(19)
(11)EP 4 123 166 A1

(12)EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION

(43)Date of publication:
25.01.2023 Bulletin 2023/04

(21)Application number: 21187330.2

(22)Date of filing:  23.07.2021
(51)International Patent Classification (IPC): 
F03D 7/02(2006.01)
F03D 80/50(2016.01)
(52)Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC):
F03D 7/0204; F05B 2260/902; F03D 80/50; F05B 2230/80
(84)Designated Contracting States:
AL AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO RS SE SI SK SM TR
Designated Extension States:
BA ME
Designated Validation States:
KH MA MD TN

(71)Applicant: Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy A/S
7330 Brande (DK)

(72)Inventors:
  • Damgaard, Steen
    7400 Herning (DK)
  • Fogh, Helge
    6852 Billum (DK)
  • Nielsen, Rune
    7430 Ikast (DK)

(74)Representative: SGRE-Association 
Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy GmbH & Co KG Schlierseestraße 28
81539 München
81539 München (DE)

  


(54)SERVICING BRAKE FOR A WIND TURBINE YAW MOTOR BRAKE


(57) It is described a service brake (1) for a wind turbine yaw motor brake (20), the service brake (1) comprising a brake housing (2) mountable vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake (20), brake housing furthermore comprising a brake housing cavity (7) extending axially, in direction of a central axis (a), through the length of the brake housing (2). Additionally, a brake disc (3) is comprised within the brake housing (2), the brake disc (3) being rotatable about the central axis (a) in an airgap (12) between at least two friction plates (11). A lever (4) is connected to the brake housing (2), the lever (4), when engaged, is configured to close at least part of the airgap (12) and bring the friction plates (11) in frictional contact with the brake disc (3). A removable centerpiece (5) is insertable within the brake housing cavity (7) along the central axis (a), the centerpiece (5) comprises a brake disc interface (9) configured to engage with the brake disc (3) and a shaft interface (10) configured to engage with a shaft (22) to be braked. The centerpiece (5) is therefore configurable to transfer braking torque from the brake disc (3) to the shaft (22) to be braked.




Description

Field of invention



[0001] The invention lies in the field of service brakes for wind turbine yaw drives. Invention relates to a service brake device for a wind turbine yaw motor brake and a corresponding method for applying a service brake to a wind turbine yaw motor brake.

Background Art



[0002] In the above described technical field service brakes are used in a yaw drive system of a modern wind turbine. Wind turbines are complex electro-mechanical systems used to generate electricity from wind energy and to supply the generated electricity into an electrical grid. A single wind turbine normally comprises a tower onto which a nacelle and rotor are mounted. The rotor comprises normally a hub and a plurality of blades. The nacelle normally houses components including a frequency converter, a generator, optionally a gearbox, a transformer and a yaw drive system.

[0003] Purpose of the yaw drive system is to rotate the nacelle and the rotor, around a tower axis and into the wind, which enables maximum energy extraction from the wind if the rotor axis, by activating the yaw drive system, will be oriented substantially in the direction of the incoming wind. The yaw drive system may also be used to rotate the nacelle and the rotor out of the prevailing wind direction in case of extreme wind speeds and therefore relieve the loads experienced by the wind turbine. The yaw drive system normally comprises a plurality of yaw drives. The yaw drive normally comprises a yaw motor, a yaw motor brake and a yaw drive gearbox with a pinion that may engage with an annular gear fixed either to the nacelle or to the tower. Via a yaw bearing the nacelle can be rotated around the tower axis.

[0004] Traditionally, the yaw drive system of a wind turbine may utilize hydraulic disc brakes with a plurality of brake calipers to maintain the desired nacelle position. Additionally, the wind turbine yaw motor brakes may be used to supplement the hydraulic disc brakes and further fix the nacelle position. In the recent wind turbine designs it may be possible to omit the hydraulic disc brakes completely from the wind turbine yaw drive system. In this case, only brakes that are used to maintain the desired nacelle position, are the wind turbine yaw motor brakes. This design change is enabled by increased number of yaw drives in the yaw drive system of wind turbines and increased braking capacity in consequence.

