(19)
(11)EP 4 050 434 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
31.08.2022 Bulletin 2022/35

(21)Application number: 22155371.2

(22)Date of filing:  07.02.2022
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
G05B 15/02(2006.01)
(52)Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC):
G05B 15/02; G05B 2219/2642
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(30)Priority: 26.02.2021 US 202117187361

(71)Applicant: Honeywell International Inc.
Charlotte, NC 28202 (US)

(72)Inventors:
  • HUGHLEY, Bill
    Charlotte, 28202 (US)
  • SALGAR, Mayur Sidram
    Charlotte, 28202 (US)
  • KARMAKAR, Sheeladitya
    Charlotte, 28202 (US)
  • GHOSH, Somnath
    Charlotte, 28202 (US)
  • SHEIKH, Shahajahan
    Charlotte, 28202 (US)

(74)Representative: Haseltine Lake Kempner LLP 
Cheapside House 138 Cheapside
London EC2V 6BJ
London EC2V 6BJ (GB)

  


(54)HIERARCHY MODEL BUILDER FOR BUILDING A HIERARCHICAL MODEL OF CONTROL ASSETS


(57) A spatial hierarchical model is built by accepting user input to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model and to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model. A graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces is displayed along with a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets. User input is accepted to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space.




Description

Technical Field



[0001] The present disclosure relates generally to spatial modeling of control assets. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to flexible spatial modeling of control assets that can be deployed for a variety of different verticals.

Background



[0002] Control systems can include a large number of control assets that are divided between parts of a building or other facility, between different buildings or facilities within a region, and/or between different geographic regions in which a particular enterprise has ongoing operations. Examples of verticals include buildings and building control systems, various industrial and manufacturing processes, large facilities such as airports and casinos, data centers and others. It will be appreciated that the control assets and how they are arranged can vary considerably based upon the vertical in which the control assets are deployed and the particular needs of the end user. What would be desirable are methods and systems for organizing large number of assets in a hierarchical model.

Summary



[0003] The present disclosure relates to spatial modeling of control assets. In one example, a method provides for building a spatial hierarchical model of a plurality of building control assets that is configured to provide spatial context of the plurality of building control assets to an operator when the operator is monitoring and/or controlling the plurality of building control assets. The illustrative method includes accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model and accepting user input via one or more screens to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model. A graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces is displayed along with a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets. User input is accepted to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space.

[0004] In another example, a method includes displaying one or more screens that enable a user to create one or more geographic region-level folders of a hierarchical folder structure. One or more screens are displayed that enable a user to create one or more location-specific folders within one or more of the geographic region-level folders of the hierarchical folder structure. One or more screens are displayed that enable a user to dispose one or more assets within one or more folders of the hierarchical folder structure. The hierarchical folder structure is analyzed to determine relationships between the one or more geographic region-level folders, the one or more location-specific folders and the one or more assets in order to assign a unique identifier to each folder and to each asset in the hierarchical folder structure. One or more screens are displayed that display the hierarchical folder structure.

[0005] In another example, a system monitors and/or controls a plurality of building control assets. The system includes an input/output that is operatively coupled to the plurality of assets, a display and one or more processors that are operatively coupled to the input/output and the display. The one or more processors are configured to display one or more screens on the display that allow a user to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of a spatial hierarchical model and to display one or more screens on the display that allow the user to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model. The one or more processors are configured to display a graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces and to display a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets operatively coupled to the input/output. The one or more processors are configured to accept user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space and to accept user input to monitor and/or control at least some of the plurality of building control assets using the spatial hierarchical model.

[0006] The preceding summary is provided to facilitate an understanding of some of the innovative features unique to the present disclosure and is not intended to be a full description. A full appreciation of the disclosure can be gained by taking the entire specification, claims, figures, and abstract as a whole.

Brief Description of the Figures



[0007] The disclosure may be more completely understood in consideration of the following description of various examples in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a schematic block diagram of an illustrative system for organizing and monitoring a variety of control assets;

Figure 2 is a schematic block diagram of an illustrative monitoring system;

Figure 3 is a schematic diagram of an illustrative spatial hierarchical model;

Figure 4 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figure 5 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figure 6 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figure 7 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figures 8A and 8B are flow diagrams that together show an illustrative method;

Figures 9A and 9B are flow diagrams that together show an illustrative method;

Figures 10A and 10B are flow diagrams that together show an illustrative method;

Figure 11 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figure 12 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method;

Figures 13 through 18 are screen shots showing an example method of creating a spatial hierarchical model;

Figure 19 is a screen shot showing an example method of assigning an asset to a particular level of the spatial hierarchical model created in Figures 13 through 18;

Figures 20 and 21 are screen shots showing an example method of assigning a tag to a particular feature of the spatial hierarchical model created in Figures 13 through 18;

Figure 22 is a screen shot showing the spatial hierarchy model created in Figures 13 through 18 displayed in a tabular format;

Figure 23 is a screen shot showing an alternate way of forming a spatial hierarchy model;

Figure 24 is a screen shot showing an illustrative healthy building dashboard; and

Figure 25 is a screen shot showing an illustrative healthy building dashboard.



[0008] While the disclosure is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the disclosure to the particular examples described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the disclosure.

Description



[0009] The following description should be read with reference to the drawings, in which like elements in different drawings are numbered in like fashion. The drawings, which are not necessarily to scale, depict examples that are not intended to limit the scope of the disclosure. Although examples are illustrated for the various elements, those skilled in the art will recognize that many of the examples provided have suitable alternatives that may be utilized.

[0010] All numbers are herein assumed to be modified by the term "about", unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. The recitation of numerical ranges by endpoints includes all numbers subsumed within that range (e.g., 1 to 5 includes 1, 1.5, 2, 2.75, 3, 3.80, 4, and 5).

[0011] As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms "a", "an", and "the" include the plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. As used in this specification and the appended claims, the term "or" is generally employed in its sense including "and/or" unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.

[0012] It is noted that references in the specification to "an embodiment", "some embodiments", "other embodiments", etc., indicate that the embodiment described may include a particular feature, structure, or characteristic, but every embodiment may not necessarily include the particular feature, structure, or characteristic. Moreover, such phrases are not necessarily referring to the same embodiment. Further, when a particular feature, structure, or characteristic is described in connection with an embodiment, it is contemplated that the feature, structure, or characteristic may be applied to other embodiments whether or not explicitly described unless clearly stated to the contrary.

