(19)
(11)EP 3 954 939 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
16.02.2022 Bulletin 2022/07

(21)Application number: 20190285.5

(22)Date of filing:  10.08.2020
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
F21V 8/00(2006.01)
(52)Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC):
G02B 6/003; G02B 6/0091; G02B 6/0053; G02B 6/0068
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(71)Applicant: Lumileds LLC
San Jose, CA 95131 (US)

(72)Inventor:
  • The designation of the inventor has not yet been filed
     ()

(74)Representative: ter Heegde, Paul Gerard Michel 
Lumileds Germany GmbH Philipsstraße 8
52068 Aachen
52068 Aachen (DE)

  


(54)INTEGRATED OPTICAL SYSTEM FOR DYNAMIC DIFFUSE AND DIRECTIONAL LIGHTING


(57) An illumination system can produce a dynamically variable illumination pattern. The illumination system can include a light guide. The illumination system can include projection optics, which can contribute to the illumination pattern at relatively low beam angles (e.g., beam angles formed with respect to a surface normal of the light guide). The projection optics can include individually addressable light-producing elements that can direct light through one or more focusing elements. A controller can control which of the light-producing elements are electrically powered and can therefore control the illumination pattern contribution from the projection optics. The illumination system can also include scattering optics, which can contribute to the illumination pattern at relatively high beam angles. The scattering optics can direct light out of the light guide over a relatively large surface area, which can help reduce glare when the light guide is viewed directly.




Description

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE



[0001] The present disclosure relates generally to an illumination system that can produce a dynamically variable illumination pattern.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE



[0002] It is challenging for an illumination system to produce a dynamically variable illumination pattern. For example, it can be difficult to achieve both a wide beam angle and a suitable resolution over the wide beam angle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS



[0003] 

FIG. 1 shows a side view of an example of an illumination system, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 2 shows a polar plot of an example of a distribution of the scattered light of the illumination system of FIG. 1, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 3 shows a polar plot of an example of a distribution of the projected light of the illumination system of FIG. 1, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 4 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 5 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 6 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 7 shows an example of a method for producing illumination, in accordance with some embodiments.



[0004] Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views. Elements in the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. The configurations shown in the drawings are merely examples and should not be construed as limiting in any manner.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION



[0005] An illumination system can produce a dynamically variable illumination pattern. The illumination system can include a light guide, which can optionally be a planar light guide.

[0006] The illumination system can include projection optics that are coupled to the light guide. The projection optics can contribute to the illumination pattern at relatively low beam angles (e.g., beam angles formed with respect to a surface normal of the light guide). The projection optics can include individually addressable light-emitting diodes. At least some of the light-emitting diodes can be arranged in an array, such as a pixilated rectangular array and/or a pixilated linear array. At least some of the light-emitting diodes can be formed discretely (e.g., may not be included as part of an array). The light-emitting diodes can direct light through one or more focusing elements, such as a lens that is separate from the light guide and/or one or more refracting elements and/or reflecting elements that are formed integrally with one or more respective surfaces of the light guide. A controller can selectively power one or more individual light-emitting diodes. By controlling which light-emitting diodes are powered, the controller can therefore control the illumination pattern contribution from the projection optics.

[0007] The illumination system can also include scattering optics that are coupled to the light guide. The scattering optics can direct light out of the light guide over a relatively large surface area, which can help reduce glare when the light guide is viewed directly.

[0008] FIG. 1 shows a side view of an example of an illumination system 100, in accordance with some embodiments.

[0009] The illumination system 100 can include a light guide 114. The light guide 114 can be formed from a substantially transparent material, such as glass or plastic. The light guide 114 can be configured to guide light from one location in the light guide 114 to another location in the light guide 114. The light guide 114 can be shaped such that light rays inside the light guide 114 are reflected at one or more surfaces of the light guide 114 via, for example, total internal reflection.

[0010] The light guide 114 can have a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface. The light guide 114 can be shaped as a substantially planar light guide 114, with the second surface being substantially parallel to the first surface. The light guide 114 can be shaped as a wedged light guide 114, with the second surface being angled with respect to the first surface. Other suitable shapes can also be used.