[0005] The main technical problem arising from the new wind turbine design with omitted hydraulic brakes, is insufficient braking capacity that may result from the worn-out wind turbine yaw motor brakes. This specific situation may occur, for example, in case of extreme wind events, where the kinetic energy of the wind surpasses the braking capacity of the wind turbine yaw motor brakes and, as a result, the nacelle slides away from the desired nacelle position. During this nacelle sliding event, the wind turbine yaw motor brakes may be worn-out to a degree where they do not provide sufficient braking capacity. Servicing the worn-out yaw motor brakes may then be necessary by service technicians.

[0006] Service procedure of the worn-out yaw motor brakes must be performed in a safe manner where any potential danger to service technicians must be minimized. Standard service brakes known in the art might not provide sufficient level of safety because the standard service brake installation may coincide with a potential rotation of the yaw motor shaft. If the standard service brake was activated, it could be propelled from its mounting place and bring an injury to service technicians. Therefore, safety improvement in service brakes is desired.

Summary of the Invention



[0007] This requirement may be met by the subject matter according to the independent claim. Advantageous embodiments of the present invention are described by the dependent claims.

[0008] According to the invention it is described a service brake for a wind turbine yaw motor brake, the service brake comprising a brake housing mountable vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake, the brake housing furthermore comprising a brake housing cavity extending axially, in direction of a central axis (a), through the length of the brake housing. Additionally, a brake disc is comprised within the brake housing, the brake disc being rotatable about the central axis (a) in an airgap between at least two friction plates. A lever is connected to the brake housing, the lever, when engaged, is configured to close at least part of the airgap and bring the friction plates in frictional contact with the brake disc. A removable centerpiece is insertable within the brake housing cavity along the central axis (a). The centerpiece may comprise a brake disc interface configured to engage with the brake disc and a shaft interface configured to engage with a shaft to be braked. The centerpiece is therefore configurable to transfer braking torque from the brake disc to the shaft to be braked.

[0009] The safety improvement feature of the service brake according to the invention, over conventional service brake, reflects in decoupling of the shaft to be braked and the brake disc by means of the centerpiece. During the mounting of the service brake according to the invention, a dangerous possibility that a service technician mounts the activated service brake on the yaw motor brake with the potentially spinning shaft to be braked, is avoided.

[0010] In an embodiment, the brake housing may be cylindrical in shape. Preferably this allows to match a shape of the wind turbine yaw motor brake, e.g. for avoiding sharp edges. Additionally, cylindrical shape of the brake housing provides for space-saving in a limited space such as the nacelle.

[0011] In another embodiment brake housing may comprise fastening means, preferably bolts, for securing the brake housing to the wind turbine yaw motor brake. This allows stable and reliable connection of the service brake and the wind turbine yaw motor brake.

[0012] In an embodiment the brake disc may comprise a central opening with a grooved surface. This enables to have a surface which could be mated with a corresponding opposite surface of another component to transfer torque to the brake disc.

[0013] Advantageously, the brake disc interface is an externally grooved spline shaft. A first groove pattern of the spline shaft may correspond to a second groove pattern of the surface of the central opening, such that the spline shaft is receivable by the brake disc by engaging the first groove pattern of the spline shaft with the second groove pattern of the surface of the central opening. Alternatively, the brake disc interface may have a polygonal cross-sectional profile, preferably a sextant cross-sectional profile.

[0014] The shaft interface may have a polygonal cross-sectional profile which, in a preferred embodiment is a sextant profile.

[0015] The centerpiece of the service brake may comprise a handle for manual insertion of the centerpiece into the brake housing cavity and/or for removal of the centerpiece from the brake housing cavity. The handle may comprise a radial hole for securing the centerpiece on an external support member. The invention is further directed to a method for applying the service brake, as defined in the previous sections, on a wind turbine yaw motor brake. Steps of mounting the service brake atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake and inserting the centerpiece in the brake housing cavity are comprised in the method. The centerpiece engages with the brake disc by means of the brake disc interface and engages with the shaft to be braked with the shaft interface. Finally, the method comprises a step of engaging the lever in order to close at least part of the airgap and bring the friction plates in frictional contact with the brake disc, thereby transferring braking torque from the brake disc to the shaft to be braked.

