(19)
(11)EP 3 764 377 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
13.01.2021 Bulletin 2021/02

(21)Application number: 19382581.7

(22)Date of filing:  09.07.2019
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
H01F 27/02(2006.01)
H01F 27/12(2006.01)
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(71)Applicant: ABB Schweiz AG
5400 Baden (CH)

(72)Inventor:
  • AGUIRRE, Miguel
    14011 CÓRDOBA (ES)

(74)Representative: ZBM Patents - Zea, Barlocci & Markvardsen 
Rambla Catalunya, 123
08008 Barcelona
08008 Barcelona (ES)

  


(54)TANK FOR A LIQUID-FILLED SHELL TRANSFORMER OR SHELL REACTOR


(57) A tank for a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor is provided. The tank comprises: a lower tank portion comprising a bottom plate and lower sidewalls, an upper tank portion comprising upper sidewalls and an outer tank portion comprising outer sidewalls, wherein the outer sidewalls are arranged radially outwardly with respect to the upper sidewalls such that the outer tank portion surrounds the upper tank portion. The tank further comprises the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion joined together along a substantially horizontal first perimetric joining line and defining an internal space for housing an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor and an insulating liquid, and the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion being joined together along a substantially horizontal second perimetric joining line. A method for assembling a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor is also provided.




Description


[0001] The present disclosure relates to tanks for shell transformers or shell reactors that are filled with an insulating liquid, such as oil.

BACKGROUND



[0002] Power transformers or reactors may be subject to internal arc energy in case of internal failure. For example, an internal short circuit or other failure in the transformer winding may cause an internal arc generating an energy of e.g. 20 MJ. The insulating fluid surrounding the active part of the transformer or reactor may then vaporize and create an expanding gas bubble, causing an overpressure that damages the active part of the transformer and may also break the transformer or reactor tank. The rupture of the tank may cause oil spills and the risk of fire breaking out, and it is therefore important to prevent such a rupture from occurring.

[0003] Such an arc fault is more critical in shell-form transformers or shell-form reactors, which have a form-fit tank that mechanically fits around the active part of the transformer/reactor and is more rigid than a tank of core-form technology.

[0004] Indeed, the tank of a shell-form transformer needs to be strong and rigid in order to withstand short-circuit loads during normal operation: when an external or internal short circuit occurs in the electrical circuit of the transformer, there is a dramatic increase of the electrical current in the windings, and this causes very high mechanical loads between the windings and on the tank. The tank needs to have enough strength and stiffness to withstand the mechanical loads without undergoing a plastic deformation, so it is able to resume normal operation after the short circuit.

[0005] The tank of shell transformers or reactors is therefore less flexible and less able to deform without breaking when subject to a high tensile stress. In case of an internal arc, the resulting overpressure will create mechanical stresses in the tank that may exceed the ultimate tensile strength of at least certain regions or parts of the tank, which may thus suffer a non-admissible strain and break, even in case of internal arcs with a relatively low level of energy.

[0006] Some solutions have been developed to address the problem of rupture of the tank in case of internal arc fault, especially for core-form transformers. Known solutions involve, for example, pressure relief devices, C-shaped clamps provided at discrete positions to reinforce the welded joint between different parts of the tank (for shell technology) and prevent them from breaking, or reinforcing ribs on the side walls of the tanks, as well as an increase in the mechanical properties of the tank itself so it can resist a certain degree of arc energy.

[0007] However, in some cases known solutions may not be suitable, or may not be sufficient, to prevent the rupture of the tank of a shell-type transformer or reactor in case of an internal arc fault, so it would be desirable to provide a tank that is safer and in which the risks of rupture is reduced.

SUMMARY



[0008] According to a first aspect, a tank for a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor is provided. The tank comprises: a lower tank portion comprising a bottom plate and lower sidewalls, an upper tank portion comprising upper sidewalls and an outer tank portion comprising outer sidewalls, wherein the outer sidewalls are arranged radially outwardly with respect to the upper sidewalls such that the outer tank portion surrounds the upper tank portion. The tank further comprises the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion joined together along a substantially horizontal first perimetric joining line and defining an internal space for housing an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor and an insulating liquid, and the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion being joined together along a substantially horizontal second perimetric joining line.