[0013] Figure 1 is a schematic block diagram of an illustrative system 10 for organizing and monitoring a variety of control assets. The illustrative system 10 includes a number of groups of assets 12, individually labeled as 12a, 12b and through 12n. A particular group of assets 12 may, for example, include at least some of the assets within a building or a portion of a building such as a wing of a building, or perhaps a particular floor of the building. A particular group of assets 12 may include at least some of the assets within two or more buildings that are grouped within a geographical region. A particular group of assets 12 may include at least some of the assets that are grouped within two or more different geographic regions within an enterprise such as a business. The assets may be grouped differently than shown. These are just examples.

[0014] The system 10 may include any number of groups of assets 12. Each group of assets 12 may include any of a variety of different assets. Examples of assets include but are not limited to devices such as cameras and access control devices, door alarms, window alarms and the like. Assets may include a variety of different types of sensors, such as but not limited to temperature sensors, humidity sensors, occupancy sensors, lighting sensors and the like. In some cases, the assets included within each of the groups of assets 12 may include Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system components such as heating sources and cooling sources. In some cases, at least some of the assets within one or more of the groups of assets 12 may include environmental sensors such as but not limited to air temperature (both indoor and outdoor), air humidity (both indoor and outdoor), CO (carbon monoxide) sensors, CO2 (carbon dioxide) sensors, NOx (nitric acid) sensors, TVOC (total volatile organic compounds) sensors and the like. In some cases, the assets included within each of the groups of assets 12 may include industrial and/or manufacturing process control assets. These are just examples.

[0015] The illustrative system 10 may include a number of monitoring systems 14, individually labeled as 14a, 14b and through 14n. In some cases, a particular monitoring system 14 may be operably coupled with at least some of the assets within a particular group of assets 12, and may receive operational and/or other information from at least some of the assets within the particular group of assets 12. A particular monitoring system 14 may provide operational instructions to at least some of the assets within the particular group of assets 12. While Figure 1 shows one monitoring system 14 coupled to one group of assets 12, it will be appreciated that this is merely illustrative. In some cases, one monitoring system 14 may be operationally coupled with two or more different groups of assets 12. One group of assets 12 may, for example, be operationally coupled with two or more different monitoring systems 14.

[0016] The monitoring systems 14 are shown as being operationally coupled with a cloud-based server 16. The cloud-based server 16 may represent one or more distinct computing sources such as one or more servers. In some cases, each of the monitoring systems 14 may receive operational instructions from the cloud-based server 16, and the monitoring systems 14 may pass those operational instructions or translations thereof down to the appropriate assets within the groups of assets 12. The monitoring systems 14 may pass operational data from assets within the groups of assets 12 up to the cloud-based server 16. While each of the monitoring systems 14 are shown as being distinct from both the cloud-based server 16 and their corresponding group of assets 12, it is contemplated that at least some of the functions of at least some of the monitoring systems 14 may be manifested within the cloud-based server 16. In some cases, at least some of the functions of at least some of the monitoring systems 14 may be manifested within one or more of the assets within the groups of assets 12. In some cases, the monitoring systems 14 may be implemented at least in part by an edge controller, such as an edge gateway or the like.

[0017] The cloud-based server 16 may be configured to monitor performance of the assets within the groups of assets 12. This may include any of a variety of different Industrial Internet of Things (HOT) systems. This can include monitoring performance of security-related assets, including detecting alarms. Some alarms may be legitimate, while others may be false alarms that can be canceled once investigated. Alternatively, or in addition, this can include monitoring performance of HVAC, lighting, fire suppression, and/or industrial and/or manufacturing control systems. In some cases, the cloud-based server 16 may be configured to monitor or track various healthy building-related criterial that can be used to ascertain how well a facility or a portion of a facility, facilities within a geographic region and/or facilities within each of a number of geographic regions under the umbrella of a company are performing with respect to meeting healthy building guidelines.

[0018] In some cases, the cloud-based server 16 may be configured to organize the assets within the groups of assets 12 into a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to the assets. This spatial hierarchical model can be helpful in being able to monitor and track assets at various hierarchical levels in the spatial hierarchical model, as will be discussed further herein.

[0019] Figure 2 is a schematic block diagram of an illustrative monitoring system 18. The monitoring system 18 may be considered as being an example of the monitoring systems 14. The monitoring system 18 is configured to monitor and/or control a plurality of building control assets 20, individually labeled as 20a, 20b and through 20n. The building control assets 20 may be considered as being examples of the assets within the groups of assets 12. The monitoring system 18 may include an input/output 22 that is operably coupled to the plurality of building control assets 20. The input/output 22 may include one or more ports that are configured to send instructions and other data to each of the plurality of building control assets 20 and/or to receive information from each of the plurality of building control assets 20. In the example shown, the monitoring system 18 includes a display 24 and a processor 26 that is operatively coupled to the input/output 22 and to the display 24. While one processor 26 is shown, it will be appreciated that the processor 26 may represent two or more distinct processors within the monitoring system 18.

[0020] The processor 26 is configured to display one or more screens on the display 24 that allow a user to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of a spatial hierarchical model. The processor 26 is configured to display one or more screens on the display 24 that allow the user to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model. The processor 26 is configured to display a graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces as well as to display a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets operatively coupled to the input/output. The processor 26 may be configured to accept user input to assign selected building control assets 20 from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets 20 to a selected child level space and to accept user input to monitor and/or control at least some of the plurality of building control assets 20 using the spatial hierarchical model. In some cases, accepting user input to assign selected building control assets 20 from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets 20 to the selected child level space comprises dragging and dropping selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets 20 to the selected child level space. An particular example of such a system is shown and described with respect to Figures 13-19.

[0021] Reference has been made to hierarchical levels within a spatial hierarchical model. Figure 3 is a schematic illustration of an illustrative spatial hierarchical model 30. It will be appreciated that the illustrative spatial hierarchical model 30 is highly schematic, as an actual spatial hierarchical model, even for a portion of a building, would likely include additional hierarchical levels relative to what is shown here, and at least some of the hierarchical levels may include a substantially greater number of assets located within those hierarchical levels. As illustrated, the spatial hierarchical model 30 may include a parent hierarchical level object 32. There may be additional higher level hierarchical level objects (not illustrated) above the parent hierarchical level object 32, if desired. Under the parent hierarchical level object 32, as indicated by relative indentation, are two child hierarchical level objects 34 and 36. In this example, the parent hierarchical level object 32 may refer to a campus of a company, and the two child hierarchical level objects 34 and 36 may each refer to specific building within that campus. In another example, the parent hierarchical level object 32 may refer to a company having operations within two geographic regions (east and west), and each of the child hierarchical level objects 34 and 36 refer to one of those two geographic regions within the company represented by the parent hierarchical level object 32. These are just examples.

