(19)
(11)EP 3 954 301 A2

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
16.02.2022 Bulletin 2022/07

(21)Application number: 21175896.6

(22)Date of filing:  26.05.2021
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
A61B 17/064(2006.01)
A61B 17/072(2006.01)
(52)Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC):
A61B 17/07207; A61B 2017/07257; A61B 2017/00884; A61B 17/0644; A61B 2017/07271; A61B 18/00
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(30)Priority: 28.05.2020 US 202016885572

(71)Applicant: Covidien LP
Mansfield, MA 02048 (US)

(72)Inventor:
  • DIAZ-CHIOSA, Olesea
    Naugatuck, CT Connecticut 06770 (US)

(74)Representative: Maschio, Antonio 
Maschio & Soames IP Limited 30 Carlton Crescent
Southampton SO15 2EW
Southampton SO15 2EW (GB)

  


(54)ELECTROTAXIS-CONDUCIVE STAPLING


(57) Surgical stapling devices have a metal coating on an anvil jaw member of the surgical stapling device, on a surface of staple pockets of a staple cartridge of the surgical stapling device, or any combination thereof. When the surgical stapling device is fired, the metal is transferred from the metal coating on the anvil jaw member, the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, etc., onto the staple. The resulting metal coating on the staple enhances healing of the tissue to which the staple is applied.




Description

TECHNICAL FIELD



[0001] The present disclosure relates to medical devices and, more particularly, to surgical stapling devices.

BACKGROUND



[0002] Surgical stapling instruments are employed by surgeons to sequentially or simultaneously apply one or more rows of fasteners, e.g., staples or two-part fasteners, to body tissue for the purpose of joining segments of the body tissue together. Such instruments generally include a pair of jaws or finger-like structures between which the body tissue to be joined is placed. When the stapling instrument is actuated, or "fired", longitudinally moving firing bars contact staple drive members in one of the jaws. The staple drive members push the surgical staples through the body tissue and into an anvil in the opposite jaw, which forms the staples.

[0003] Stapled tissue undergoes a complex wound healing process to restore flexibility and robustness to the tissue. However, there are instances when wound healing fails, and the patient can develop leaks at the wound site, including anastomotic leaks. Causes of leaks are frequently patient-related, including the quality of tissue being stapled. For example, tissue of oncology patients that has been irradiated is very distinct from healthy tissue, both at the molecular and physiological levels, and is more likely to leak.

[0004] Improved surgical repair materials, including surgical stapling devices and staples used therewith, remain desirable.

SUMMARY



[0005] Surgical stapling devices which can be used to repair tissue are provided. In aspects, a surgical stapling device of the disclosure includes an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position. A metal coating having an anodic potential is on the anvil jaw member. The surgical stapling device also has a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member and staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, the staples formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.

[0006] In aspects, the metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.

[0007] In some aspects, the staples are formed of titanium.

[0008] In other aspects, the surgical stapling device also includes a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge. The second metal coating can be formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof

[0009] In aspects, a surgical stapling device of the disclosure includes an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position. A first metal coating having an anodic potential is on the anvil jaw member. The surgical stapling device also has a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member. A second metal coating having an anodic potential is on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge. Staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge are formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.

[0010] In aspects, the first metal coating and the second metal coating are formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.

[0011] In other aspects, a surgical stapling device of the disclosure includes an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position. A metal coating having an anodic potential is on the anvil jaw member. The surgical stapling device also has a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member and staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, and the staples are formed of titanium.

[0012] Methods for treating tissue by stapling tissue with the surgical stapling devices of the disclosure are also provided.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0013] Various aspects of the disclosed surgical stapling device are described herein below with reference to the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a surgical stapling device including a handle, an adapter assembly, and an end effector in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the indicated area of detail shown in FIG. 1, focusing on an anvil jaw member of the end effector;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the indicated area of detail shown in FIG. 1, focusing on a staple cartridge jaw member of the end effector;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the indicated area of detail shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of the indicated area of detail shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the staple cartridge jaw member of the end effector of the surgical stapling device shown in FIG. 1, with some parts thereof separated;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the end effector of FIG. 1 engaged with a tissue to be stapled;

FIG. 8 is a side cross-sectional view along section line 8-8 of FIG. 7, showing the tissue to be stapled between the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member of the end effector;