[0009] The outer tank portion does not need to remain operative after an arc failure incident, and may therefore be designed with enough flexibility to absorb the internal arc energy by deforming outwards, without reaching rupture. In this respect, in case of an overpressure caused by an internal arc in the transformer or reactor, the deformation of the outer tank portion provides a protection of the inner tank, and the increase in the inner volume caused by the deformation also reduces the overpressure inside the tank. In summary, a tank arrangement including an outer tank portion surrounding the upper tank portion thus allows providing a safer tank, with a lower risk of oil spills and fire hazard in case of an arc failure, while at the same time maintaining the advantages of a strong and rigid structure suitable for resisting short circuits during normal operation.

[0010] In some examples the outer tank portion is arranged at a distance from the upper tank portion, for example a distance of at least 15 millimetres. Such a distance between the outer sidewalls and the upper sidewalls of the tank allows the pressure wave generated in the insulating liquid by the internal arc to reach also towards the lower part of the outer sidewall, so that substantially all the extension of the outer sidewall may deform and absorb arc energy.

[0011] In examples, the tank further comprises a reinforcing cincture surrounding and joined to the lower side walls of the lower tank portion and the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion and forming a sealed chamber enclosing the first perimetric joining line between the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion and the second perimetric joining line between outer tank portion and the upper tank portion.

[0012] The reinforcing cincture provides a protection of the joints between the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion and between the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion and displaces the weakest point of the tank to other regions e.g. the outer tank portion, where the overpressure can be more easily accommodated.

[0013] Furthermore, the reinforcing cincture being configured to form a sealed chamber surrounding the joint between the lower and upper portions and the joint between the upper and outer portions of the tank means that even if the primary weld mail fail or break at one or more points due to a very high overpressure and stress, the insulating liquid, for example oil, will be confined in the chamber and will not spill out of the tank thanks to the additional protection. The reinforcing cincture therefore has the additional advantage of protecting the environment from an oil spill and from the risk of fire associated with such an oil spill.

[0014] The present disclosure also provides a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor with a tank as disclosed herein.

[0015] Embodiments of tanks presented in the present disclosure are suitable for single-phase shell transformers and reactors, but may also be applied in multiphase shell systems, such as three-phase transformers and reactors.

[0016] According to a second aspect, the present disclosure provides a method for assembling a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor, comprising:
  • providing an outer tank portion and an upper tank portion, configured to be joined to each other along a substantially horizontal perimetric joining line, wherein the upper tank portion comprises a short circuit beam mounted at an inner surface of upper sidewalls of the upper tank portion,
  • mounting the outer tank portion on the upper tank portion and welding them together along the perimetric joining line,
  • providing a lower tank portion configured to be joined to the upper tank portion along a substantially horizontal further perimetric joining line,
  • mounting an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor inside the lower tank portion,
  • mounting the upper tank portion on the lower tank portion and welding them together along the further perimetric line,
  • providing a tank cover;
  • mounting the tank cover on a top of the upper tank portion and welding them together.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0017] Particular embodiments of the present device will be described in the following by way of non-limiting examples, with reference to the appended drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a schematic cross section view of a lower tank portion, an upper tank portion and an outer tank portion of a tank according to an example of the present disclosure;

Figure 2 is a schematic perspective view showing a short-circuit beam forming part of the tank which may be the same or similar to the one shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a schematic cross section view of a lower tank portion, an upper tank portion and an outer tank portion of a tank which may be the same or similar to the one shown in Figure 1 further comprising a reinforcing cincture applied to the joint between the upper tank portion and the lower tank portion and the joint between the upper tank portion and the outer tank portion;

Figure 4 is a diagram showing the deformation of a tank according to an example of the present disclosure, in case of an internal arc;

Figure 5 shows an enlarged detail of Figure 4; and

Figure 6 is a flow diagram illustrating an example of a method for assembling a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0018] In the present disclosure the expressions upper, lower, vertical, horizontal, etc. are given with reference to the intended position of the transformer and the tank when in use.