[0022] The spatial hierarchical model 30, as shown, also includes grandchild hierarchical level objects 38 and 40. The grandchild hierarchical level object 38 and the grandchild hierarchical level object 40 are both at the same organizational level, and are both children of child hierarchical level object 36. In the previous example, if the child hierarchical level object 36 represents a geographic region, the grandchild hierarchical level object 38 and 40 may each represent particular buildings within the geographic region represented by the child hierarchical level object 36. Continuing with this example, it is contemplated that the spatial hierarchical model 30 may include a number of great grandchild hierarchical level objects below, for example, the grandchild hierarchical level object 38 that each represent a particular zone or space within the particular building represented by the grandchild hierarchical level object 38. This is just an example. It is contemplated that the spatial hierarchical model 30 may have any suitable number of hierarchical levels, depending on the application.

[0023] A number of assets have been placed within the spatial hierarchical model 30. In particular, an asset 34a and an asset 34b have been placed within the child hierarchical level object 34. Similarly, an asset 36a and an asset 36b have been placed within the child hierarchical level object 36. An asset 38a and an asset 38b have been placed within the grandchild hierarchical level object 38. An asset 40a and an asset 40b have been placed within the grandchild hierarchical level object 40. While only two assets are shown in each hierarchical level, it will be appreciated that each hierarchical level object 32, 34, 36, 38, 40 may include any number of assets, and depending on what a particular hierarchical level object 32, 34, 36, 38, 40 represents, may include a substantially greater number of assets.

[0024] An asset may be considered as belong to a hierarchical level object that it is assigned to, as well as to higher level hierarchical level objects (e.g. parent and grandparent hierarchical level object). For example, the asset 38a may be considered as belonging to the grandchild hierarchical level object 38, and also the child hierarchical level object 36 and the parent hierarchical level object 32. It will be appreciated that within the context of monitoring healthy building performance across any of a number of buildings, other facilities, geographic regions and even companies, the spatial hierarchical model 30 facilitates being able to compile and track aggregated data while also permitting easily drilling down to a lower hierarchical level objects in the model, and the particular assets at (and below) that lower hierarchical level objects in order to better ascertain performance with respect to healthy building guidelines.

[0025] Figure 4 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 50 of building a spatial hierarchical model (such as the spatial hierarchical model 30) of a plurality of building control assets (such as the building control assets 20), the spatial hierarchical model configured to provide spatial context of the plurality of building control assets to an operator when the operator is monitoring and/or controlling the plurality of building control assets. In some cases, at least some of the plurality of building control assets include video cameras. In some instances, at least some of the plurality of building control asserts include HVAC system assets. These are just examples.

[0026] The method 50 includes accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 52. In some cases, accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at the first level of the spatial hierarchical model may include accepting a selection of an add new space icon, displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon, and accepting a name for at least one of the one or more first level spaces. The word "space" here may be considered to be a generic term, and may refer to any of the hierarchical level objects referenced in Figure 3. For example, the spaces may correspond to a region, a campus, a building and/or a space/zone within a building, to name a few.

[0027] User input is accepted via one or more screens to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 54. In some cases, accepting user input via one or more screens to select the selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at the second level of the spatial hierarchical model may include accepting a selection of the selected one of the first level spaces, accepting a selection of an add new space icon, displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon, and accepting a name for at least one of the one or more child level spaces. A graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces is displayed, as indicated at block 56.

[0028] In the example shown, a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets is displayed, as indicated at block 58. User input is accepted to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space, as indicated at block 60. In some instances, accepting user input to assign selected building control asserts to the selected child level may include dragging and dropping selected building control asserts from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control asserts to the selected child level space. In some cases, the displayed listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets may include building control assets that are already connected and visible on a building control network that is to be monitored and/or controlled using the spatial hierarchical model. In some cases, the displayed listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets may include building control assets that are not yet connected and visible on the building control network that is to be monitored and/or controlled using the spatial hierarchical model. Displaying the list of at least some of the plurality of building control asserts may include filtering the plurality of building control asserts using filter criteria and displaying only the building control assets that meet the filter criteria. In some cases, the method 50 may include deploying the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 62. The method 50 may include monitoring and/or controlling at least some of the plurality of building control assets using the deployed spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 64.

[0029] Figure 5 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 70 of building a spatial hierarchical model (such as the spatial hierarchical model 30) of a plurality of building control assets (such as the building control assets 20), the spatial hierarchical model configured to provide spatial context of the plurality of building control assets to an operator when the operator is monitoring and/or controlling the plurality of building control assets. In some cases, at least some of the plurality of building control assets include video cameras. In some instances, at least some of the plurality of building control asserts include HVAC system assets. These are just examples. The illustrative method 70 includes accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 72. In some cases, accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at the first level of the spatial hierarchical model may include accepting a selection of an add new space icon, displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon, and accepting a name for at least one of the one or more first level spaces.

[0030] User input is accepted via one or more screens to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 74. In some cases, accepting user input via one or more screens to select the selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at the second level of the spatial hierarchical model may include accepting a selection of the selected one of the first level spaces, accepting a selection of an add new space icon, displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon, and accepting a name for at least one of the one or more child level spaces. A graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces is displayed, as indicated at block 76.

[0031] In the example shown, a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets is displayed, as indicated at block 78. An indication of which of the plurality of building control assets have not yet been assigned may be displayed, as indicated at block 80. In some cases, the unassigned building control assets may be displayed in a different color, for example, or may be bolded relative to how the assigned building control assets are displayed. In some cases, only unassigned building control assets are displayed, while those that have already been assigned are not displayed in the listing.

[0032] User input is accepted to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space, as indicated at block 82. In some instances, accepting user input to assign selected building control asserts to the selected child level may include dragging and dropping selected building control asserts from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control asserts to the selected child level space. The displayed listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets may include building control assets that are already connected and visible on a building control network that is to be monitored and/or controlled using the spatial hierarchical model. Displaying the list of at least some of the plurality of building control asserts may include filtering the plurality of building control asserts using filter criteria and displaying only the building control assets that meet the filter criteria.