[0011] A plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B can direct first light 108A, 108B into the light guide 114 through the first surface of the light guide 114. The plurality of individually addressable light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B can be formed as one or more arrays of light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B. Each array of light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B can have electrical connections that allow each light-emitting diode in the array to be individually addressable. Alternatively, one or more of the individually addressable light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B can be formed discretely (e.g., not included as part of an array). FIG. 6, discussed below, shows an example of such a discretely formed light-emitting diode.

[0012] Returning to FIG. 1, focusing optics 110A, 110B can at least partially focus the first light 108A, 108B to emerge from the light guide 114 through the second surface of the light guide 114 as projected light 112A, 112B. In the example of FIG. 1, the focusing optics 110A, 110B can collimate the first light 108A, 108B, such that the projected light 112A, 112B can emerge as being collimated or substantially collimated. Alternatively, the focusing optics 110A, 110B can at least partially focus the first light 108A, 108B to form exiting light, where the exiting light is diverging and has a divergence angle that is smaller than a divergence angle of light emitted from the light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B. As a further alternative, the focusing optics 110A, 110B can at least partially focus the first light 108A, 108B to form exiting light, where the exiting light is converging to a focus and then diverging thereafter, and, in divergence, has a divergence angle that is smaller than a divergence angle of light emitted from the light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B.

[0013] The focusing optics 110A, 110B can be formed as refractive projection optics, which can project light from the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes into a far field in a substantially imaging fashion. For example, a position of a particular light-emitting diode can correlate with an angle in the far field at which light from the light-emitting diode emerges. In some examples, most or all of the projected light 112A, 112B (defined as projected light 112A, 112B having an intensity greater than or equal to half of a peak intensity) can fall within a range of propagation angles (being defined with respect to a surface normal of the second surface of the light guide 114). In some examples, the range of propagation angles can be between about 40 degrees and about 60 degrees. Other suitable angular ranges can also be used.

[0014] At least one second light-emitting diode can direct second light into the light guide 114 as guided light 120 that is guided between the first surface of the light guide 114 and the second surface of the light guide 114. For example, the second light-emitting diode can be located along an edge of the light guide 114 and can direct the second light into the light guide 114 through the edge of the light guide 114. Alternatively, the second light-emitting diode can be located proximate an edge of the light guide 114 and can couple second light into the light guide 114 via the first or second surfaces of the light guide 114. For configurations in which the illumination system 100 includes multiple second light-emitting diodes, the second light-emitting diodes can be spaced apart along one or more edges of the light guide 114 and may be oriented such that their respective emissions may not be parallel to one other. In other words, an emission of one second light-emitting diode can be angled with respect to an emission of another second light-emitting diode. One or more second light-emitting diodes can be included in an array or can be formed discretely.

[0015] A plurality of light-extraction features 122 can be disposed on the light guide 114. The light-extraction features 122 can direct at least some of the guided light 120 out of the light guide 114 through the second surface of the light guide 114 as scattered light 124. The light-extraction features 122 can be distributed over a relatively large area of the light guide 114. Such a distribution over a relatively large area can produce a relatively low, relatively uniform luminance to the scattered light 124. This relatively low, relatively uniform luminance can reduce glare, when, for example, a user directly views the output of the illumination system 100. The light-extraction features 122 can include a roughened surface, such as a diffuser, a plurality of relatively small shaped structures, such as prisms or microprisms that can be embossed or injection molded, a plurality of absorbing or scattering elements, such as dots of scattering ink that can be screen printed or inkjet printed, and/or other light-scattering elements. The first surface of the light guide 114 can optionally include a reflector that can direct the scattered light 124 away from the first surface and toward the second surface of the light guide 114. One or more of the light-extraction features 122 can be disposed on the second surface of the light guide 114, as shown in the example of FIG. 1. One or more of the light-extraction features 122 can be disposed on the first surface of the light guide 114. One or more of the light-extraction features 122 can be disposed in an interior of the light guide 114. The light-extraction features 122 can be absent in regions of the first surface of the light guide 114 and regions of the second surface of the light at which the projected light 112A, 112B can propagate.