[0016] Additionally, invention is directed to a method for locking a wind turbine yaw drive system comprising a plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes. Method comprises steps of:
  • mounting a plurality of service brakes, wherein each brake of the plurality of service brakes is designed according to the previous paragraphs, atop the plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes;
  • inserting the respective centerpiece of each service brake of the plurality of service brakes in the respective brake housing cavity of the plurality of service brakes and
  • engaging the respective lever of each service brake of the plurality of service brakes. Number of the service brakes mounted may be equal to the number the wind turbine yaw motor brakes or may be less than the number of the wind turbine yaw motor brakes.


[0017] Finally, invention is directed to a method for servicing a wind turbine component, comprising the steps of:
  • locking the wind turbine yaw drive system according to previously described method for the plurality of service brakes,
  • performing a service operation on the wind component, preferably the wind turbine component being a further wind turbine yaw motor brake.


[0018] The invention is described in more detail hereinafter with reference to examples of embodiment but to which the invention is not limited.

[0019] It has to be noted that embodiments of the invention have been described with reference to different subject matters. In particular, some embodiments have been described with reference to apparatus type claims whereas other embodiments have been described with reference to method type claims. However, a person skilled in the art will gather from the above and the following description that, unless other notified, in addition to any combination of features belonging to one type of subject matter also any combination between features relating to different subject matters, in particular between features of the apparatus type claims and features of the method type claims is considered as to be disclosed with this application.

Brief Description of the Drawings



[0020] The aspects defined above and further aspects of the present invention are apparent from the examples of embodiment to be described hereinafter and are explained with reference to the examples of embodiment. The invention will be described in more detail hereinafter with reference to examples of embodiment but to which the invention is not limited.
Fig. 1a
shows a service brake mounted atop of a wind turbine yaw motor brake, where a lever is in disengaged position;
Fig. 1b
shows a service brake mounted atop of a wind turbine yaw motor brake, where a lever is in engaged position;
Fig. 2
shows the service brake with its main components;
Fig. 3
shows the service brake with its main components from a different angle;
Fig. 4
shows a removable centerpiece with main components;
Fig. 5a
shows the service brake mounted atop of a wind turbine yaw motor brake, where the removable centerpiece is absent from a brake housing cavity;
Fig. 5b
shows the service brake mounted atop of a wind turbine yaw motor brake, where the removable centerpiece engages with a shaft to be braked and;
Fig. 6
shows the service brake with the lever in engaged position.

Detailed Description



[0021] The illustrations in the drawings are schematical. It is noted that in different figures, similar or identical elements are provided with the same reference signs. Well known elements are indicated in the further text and have not been described in detail.

[0022] Fig. 1a shows a service brake 1 that may be mounted atop a wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 via a brake housing 2. The wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 and a wind turbine yaw motor 21 are standard components of a wind turbine yaw drive and will not be discussed in detail herein. The wind turbine yaw drive houses a yaw motor shaft (not shown in fig. 1) which may be referred to as a shaft 22 to be braked (not shown in fig. 1). The wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 may become worn-out and it may be desirable to mount the service brake 1 atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 in order to provide additional braking capacity to the wind turbine yaw drive.

[0023] The service brake 1 comprises the brake housing 2 to which a lever 4 may be connected. The lever 4 may be used to activate or deactivate the service brake 1. Fig. 1a shows the lever 4 in "disengaged" position. This means that an internal brake disc 3 (not shown in fig. 1a) is in a free-running state and the service brake 1 is deactivated. The brake housing 2 serves to house internal components of the service brake 1. The brake housing 2 may be cylindrical in shape and might match the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 which might also be cylindrical with a diameter of the same size as the brake housing 2.