[0033] In some instances, the method 70 may further include assigning a unique identifier to each of the one or more first level spaces, the one or more child level spaces and the one or more building control assets that are assigned to a child level space, as indicated at block 84. This may be done automatically without user input. In some cases, the method 70 may include accepting user input via one or more screens to assign searchable tags to at least some of the first level spaces, child level spaces and/or assigned building control assets, as indicated at block 86. The searchable tags may allow a user to categorize and/or group at least some of the first level spaces, child level spaces and/or assigned building control assets for later reference.

[0034] Figure 6 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 90. The method 90 includes displaying one or more screens that enable a user to create one or more geographic region-level folders of a hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 92. One or more screens are displayed that enable a user to create one or more location-specific folders within one or more of the geographic region-level folders of the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 94. The folders referenced here may be analogous to the various hierarchical level objects referenced in Figure 3.

[0035] In the example shown, one or more screens are displayed that enable a user to dispose one or more assets within one or more folders of the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 96. In some cases, the one or more screens that enable the user to dispose one or more assets within one or more folders of the hierarchical folder structure allow the user to drag and drop selected assets from a listing of available assets to a selected folder of the hierarchical folder structure. The hierarchical folder structure is analyzed to determine relationships between the one or more geographic region-level folders, the one or more location-specific folders and the one or more assets in order to assign a unique identifier to each folder and to each asset in the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 98. One or more screens are displayed that display the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 100.

[0036] In some cases, the method 90 may further include generating a spatial hierarchical model based on the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 102. The spatial hierarchical model may be deployed, as indicated at block 104. At least some of the assets may be monitored and/or controlled using the deployed spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 106.

[0037] Figure 7 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 110. The method 110 includes displaying one or more screens that enable a user to create one or more geographic region-level folders of a hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 112. One or more screens are displayed that enable a user to create one or more location-specific folders within one or more of the geographic region-level folders of the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 114. One or more screens are displayed that enable a user to dispose one or more assets within one or more folders of the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 116. In some cases, the one or more screens that enable the user to dispose one or more assets within one or more folders of the hierarchical folder structure allow the user to drag and drop selected assets from a listing of available assets to a selected folder of the hierarchical folder structure.

[0038] The hierarchical folder structure is analyzed to determine relationships between the one or more geographic region-level folders, the one or more location-specific folders and the one or more assets in order to assign a unique identifier to each folder and to each asset in the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 118. This may be performed automatically without user input. In the example shown, one or more screens are displayed that display the hierarchical folder structure, as indicated at block 120. In some instances, the method 110 may further include displaying one or more screens that enable the user to create one or more building-specific folders within one or more of the one or more location-specific folders, as indicated at block 122. The illustrative method 110 may further include displaying one or more screens that enable a user to dispose one or more assets within one or more of the building-specific folders, as indicated at block 124.

[0039] Figure 8A and 8B together provide a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 130 of monitoring compliance with healthy building guidelines using a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to a plurality of building control assets disposed within a plurality of hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model. The healthy building guidelines may be based at least in part on one or more healthy building criteria. The illustrative method 130 includes allowing a user to select a particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 132. Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 134.

[0040] The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 136. In some instances, aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. The period of time may, for example, be user-selectable using a healthy building dashboard. A healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 138. The healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 140. A user is allowed to select a different hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 142.

[0041] Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 144. Control passes to an anchor 146, which is repeated at the top of Figure 8B. The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 148. Aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. An updated healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 150. The updated healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 152.

[0042] In some instances, the method 130 may further include generating a first overall compliance score for the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model based at least in part on the aggregated non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, and displaying the first overall compliance score on the healthy building dashboard, as indicated at block 154. In some instances, the method 130 may further include generating a second overall compliance score for the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model based at least in part on the aggregated non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, and displaying the second overall compliance score on the updated healthy building dashboard, as indicated at block 156.

[0043] In some cases, one or more of the building control assets may include video cameras, and at least some of the non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines may be detected by performing video analytics on video streams provided by one or more video cameras. The non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines may include one or more of non-compliance occupancy levels, non-compliant social distancing behavior and/or non-compliance mask behavior. The one or more of the building control assets may include a temperature sensor, and at least one of the non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines include a non-compliant space temperature. One or more of the building control assets may include a humidity sensor, and at least one of the non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines may include a non-compliant space humidity. One or more of the building control assets may include a thermal sensor for sensing a body temperature of an occupant, and at least one of the non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines may include a non-compliant body temperature.

[0044] Figure 9A and 9B together provide a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 160 of monitoring compliance with healthy building guidelines using a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to a plurality of building control assets disposed within a plurality of hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model. The healthy building guidelines may be based at least in part on one or more healthy building criteria. The method 160 includes allowing a user to select a particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 162. Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 164.

[0045] In the example shown, the non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 166. In some instances, aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. The period of time may, for example, be user-selectable using a healthy building dashboard. A healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 168. The healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 170. A user is allowed to select a different hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 172.

[0046] Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 174. Control passes to an anchor 176, which is repeated at the top of Figure 9B. The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 178. Aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. An updated healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 180. The updated healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 182.

[0047] In some instances, the method 160 may further include determining a non-compliance trend over a trend time period of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 184. In some instances, the trend time period may be user-selectable. The non-compliance trend may be displayed on the healthy building dashboard, as indicated at block 186. In some instances, the method 160 may further include displaying a plurality of recent non-compliance events on the healthy building dashboard, as indicated at block 188.

[0048] Figure 10A and 10B together provide a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 190 of monitoring compliance with healthy building guidelines within a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to a plurality of building control assets disposed within a plurality of hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model, the healthy building guidelines based at least in part on one or more healthy building criteria. The method 190 includes allowing a user to select a particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 192. Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 194.

[0049] The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 196. In some instances, aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. The period of time may, for example, be user-selectable using a healthy building dashboard. A healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 198. The healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 200. A user is allowed to select a different hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 202.

[0050] Non-compliance events are identified that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 204. Control passes to an anchor 206, which is repeated at the top of Figure 10B. The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 208. Aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model may include separately aggregating the non-compliance events for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time. An updated healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the newly selected different particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 210. The updated healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 212.