[0016] A controller 102 can electrically control, via a first electrical connection 104A and a second electrical connection 104B, the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes, such as to determine which of the light-emitting diodes are turned on or off. As used herein, the term "electrical connection" may be, for example, a hardwired connection or a remotely coupled connection (e.g., a wireless connection). By changing which of the first individually addressable light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B are electrically powered, the controller 102 can change an angular output of the projected light 112A, 112B. For example, if the controller 102 powers a first light-emitting diode of the plurality, the projected light 112A, 112B can have an angular output having a first width. If the controller 102 powers the first light-emitting diode of the plurality and an adjacent second light-emitting diode of the plurality, the projected light 112A, 112B can have an angular output having a second width that is, for example, twice the first width. Other suitable examples can also be used. In this manner, the controller 102 can allow a user to tailor a beam shape and/or a beam direction of a light output of the illumination system 100. The controller 102 can perform the controlling via, for example, routing to a central microcontroller, passive/active matrix addressing, and/or addressing of integrated switches over a common data line through a digital communication protocol (not shown in FIG. 1 but understandable to a person of ordinary skill in the art upon reading and understanding the disclosed subject matter). In some examples, the controller 102 can receive input from the user, such as via a user interface, to select the beam shape and/or beam direction. In some examples, the input can include a selection of one of a predefined or specified plurality of configurations. In some examples, the controller 102 can receive one or more inputs to determine a desired light distribution. The inputs can include occupant location and activity, time of day, ambient lighting, and others. Suitable sensors may be connected to or integrated into the control system to provide input.

[0017] The controller 102 can also electrically control, via 116A and 116B, the at least one second light-emitting diode 118A, 118B. In some examples, the controller 102 can allow selection of a configuration of the projected light 112A, 112B (resulting from control of the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes 106A, 106B), but not allow selection of a configuration of the second light-emitting diode(s) 118A, 118B. In this manner, the projected light 112A, 112B can be controlled, such as by a user, but the scattered light 124 may not be controllable by the user. By allowing control of the light output in this manner, the illumination system 100 can allow relatively high resolution of the light output in the projected light 112A, 112B, while achieving a relatively wide angular output by addition of the scattered light 124 to the projected light 112A, 112B.

[0018] As a result of the aforementioned embodiments, the illumination system 100 can combine projected light 112A, 112B, which can have beam propagation directions relatively close to a surface normal of the second surface of the light guide 114 (e.g. relatively small propagation angles, such as less than about 40 degrees, less than about 50 degrees, less than about 60 degrees, or others), with scattered light 124, which can include beam propagation directions relatively far from the surface normal of the second surface of the light guide 114 (e.g. relatively large propagation angles, greater than about 40 degrees, greater than about 50 degrees, greater than about 60 degrees, or others). The projection optics can project a digitally addressable high-luminance LED source for beam shaping and steering at angles that can be substantially outside direct view for users. The scattering optics are designed such that light is mainly scattered towards higher angles that may be in direct view and can be distributed over a larger area to reduce luminance contrast and associated glare.

[0019] FIG. 2 shows a polar plot of an example of a distribution of the scattered light 124 of the illumination system 100 of FIG. 1, in accordance with some embodiments. In the polar plot of FIG. 2, angles are formed with respect to a surface normal of the second surface of the light guide 114. For example, an angle of zero degrees coincides with the surface normal, while an angle of positive 90 degrees or negative 90 degrees is essentially parallel to the second side of the light guide 114.

[0020] In the example of FIG. 2, the scattered light distribution is bifurcated, having a first peak separate from a second peak. Such a bifurcated light distribution can be referred to as a batwing distribution. In the example of FIG. 2, the first peak lies between negative 70 degrees and negative 60 degrees, and the second peak lies between positive 60 degrees and positive 70 degrees. Other numerical ranges can also be used.

[0021] FIG. 3 shows a polar plot of an example of a distribution of the projected light 112A, 112B of the illumination system 100 of FIG. 1, in accordance with some embodiments. In the polar plot of FIG. 3, angles are formed with respect to the surface normal of the second surface of the light guide 114.