FIG. 9 is a side cross-sectional view of the end effector of FIG. 1, showing formation of staples in the tissue during firing of the surgical stapling device; and

FIG. 10 is a side view of a staple deployed in tissue in accordance with the present disclosure.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0014] The disclosure provides tissue fixation devices, such as surgical stapling devices, which deploy staples into tissue to close wounds. The surgical stapling device has a coating including a metal with an anodic potential on portions thereof. The staples are formed of a metal having a cathodic potential. When the surgical stapling device is fired, legs of the staples come into contact with the metal coating having the anodic potential on the surgical stapling device, thereby transferring a portion of the metal coating from the surgical stapling device onto the legs of the staples. The deployed staple, formed of a cathodic metal now possessing an anodic metal coating on its legs, produces a local directional electric field which induces cell migration and proliferation, resulting in accelerated wound healing. Electrotaxis can thus be artificially induced by introducing a charge differential during the stapling process, without the need for some additional implant or having to compromise the soundness of the anastomosis, and does not require any change in surgical techniques.

[0015] A variety of surgical stapling devices are encompassed by the disclosure. In aspects, linear staplers may be utilized such as, for example, those including EndoGIA Reinforced Reload with Tri-Staple Technology and other staplers with Tri-Staple technology, available through Covidien, (North Haven, CT), as well as other anastomosis staplers, such as, for example, EEA, CEEA, GIA, EndoGIA, and TA, also available through Covidien. It should also be appreciated that the principles disclosed herein are equally applicable to surgical staplers having alternate configurations, such as, for example, end-to-end anastomosis staplers having a circular cartridge and anvil (see, e.g., commonly owned U.S. Patent No. 5,915,616, entitled "Surgical Fastener Applying Apparatus"); laparoscopic staplers (see, e.g., commonly owned U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,330,965 and 6,241,139, each entitled "Surgical Stapling Apparatus"); and transverse anastomosis staplers (see, e.g., commonly owned U.S. Patent Nos. 5,964,394 and 7,334,717, each entitled "Surgical Fastener Applying Apparatus").

[0016] Aspects of the presently disclosed surgical stapling device will now be described in detail with reference to the drawing figures, wherein like reference numerals identify similar or identical elements. In the following discussion, the terms "proximal" and "trailing" may be employed interchangeably, and should be understood as referring to the portion of a structure that is closer to a clinician during proper use. The terms "distal" and "leading" may also be employed interchangeably, and should be understood as referring to the portion of a structure that is further from the clinician during proper use. As used herein, the term "patient" should be understood as referring to a human subject or other animal, and the term "clinician" should be understood as referring to a doctor, nurse, or other care provider and may include support personnel.

[0017] FIGS. 1-6 depict an exemplary surgical stapling device or surgical stapler 10 for use in stapling tissue. As depicted in FIG. 1, the surgical stapling device 10 generally includes a handle 12 and an adapter assembly including an elongate tubular member 14 extending distally from the handle 12. An end effector 16 is mounted on a distal end 18 of the elongate tubular member 14. The end effector 16 may be permanently affixed to the elongate tubular member 14 or may be detachable and thus replaceable with a new end effector 16.

[0018] The end effector 16 includes an anvil jaw member 20 and a staple cartridge jaw member 30 configured to receive a staple cartridge 32 (FIGS. 2-3). The anvil jaw member 20 is movably mounted on the distal end 18 of the end effector 16 and is movable between an open position spaced apart from the staple cartridge jaw member 30 to a closed position substantially adjacent the staple cartridge jaw member 30. The anvil jaw member 20 has a plurality of staple deforming concavities 22 (FIG. 4).

[0019] The staple cartridge jaw member 30 possesses a staple cartridge 32 therein that defines a central knife slot 34 and rows of staple pockets 36 on each side of the central knife slot 34 (FIG 3). It is envisioned that two or more rows of staple pockets 36 can be provided on each side of the central knife slot 34 (FIGS. 5-6). It is also envisioned that the staple pockets 36 need not be aligned in rows but rather a variety of different arrays of staple pockets 36 can be defined on each side of the central knife slot 34 (not shown).

[0020] As depicted in FIG. 6, each of the staple pockets 36 receives staples 40 and pushers 38. The staples 40 are formed of a suitable metal having a cathodic potential, such as titanium, titanium alloys, combinations thereof, and the like.