[0051] In some instances, the method 190 further includes aggregating non-compliance events for each at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria for each of two or more hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 214. In some instances, the method 190 may further include concurrently displaying a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria for each of the two or more hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 216.

[0052] In some cases, the method 190 may further include forming the spatial hierarchical model. The spatial hierarchical model may be formed, as shown for example in Figures 4 through 7. As a particular example, the spatial hierarchical model may be formed by accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model and accepting user input via one or more screens to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model. A graphical representation may be displayed of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces. A listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets may be displayed. User input may be accepted to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space.

[0053] In some instances, accepting user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space may include dragging and dropping selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space. In some cases, accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at the first level of the spatial hierarchical model may include accepting a selection of an add new space icon, displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon, and accepting a name for at least one of the one or more first level spaces.

[0054] Figure 11 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 220 of monitoring compliance with healthy building criteria within a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to a plurality of building control assets disposed within a plurality of hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model. The method 220 includes identifying non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of healthy building guidelines detected by building control assets disposed at and below a particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 222. The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model over a period of time, as indicated at block 224. A healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by building control assets disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 226. The healthy building dashboard is displayed on a display, as indicated at block 228. In some cases, the non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of the healthy building guidelines may include one or more of non-compliance occupancy levels, non-compliant social distancing behavior, non-compliance mask behavior and elevated body temperatures.

[0055] Figure 12 is a flow diagram showing an illustrative method 230 of monitoring compliance with healthy building criteria within a spatial hierarchical model that provides spatial context to a plurality of building control assets disposed within a plurality of hierarchical levels of the spatial hierarchical model, at least some of the plurality of building control assets comprising video cameras. The method 230 includes allowing a user to select a particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 232. Video streams are obtained over a period of time from video cameras disposed at or below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 234. Video analytics are performed on the video streams over the period of time in order to identify non-compliance events that are non-compliant with one or more of the healthy building criteria of healthy building guidelines, as indicated at block 236.

[0056] The non-compliance events are aggregated for each of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by the video cameras disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 238. A healthy building dashboard is generated that includes a representation of the aggregated non-compliance events for each of at least some of the one or more of the healthy building criteria detected by the video cameras disposed at and below the particular hierarchical level of the spatial hierarchical model, as indicated at block 240. The healthy building dashboard is displayed, as indicated at block 242.

[0057] Figures 13 through 18 are screen shots illustrating creation of a spatial hierarchical model. In Figure 13, a screen 250 is seen. The screen 250 includes a workspace 252 on which a user can build a spatial hierarchical model in an intuitive way. As illustrated, a hierarchical level object 254 labeled "Oracle" has been created on the workspace 252. The hierarchical level object 254 is accompanied by an ADD NEW FOLDER button 256 and an ADD MULTIPLE NEW FOLDERS button 258. These options are duplicated in a pop-up menu 260, along with a delete folder option. In some cases, the pop-up menu 260 may appear as a result of the hierarchical level object 254 being selected. It can be seen that the hierarchical level object 254 is highlighted, meaning that the hierarchical level object 254 has been selected. The screen 250 also includes an asset list 262. As can be seen, each asset within the asset list 262 includes a name of the asset, an IP address and may include a current assignment of that particular asset. Figures 14 through 18 will show step-by-step an example of creating a spatial hierarchical model, beginning with the hierarchical level object 254.

[0058] Figure 14 shows a screen 270. The screen 270 is similar to the screen 250, but includes a pop-up box 272 that allows the user to create multiple new folders under the hierarchical level object 254. The rest of the screen 270, apart from the pop-up box 272, may be a grayed out version of the screen 250 to make it easier for the user to understand that they should be interacting with the pop-up box 272. The pop-up box 272 may appear as a result of the user having selected (with respect to Figure 13) either the ADD MULTIPLE NEW FOLDERS button 258, or the appropriate option within the pop-up menu 260. It can be seen that the pop-up box 272 identifies the hierarchical level (hierarchical level 254, labeled "Oracle") in which the new folders will be placed. The pop-up box 272 includes a space 274 in which the user can type the name of a new folder. The user has already entered a new folder named "Ground Floor" and a new folder named "First Floor". The pop-up box 272 will allow a user to keep entering names of new folders to be created under the hierarchical level object 254 until the user either selects a CANCEL button 276 or selects a CREATE 2 FOLDERS button 278. It will be appreciated that the counter within the name of the button 278 will vary, depending on how many new folders are being created. It will be appreciated that a similar pop-up box may be displayed in response to the user having selected the ADD NEW FOLDER button 256 or the corresponding option within the pop-up menu 260, but would only be adding a single new folder.

[0059] When the user selects the CREATE 2 FOLDERS button 278, a screen 290 will be displayed, as seen in Figure 15. The screen 290 includes the hierarchical level object 254, but now also includes a hierarchical level object 292 labeled "Ground Floor" and a hierarchical level object 292 labeled "First Floor". It can be seen that the hierarchical level objects 292 and 294 are indented from the hierarchical level object 254, indicating that the hierarchical level objects 292 and 294 are child levels relative to the hierarchical level object 254, and the "Ground Floor" and the "First Floor" are both within the hierarchical level object labeled "Oracle". In this example, "Oracle" may be the name of a building.

[0060] Figure 16 shows a screen 310 that may be displayed as a result of the user selecting the hierarchical level object 292 labeled "Ground Floor" in the screen 290. It can be seen in Figure 16 that the hierarchical level object 292 has been highlighted. As a result of the hierarchical level object 292 having been selected, a pop-up menu 312 has been displayed. The pop-up menu 312 includes options to create a New Folder in "Ground Floor", create Multiple Folders in "Ground Floor" or to delete a folder. Selecting Multiple Folders causes a screen 320 to be displayed, as seen in Figure 17.

[0061] Figure 17 shows the screen 320. The screen 320 is similar to the screen 310, but includes a pop-up box 322. In some cases, apart from the pop-up box 322, the screen 320 is the same as the screen 310 but everything excluding the pop-up box 322 is grayed out to make it easier for the user to understand that they should be interacting with the pop-up box 322.