[0024] Fig. 1b shows the service brake 1 in which the lever 4 is in "engaged" position. This means that the brake disc 3 (not shown in fig. 1b) is not in a free-running state anymore i.e. the service brake 1 is activated.

[0025] Once the service brake 1 is mounted, a service technician may insert a centerpiece 5 (not shown in fig. 1) which couples the shaft 22 to be braked and the service brake 1. By activating the service brake 1, the worn-out wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 is bypassed or its braking capacity supported with the service brake 1. The shaft 22 to be braked is braked by the service brake 1. To activate the service brake 1, the service technician puts the lever 4 in engaged position (fig. 1b). To deactivate the service brake 1, the service technician puts the lever 4 in disengaged position (fig. 1a) .

[0026] Alternatively, such operation of the lever 4 may also be performed by an electrically driven actuator acting upon the lever 4.

[0027] Fig. 2 shows main components of the service brake 1. The service brake 1 comprises the brake housing 2 to which the lever 4 may be connected. The brake housing 2 may house the brake disc 3 (not shown in fig. 2).

[0028] The brake housing 2 may be cylindrical in shape but other shapes of the brake housing 2 are possible.

[0029] The brake housing 2 may be mountable vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 and may comprise a brake housing cavity 7 extending axially, in direction of a central axis (a), through the length of the brake housing 2.

[0030] The brake housing 2 may be secured to the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 with fastening means 6. In a preferred embodiment the fastening means 6 are bolts.

[0031] Also seen on fig. 2 is the removable centerpiece 5 that may be insertable within the brake housing cavity 7, along the central axis (a). The centerpiece 5 may be configured to engage with the brake disc 3 (shown in fig. 5) and with the shaft 22 to be braked and thereby to transfer braking torque from the brake disc 3 to the shaft 22 to be braked.

[0032] Fig. 3 shows the service brake 1 from another view. The brake housing 2 may house the brake disc 3. The brake disc 3 is rotatable within the brake housing 2 about the central axis (a) in an airgap 12 between at least two friction plates 11 (see fig. 5). The centerpiece 5, as partially shown in fig. 3, is configured to engage with the brake disc 3 via a brake disc interface 9 (see fig. 4). The brake disc 3 may comprise a central opening 13 with a grooved surface 14 into which the brake disc interface 9 of the centerpiece 5 may be received.

[0033] Bottom section of the centerpiece 5, as seen on fig. 3, may be a shaft interface 10, configured to engage with the shaft 22 to be braked. In an embodiment the shaft interface 10 of the centerpiece 5 may have a polygonal cross-sectional profile. Preferably, the polygonal cross-sectional profile is a sextant profile as also shown in fig. 3. The sextant profile of the shaft interface 10 may engage with a corresponding opening of the shaft 22 to be braked.

[0034] Fig. 4 shows the removable centerpiece 5. Removable means that it can be manually - or via an actuating tool - inserted into the brake housing cavity 7 and/or manually removed from the brake housing cavity 7. The centerpiece 5 may comprise the already mentioned brake disc interface 9 which may be configured to engage with the brake disc 3 (not shown in fig. 4). In a preferred embodiment, the brake disc interface 9 is an externally grooved spline shaft 15 as shown in fig. 4. The centerpiece 5 is insertable into the brake housing cavity 7. A first groove pattern of the spline shaft 15 may correspond to a second groove pattern of the surface 14 of the central opening 13. Once the centerpiece 5 is inserted, the externally grooved spline shaft 15 may engage with the central opening 13 of the brake disc 3. In this way direct coupling of the brake disc 3 and the centerpiece 5 is achieved. This interface defined by mating surfaces of the spline shaft 15 and the surface 14 of the second groove pattern allows the transmission of torque, like breaking torque.