[0019] In the present disclosure, the expression "transformers" is also meant to encompass autotransformers.

[0020] Figure 1 is a schematic cross section view of a lower tank portion, an upper tank portion and an outer tank portion of a tank according to an example of the present disclosure. Particularly, an upper tank portion 10 is provided. The upper tank portion 10 may be e.g. a prismatic tank. The upper tank portion 10 may comprise upper sidewalls 11 that are substantially vertical and end in a horizontal flange 12 at a lower end of the sidewalls 11, extending all around the perimeter of the upper tank portion 10. The flange may be formed by bending the end portion of the side walls 11 (and thus the flange may be integrally formed with the sidewalls 11). In some other examples, the flange 12 may be welded to at or near the lower end of the side walls 11 e.g. by a weld seam.

[0021] In the present disclosure and in the attached claims, the terms "upper tank portion" and "upper sidewalls" are employed to indicate structural elements surrounding and in contact with the active part of the transformer or reactor. These terms encompass conventional tank structures with continuous walls, but also structures wherein the upper sidewalls surrounding the active part of the transformer are not continuous, such as structures comprising bars, cages, walls with openings and the like.

[0022] Additionally, a lower tank portion 20 is provided. The lower tank portion 20 may also be e.g. a prismatic tank. The lower tank portion 20 is configured to match the shape of the upper tank portion 10 such that both portion 10, 20 can be joined to form a tank for containing an active part, for example of a shell transformer or a shell reactor (not shown).

[0023] The lower tank portion 20 comprises a bottom plate 23, lower sidewalls 21 which are substantially vertical and end in a horizontal flange 22 located at or near an upper end of the sidewalls 21. The flange 22 extends all around the perimeter of the lower tank portion 20. The lower tank portion 20 may have smaller internal horizontal and vertical dimensions with respect to the upper tank portion 10, but the dimensions of the flange 12 of the upper tank portion 10 and the flange 22 of the lower tank portion 20 may be configured to match and form between them a horizontal perimetric joining line between the upper tank portion 10 and the lower tank portion 20.

[0024] In this respect, the upper tank portion 10 and the lower tank portion 20 are assembled to form part of the tank. The horizontal flange 12 may be overlapped on horizontal flange 22 and the two flanges may be welded together e.g. with a weld seam that joins and seals the two portions 10, 20 of the tank all around the substantially horizontal perimetric joining line.

[0025] In tanks for shell technology, a winding package (not shown, typically formed by multiple pancakes stacked and connected in series) is provided arranged inside the lower tank portion 20. The transformer core (not shown) is then stacked around the winding package, on the bottom plate of the tank. The upper tank portion 10 is then set on the lower tank portion 20, surrounding the core, and is welded to the lower tank portion. The space in the tank is filled with an insulating liquid, such as oil. It is noted that the transformer of this example may correspond to a three-phase transformer although other transformer arrangements are possible e.g. a single-phase transformer.

[0026] In summary, the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion define between them an internal space for the shell-form active part (windings, core, etc.) and the insulating liquid. As commented above, the tank, and therefore the upper and lower tank portions, may be prismatic. Typically, it may be a rectangular prism.

[0027] In some examples, the tank may also be provided with a short-circuit beam, which will be described later on.

[0028] An outer tank portion 40 is further provided. The outer tank portion 40 comprises outer sidewalls 41 that are substantially vertical and end in a horizontal flange 42 located at a lower end of the outer sidewalls 41. Similarly as before, the flange 42 may be formed by bending a lower portion of the outer sidewalls 41. In some other examples, the flange 42 may be welded to the lower end of the outer sidewalls 41.

[0029] The dimensions of the flange 12 of the upper tank portion 10 and of the flange 42 of the outer tank portion 40 may be configured to match and form between them a horizontal perimetric joining line between the upper tank portion 10 and the outer tank portion 40.