[0062] It can be seen that the pop-up box 322 identifies the hierarchical level (hierarchical level object 292, labeled "Ground Floor") in which the new folders will be placed. The pop-up box 322 includes a space 324 in which the user can type the name of a new folder. The user has already entered a new folder named "Reception", a new folder named "Server Room", a new folder named "Office Supplies", a new folder named "Healthcare" and a new folder named "Elevator Area". The pop-up box 322 will allow a user to keep entering names of new folders to be created under the hierarchical level object 292 until the user either selects a CANCEL button 326 or selects a CREATE 5 FOLDERS button 328. It will be appreciated that the counter within the name of the button 328 will vary, depending on how many new folders are being created. It will be appreciated that a similar pop-up box may be displayed in response to the user having selected the ADD NEW FOLDER button 256 or the corresponding option within the pop-up menu 312, but would only be adding a single new folder. Selecting the CREATE 5 FOLDERS button 328 will cause a screen 340 to be displayed, as seen in Figure 18.

[0063] It can be seen that the spatial hierarchical model displayed within the workspace 252 has grown. The spatial hierarchical model still includes the hierarchical level object 254 labeled "Oracle", the hierarchical level object 292 labeled "Ground Floor" and the hierarchical level object 294 labeled "First Floor", but also includes additional hierarchical levels objects that are child levels relative to the hierarchical level object 292 and are grandchild levels relative to the hierarchical level object 254. These new hierarchical levels include a hierarchical level object 342 labeled "Reception", a hierarchical level object 344 labeled "Server Room", a hierarchical level object 346 labeled "Office Supplies", a hierarchical level object 348 labeled "Healthcare" and a hierarchical level object 350 labeled "Elevator Area". It will be appreciated that additional child hierarchical level objects may be created relative to the hierarchical level object 294 labeled "First Floor", and that additional hierarchical level object may be added relative to the hierarchical level object 254 labeled "Oracle" such as "Second Floor", "Third Floor and so on, or perhaps Parking Garage.

[0064] Figure 19 shows an illustrative screen 360 that illustrates assigning an asset to a particular level of the spatial hierarchical model created in Figures 13 through 18. In this example, an asset 362, which is included in the asset list 262, is being assigned to the hierarchical level object 342 labeled "Reception Area". This may be achieved by dragging the asset 362 from the asset list 262 and dropping the asset 362 onto the desired hierarchical level, which in this case is the hierarchical level object 342. A pop-up box 364 identifies the asset 362, which serves as a double check that the correct asset has been assigned to the desired hierarchical level object. The asset 362 is also highlighted within the asset list 262 and the target hierarchical level object 342 is also highlighted. It will be appreciated that this process may be repeated until all desired assets have been properly assigned to the appropriate hierarchical level object. As the spatial hierarchical model is built up in this manner, a powerful tool is created that allows a user to capture global information while also being able to drill down to particular hierarchical levels or even particular installed and assigned assets.

[0065] Figure 20 provides an example in which additional assets have been assigned. The spatial hierarchical model includes the same hierarchical level objects 254, 292, 294, 442, 344, 346, 348 and 350 as shown in previous Figures. An Entrance Camera 382 has been assigned to the hierarchical level object 342 labeled "Reception". A Controller 384 and a Camera 386 have been assigned to the hierarchical level object 344 labeled "Server Room". A Camera 388 has been assigned to the hierarchical level object 346 labeled "Office Supplies". A Reader 390 and a Camera 392 have been assigned to the hierarchical level object 348 labeled "Healthcare". A Camera 394 has been assigned to the hierarchical level object 350 labeled "Elevator Area".

[0066] Once a spatial hierarchical model has been created and put into use, a user may have a desire to search within the spatial hierarchical model. Searches and/or filtering can be performed using the names or portions of names of the hierarchical level objects, for example. As an example, perhaps a user wants to see the assets assigned to every "Reception" area in the company, spread over multiple buildings in multiple geographic regions. The user could search and/or filter search results for "reception" to obtain this information. Searches and/or filtering may be performed using the names or portions of names of the assets that are assigned to the various hierarchical level objects. For example, a user could decide they want to see the location of every door access device in the building. They could search for "door access" or "card reader" or something similar, for example.

[0067] Another way that the user can search and/or filter search results is to use what can be referred to as tags. With reference to the Figures 13 through 20, it can be seen that each displayed hierarchical level object 254, 292, 294, 442, 344, 346, 348 and 350 includes an "Add Tags" icon as part of the displayed hierarchical level object. With particular reference to Figure 20, it can be seen that the Camera 394, which is under the hierarchical level object 350, includes a tag 396 that reads "Elevator". This provides a user an easy way to find all assets that are associated with an elevator, for example. In Figure 20, it can be seen that the hierarchical level object 292 labeled "Ground Floor" includes an Add Tags icon 398. Actually, each of the displayed hierarchical level objects and assigned assets include an Add Tags icon 398, although for simplicity each Add Tags icon 398 is not labeled. Selecting one of the "Add Tags" icon 398 may cause a screen 400 to be displayed, as seen in Figure 21.

[0068] Figure 21 provides a screen 400 that is similar to the screen 380, but includes a pop-up box 402 that can be used to add a tag. A tag can be added that has already been used, or a tag can be newly created. The pop-up box 402 includes a box 404 that allows the user to enter the name of a tag they wish to assign to the particular hierarchical level object or assigned asset. The pop-up box 402 includes a listing 406 of recently used tags, which allows the user to easily select one of those tags, rather than having to retype the name into the box 404. The pop-up box 402 also includes a SAVE AND EXIT button 408, which when selected causes the new tag and its association with a hierarchical level object or an assigned asset. It will be appreciated that the pop-box 402 demonstrates creation and assignment of the tag 396 that reads "Elevator" in Figure 20.

[0069] Figure 22 is a screen shot providing a screen 420 that shows the spatial hierarchy model created in Figures 13 through 18 displayed in a tabular format. The screen 420 shows a portion of a spreadsheet that may be displayable using various software such as but not limited to Microsoft Excel, Apple Numbers, Google Sheets, Quip, EtherCalc, Zoho Sheets, LibreOffice, Apache OpenOffice Calc, Smartsheet and Airtable, among others. Figure 22 provides an example displayed using Microsoft Excel, but of course other spreadsheet software or the like may be utilized as desired.

