.9|GG99|9943 30 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea agglomerans
B_3489 B0.9|GG97|2582263 31 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea
B_1255 B0.9|GG97|2582263 32 Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriaceae; Pantoea ananatis
B_7 B0.9|GG99|4327501 33 Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonas
B_2829 B0.9|GG97|593848 36 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_83 B0.9|GG99|4102407 37 Gammaproteobacteria; Xanthomonadaceae; Stenotrophomonas
B_219 B0.9|GG99|832301 56 [Chloracidobacteria]; Ellin6075;
B_334 B0.9|GG99|4017244