[0030] In this respect, the upper tank portion 10 and the outer tank portion 40 are assembled to complete the tank. The horizontal flange 42 may be overlapped on horizontal flange 12 and the two flanges may be welded together e.g. with a weld seam that joins and seals the two portions 40, 20 of the tank all around a substantially horizontal perimetric joining line.

[0031] In this respect, the outer sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion 40 may surround all the upper tank portion 10. Particularly, the outer sidewalls 41 may be arranged radially outwardly with respect to the upper sidewalls 11 of the upper tank portion at a distance of at least 15 millimetres from the upper sidewalls 11, preferably at a distance between 20 - 60 millimetres, more preferably at a distance between 20 - 30 millimetres.

[0032] In some cases, the outer sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion may have a higher ultimate tensile strength with respect to the ultimate tensile strength of the upper sidewalls 11 of the upper tank portion and / or the lower sidewalls 21 of the lower tank portion. However, the material may also be the same for all the tank, and the increased flexibility of the outer tank with respect to the upper tank may depend on the geometry, e.g. the outer tank may be thinner, and/or have less stiffening or reinforcing elements than the inner tank.

[0033] The outer tank portion 40 may be designed such that it can deform to accommodate the overpressure caused by an internal arc, without breaking.

[0034] The outer sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion 40 may further be provided with ribs e.g. vertical and / or horizontal ribs. The ribs may be located e.g. on an outer surface of the outer sidewalls. For example, in case of a prismatic tank with two larger sides and two smaller sides, ribs may be provided at least on the two larger sides. The number, position and configuration of the ribs to provide a suitable compromise between strength and flexibility will depend on each particular case.

[0035] A tank cover 60 is further provided. Upon assembly, the tank cover 60 may be welded to the top of the outer tank portion 40, i.e. to the upper end of the outer sidewalls 41. The cover 60 may have sidewalls as shown in the figures, but it may also be flat or have other configurations, and may comprise other usual elements such as conduits, reinforcing ribs and the like.

[0036] As visible in Figure 1, a space 43 is formed between sidewalls 11 of the upper tank portion 10 and sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion 40. This space 43 is in fluid communication with the above-commented internal space for housing the active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor and insulating liquid. The space 43 is therefore also filled with the insulating liquid, and pressure waves may travel inside this space.

[0037] In case of an internal arc, the arc energy will cause a high increase in the pressure of the insulating liquid and an outward deformation of the outer tank without breaking and thus the overall pressure in the tank may be reduced. As a result, the risk of rupture of the attachment points between the upper tank and the lower tank and between the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion is also reduced.

[0038] The inner tank in practice may be so rigid that it undergoes little or no deformation: in any case, the behaviour of the inner tank in case of internal arc is not so relevant, since it is the outer tank that is designed to absorb most of the arc energy and preventing a rupture of the tank that may cause an oil spill.

[0039] At least part of the tank cover 60, e.g. at least the sidewalls thereof, may have the same degree of flexibility as the outer tank portion 40, i.e. it can also deform in a similar way without breaking. This maintains a reduced degree of stress on the joint between the cover 60 and the outer tank portion 40.

[0040] It is noted that transformers may also occasionally suffer from external short-circuits. When such a fault occurs heat and stress may be generated e.g. on the winding packages that may be enormous. For these reasons, as also visible in Figure 1 in some examples the upper tank portion 10 may be equipped with a short-circuit beam 50 that strengthens the upper tank portion to withstands such stress.

[0041] As shown in figure 2, the short-circuit beam 50 comprises two U-shaped profiles 51, 53 and two U-shaped beams 52, 54, welded together forming a resistant structure, substantially continuous and substantially matching the prismatic shape of the upper tank portion 10. The profiles and beams may also have a cross section with any other shape and dimension. In other examples, the short-circuit beam 50 may be integrally formed.

[0042] Each U-shaped profile 51, 53 comprises an upper branch and a lower branch for attachment to an inner surface of two of the sidewalls of the upper tank portion 10. Similarly, each beam 52, 54 comprises an upper branch and a lower branch for attachment to the inner surface of other two of the sidewalls of the upper tank portion 10.