[0022] In the example of FIG. 3, the scattered light distribution is relatively sharply peaked, having a single peak. In the example of FIG. 3, the single peak lies between positive 20 degrees and positive 30 degrees. Other numerical ranges can also be used.

[0023] The single peak can correspond to a light from a single light-emitting diode. The projected light distribution from each light-emitting diode can have a width similar to the width shown in FIG. 3, but angularly offset from the distribution shown in FIG. 3. By controlling which light-emitting diodes are powered concurrently, the controller 102 can effectively combine the individual projected light distributions that correspond to the light-emitting diodes that are powered. For example, the controller 102 can move the relatively narrow peak to another angle by electrically powering another light-emitting diode at a different location. As another example, the controller 102 can widen the angular output by electrically powering multiple light-emitting diodes, optionally at contiguous locations.

[0024] In the configuration of FIG. 1, the focusing optics 110A, 110B include lenses that are formed separately from the light guide 114, such that the output of the lenses propagates through the first surface of the light guide and the second surface of the light guide without any focusing or decollimating effects being imparted by the generally planar first and second surfaces of the light guide 114. Other configurations for the focusing optics are possible, including integrating the focusing optics into the first and/or second surfaces of the light guide 114.

[0025] FIG. 4 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system 400, in accordance with some embodiments. Elements 402-422 of FIG. 4 are the same as or similar respective functions and structures of corresponding elements 102-122 of FIG. 1. Focusing optics 426A, 428A, 426B, 428B can be formed as respectively shaped portions (e.g., curved portions) of the first and second surfaces of the light guide 414. For example, focusing optics 426A and 428A can at least partially focus the light emitted from light-emitting diode array 406A, and focusing optics 426B and 428B can at least partially focus the light emitted from light-emitting diode array 406B. Other suitable configurations are possible. In this manner, the focusing optics can be integrated with the light guide 414. Any or all of the shaped portions can be used instead of or in addition to any of the lenses shown in FIG. 1.

[0026] In the configuration of FIG. 4, the light-emitting diodes that generate the scattered light are located along one or more edges of the light guide. Other configurations are possible for these light-emitting diodes that generate the scattered light, including locating them alongside the light-emitting diodes that generate the projected light. FIG. 5 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system 500, in accordance with some embodiments. Elements 502-528 of FIG. 5 are the same as or similar respective functions and structures of corresponding elements 402-428 of FIG. 4.

[0027] The array 506A of light-emitting diodes can include one or more light-emitting diodes 530 at its periphery, which can generate light that is directed to the light-extraction features 522 to form the scattered light 524. Other arrays of light-emitting diodes, such as 506B, can include similar light-emitting diodes 530 at their respective peripheries, which can similarly generate the light that forms the scattered light 524. Light from the interior light-emitting diodes of the array can form the projected light. A reflector 532 can split off light from the light-emitting diode 530 and direct the light into the light guide 514 as guided light. The light-extraction features 522 can direct at least some of the guided light out of the light guide 514 through the second surface of the light guide 514 as scattered light 524. The reflector 532 can be formed as a discontinuity between adjacent portions of the light guide 514. The reflector 532 can reflect via, for example, total internal reflection or can include one or more reflective and/or dielectric layers that can reflect the light into the light guide 514.

[0028] In some examples, the reflector 532 can extend around a perimeter of the array 506A of light-emitting diodes, so as to direct light from multiple peripherally located light-emitting diodes from the array 506A into the light guide 514 as guided light and out of the light guide 514 as scattered light.

[0029] In the configuration of FIGS. 1, 4, and 5, the light-emitting diodes are arranged in one or more arrays. Other configurations are possible for the light-emitting diodes, including using discretely formed light-emitting diodes.

[0030] FIG. 6 shows a side view of another example of an illumination system 600, in accordance with some embodiments. The configuration of FIG. 6 uses discretely formed light-emitting diodes, rather than arrays of light-emitting diodes.