[0035] The centerpiece 5 may comprise the shaft interface 10, configured to engage with the shaft 22 to be braked (not shown in fig. 4). In a preferred embodiment, the shaft interface 10 has a polygonal cross-sectional profile. Preferably, the polygonal profile is a sextant profile (shown in fig. 4 but which can better be seen in fig. 3). Once the centerpiece 5 is inserted within the brake housing cavity 7, the shaft interface 10 may engage with the shaft 22 to be braked. The shaft interface 10 may protrude into the shaft 22 to be braked via a cavity present in the shaft 22 to be braked. This cavity in the shaft 22 to be braked may be have a substantially same cross-sectional profile as the cross-sectional profile of the shaft interface 10.

[0036] The centerpiece 5 may comprise a handle 8. The handle 8 may be used for manual insertion and/or removal of the centerpiece 5 into or from the brake housing cavity 7. The handle 8 may, in an embodiment, comprise a hole 16 for securing the centerpiece 5 on an external support member 17, for example via a pin 18 (see fig. 2). The external support member 17 may rest on top side of the brake housing 2. The top side of the brake housing 2 is the side facing away from the wind turbine yaw motor 21. The centerpiece 5 may be secured on the external support member 17 in a way that the handle 8 protrudes outwards of the brake housing cavity 7. Term outwards may be understood as, for example, along the central axis (a) in the direction facing away from the wind turbine yaw motor 21. By removing the pin and releasing the handle 8, the centerpiece 5 may be inserted into the brake housing cavity 7.

[0037] The centerpiece 5 may be configured to engage with the brake disc 3 via the brake disc interface 9. The centerpiece 5 may also engage with the shaft 22 to be braked via the shaft interface 10. In this way direct coupling between the shaft 22 to be braked and the brake disc 3 may be achieved. If the service brake 1 is deactivated, any rotation of the shaft 22 to be braked is directly translated to the centerpiece 5 and in turn to the free-running brake disc 3. If the service brake 1 is activated, braking torque from the brake disc 3 is transferred to the shaft 22 to be braked.

[0038] Fig. 5a shows the service brake 1 mounted vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20. The brake housing 2 comprises the brake housing cavity 7 which extends axially through the length of the brake housing 7 and in the direction - i.e. coaxially - of the central axis (a). The service brake 1 comprises the brake disc 3 within the brake housing 2. The brake disc 3 is rotatable about the central axis (a) in a surrounding airgap 12, between at least two friction plates 11. The friction plates 11 may be comprised in the brake housing 2.

[0039] The brake disc 3 may be free-running if the service brake is deactivated. The shaft 22 to be braked, as shown in fig. 5a, is decoupled from the brake disc 3 of the service brake 1 because the centerpiece 5 is not inserted in the brake housing cavity 7. This decoupling of the shaft 22 to be braked and the brake disc 3 is a safety feature of the service brake 1. This ensures that mounting of the activated service brake 1 on the yaw motor brake 20, even with the potentially spinning shaft 22 to be braked, does not result in propelling of the service brake 1. There is clearly no torque transfer from the shaft 22 to be braked to the brake disc 3 because of the absence of the centerpiece 5 that would provide the necessary coupling. Only when the centerpiece 5 is inserted into the brake housing cavity 7, by the service technician, does the coupling between the brake disc 3 and the shaft 22 to be braked exist. This safety feature minimizes the risk that the service brake 1 may be propelled within the nacelle because of the potentially spinning shaft 22 to be braked.

[0040] Fig. 5b shows the service brake 1 positioned vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 wherein the centerpiece 5 is inserted within the brake housing cavity 7, engaging both with the brake disc 3 and the shaft 22 to be braked. In this state, the centerpiece 5 may serve as a coupling means between the shaft 22 to be braked and the brake disc 3. In the deactivated state of the service brake 1, any rotation of the shaft 22 to be braked translates directly to rotation of the brake disc 3, via the centerpiece 5. In the activated state of the service brake 1, braking torque of the brake disc 3, via the centerpiece 5, is transferred to braking of the shaft 22 to be braked.