[0043] The short-circuit beam 5 further comprises two interphase elements 55, 56. The function of the interphase elements is to separate each phase forming part of the transformer. It is noted that, in case of a single-phase transformer, the interphase elements 55, 56 may be omitted from the short-circuit beam 50.

[0044] Again in figure 1, in use, the short-circuit beam 50 may be mounted inside an upper inner portion 13 of the sidewalls 11 of the upper tank portion 10, completely surrounded by the sidewalls 11, and may be joined to the inner portion 13 of the side walls of the upper tank portion e.g. by welding to form an integral structure.

[0045] The presence of the short-circuit beam 50 strengthens the upper tank portion 10 and allows it to resist the stress generated e.g. by external or internal short-circuits without undergoing a permanent deformation, while at the same time the high strength of the upper tank portion 10 does not compromise the safety of the tank in case of an internal arc failure, because the outer tank 40 allows accommodating the resulting overpressure without breaking.

[0046] Figure 3 is a schematic cross section view of a lower tank portion 20, an upper tank portion 10 and an outer tank portion 40 of a tank which may be the same or similar to the one described in Figure 1, further comprising a reinforcing cincture 100 applied around the joint between the upper tank portion 10 and the lower tank portion 20 as well as the joint between the upper tank portion 10 and the outer tank portion 40. The tank shown in figure 3 may differ from the tank shown in figure 1 only in that a reinforcing cincture 100 is provided.

[0047] Joined to the sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion 40 is shown an upper reinforcing ring 110, which may be hollow and may for example have a U-shaped cross section as shown, but also a cross section that is rectangular or has any other shape or dimension.

[0048] The upper reinforcing ring 110 may be provided to surround all the outer tank portion 40 forming a continuous piece, and may be joined to the side walls 41 of the outer tank portion 40 by welding.

[0049] Joined to the flange 22 of the lower tank portion 20 is shown a lower reinforcing ring 120, which may be hollow and may for example have a G-shaped cross-section as shown, but also a cross section that is rectangular or has any other shape or dimension. The lower reinforcing ring 120 may project further horizontally from the vertical sidewall 21 than the horizontal flange 22, and may also or alternatively be attached to the lower sidewall 21.

[0050] Lower reinforcing ring 120 may surround all the lower tank portion 20 forming a continuous piece, and it may be joined to the lower tank portion 20 e.g. by welding.

[0051] A closing plate or belt 130 may be applied against the upper reinforcing ring 110 and lower reinforcing ring 120 and joined to both. For example, it may be welded to the rings 110 and 120. In some other examples, the joint between the belt 130 and the reinforcing rings 110, 120 may be formed by bolting instead of welding. Belt 130 may be applied surrounding all the tank in a continuous and sealing way.

[0052] The assembly of upper reinforcing ring 110, lower reinforcing ring 120 and belt 130 forms the reinforcing cincture 100 that surrounds the side walls 41 and 21 of the outer tank portion 40 and the lower tank portion 20, at the level of the perimetric joining line between the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion and of the perimetric joining line between the upper tank portion and the lower tank portion. As a result, the reinforcing cincture 100 may form a sealed chamber 140 enclosing all the perimetric joining line between the upper and outer tank portions and all the perimetric joining line between the upper and the lower tank portions.

[0053] The chamber may be a single, substantially toroidal-like chamber all around the perimeter of the tank, or may be divided in multiple separate compartments for example by vertical plates (not shown).

[0054] The reinforcing cincture 100 strengthens and protects the joining between the outer tank portion 40 and the upper tank portion 10 and the joining between the upper tank 10 portion and the lower tank portion 20.

[0055] The joint between the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion of the tank is a weak point and may not be able to withstand the overpressure resulting from an internal arc, and would tend to break. The same is true for the joint between the upper tank portion and the lower tank portion.