[0031] In the configuration of FIG. 6, a controller 602 can control a light-emitting diode 606A, which can emit light into focusing optics 610A to produce projected light 612A. The controller 602 can further control a light-emitting diode 606B, which can emit light into focusing optics 610B to produce projected light 612B. The controller 602 can further control a light-emitting diode 606C, which can emit light into focusing optics 610C to produce projected light 612C. The projected lights 612A, 612B, and 612C can optionally be angled with respect to one another. Each of the focusing optics 610A, 610B, 610C can be formed as an individual lens or can optionally be formed integrally with the light guide 614, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5.

[0032] The controller 602 can additionally control light-emitting diode 618A and 618B, which can direct light into the light guide 614 to form the scattered light.

[0033] In some examples, in combination with any of the above configurations, the scattering elements can optionally be divided into zones. Each zone can produce a different output light distribution. The light-emitting diodes can be individually addressable for each zone. For example, the zones can have a same or similar polar angular distribution but different azimuthal angular distributions. In this manner, the illumination system can effectively steer the scattered light. Because the scattered light can extend over a wide angular range, this arrangement can effectively allow beam steering over the wide angular range.

[0034] In some examples, in combination with any of the above configurations, the projected light and/or the scattered light can be made tunable in color, by coupling at least two different primary light-emitting diodes into the respective optics that can be separately addressed. Color tuning in this manner can support functionalities like dim-to-warm, white correlated color temperature tuning, or full color tuning. In addition, light guide plates and scattering elements can provide good color mixing, which can help avoid or eliminate visualizing the individual color contributions from the individual light-emitting diodes.

[0035] In projection optics, there are several options that can help ensure that the different primary colors have the same light distribution in the far field, so as to maintain substantial color uniformity in the far field.

[0036] For example, multiple colors may can be implemented in a single pixilated light source, such as an array of light-emitting diodes. An optional mixing optic or optics, such as a scattering layer, can mix the colors prior to the light being projected. Because the mixing optic can reduce a spatial resolution of the pixilated light source, a practical design can typically trade off between color mixing and spatial resolution.

[0037] As another example, multiple colors may be implemented as separate pixilated sources, with each source having only one color. If the projection optics produce beams that traverse similar paths in the far field, such as by being parallel to one another, then colors can mix in the far field. The layout of the pixilated sources relative to each other can minimize or reduce color shadows.

[0038] As still another example, for configurations in which the light-emitting diodes are in a sparse array or are discrete, color mixing in the far field can also be achieved if the collective light distribution of the projection optics for a color is the same for all the colors.

[0039] In some examples, the light-emitting diodes that form the scattered light can have a higher correlated color temperature (CCT) than the light-emitting diodes that form the projected light. For example, the scattered light can have a correlated color temperature of about 5000K or higher, while the projected light can have a correlated color temperature between about 2700K and about 4000K. Distributing the correlated color temperatures in this manner can help support a human-centric lighting design. For example, in an overhead lighting fixture, distributing the correlated color temperatures in this manner can deliver blue-rich light directly to the eye for circadian entrainment and other physiological benefits, while providing functional neutral or warm white downward directed light for illumination. The higher correlated color temperature light-emitting diodes can optionally be dimmed or turned off in the evening to reduce melatonin suppression while keeping the functional illumination provided by the lower correlated color temperature light-emitting diodes.

[0040] In some examples, the light-emitting diodes that form the scattered light can be tunable in correlated color temperature, while the light-emitting diodes that form the projected light can be fixed in correlated color temperature. In addition to helping support the human-centric lighting design discussed above, allowing the scattered light to be tunable in correlated color temperature can allow for scene setting and/or physiological benefits.

[0041] The illumination system can be formed as a dynamic lighting system, which can be used for indoor lighting, such as for hospitality, retail, office lighting, and other applications.
FIG. 7 shows an example of a method 700 for producing illumination, in accordance with some embodiments. The method 700 can be executed on the illumination systems shown in FIGS. 1 and 4-6, or on other suitable illumination systems

[0042] At operation 702, the method 700 can produce first light with a plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes.

[0043] At operation 704, the method 700 can direct the first light into a light guide through a first surface of the light guide.