[0041] Fig. 6 shows the service brake 1 with the centerpiece 5 inserted in the brake housing cavity 7, engaging both with the brake disc 3 and the shaft 22 to be braked. Furthermore, the lever 4 is shown to be in engaged position. This means that the service brake 1 is activated. The lever 4 may be brought to engaged position by the service technician in order to activate the service brake 1. By placing the lever 4 in engaged position as indicated in fig. 6, at least a part of the airgap 12 is closed and the friction plates 11 are brought in frictional contact with the brake disc 3. The brake disc 3 may now transmit braking torque to the shaft 22 to be braked, via the centerpiece 5. The service brake 1 may in this way bypass the wind turbine yaw motor brake 20. Spring mechanism of the service brake 1 causing this frictional contact is not considered as part of the invention and is not discussed in detail. Several state-of-art braking mechanisms are known to person skilled-in-the-art.

[0042] In certain conditions of the wind turbine operation, plurality of the wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20, comprised in a wind turbine yaw drive system, may become worn-out. This situation may occur for example due to extreme wind load on the wind turbine. In such scenarios there may be a need to lock the complete wind turbine yaw drive system to enable safe repair of a wind turbine component. The wind turbine component may preferably be the worn-out wind turbine yaw motor brake 20 or other component inside the wind turbine.

[0043] Method for locking the wind turbine yaw drive system which may comprise a plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20, may include a step of mounting a plurality of service brakes 1 atop the plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20. Each of the plurality of service brakes 1 may comprise already described components.

[0044] During the mounting process, regardless of state of the plurality of brakes 1 being activated or deactivated, there is no danger of any one service brake 1 of the plurality of service brakes 1 being potentially propelled in case one or more of a plurality of shafts 22 to be braked are spinning. This is because, in the plurality of service brakes 1, there is no torque transfer from the respective brake discs 3 towards the respective shafts 22 to be braked before respective centerpieces 5 are inserted in the respective brake housing cavities 7.

[0045] Once the mounting step is completed, the centerpieces 5 of each of the service brakes 1 may be inserted in the respective brake housing cavities 7. Afterwards, the service technician may bring the lever 4 of the service brake 1 of each of the plurality of service brakes 1 in engaged position. The wind turbine yaw drive system may, in this way, be safely locked.

[0046] The number of the plurality of mounted service brakes 1 may correspond to the number of wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20 present in the wind turbine. This provides for a safe environment for service technicians performing inspection or service operations on the wind turbine component.

[0047] The number of the plurality of mounted service brakes 1 may be less than the number of wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20 present in the wind turbine. This also may provide for a safe environment for service technicians to perform service operation on the wind turbine component. The wind turbine component may preferably be a further wind turbine yaw motor brake 20. The further wind turbine yaw motor brake may be free of the service brake 1, i.e. the service brake 1 may not be installed on the further wind turbine yaw motor brake 20.

[0048] For example, the wind turbine yaw drive system may comprise five to twenty, preferably eight to twelve, for example ten wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20 in total and all may become worn-out. The service technician may mount, in an exemplary system of ten wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20, nine service brakes 1 atop nine worn-out wind turbine yaw motor brakes 20 and leave preferably one yaw motor brake 20 without the service brake 1, i.e. the further wind turbine yaw motor brake 20. Then, the service technician may perform service operation on the further wind turbine yaw motor brake 20, onto which the service brake 1 is not mounted. In this way a sufficient braking capacity may be achieved which may safely hold the complete wind turbine yaw drive system braked while allowing for simultaneous service operation. In the mentioned example, it may also be possible to achieve similar results with mounting even fewer service brakes 1.

[0049] Preferably, for X number of wind turbine yaw motor brakes, X-1 number of service brakes 1 may be applied to enable servicing of the remaining wind turbine yaw motor brakes. More generally, X number of wind turbine yaw motor brakes are present in the wind turbine, X-N number of service brakes 1 may be applied to enable serving of the remaining number of N wind turbine yaw motor brakes.

[0050] Performing service operation may comprise inspection, repair procedures or replacement of the wind turbine component with a replacement component.