[0021] The surgical stapling device 10 has a metal coating 50 on the anvil jaw member 20 (FIG. 4), a metal coating 60 on a surface of the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32 (FIG. 5), or both. Where present, the staple pockets 36 have the metal coating 60 on a surface of the staple pockets 36 that comes into contact with the staples 40. Suitable metals for forming the metal coating 50 on the anvil jaw member 20 and/or the metal coating 60 on the surface of the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32 include metals having an anodic potential, such as magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, combinations thereof, and the like.

[0022] The metal coating 50 may be applied to the anvil jaw member 20 and/or the metal coating 60 may be applied to the surface of the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32, in aspects, by applying the metal in a solution, sometimes referred to herein as a "metal solution", to the anvil jaw member 20 and/or on the surface of the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32.

[0023] Any suitable solvent may be used to form the metal solution. Exemplary solvents encompass pharmaceutically acceptable solvents including, but not limited to, saline, water, alcohol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethyl acetate, N-methylpyrrolidone, combinations thereof, and the like. Methods for forming such solutions are within the purview of those skilled in the art and include, but are not limited to, mixing, blending, sonication, heating, combinations thereof, and the like.

[0024] The metal solution may be applied to the anvil jaw member 20 and/or the staple cartridge 32 of the staple cartridge jaw member 30 using any means within the purview of those skilled in the art, including dipping, spraying, solution casting, combinations thereof, and the like.

[0025] After application, the solvent of the metal solution is driven off so that the metal coating 50 remains on the anvil jaw member 20 and/or the metal coating 60 remains on the surface of the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32. The solvent may be driven off by methods within the purview of those skilled in the art, including evaporation, heating, the application of a vacuum, combinations thereof, and the like. Solvent evaporation may be facilitated by heat, gas flow, time, reduced pressure, combinations thereof, and the like.

[0026] Driving off the solvent leaves the metal coating 50 on the anvil jaw member 20 and/or the metal coating 60 on the staple cartridge 32 of the staple cartridge jaw member 30. In some aspects, the metal solution is deposited in the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32 of the staple cartridge jaw member 30 and the solvent is not driven off, so the metal solution remains within the staple pockets 36 (not shown).

[0027] In aspects, the entire surface of the staple cartridge 32 may also be coated with a metal as described above (not shown).

[0028] As depicted in FIGS. 7-8, the tissue to be stapled "T" is placed between the staple cartridge jaw member 30 and the anvil jaw member 20 of the end effector 16 of the surgical stapling device 10. Once the tissue "T" is between the staple cartridge jaw member 30 and the anvil jaw member 20 of the end effector 16, the surgical stapling device 10 may be fired to deploy staples 40.

[0029] Upon firing of the surgical stapling device 10, an actuation sled (not shown) translates through staple cartridge 32 to advance cam wedges (not shown) into sequential contact with the pushers 38, thereby forcing the pushers 38 within the staple cartridge 32 to move vertically (as indicated by arrows "A" in FIG. 9), thereby ejecting the staples 40 from the staple cartridge 32. Additional details regarding the staple cartridge 32, including mechanisms by which the pushers are advanced to deploy staples from the staple cartridge 32, are described in U.S. Patent No. 6,241,139.

[0030] As depicted in FIG. 9, as the staples 40 are ejected from the staple cartridge 32, the staple legs 42, 44 pass through the tissue "T", and come into contact with the staple deforming concavities 22 of the anvil jaw member 20 to deform so that the tissue "T" is sandwiched between the staple legs 42, 44, thereby securing the adjoining tissue "T" and to seal the tissue "T".

[0031] As the staple legs 42, 44 come into contact with the staple deforming concavities 22 of the anvil jaw member 20, a portion of the metal from the metal coating 50 on the anvil jaw member 20 is transferred to the staple legs 42, 44, forming a metal coating 70 on the staple legs 42, 44 (FIG. 10).

[0032] Similarly, although not depicted, where the staple pockets 36 of the staple cartridge 32 have the metal coating 60 thereon or a metal solution therein, as the staples 40 pass through the staple pockets 38, a portion of the metal coating 60 is transferred onto the staple legs 42, 44 forming the metal coating 70 on the staple legs 42, 44.