[0044] At operation 706, the method 700 can at least partially focus the first light, with focusing optics, to emerge from the light guide through a second surface of the light guide as projected light, the second surface of the light guide being opposite the first surface of the light guide.

[0045] At operation 708, the method 700 can produce second light with a second light-emitting diode.

[0046] At operation 710, the method 700 can direct the second light into the light guide as guided light that is guided between the first surface and the second surface. At optional operation 712, the method 700 can direct, with a plurality of light-extraction features, at least some of the guided light out of the light guide through the second surface of the light guide as scattered light.

[0047] While only certain features of the system and method have been illustrated and described herein, many modifications and changes will occur to those skilled in the art. It is, therefore, to be understood that the appended claims are intended to cover all such modifications and changes. Method operations can be performed substantially simultaneously or in a different order.


Claims

1. An illumination system, comprising:

a light guide having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface;

a plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes configured to direct first light into the light guide through the first surface of the light guide;

focusing optics configured to at least partially focus the first light to emerge from the light guide through the second surface of the light guide as projected light; and

a second light-emitting diode configured to direct second light into the light guide as guided light that is guided between the first surface and the second surface.


 
2. The illumination system of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of light-extraction features configured to direct at least some of the guided light out of the light guide through the second surface of the light guide as scattered light.
 
3. The illumination system of claim 1, further comprising a controller configured to electrically control the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes.
 
4. The illumination system of claim 3, wherein the controller is further configured to electrically power one of a plurality of specified subsets of light-emitting diodes of the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes.
 
5. The illumination system of claim 4, wherein the controller is further configured to receive input that specifies which of the plurality of specified subsets is to be electrically powered.
 
6. The illumination system of claim 1, wherein:

the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes includes a first light-emitting diode; and

the focusing optics includes a first lens positioned in a first optical path between the first light-emitting diode and the first surface of the light guide.


 
7. The illumination system of claim 6, wherein:

the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes further includes a second light-emitting diode positioned away from the first light-emitting diode; and

the focusing optics includes a second lens positioned in a second optical path between the second light-emitting diode and the first surface of the light guide.


 
8. The illumination system of claim 1, wherein:

the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes includes a first light-emitting diode; and

the focusing optics includes a first curved portion disposed on the first surface of the light guide and a second curved portion disposed on the second surface of the light guide, the first and second curved portions configured to at least partially focus light emitted from the first light-emitting diode.


 
9. The illumination system of claim 8, wherein:

the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes further includes a second light-emitting diode positioned away from the first light-emitting diode; and

the focusing optics includes a third curved portion disposed on the first surface of the light guide and a fourth curved portion disposed on the second surface of the light guide, the third and fourth curved portions configured to at least partially focus light emitted from the second light-emitting diode.


 
10. The illumination system of claim 1, wherein the second light-emitting diode is spaced apart from the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes and configured to direct the second light into an edge of the light guide, the edge extending between the first and second surfaces of the light guide.
 
11. The illumination system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes includes at least two light-emitting diodes that emit light having different correlated color temperatures.
 
12. The illumination system of claim 1, further comprising a third light-emitting diode configured to direct third light into the light guide as guided light that is guided between the first surface and the second surface, the second light and the third light having different correlated color temperatures.
 
13. The illumination system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of light-extraction features are disposed on the second surface of the light guide.
 
14. A method for providing illumination, the method comprising:

producing first light with a plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes;

directing the first light into a light guide through a first surface of the light guide;

at least partially focusing the first light, with focusing optics, to emerge from the light guide through a second surface of the light guide as projected light, the second surface of the light guide being opposite the first surface of the light guide;

producing second light with a second light-emitting diode;

directing the second light into the light guide as guided light that is guided between the first surface and the second surface;

directing, with a plurality of light-extraction features, at least some of the guided light out of the light guide through the second surface of the light guide as scattered light.


 
15. The method of claim 14, further comprising:

receiving input that specifies a first subset of a plurality of specified subsets of plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes;

electrically powering the first subset of the plurality of first individually addressable light-emitting diodes.


 




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