[0056] On the one hand, as commented above, due to the provision of the outer tank portion which is able to deform without breaking, the tank structure is more flexible, and it is able to withstand the overpressure generated by an internal arc fault. On the other hand, the reinforcing cincture provides a specific protection to the joint between the upper tank portion and the lower tank portion of the tank and to the joint between the upper tank portion and the lower tank portion of the tank. Particularly, the reinforcing cincture may displace the weakest point from the joints to other regions of the tank (e.g. the outer tank portion) where the overpressure and the consequent stresses on the tank walls can be more easily accommodated.

[0057] Furthermore, the sealed chamber 140 surrounding the joints between the lower and upper tank portions and between the upper and outer tank portions provides further safety to the tank, because even if the joints (e.g. welds) mail fail or break at one or more points due to a very high overpressure and stress, the insulating liquid, for example oil, will be confined in the chamber and will not spill out of the tank.

[0058] Figure 4 shows a simulation of the deformation occurring in a tank according to an example of the present disclosure, for example a tank such as that of Figure 3, in case of an internal arc, and illustrates in particular the advantages of the tank structure with an outer tank portion 40 having sidewalls 41 surrounding the sidewalls 11 of the upper tank portion 10. The effects of the short circuit beam 50 and of the reinforcing cincture 100 are also illustrated.

[0059] As visible in Figure 4, in case of a sudden rise in the internal pressure due to an internal arc, the sidewalls 11 of the upper tank 10 reinforced by the short circuit beam 50 and therefore very rigid, substantially maintain their shape or suffer only a small deformation.

[0060] On the contrary, the sidewalls 41 of the outer tank portion 40 and of the attached cover 60 may bulge outwards, deforming without breaking, such that there is no oil spill from the transformer. This deformation also provides an increase of the internal volume of the tank and therefore a reduction of the internal pressure and of the stress on other parts of the tank.

[0061] The transformer is therefore protected at the same time from both types of critical loads, short circuit and arc failure, by two structures with a different mechanical design, each addressing a particular condition or transformer failure.

[0062] Figure 5 shows an enlarged detail of Figure 4 showing the deformation in the area of the joint between the sidewall 11 of the upper tank 10, the sidewall 21 of the lower tank 20, and the sidewall 41 of the outer tank 40, through the respective flanges 12, 22 and 42 and welds, and the reinforcing cincture 100 with the upper and lower reinforcing rings 110 and 120 and the closing plate 130.

[0063] In particular, Figure 5 illustrates the small deformation of upper sidewall 11 and the much larger deformation of outer sidewall 41, and also shows how the area of the welded joint is protected by the reinforcing cincture 100.

[0064] A transformer or reactor with a tank according to the present disclosure may be assembled by embodiments of a method comprising for example the following steps, as shown in Figure 4:
  • In block 200: providing an outer tank portion and an upper tank portion, configured to be joined to each other along a substantially horizontal perimetric joining line, wherein the upper tank portion comprises a short circuit beam mounted at an inner surface of upper sidewalls of the upper tank portion;
  • In block 201: mounting the outer tank portion on the upper tank portion and welding them together along the perimetric joining line;
  • In block 202: providing a lower tank portion configured to be joined to the upper tank portion along a substantially horizontal further perimetric joining line;
  • In block 203: mounting an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor inside the lower tank portion;
  • In block 204: mounting the upper tank portion on the lower tank portion and welding them together along a further perimetric line;
  • In block 205: providing a tank cover; and
  • In block 206: mounting the tank cover on top of the outer tank portion and welding them together.


[0065] The assembly of the outer tank portion and upper tank portion may of course be carried out at any time before the assembly is mounted on the lower tank portion.

[0066] If the transformer or reactor tank comprises a reinforcing cincture 100 such as described above, in the above method the outer tank portion may be provided with a upper reinforcing ring, and the lower tank portion may be provided with a lower reinforcing ring, before the upper and outer tanks are mounted on the lower tank. The closure plate or belt of the reinforcing cincture is applied and welded after the upper tank portion and lower tank portion have been mounted and welded to each other. The closure plate or belt may be attached for example as the last step of the process, after mounting the tank cover.