[0070] The screen 420 shows a number of columns, including a Type column 422, a Name column 424, a Parent column 426, a Device Type column 428, an IP column 430, and a Tag1 column 432. It will be appreciated that the screen 420 includes the same information regarding the spatial hierarchy model as does Figures 13 through 18, but simply in a different format. Row 434 of the spreadsheet has a Type of Folder and a name "Oracle". This corresponds to the hierarchical level object 254 labeled "Oracle". Row 436 has a Type of Folder, a name "Ground Floor and a parent of "Oracle". This corresponds to the hierarchical level object 292 labeled "Ground Floor". Row 438 of the spreadsheet has a Type of Folder, a name "First Floor" and a parent of "Oracle". This corresponds to the hierarchical level object 294 labeled "First Floor". Similarly, row 438 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 342 labeled "Reception". Row 440 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 344 labeled "Server Room". Row 442 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 346 labeled "Office Supplies". Row 444 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 348 labeled "Healthcare". Row 446 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 350 labeled "Elevator Area". Row 448 of the spreadsheet corresponds to the hierarchy level object 294 labeled "First Floor". It will be appreciated that similar corollaries may be made between the devices shown in Figure 22 and those shown for example in Figure 20. As an example, a device 450, with a name "Camera4" corresponds to the device 394 shown in Figure 20. It can be seen that the illustrative spreadsheet even includes the tag "Elevator" that was assigned to the device 394.

[0071] Figure 23 provides a screen 460 that shows an alternate way of creating a spatial hierarchy model. Much like the screen 420, the screen 460 may be displayed by any preferred spreadsheet software or the like. For this particular example, Microsoft Excel was used. The screen 460 includes a column 462 labeled "Space ID". This column simply increments by one each row, and provides a numerical identifier for that row and the hierarchical level object or device included in that particular row. A column 464 is labeled "Space Name" and provides a space for a name to be entered along with a "\" character that indicates a depth. Use of a single "/" character represents a higher level than use of two "/" characters. Use of three "/" characters represents a lower level than use of two "/" characters. This is merely illustrative, as any particular character may be selected or used to indicate relative depth. A column 466 labeled "Space Type" provides a space for a user to enter this information.

[0072] In the spatial hierarchy model shown on the screen 460, there are two regions, named "US EAST" and "US WEST", as indicated by these names having a single "/" character prefixing the name. There is a "ATLANTA" site within the US EAST region, and a "HONEYWELL MIDTOWN" building within the "ATLANTA" site. There is also a "NEW JERSEY" site within the "US EAST" region, with a "HONEYWELL NJ OFFICE" building within the "NEW JERSEY" site. Each of the sites has two "/" characters prefixing the site name, and each of the buildings has three "/" characters prefixing the building name. Similarly, the "US WEST" region includes a "SAN FRANCISCO" site with a "HONEYWELL SFD OFFICE" building within the "SAN FRANCISCO" site. The "US WEST" region also includes a "SAN DIEGO" site, but no buildings within the "SAN DIEGO" site have been entered yet.

[0073] Figure 24 is a screen shot providing a screen 480 that provides a healthy building dashboard 482. The dashboard 482 includes a hierarchy level indicator 484 that informs the user that the dashboard 482 is displaying aggregated data from a particular hierarchy level. It will be appreciated that for displaying aggregated data from a particular hierarchy level, this will include data from any and all child and grandchild hierarchal levels relative to that particular hierarchy level. In this particular example, the hierarchy level 484 reads "All Spaces". The dashboard 482 includes a time frame pull-down menu 486, which allows the user to display information for a desired time frame. The pull-down menu 486 may include any desired time frames to select from, such as "PAST 24 HOURS", "PAST WEEK", "PAST 15 DAYS", "PAST 30 DAYS", "PAST YEAR" and the like. In some cases, the pull-down menu 486 may instead provide a calendar that the user can select a starting point and an ending point from. The pull-down menu 486 may instead be a box in which the user can directly type in either a desired time frame, or specific starting and ending points. As illustrated, the pull-down menu 486 reads "LAST 15 DAYS". The dashboard 482 includes a date indicator 488 that provides the actual dates corresponding to the time-frame selected using the pull-down menu 486.

[0074] Because the hierarchal level indicator 484 reads "All Spaces", the aggregated data that is displayed within the dashboard 482 represents, for each particular healthy building criteria, a sum total of incidents relating to that particular healthy building criteria not only for the selected hierarchal level, but also for all child and grandchild hierarchal levels that are under the selected hierarchal level. For the sake of this example, assume that the spatial hierarchy model represented by the dashboard 482 is the same as that shown in Figure 23.

[0075] The dashboard 482 includes a "COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW" section 490 that shows, for the selected hierarchal level (as indicated by the hierarchy level indicator 484), an aggregated total for each of the displayed healthy building criteria from the selected hierarchal level and all sub-levels. In this example, the COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW section 490 includes a CAPACITY indicator 490a, an INCIDENTS indicator 490b, a NO MASKS indicator 490c and an ELEVATED BODY TEMPERATURE indicator 490d. As indicated, in the last 15 days, in the time period "17 Jan 2021 - 31 Jan 2021", there have been no incidents with average capacity exceeding capacity limits, there are a total of 250 open incidents, there were 30 incidents of people not wearing masks and there were 10 incidents of people being detected having elevated body temperatures.

[0076] The dashboard 482 may also display additional detail. For example, the dashboard 482 provides a graphical representation 492 that indicates that during the selected time period, and for the selected hierarchal level, average occupancy has been 80.7 percent of capacity. In this, capacity may indicate a summation of the actual capacity limits for each of the included facilities, such as but not limited to the capacity limits that fire departments set for particular facilities. Capacity may alternatively indicate a reduced capacity figure, such as a 25 percent capacity or a 50 percent capacity as directed by infectious disease protocols. For example, many local governments have directed such reduced capacity figures during the COVID19 pandemic. The dashboard 482 may also include a graphical representation 494, over time, of actual occupancy values. While there have been several transient periods in which the actual occupancy exceeded a capacity limit, it can be seen that overall, the average occupancy has not. In some cases, the graphical representation 494 may use a different color, for example, to indicate when the actual occupancy has exceeded capacity.