Claims

1. Service brake (1) for a wind turbine yaw motor brake (20), the service brake (1) comprising:

- a brake housing (2) mountable vertically atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake (20), the brake housing (2) comprising a brake housing cavity (7) extending axially, in direction of a central axis (a), through a length of the brake housing (2),

- a brake disc (3) within the brake housing (2), the brake disc (3) being rotatable about the central axis (a) in an airgap (12) between at least two friction plates (11),

- a lever (4) connected to the brake housing (2), the lever (4), when engaged, configured to close at least part of the airgap (12) and bring the friction plates (11) in frictional contact with the brake disc (3),

- a removable centerpiece (5), the centerpiece (5) insertable within the brake housing cavity (7) along the central axis (a), the centerpiece (5) comprising a brake disc interface (9) configured to engage with the brake disc (3) and a shaft interface (10) configured to engage with a shaft (22) to be braked, configurable to transfer braking torque from the brake disc (3) to the shaft (22) to be braked.


 
2. Service brake (1) according to claim 1, wherein the brake housing (2) is cylindrical in shape.
 
3. Service brake (1) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the brake housing (2) comprises fastening means (6), preferably bolts, for securing the brake housing (2) to the wind turbine yaw motor brake (20).
 
4. Service brake (1) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the brake disc (3) comprises a central opening (13) with a grooved surface (14).
 
5. Service brake (1) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the brake disc interface (9) is an externally grooved spline shaft (15).
 
6. Service brake (1) according to claims 4 and 5, wherein a first groove pattern of the spline shaft (15) corresponds to a second groove pattern of the surface (14) of the central opening (13), such that the spline shaft (15) is receivable by the brake disc (3) by engaging the first groove pattern of the spline shaft (15) with the second groove pattern of the surface (14) of the central opening (13).
 
7. Service brake (1) according to any one of the claims 1-4, wherein the brake disc interface (9) has a polygonal cross-sectional profile, particularly a sextant cross-sectional profile.
 
8. Service brake (1) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein a shaft interface (10) has a polygonal cross-sectional profile, preferably a sextant cross-sectional profile.
 
9. Service brake (1) according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the centerpiece (5) comprises a handle (8) for manual insertion of the centerpiece (5) into the brake housing cavity (7) and/or removal of the centerpiece (5) from the brake housing cavity (7).
 
10. Service brake (1) according to the previous claim 9, wherein the handle (8) comprises a hole (16) for securing the centerpiece (5) on an external support member (17).
 
11. Method for applying the service brake (1) of any one of the claims 1 to 10 on a wind turbine yaw motor brake (20), the method comprising steps of:

- mounting the service brake (1) atop the wind turbine yaw motor brake (20);

- inserting the centerpiece (5) within the brake housing cavity (7), the centerpiece (5) engaging with the brake disc (3) by means of the brake disc interface (9) and engaging with the shaft (22) to be braked with the shaft interface (10), and

- engaging the lever (4) in order to close at least part of the airgap (12) and bring the friction plates (11) in frictional contact with the brake disc (3),

thereby transferring braking torque from the brake disc (3) to the shaft (22) to be braked.
 
12. Method for locking a wind turbine yaw drive system comprising a plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes (20), the method comprising steps of:

- mounting a plurality of service brakes (1), wherein each brake of the plurality of service brakes (1) is designed according to any one of the claims 1 to 10, atop the plurality of wind turbine yaw motor brakes (20);

- inserting the respective centerpiece (5) of each service brake (1) of the plurality of service brakes (1) in the respective brake housing cavity (7) of the plurality of service brakes (1) and

- engaging the respective lever (4) of each service brake (1) of the plurality of service brakes (1).


 
13. Method according to claim 12, wherein the mounting step comprises mounting a number of the service brakes (1) equal to the number the wind turbine yaw motor brakes (20).
 
14. Method according to claim 12, wherein the mounting step comprises mounting a number of the service brakes (1) less than the number of the wind turbine yaw motor brakes (20).
 
15. Method for servicing a wind turbine component, comprising the steps of:

- locking the wind turbine yaw drive system according to claim 14 for the plurality of service brakes (1),

- performing a service operation on the wind turbine component, preferably the wind turbine component being a further wind turbine yaw motor brake (20).


 




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