[0067] Although only a number of particular embodiments and examples have been disclosed herein, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the disclosed innovation and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof are possible. Furthermore, the present disclosure covers all possible combinations of the particular embodiments described. The scope of the present disclosure should not be limited by particular embodiments, but should be determined only by a fair reading of the claims that follow.


Claims

1. A tank for a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor, comprising:

- a lower tank portion comprising a bottom plate and lower sidewalls, an upper tank portion comprising upper sidewalls and an outer tank portion comprising outer sidewalls, wherein the outer sidewalls are arranged radially outwardly with respect to the upper sidewalls such that the outer tank portion surrounds the upper tank portion,

- the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion being joined together along a substantially horizontal first perimetric joining line and defining an internal space for housing an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor and an insulating liquid, and

- the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion being joined together along a substantially horizontal second perimetric joining line.


 
2. A tank according to claim 1, wherein the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion are arranged at a distance of at least 15 millimetres from the upper sidewalls of the upper tank portion, preferably at a distance between 20 - 60 millimetres, more preferably at a distance between 20 - 30 millimetres.
 
3. A tank according to any of claims 1 - 2, wherein a space is formed between the upper sidewalls and the outer sidewalls, wherein the space is in fluid communication with the internal space for housing the active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor and insulating liquid.
 
4. A tank according to any of claims 1 - 3, wherein the tank further comprises a short circuit beam mounted at an inner surface of the upper sidewalls.
 
5. A tank according to any of claims 1 - 4, wherein the lower sidewalls comprise a first horizontal flange and the upper sidewalls comprise a second horizontal flange, and the lower tank portion is joined to the upper tank portion via the first horizontal flange and the second horizontal flange, by welding.
 
6. A tank according to claim 5, wherein the outer sidewalls comprise a third horizontal flange the outer tank portion and the upper tank portion are joined together via the third horizontal flange and the second horizontal flange, by welding.
 
7. A tank according to any of claims 1 - 6, wherein the tank further comprises a reinforcing cincture surrounding and joined to the lower side walls of the lower tank portion and the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion and forming a sealed chamber enclosing the first perimetric joining line between the lower tank portion and the upper tank portion and the second perimetric joining line between outer tank portion and the upper tank portion.
 
8. A tank according to claim 7, wherein the reinforcing cincture is joined to a horizontal flange of the lower side walls of the lower tank portion and joined to a portion of the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion, by welding.
 
9. A tank according any of claims 7 - 8, wherein the reinforcing cincture comprises a lower reinforcing ring surrounding and joined to a horizontal flange or to a portion of the lower side walls of the lower tank portion, and an upper reinforcing ring surrounding and joined to a portion of the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion.
 
10. A tank according to claim 9, wherein the reinforcing cincture comprises a belt or closing plate joined to the lower reinforcing ring and to the upper reinforcing ring.
 
11. A tank according to any one of claims 1 - 10, further comprising a tank cover configured to be joined to an upper end of the sidewalls of the outer tank portion.
 
12. A tank according to claim 11, wherein the flexibility of at least part of the tank cover is the same as the flexibility of the outer sidewalls of the outer tank portion.
 
13. A tank according to any of claims 1 - 12, wherein the tank further comprises one or more reinforcing ribs on an outer surface of at least two of the outer sidewalls.
 
14. A liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor comprising a tank according to any of claims 1 - 13.
 
15. A method for assembling a liquid-filled shell transformer or shell reactor according to any of claims 1 - 14, comprising:

- providing an outer tank portion and an upper tank portion, configured to be joined to each other along a substantially horizontal perimetric joining line, wherein the upper tank portion comprises a short circuit beam mounted at an inner surface of upper sidewalls of the upper tank portion,

- mounting the outer tank portion on the upper tank portion and welding them together along the perimetric joining line,

- providing a lower tank portion configured to be joined to the upper tank portion along a substantially horizontal further perimetric joining line,

- mounting an active part of the shell transformer or shell reactor inside the lower tank portion,

- mounting the upper tank portion on the lower tank portion and welding them together along the further perimetric line,

- providing a tank cover;

- mounting the tank cover on a top of the outer tank portion and welding them together.


 




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