[0077] In some cases, selecting the hierarchy level indicator 484 may cause a screen 500 to be displayed, as seen in Figure 25. The screen 500 includes the dashboard 482, although a pull-down menu 502 provides options for controlling what is displayed on the dashboard 482. The pull-down menu 502 includes a FILTER option 504 that can be used to filter what is displayed. The pull-down menu 502 includes a SEARCH option 506 that can be used to direct a search. The pull-down menu 502 also includes a spatial hierarchal model indicator 508. It will be appreciated that the spatial hierarchal model indicator 508 will typically be much larger than what is shown, and thus the spatial hierarchy model indicator 508 may include scroll-bars (not shown) that allow a user to move vertically within the spatial hierarchy model indicator 508. It will be appreciated that the spatial hierarchy model indicator 508 matches that shown in Figure 23. As shown, the spatial hierarchy model indicator 508 also includes an indicator 510 displayed opposite the ATLANTA site and an indicator 512 that is displayed opposite the SAN FRANCISCO site. These indicators 510, 512, if displayed, may include a number displayed within the indicator 510, 512 that informs the user that these particular hierarchal levels may have a number of problems needing attention.

[0078] As seen, all of the boxes are checked, meaning that the aggregated data displayed within the dashboard 482 includes all data from the US EAST region and the US WEST region. The US EAST region includes the ATLANTA site, which itself includes the "Honeywell Midtown" building, and the NEW JERSEY site, which itself includes the "Honeywell NJ Office" building. The US WEST region includes the SAN FRANCISCO site, which itself includes the "Honeywell SF Office" building, and the SAN DIEGO site which does not yet have any buildings indicated.

[0079] If for example, the US EAST box was checked (instead of checking the "Select All" box), the ATLANTA site and the "Honeywell Midtown" buildings would also be checked as a matter of course. The aggregated data displayed on the dashboard 482 would only include data aggregated from each of the ATLANTA site and the "Honeywell Midtown" building. It will be appreciated that the ATLANTA site likely includes a plurality of buildings, but in this example only one building has been entered thus far. To continue the example, an occupancy sensor within the "Honeywell Midtown" building may provide a signal indicating that a particular room to which that occupancy sensor has been installed and assigned. That signal would indicate a potential problem for that particular room in the "Honeywell Midtown" building. That signal would also indicate a potential problem for the particular floor including that particular room, for example. The building may be further divided into areas or portions, and that signal would also indicate a problem within any area or portion that includes the particular room to which the particular sensor is assigned. That signal would also indicate a problem for the ATLANTA site and the US EAST region.

[0080] Occupancy data that might be displayed on the dashboard 482 if the US EAST box was checked would include, for the "Honeywell Midtown" building, an aggregation of signals from every occupancy sensor within the "Honeywell Midtown" building. Continuing the example, occupancy data that might be displayed on the dashboard 482 for the ATLANTA site would include the occupancy data from the "Honeywell Midtown" building as well as for any other buildings (not shown) that are within the ATLANTA site. Occupancy data that might be displayed on the dashboard 482 for the US EAST region would include the aggregated occupancy data for the ATLANTA site, the NEW JERSEY site and any other sites (not yet entered) that are assigned within the US EAST region.

[0081] Having thus described several illustrative embodiments of the present disclosure, those of skill in the art will readily appreciate that yet other embodiments may be made and used within the scope of the claims hereto attached. It will be understood, however, that this disclosure is, in many respects, only illustrative. Changes may be made in details, particularly in matters of shape, size, arrangement of parts, and exclusion and order of steps, without exceeding the scope of the disclosure. The disclosure's scope is, of course, defined in the language in which the appended claims are expressed.


Claims

1. A method of building a spatial hierarchical model of a plurality of building control assets, the spatial hierarchical model configured to provide spatial context of the plurality of building control assets to an operator when the operator is monitoring and/or controlling the plurality of building control assets, the method comprising:

accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of the spatial hierarchical model;

accepting user input via one or more screens to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model;

displaying a graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces;

displaying a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets; and

accepting user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space.


 
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

deploying the spatial hierarchical model; and

monitoring and/or controlling at least some of the plurality of building control assets using the deployed spatial hierarchical model.


 
3. The method of claim 1, wherein accepting user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space comprises dragging and dropping selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space.
 
4. The method of claim 1, wherein accepting user input via one or more screens to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at the first level of the spatial hierarchical model comprises:

accepting a selection of an add new space icon;

displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon; and

accepting a name for at least one of the one or more first level spaces.


 
5. The method of claim 1, wherein accepting user input via one or more screens to select the selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at the second level of the spatial hierarchical model comprises:

accepting a selection of the selected one of the first level spaces;

accepting a selection of an add new space icon;

displaying a pop-up menu in response to the selection of the add new space icon; and

accepting a name for at least one of the one or more child level spaces.


 
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the displayed listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets comprises building control assets that are already connected and visible on a building control network that is to be monitored and/or controlled using the spatial hierarchical model.
 
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the plurality of building control assets comprise video cameras.
 
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the plurality of building control assets comprise Heating, Ventilation and/or Air Conditioning (HVAC) assets.
 
9. The method of claim 1, wherein displaying the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets comprises filtering the plurality of building control assets using filter criteria and displaying only the building control assets that meet the filter criteria.
 
10. The method of claim 1, further comprises providing an indication of which of the plurality of building control assets have not been yet been assigned.
 
11. The method of claim 1, further comprising assigning a unique identifier to each of the one or more first level spaces, the one or more child level spaces and the one or more building control assets that are assigned to a child level space.
 
12. The method of claim 1, further comprising accepting user input via one or more screens to assign searchable tags to at least some of the first level spaces, child level spaces and/or assigned building control assets.
 
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the searchable tags allow a user to categorize and/or group at least some of the first level spaces, child level spaces and/or assigned building control assets.
 
14. A system for monitoring and/or controlling a plurality of building control assets comprising:

an input/output operatively coupled to the plurality of building control assets;

a display;

one or more processors operatively coupled to the input/output and the display, the one or more processors configured to:

display one or more screens on the display that allow a user to add and name each of one or more first level spaces at a first level of a spatial hierarchical model;

display one or more screens on the display that allow the user to select a selected one of the first level spaces of the spatial hierarchical model and add and name each of one or more child level spaces that are spatially part of the selected first level space at a second level of the spatial hierarchical model;

display a graphical representation of one or more of the first level spaces and one or more corresponding child level spaces;

display a listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets operatively coupled to the input/output;

accept user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to a selected child level space; and

accepting user input to monitor and/or control at least some of the plurality of building control assets using the spatial hierarchical model.


 
15. The system of claim 14, wherein accepting user input to assign selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space comprises dragging and dropping selected building control assets from the listing of at least some of the plurality of building control assets to the selected child level space.
 




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