[0033] The difference in metals, i.e. the titanium forming the staple 40 and the magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc and/or zinc alloys of the metal coating 70 on the staple legs 42, 44 forms an electric field. This electric field is depicted by arrows "B" in FIG. 10, and travels in the direction from the top (crown) 46 of the staple 40 to the interior "I" of the staple 40. This electric field reduces infection, improves cellular immunity, increases perfusion, and accelerates wound healing. Wound healing is initiated by cell proliferation and migration to the repair site. The directional migration of biological cells is done through electric fields, in a process called electrotaxis. The cells migrate to the charged are and multiply, thus restoring the health of the wound.

[0034] The electric field enhances tissue remodeling for tissue within the staple. The induced electric field provides direction for cells to migrate and multiply. The metal coating 70 quickly degrades, so the electric field at the time of repairing the anastomosis will boost healing immediately and continue through the initial stages of healing. As leaks often occur around day 5 after repair, having this electric field naturally reinforces the wound using the natural cellular response.

[0035] It will be understood that various modifications may be made to the disclosed surgical stapling devices and surgical buttresses. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting, but merely as exemplifications of aspects of the disclosure. Those skilled in the art will envision other modifications within the scope and spirit of the disclosure. For example, any and all features of one described aspect may be suitably incorporated into another aspect.

[0036] The invention is described by the following numbered paragraphs:-
  1. 1. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

    an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

    a metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

    a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member; and

    staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, the staples formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.

  2. 2. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 1, wherein the metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
  3. 3. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 1, wherein the staples are formed of titanium.
  4. 4. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 1, further comprising a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.
  5. 5. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 4, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof
  6. 6. A method for treating tissue comprising stapling tissue with the surgical stapling device of paragraph 1.
  7. 7. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

    an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

    a first metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

    a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member;

    a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge; and

    staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, the staples formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.

  8. 8. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 7, wherein the first metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
  9. 9. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 7, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
  10. 10. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 7, wherein the staples are formed of titanium.
  11. 11. A method for treating tissue comprising stapling tissue with the surgical stapling device of paragraph 7.
  12. 12. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

    an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

    a metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

    a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member; and

    staples formed of titanium in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.

  13. 13. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 12, wherein the metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
  14. 14. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 12, further comprising a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.
  15. 15. The surgical stapling device of paragraph 14, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof
  16. 16. A method for treating tissue comprising stapling tissue with the surgical stapling device of paragraph 12.



Claims

1. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

a metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member; and

staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, the staples formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.


 
2. The surgical stapling device of claim 1, wherein the metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
 
3. The surgical stapling device of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the staples are formed of titanium.
 
4. The surgical stapling device of any preceding claim, further comprising a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.
 
5. The surgical stapling device of claim 4, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof
 
6. A method for treating tissue comprising stapling tissue with the surgical stapling device of claim 1.
 
7. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

a first metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member;

a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge; and

staples in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge, the staples formed of a metal having a cathodic potential.


 
8. The surgical stapling device of claim 7, wherein the first metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
 
9. The surgical stapling device of claim 7 or claim 8, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
 
10. The surgical stapling device of any of claims 7 to 9, wherein the staples are formed of titanium.
 
11. A surgical stapling device, comprising:

an end effector including an anvil jaw member and a staple cartridge jaw member coupled to one another, the anvil jaw member and the staple cartridge jaw member being relatively movable such that the end effector is movable between an open position and a clamped position;

a metal coating having an anodic potential on the anvil jaw member;

a staple cartridge having staple pockets in the staple cartridge jaw member; and

staples formed of titanium in the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.


 
12. The surgical stapling device of claim 11, wherein the metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
 
13. The surgical stapling device of claim 11 or claim 12, further comprising a second metal coating having an anodic potential on at least a portion of a surface of the staple pockets of the staple cartridge.
 
14. The surgical stapling device of claim 13, wherein the second metal coating is formed of magnesium, magnesium alloys, zinc, zinc alloys, or combinations thereof.
 




Drawing


























Cited references

REFERENCES CITED IN THE DESCRIPTION



This list of references cited by the applicant is for the reader's convenience only. It does not form part of the European patent document. Even though great care has been taken in compiling the references, errors or omissions cannot be excluded and the EPO disclaims all liability in this regard.

Patent documents cited in the description